Posts by tag: AMA Superbike

Ducati August 17, 2019 posted by

Venti­quattro: 1993 Ducati 888

The follow-on evolution of the wildly successful 851, the Ducati 888 had a short, but equally productive life span. Championed by Doug Polen on the world’s SBK stage Ducati was victorious in both 1991 and 1992 campaigns. As a street bike, the 888 continued on through 1994. However by 1993 the SPO models in the lineup were already powered by the next revolution in Ducati firepower, the 916cc desmoquattro engine (as was the SBK racer). However the 888 was still a very stout street bike, and the overall update to the 851 made this an outstanding platform in its own right. Often overlooked as simply the bridge to the 916, the 888 is worth a serious look if you are a riding enthusiast.

1993 Ducati 888 for sale on eBay

Born from the punched out sports production (i.e. homologation) 851 model, the 888 featured the larger displacement engine that the nomenclature on the fairing might suggest. And the engine was not the only updates piece of the 888 puzzle. Notable designer Pierre Terblanche (yes, of the 999 infamy), reworked the styling of the 851 to lengthen the lines and produce an evolved shape. In many ways, this makes the 888 look physically bigger than the 851, yet it is equal or smaller in the most significant dimensions (wheelbase, overall length, height, etc). These longer lines are echoed in some of Terblanche’s other designs, including the Supermono. Overall, the 888 is a visually striking machine. Aurally, the fuel injected, liquid cooled, 4-valve per cylinder with desmodronic action L-twin remained a booming beast, offering low down torque and an intoxicating higher RPM rush. Formidable on the racetrack as well as the street, the 888 was the middle child that never seemed to get the accolades of the younger or older siblings. It is, on the whole, the rarest of the 851/888/916 trio.

From the seller:
This is a nice 888 with 14026 miles. It needs nothing and was just serviced. It starts and runs good with everything in good working order.

The 888 that Ducati imported into the US was an SP0 model. Note that this was during a tumultuous period in Ducati’s history, before they hit it big and really made strides in consistent manufacturing. Record keeping was marginal, and many models changed mid-year simply due to parts on hand. That being said, the 888 came to America to go racing – in AMA Superbike. Thus, all of the US imported (i.e. federalized) 888s are homologation machines. You can check the VIN number in positions 4-6: “1” for street bike (versus race only), “H” for homologation (versus super sport, super bike, monster, etc), and letters for variation on street bike (i.e. A,B,C), or numbers for the racers. A reported 200 units were imported in 1993, and about half that number in 1994. Of course by the end of 1994, nobody wanted a 888 anymore. The 916 had arrived. That makes the SP0 a rare example – and one to hold on to.

There is not much info about this particular bike, nor too many pictures. It has apparently just had a service (good), and seems to have been thoroughly enjoyed given the mileage (14026). The 851/888 models are far more comfortable than the 916 series that followed, and the engines have proven to be extremely durable provided that the usual belt/valve/oil change services have been completed regularly. Parts are still available, and performance is more than adequate for any para-legal street activities. Best of all, the bidding starts at a reasonable $7k. You get the sound and the status of Ducati ownership, along with the visceral presence of the bike and the rarity of the US homologation model. Win win win. Check it out here and Good Luck!!

MI

Honda July 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2001 Honda RC51

Update 7.28.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Dennis has 3 very low mileage bikes listed right now:

Thank you for supporting the site, Dennis, and good luck to buyers! -dc

Honda has always been an engineering company. Often times it would appear that Honda would release a new model with a new configuration just to prove to the world that it could. Sometimes it was difficult to determine why Honda decided to make a substantial change. But in the case of the RVT1000R – better known as the RC51 – the reason was clear. You see, Honda enjoyed tremendous success on the racetrack with their four-cylinder, 750cc RC30 and RC45 machines. But when rules changed in World Superbike racing to allow a displacement advantage to twins and Ducati started winning, Honda took notice. Casting the V-4 machines aside for a twin, Honda created the 1000cc V-twin RC51 – and picked right back up with their winning ways. And while in some ways overshadowed by the collector status of the RC30 and RC45, the RC51 was arguably more successful in the intended theater of the racetrack thanks to the efforts of Colin Edwards (WSBK) and Nicky Hayden (AMA Superbike).

Featured Listing: 2001 Honda RC51

While badged as an RVT1000R, the RC51 actually displaces 999cc to allow it to squeak under the rule book cut off on swept volume. The Ducati killer’s short-stroke motor was built to rev, producing 133 HP . And while Honda copied Ducati in the use of the 90 degree vee configuration, they skipped on the desmo-drama and fitted the four-valve heads with conventional valve-train components. But don’t think that Honda simply phoned in a fake Duc replacement here; the aluminum perimeter beam chassis, the high-mount exhaust pipes, the aero bodywork complete with high-pressure intake, and the unique side-mounted radiators are all Honda tech. Built for the public at a fraction of the price of the Italian machine, the RC51 was a bit porkier in most dimensions (including weight). On the racetrack this was negated by minimum weight rules. On the street, the difference is negligible – until you sit in the cockpit. Unlike the Ducati- which demands rider conformity to a narrow, sharp and stretched position, the Honda is regarded as, well, comfortable. As a streetbike, the RC51 just works – and performs with the metronomic reliability you would expect from Big Red.

From the seller:
2001 Honda RC51 (RVT1000R) (PHX)
VIN: JH2SC45471M100004

Price: $9,000

I purchased this motorcycle in San Jose, CA, new in 2000 and rode it 286 miles and then parked it. I’m turning 80 years old in the next month and the time has come to find it a new, younger owner, hopefully someone that is a collector of motorcycles and that would appreciate the fact that it is 99.9% original (new batteries only and still on original tires), has been ridden 286 miles and has been in a climate-controlled environment from the very first day that it was bought and has had the best of care.

As always, RSBFS finds you the best of what is out there. And in this case, that means a basically NEW 2001 Honda RC51 with fewer than 300 miles. This bike is amazingly immaculate, and is completely original as new with the exception of a new battery. Drool over some of these pictures, and realize that the RC51 is the bike you really need, versus simply want. This is a do it all machine that can carve corners better than the best (unless you know better than Colin Edwards), has more than enough grunt to get most jobs done quickly, is comfortable enough to spend some time on, and has built-in legendary Honda reliability. Did I mention it sounds glorious? Seriously, what more could you want! Devoid of today’s game console electronic gadgetry, this is bike that expects you to ride it – and in exchange it will provide you with miles and miles of smiles.

If you are thinking that the latter SP-2 variant of the RC51 in Nicky Hayden livery is the most collectible of the lot, you wouldn’t be wrong. But when pen hits paper, it is what you can find that means the most. And in a model like this, where the “rarer” bike is essentially a sticker kit, the differences are not great. It is the difference in the condition of the bike that will contribute the most to the overall value in the near term, and likely well beyond that. And I would challenge you to find a cleaner, low mileage RC51 on the market today. Jump quickly before this twin-cylinder rocket is gone in a booming howl. Good Luck!

MI

Featured Listing: 2001 Honda RC51
KTM June 8, 2019 posted by

Different Perspectives: 2014 KTM RC8R 1190

In the world of different strokes, there are Japanese sport bikes and Italian sport bikes. And for a short while, there was a rational choice out of left field – Austria – with the KTM RC8R. With a unique blend of high-quality components and features not often found on bikes in the range, the RC8R was powerful, potent, very competent and largely ignored. Not even the impressive results of factory racer Chris Filmore in AMA Superbike competition could make the RC8R a commercial success. Ultimately KTM pulled the plug on the RC8 line – in part thanks to the CEO suggesting they should not build machines that could not be used sensibly on the street.

2014 KTM RC8R 1190 for sale on eBay

Powered by a 1190cc v-twin set at 75 degrees, the RC8R offered up a very healthy 175+ HP. With Keihin fuel injection via 52 mm throttle bodies feeding directly into the twin spark, four valve heads, power was instantaneous – if not a bit abrupt. Coupled with a 6-speed tranny and nestled in a unique trestle frame, the RC8R takes convention to a new level. Adjustments abound: the RC8R provided for a vast array of adjustments similar to what you would expect on a race bike. From levers to pegs, suspension and sub-frame height, the RC8R was an open book for a rider who knew what they wanted. Even the swing arm pivot angle is adjustable. And with WP suspension front an rear, the rider is availed to a dizzying array of potential changes that can be made in order to maximize the handling of the bike. When it comes time to stop, radial mount Brembos are up to the task. The seller is the original purchaser of this one-owner bike, and has quite a bit to share. Read on:

From the seller:
I am the original owner of this 2014 KTM RC8R 1190. I purchased the bike in March of 2014 from Thousand Oaks. The bike runs perfect and looks beautiful. I have taken excellent care of the bike keeping up on regular maintenance and always in my garage. Its always clean and waxed and has never seen rain. Never downed, raced, or abused, in like new condition and babied.

The fluids were changed last year including the oil, coolant, and brake fluids and have about a 1000 miles on them. I have only used Motorex Power Synt 4T oil in this bike per KTM’s recommendations. It has never been raced and most of the miles are highway from road trips with my buddies.

More from the seller:
I want to sell the bike with the accessories, but if somebody doesn’t want them I would let it go for less money as stock. Here are a list of the mods:

-Akrapovic EVO 4 Full Titanium Exhaust ($4600 and over 20lbs weight savings)
-K&N Air Filter
-KTM Factory EVO 4 Tune
-CJ Designs Block Off Plates
-KTM PowerParts Reservoir Covers
-KTM PowerParts Tinted Wind Screen
-KTM PowerParts Rear Seat Plugs
-KTM PowerParts Supersprox Rear Sproket
-KTM PowerParts Swingarm Protector
-KTM PowerParts Tank Pad
-Bestem Carbon Fiber Tank Guards
-Bestem Carbon Fiber Chain Guard
-Bestem Carbon Fiber Rear Fender
-Evotech Fender Eliminator
-Brand new Dunlop Q3+ Tires
-Clear Wrap on Front and Rear Tail Panels
-Fuel Tank Anti-Scratch Protector
-HID Headlamp
-DB Silencer for Akra Exhaust
-KTM RC8 Indoor Cover

More from the seller:
Factory Wise, the bike is set up very well. It has many adjustments with seat height, foot peg location and height, and handlebar height. WP suspension is stock and very good, Marschesini Wheels, Brembo Brakes, and hydraulic slipper clutch. This bike is a blast to ride, has so much torque and power I can only explain it as violent. This truly is a riders bike as there aren’t any rider aids and its all up to you. I am 6’1″ and 200lbs and this bike was comfortable for me on long road trips because of its adjustability and room to move around.

Only issue with the bike is a small burn mark I put into the lower right fairing when I installed the EVO 4 exhaust. The exhaust was missing a bracket, I was excited to ride the bike and the fairing was touching the header. But its fixed and only cosmetic. I was planning on replacing the fairing with the KTM race pan. The EVO 4 Headers also developed a crack at the intersection which was not uncommon. The crack was welded and is only cosmetic and doesn’t affect performance. I have all of the stock parts to go with the bike too.

Otherwise, bike really is 10/10 and still looks and rides perfect. Any questions please feel free to ask.

By then numbers, RC8 machines are relatively rare. Only a few hundred units were purportedly imported each model year, with the 2015 – and final – example being the rarest. But the RC8 is plagued by the worst of all collector bike syndromes; ambivalence. You see, these are great motorcycles swimming in a sea of lots of great motorcycles. The fact that the RC8 and RC8R failed to make a splash has more to do with economics and dealer reach than anything performance or quality related. No, the RC8R did not win an AMA Superbike race. Nor did one top the championship standings. But Chris Filmore was there and was close, and such speaks to the potential of this platform. As an out of the box offering from the Austrian manufacturer – their first big-bore sport bike – the RC8 was a refreshing alternative to the rest of the known crowd. And while the party ended too soon, there are plenty of good examples around. This particular RC8R looks to be well cared for, has some tasty updates, and fewer than 7,000 miles. The ask on it is a very strong $13k, but the seller indicates he is willing to entertain offers. The last few R bikes we have seen have been up in the $10k range – with exception units topping at $12k – but the dollars sunk into all of the KTM upgrades may bolster that price somewhat. It was a pity that the KTM street bike party ended too soon – it would have been fun to see what could happen at the WSBK level. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Different Perspectives: 2014 KTM RC8R 1190
Kawasaki June 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1

6.26.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Last seen on RSBFS in 2013 under the byline Kawgasm, the 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1 is off the rarity scales.  This S1 was found in a storage container, cleaned and assembled but not restored, then taken to the Quail Motorcycle Gathering in May, this might be the silk purse from a sow’s ear story for spring 2019.

Unrestored 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1 For Sale on eBay

The Kawi S1 is pictured in Webster’s next to the word unobtanium, and you would’ve had to know somebody in the motorcycle business then, and perhaps finance now to procure one. The race engine was quite different from an ELR with dual plugs, magneto drive on the right end of the crank, a bank of Keihin CR carburetors and a mammoth oil cooler under the steering head. The fabricated swingarm is supported by remote reservoir Works Performance shocks. Lockheed racing brakes made the solid 330mm disks, looking downright oversized even these days.

Evidently the original owner was a machinist and cooked up some beautiful light alloy parts for his new machine. The oil cooler brackets are bombproof but the brake rotor and caliper mounts have a serious look. Comments accompanying the before pictures:

n October, 2014, a friend of mine told me about a guy that was interested in selling his 1982 Kawasaki 1000. He said he bought it new in 1983. His wife said that he was getting on in age and if he passed away, she wouldn’t know what to do with it. He asked me to come by and see it. When he opened the storage container door, stuffed in the back was a green bike. I assumed it was a 1983 ELR. There was no lighting in the container and you could hardly move inside. I was able to get some pictures and realized it was truly an S1. I told him I was interested and he said he’d get back to me. It took him 5 years to get back to me. It took us 6 hours to move a machine and many boxes in order to get to it. But finally, it was extracted. Here’s a chance to own the Holy Grail of 80’s sport bikes.

A careful inventory and cleaning was in order, but you can’t call it a restoration. The original CR carbs were in a box and re-fitted. They still have yet to experience dino juice. The condition and documentation defies belief, and the owners’ restraint in the presence of a “new” S1 indicates this isn’t their first barn find.

1 of 29 produced. Frame #0080 Motor#030330. Arizona Titled. This bike was sold new in Tucson,Az.
Bike was originally shipped to Hill Kawasaki in Orlando, Florida

Then Transferred to Kawasaki of Tucson on 10/21/1983

Sold on 10/31/1983 by Kawasaki of Tucson

Never any track time. This one owner bike was played with on the street for less than 3 months and then stored away until January 2019. It was removed from storage and is now for sale. Unrestored and like new. A true “barn find”. Documentation includes the Predelivery (PDI) Form. The dealer information sheet from Kawasaki Motor Company regarding these bikes. The Dealer transfer form with pricing and serial numbers. The warranty forms filled out, even though there was no warranty. The Factory Chassis and Engine manuals. The Chassis and Engine parts pricing books. The Factory race stand . The original carbs were never run on the bike. The owner opted for 33mm smooth bore Mikunis. The original Keihin CR carbs were reinstalled at the time the bike was removed from storage. They are new and have never had fuel run through them. The owner was a machinist and made billet oil cooler mounts, billet caliper hangers and billet front brake rotor carriers. The original steel kerker muffler was replaced with an aluminum one. The slicks were replaced with street Dunlop’s in 1983. The condition of this bike is unbelievable. Unrestored !

Around thirty S1’s are reputed to exist, along with a substantial number of replicas in various states of correctness.  As the real deal, the fuel tank and carbs of this one will likely remain dry, some old slicks sourced, and some velvet ropes strung to keep it out of arm’s reach.  .

-donn

Featured Listing – 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1
Honda April 16, 2019 posted by

De-Stabilization – 1983 Honda CB1000F

This Florida owner shows a few other classic -80’s machines behind, but this unrestored CB1000F might be the one to cut away from the herd !

1983 Honda CB1100F for sale on eBay

Honda’s was looking deep into the corner and the vee-four 750 was brand new, but before the carburetted inline four left the sport category, displacement was increased to 1,062 cc’s and 38mm carbs delivered 110 hp.  Just oversquare 69mm stroke kept torque up there at 72 ft.-lbs.  Though still a typical twin-downtube, the chassis was beefed up and sported 39mm forks and a box-section swingarm.  Dampers were premium with air-adjustable anti-dive forks and adjustable twin rear shocks.  More UJM than sport, the 18-inch front and 17-inch rear wheel kept seat height low.  Brakes reflected the 543 lbs. dry weight with three 296mm disks.

Obviously a fan from the looks of the garage, this owner has taken nice care of his reference CB1100F.  The preservation of the deep blue paint and black engine finish is as rare as the factory black chrome exhaust.  Just a few rubs tell of its 21,000 miles.  The owner is correct that at this age, most have been disassembled, restored, and altered.  From the eBay auction:

Original bodywork with original paint and factory original 4-2 black chrome exhaust. All in excellent condition with only minor imperfections. Tank is dent free with no trace of rust inside original key opens all the locks, tool kit and original owners manual included,  seat is perfect, no nicks or anything. I put 3000 miles on it last year, just put on new tires, all carburetor O-rings have been changed, then carbs synced, only ethanol free gas used. new o-ring chain, old one was fine, but old is all, This bike is 100% ready to ride and enjoy, no modifications, just stock and original.

As you can see in the pictures, this bike is in excellent condition. hard to find one that has not been apart, repainted or screwed with especially in the awesome blue paint scheme. one minor scuff on right fairing, hard to get to show up in pics some oxidation under aluminum clear coat in spots as well, but a really nice bike, always get compliments. Tires are new Dunlops in original factory sizes.

Honda tweaked the CB1100F until it did pretty much everything well – it got high marks for usable power, stable handling, and comfortable cockpit.  Answering the escalating power competition, it ran a quarter in just over 11 seconds, and Honda quality insured popularity.  Starting out at a reasonable $4,900, this example should do better – last January a red one with less miles brought $9,350 at Mecum in Vegas.  Sure to be a hit at a show or cruise night, this CB1100F marks a sweet spot in Honda history and owner care.

-donn

De-Stabilization – 1983 Honda CB1000F
Ducati February 7, 2018 posted by

Improving Perfection: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale

Many people assume that whatever dusty, badly-lit, low-resolution photographs they’ve taken will be enough sell their valuable motorcycles and include almost no additional information. But it’s easy to head in the other direction and go full-on used car salesman, which the listing for this Ducati 999R has done, going so far as to describe it as being “built like a MotoGP bike…” Hyperbole is fine: I obviously indulge in stylistic excess regularly. But comparing an homologation superbike to a pure prototype racing machine suggests someone who is more of a salesman than a knowledgeable enthusiast.

Considering that the 999R has basically little in common with a MotoGP machine other than the Ducati name and the fact that it has two wheels and an engine, “built like a WSBK bike” would be much more accurate, and much closer to the original point. So if the 999R, even a “custom” one, is really nothing like a MotoGP race bike, what exactly is it?

Well unlike the 999S that was basically a spiffed-up version of the standard 999 with nicer suspension and some carbon-fiber farkles for “weight savings,” the 999R was intended to homologate the bike for competition, AMA Superbike racing in particular. Titanium rods and valves meant less reciprocating mass, a completely new cylinder head design meant better breathing, and bore and stroke were completely different than the standard bike, much more oversquare, to increase the bike’s appetite for revs: 104mm × 58.8mm versus 100mm × 63.5mm for a displacement of exactly 999cc, instead of the 999’s 998cc… Compression was higher and the crank knife-edged where it lived behind the sand-cast engine cases, all of which added up to 134 rear wheel horses and 76.6 lb-ft of torque.

The seller suggests that this customized 999R is even more desirable than a completely original bike, and lists everything that’s gone into it. The main issue here is that in hyping up changes that supposedly make the bike “more bad-ass,” he’s missing the real point of the 999R’s value. Originality is often critical in establishing the desirability of limited-production bikes like this and, as the listing describes the “custom” touches, I’m imagining the value dropping in the minds of potential buyers. That’s not to say that the changes are bad, mind you, and the modified engine definitely could prove to be enticing to buyers who actually plan to use their purchase for track or fast road work. But I’d definitely want someone other than the person who wrote the listing to tell me about the build in more detail.

From the original eBay listing: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale

UPGRADED – CARBON WHEELS

THIS IS IT! The Ducati 999R – Motorcycle History. If you are looking for one the baddest bikes ever made – this is it. Pure Ducati. Period!

When owning one of the rarest bikes in the world is not enough we invite you to take a look at our custom 2005 Ducati 999R. This is your once in a lifetime opportunity to own a piece of motorcycle history. This bike is in perfect condition with very low miles. Truly breathtaking! This 999R is highly upgraded:

– $10k Engine Rebuilt with Lighter Titanium Rods by Ducati Race Technician
– BST Carbon Fiber Rims
– NCR Rear Sets Custom Made
– Brembo Brakes and Master Cylinders
– Custom Seat
– NCR Race Gas Cover
– STM Dry Clutch
– EVR Cylinder
– Dark Upgrade Windshield
– New Rear Brake and Turn Signal
– 6112 Miles on Bike Overall (After Engine Rebuild Less than 1000 miles)
– Garage Kept
– Bike Has Never Been Down

There’s no other way to describe the Ducati 999R than as a race bike with lights; it really is that close to the real thing.

Breathtaking quickness—0 to 60 mph comes in less than three seconds—is matched by the bike’s Brembo brakes. The Ducati 999R is built like a MotoGP bike so it’s dripping with exotic parts. The Desmodromic motor is packed with titanium, specially coated alloys and magnesium. Many carbon fiber parts and the exhaust heat shield is from a carbon/ceramic composite.

Mileage is pretty low and the bike does look very sharp, helped by some high-quality, professional photography. Of course, all of the 999 models had dry clutches, so the listing is probably referring to an STM slipper clutch [and cool slotted housing], and I’m pretty sure the bike had Brembo brake and clutch masters originally, just not the radial units seen here. Also, when did “Dark Upgrade Windshield” become a selling-point for a rare and collectible superbike? Are the original parts, especially the wheels, included? At least any missing peripherals can likely be cheaply sourced at the moment to get it closer to stock condition. The $19,880 Buy It Now is on the higher end for an original R, but the question remains: do the changes made to this particular bike increase or decrease the value?

-tad

Improving Perfection: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale
Suzuki October 9, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

The market for factory replicas is hot right now, especially from the 1980s era of Superbike racing. These were the days of low-tech, skinny tires, big handlebars and manly men riders. Air-cooled, inline fours with two-valve heads and a quartet of carbs ruled the track. Motors were impossibly wide, bias-ply tires were (by today’s standards) impossibly skinny, forks were still conventional and had yet to be turned upside down, and brake rotors had yet to grow to the insane proportions of current hardware. This was a key period of sport bike development, and this fantastic 1980 Suzuki GS1000S “Wes Cooley” replica highlights all that was right about the moment.

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

Wester Steven Cooley won the 1979 and 1980 AMA Superbike Championships on a Pops Yoshimura-prepped Suzuki GS1000S. Suzuki never officially cashed in on Wes Cooley’s name and fame, but the 1980 GS1000S was a stunning silhouette of the AMA racer. It was only in the years following that these models became know as Wes Cooley models – but it only seems fair given Kawasaki’s similar creation of the ELR. To build the replica, Suzuki used the standard GS1000 offering; the limited edition “S” model came a year after the rest of the GS1000 lineup. The Wes Cooley replica did not have any material differences to the other GS1000 models in terms of engine, but it did share what was widely regarded as the best chassis to emerge from Japan during the era. Ultimately, that was the secret to the success of the bike on the track. For its first entry into the 1000cc market, Suzuki created a winner – both on the race track as well as the showroom.

From the seller:
1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

Good solid riding classic, clean GA title, you don’t see too many of these in this condition, although no museum piece it shows nice and rides well, starts right up and everything works like it did back in 1980. A cool survivor to ride “as is” or to do a complete showroom restoration, I have the stock air box and stock exhaust although the mufflers look good, underneath they are starting to give in to the dreaded rust.

New Michelin tires, new OEM petcock, new OEM clutch, new K&N pod filters, new Dynojet kit, new oil and filter, new OEM head gasket just installed (inc bills for work done) head decked, valves checked, new OEM o rings and gaskets used. paint work is shiny and shows well, no rust on or in the tank, has some signs of an older repair on the fairing, has had one re bore with OEM pistons and rings at 40k or 8 thousand miles ago. The seat really needs a new cover, the clock no longer functions, the fuel gauge is intermittent and the needle from the oil temp gauge has come off. This bike has been my rider for the past several thousand miles and gets plenty of attention everywhere it goes.

Just a good solid representation of a getting harder to find classic, ready to ride home to anywhere in the country today.

Make no mistake – this is a rare make and model. Suzuki had no plans to bring the GS1000S into America. But when US dealers saw it during an overseas dealer conference they pressured Suzuki into importing the model. Reports indicate that dealers in the US were allotted a single bike, with only 500 units imported for 1979 and 700 units for 1980. Today few survive in recognizable condition, and those that do are commanding higher and higher prices. This one has higher mileage than some we have seen, but there is still a lot of life left in it yet.

This beautiful Suzuki time piece is located in Georgia, and will be going to a good home at the end of this No Reserve auction. There have been a large number of bids early on, showing the level of interest that these Wes Cooley replica models generate. Jump in before it is too late, as this 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley Replica looks too good to pass up. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley
Ducati September 7, 2017 posted by

Top Tier: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale

Since the 916 series, Ducati superbike ownership has been about tiers. There’s generally a “base” model for the hoi polloi, although those still feature adjustable suspension front and rear and a fire-breathing four-valve v-twin. Above that is generally the “S” version, with some bolt-on carbon that saves a few ounces on a 400lb-plus machine, a couple additional horses, and some bling-y suspension that likely offers minimal improvement in handling for the thousands extra it costs. But if you’re serious about your Ducatis, it’s the “R” model you generally want, at least post-SP5, SPO, and SPS, and the reasons for that are abundantly clear when you look closely at bikes like today’s 999R.

Designed to compete in production-based AMA Superbike racing, the 999R was blessed with high-performance titanium valves and connecting rods, along with an entirely new cylinder head design. The internal dimensions are completely different compared to the standard and S models, with a bore and stroke of 104mm × 58.8mm versus the regular 999’s 100mm × 63.5mm. Interestingly, the 999R actually displaces exactly 999cc, whereas the regular 999 makes do with just 998…

A 12.5:1 compression ratio, titanium rods and valves and a knife-edged crankshaft inside sand-cast cases meant the R was good for 134hp measured at the rear wheel, with 76.6 lb-ft of torque to punch the bike out of corners. Keep in mind: in some cases, a bike with wildly different and very rare engine internals might require shorter maintenance intervals e and parts could prove to be much more expensive as well, so keep that in mind if you plan to actually pile the miles on your bit of Italian exotica.

From the original eBay listing: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale

(Multiple collectors are interested but I’m looking for the best deal.)

Wikipedia regarding the 999S:  “2005 Ducati 999S won the Maxisport category for the prestigious international Masterbike 2005 … received critical acclaim … MCN … ‘simply the best V-Twin on the planet’… Motorbikestoday.com, … ‘the most desirable, most exciting roadbike on the planet’ in 2004. MotorcycleUSA.com … ‘stupendous’ … ‘the epitome of V-Twin power.’ Motorcyclist Online: “The 2005 Ducati 999, in particular, would represent the nameplate’s height of critical acclaim.”

This is not the 999S.  This is the superior, racing version, the 999R.

This is a piece of Motorcycle history.  Considered by some to be the finest bike EVER made.

The 2005 999R had a production run of 200 units.  That means there are only 200 of these bikes on the planet!  (The minimum number required to qualify the bike for use in production superbike races.)  This one has been kept in excellent condition by an experienced motorcycle enthusiast with multiple Ducatis.

The 999R model of the 2005 Ducati 999 has the most powerful Testastretta engine. It pumps out 150 horsepower and 86 lb-ft of torque; and it has larger intake valves, longer bore and shorter stroke. Each engine on the 2005 Ducati 999 is hooked up to a six-speed manual transmission. Due to its racing orientation, it is lighter than the other two models: 11 lbs. lighter, to be more precise. Each 2005 Triple Nine has a fuel tank that can hold up to 4.1 gallons (15.5 liters) with a 0.8-gallon (3-liter) reserve. With the 999S or 999R variants, the 2005 999 can go from zero to 62 miles per hour (mph) in under 3 seconds, and it can achieve a top speed of over 170 mph.

The 999R uses titanium valves both on intake and exhaust, as well as titanium connecting rods, and requiring Ducati to use special valve seats and guides.  This saves considerable weight.  Numerous changes have been made to every part of the bike making this model lighter, faster, and more powerful.  Forged aluminum alloy wheels, more sophisticated engine ECU, and much more.  From Ducati’s press manual: “The Testastretta engine of the 999R [’05 because of the lighter weight]… MEP value… exceeds 14 bar.  Information is available for Serious Buyers.”

My 75 yr old father who can no longer ride it after surgery says “this model is a lot revvier because of the titanium, and shortly after this year, Ducati started increasing the engine displacement of their superbikes, so this is one of the last of the 1000cc series.”

I’m sure someone does consider the 999R the “finest bike EVER made” but that’s a very crowded field. Hey, there’s plenty of competition even if we’re just talking about the finest Ducati ever made. Hyperbole aside, the R is a pretty trick piece of kit, and after languishing in the suberbike bargain basement for years, values for the 999 are rising across the board. Have they risen to the point where the seller’s $24,000 asking price makes sense? We’ll have to wait and see if the bike actually sells. The style may be polarizing, but the 999 is an excellent motorcycle, and an improvement in almost every way over the 998 that preceded it.

-tad

Top Tier: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale