Posts by tag: AMA Superbike

Ducati June 17, 2020 posted by

On the Dotted Line – 2007 Ducati 999S Team USA Edition

For 2007, Ducati asked superbike riders Ben Bostrom and Neil Hodgeson to sign 150 copies of their 999S in Parts Unlimited race livery, with all the -S niceties.  This example comes out of Georgia flying U.S. and Italian flags, with under 8,000 miles and in outstanding shape.

2007 Ducati 999S Team USA Edition for sale on eBay

Despite the polarizing looks of the Pierre Terblanche design, the 999 was a superlative for the time, its 998 cc’s good for 143 hp.  Torque was the back story with 83 ft.-lbs. helping out through tricky sections.  The -S came with Öhlins all around, the latest 320mm Brembo offerings, and forged Marchesini alloys.  Always in red ( at least the S ), the taller fairing gave riders an “in” feeling rather than being perched “on”.

Besides saying maintenance is caught up, the owner can’t offer much history with this 999S.  Miles are low, but higher than most limited edition superbikes.  Hard to quibble about the condition, at least until seeing it in person.  Comments from the eBay auction :

This 996S has 7,796 miles and is in excellent shape with only a few small rock chips that have been only been touched up (bike not repainted). It’s up to date on services, has never been tracked, and it’s ready for someone to enjoy it by riding it, or simply continuing its preservation. there are no known issues. I believe that I am the second owner, but I bought the bike from a divorcee, who won it in a settlement. As such, full documentation is not available. I have an extra ecu that will go with the bike.  This Ducati 999S Team USA race replica for sale locally, so I reserve the right to end the auction, if it sells. This is why I’ve included a buy it now option.

Bostrom and Hodgeson have been Ducati loyalists and were rewarded for consistent top top-tens and an occasional podium, though Suzuki was untouchable in 2006.  Ironically, Ducati turned AMA back over to privateers the next year, making this commemorative a single year.  Reviewed as very rideable for a superbike, this example seems like a good compromise between fun, condition, and collectability.

-donn

On the Dotted Line – 2007 Ducati 999S Team USA Edition
KTM April 30, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 2013 KTM RC8R

This bike just SOLD in 2 days! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The latest Featured Listing in the RSBFS catalog is this fantastic KTM RC8R. By all counts a dark horse in the 2008 – 2013 big bore sport bike arena, the KTM remains a unique and rare offering bristling with features and performance that made it a real contender. This was a bike that took the fight to the Japanese and the Italians before its untimely demise due to corporate mandates. The origami shape, the 75 degree V-twin sound, the huge exhaust slung under the chassis and the bright orange trellis frame makes it clear that something different was happening here – something different that was unmolested by rider aids or anti-wheelie wizardry. The RC8R is a bike that you ride via command and control, and as such represents possibly the last honest large capacity sport bike of the type.

Featured Listing: 2013 KTM RC8R

The lack of electronic nannies does not mean that this mighty KTM is archaic or ill-designed. The truth is there is some truly stunning technology embedded into the DNA of this model that enhances rideability and performance. Take the complex engine management system that includes dual plugs in each head that are capable of firing independently to promote clean burning and torque at lower RPM, while firing together at hard throttle settings and higher RPM to maximize efficiency. The intake system consists of multiple butterfly valves that broaden the torque curve based on RPM and speed, all backed by a throttle body EFI setup. The 1195cc engine was good for 175 HP at over 10,000 RPM, pushing the RC8R to nearly 170 MPH on the top end.

From the seller:
2013 KTM RC8R, I purchased it new in 2014. What can I say about this V-twin rocket that hasn’t already been said here? Fun to ride doesn’t begin to describe this torque monster. I’m ashamed to admit it, but, I have to be realistic – this is the proverbial “its been driven by a little old lady from Pasadena to church on Sundays, never over 25 MPH.” Well, in my case mostly to the local gym and back. And, not frequently at that!

It is completely stock. I’ve changed the oil 3 times. Buyer will get a new oil filter and a jug (4L) of Motorex Oil. Chain Degreaser and Lube. I replaced the battery a couple of years ago.

The photos are a year old because I contemplated selling it last year – and only rode it 233 miles this year – so, the odometer reading is currently 3,854. Only issue is the small tear in the striping where the passenger seat goes (see photo).

Located in Sacramento, with a clean Montana title
$9,499 and a box of Kleenex for my tears.

The big fly in the RC8R ointment was the relative recent entry of KTM into the sport bike world. KTM was a well-respected name in motorcycle circles, but had up to this point made their name with motocross and enduro bikes, and a dominant position at the front of events such as the Dakar Rally. Winning over the sport bike crowd required, well, winning. KTM duly announced plans to attack the FIM SuperStock championship in Europe, created a RC8R one-make series, and saw limited success (highest finish of 4th place) in the US AMA Superbike championship with Chris Filmore. Without the dominant performance shown by their off road machinery KTM struggled to move units off showroom floors. The nail in the coffin was a proclamation from the KTM CEO that they would no longer create street bikes that had the capability to cause irresponsible riding on the street. With that, the capable RC8R project was shelved for good.

Today’s Featured Listing is the last year model of the RC8R line. Production ended in 2013, but this particular example was purchased in 2014 out of remaining stock. Showing the classic lines of the RC8 in bright orange and white KTM livery, you are looking at a neo classic that exhibits character and novelty in a sea of common looking plastic rockets. This is your chance to jump on a one-owner, low mileage underappreciated machine before the world realizes what it overlooked. This is a gem that will continue to look like a standout wherever you go, and it will get you there with speed and style. This well-loved KTM will undoubtedly steal your heart, and by the sound of it also comes with the the heart of the original owner. That is probably the highest compliment bestowed upon the lesser known RC8R line, and bodes well for the future collectibility of this model. Good Luck!

MI

Featured Listing:  2013 KTM RC8R
Kawasaki March 5, 2020 posted by

Dark Horse – 1996 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R with just 5,800 miles !

One of Kawasaki’s alternative livery used basic black instead of championship lime, but this carefully tended example is an eye-catcher even so.

1996 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R for sale on eBay

Right in the middle of the 1989-2003 model run, the ’96 was the first year where the rest-of-world and North American models had the same ZX-7R name.  The classic 748 cc inline was carburetted and boasted 111 ponies.  Intake runners were dialed back a few mm to improve throttle response, and mid-range torque was augmented by a crossover pipe between downpipes 1 and 4.  Not messing with the good, the alloy twin-spar chassis can handle whatever comes its way and the conservative headstock geometry takes it all in stride.  Components like the 6-piston front brakes and piggyback reservoir rear shock were definite improvements.

This Virginia owner took super care of this baby, and the detailed photos show no wear or corrosion, not even a rub on the heel guards.  Rarely seen OEM mirrors and signals might actually work as intended.  The rims look as though they’ve been subjected to just one tire change.  From the eBay auction:

Bike still has over 99% of its original OEM parts – Bridgestone Battlax Hypersports and stainless steel front brake lines are not.  Extremely well preserved and under 6K there’s not much of a service record here.  Maintenance done recently – MOTUL 10W40 100% synthetic, OEM Kawasaki oil filter, MOTUL 7.5W 100% synthetic fork oil, MOTUL MC CARE chain clean and lube, OEM Kawasaki air filter, NGK spark plugs, OEM Kawasaki fuel filter, rear 41 PSI, front 37 PSI, P21S Carnauba Wax – check!

Clearly this bike is ready to show or ride to the beach, canyon.  Runs like it looks, INCREDIBLE.  Items included in sale: original owners manual, clear Exempt title, 2 keys and 1 spare, original sales ad, period correct never used tank bra, 100% original never used OEM Kawasaki tool kit.  Rare was the factory Ebony with reflective iridescence decals that color morph in sunlight but rarer here is a true survivor time capsule ready to take you back – don’t miss it.

Though the street-going ZX-7R had grown up into a slightly overweight kit, the AMA Superbikes had to make room for Doug Chandler and his Team Muzzy special, who repeated in 1997.  For a fan, this might be a perfect redux – hardly used, perfect shape, serious rather than flashy, and sensibly priced.

-donn

Dark Horse – 1996 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R with just 5,800 miles !
Ducati August 17, 2019 posted by

Venti­quattro: 1993 Ducati 888

The follow-on evolution of the wildly successful 851, the Ducati 888 had a short, but equally productive life span. Championed by Doug Polen on the world’s SBK stage Ducati was victorious in both 1991 and 1992 campaigns. As a street bike, the 888 continued on through 1994. However by 1993 the SPO models in the lineup were already powered by the next revolution in Ducati firepower, the 916cc desmoquattro engine (as was the SBK racer). However the 888 was still a very stout street bike, and the overall update to the 851 made this an outstanding platform in its own right. Often overlooked as simply the bridge to the 916, the 888 is worth a serious look if you are a riding enthusiast.

1993 Ducati 888 for sale on eBay

Born from the punched out sports production (i.e. homologation) 851 model, the 888 featured the larger displacement engine that the nomenclature on the fairing might suggest. And the engine was not the only updates piece of the 888 puzzle. Notable designer Pierre Terblanche (yes, of the 999 infamy), reworked the styling of the 851 to lengthen the lines and produce an evolved shape. In many ways, this makes the 888 look physically bigger than the 851, yet it is equal or smaller in the most significant dimensions (wheelbase, overall length, height, etc). These longer lines are echoed in some of Terblanche’s other designs, including the Supermono. Overall, the 888 is a visually striking machine. Aurally, the fuel injected, liquid cooled, 4-valve per cylinder with desmodronic action L-twin remained a booming beast, offering low down torque and an intoxicating higher RPM rush. Formidable on the racetrack as well as the street, the 888 was the middle child that never seemed to get the accolades of the younger or older siblings. It is, on the whole, the rarest of the 851/888/916 trio.

From the seller:
This is a nice 888 with 14026 miles. It needs nothing and was just serviced. It starts and runs good with everything in good working order.

The 888 that Ducati imported into the US was an SP0 model. Note that this was during a tumultuous period in Ducati’s history, before they hit it big and really made strides in consistent manufacturing. Record keeping was marginal, and many models changed mid-year simply due to parts on hand. That being said, the 888 came to America to go racing – in AMA Superbike. Thus, all of the US imported (i.e. federalized) 888s are homologation machines. You can check the VIN number in positions 4-6: “1” for street bike (versus race only), “H” for homologation (versus super sport, super bike, monster, etc), and letters for variation on street bike (i.e. A,B,C), or numbers for the racers. A reported 200 units were imported in 1993, and about half that number in 1994. Of course by the end of 1994, nobody wanted a 888 anymore. The 916 had arrived. That makes the SP0 a rare example – and one to hold on to.

There is not much info about this particular bike, nor too many pictures. It has apparently just had a service (good), and seems to have been thoroughly enjoyed given the mileage (14026). The 851/888 models are far more comfortable than the 916 series that followed, and the engines have proven to be extremely durable provided that the usual belt/valve/oil change services have been completed regularly. Parts are still available, and performance is more than adequate for any para-legal street activities. Best of all, the bidding starts at a reasonable $7k. You get the sound and the status of Ducati ownership, along with the visceral presence of the bike and the rarity of the US homologation model. Win win win. Check it out here and Good Luck!!

MI

Honda July 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2001 Honda RC51

Update 7.28.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Dennis has 3 very low mileage bikes listed right now:

Thank you for supporting the site, Dennis, and good luck to buyers! -dc

Honda has always been an engineering company. Often times it would appear that Honda would release a new model with a new configuration just to prove to the world that it could. Sometimes it was difficult to determine why Honda decided to make a substantial change. But in the case of the RVT1000R – better known as the RC51 – the reason was clear. You see, Honda enjoyed tremendous success on the racetrack with their four-cylinder, 750cc RC30 and RC45 machines. But when rules changed in World Superbike racing to allow a displacement advantage to twins and Ducati started winning, Honda took notice. Casting the V-4 machines aside for a twin, Honda created the 1000cc V-twin RC51 – and picked right back up with their winning ways. And while in some ways overshadowed by the collector status of the RC30 and RC45, the RC51 was arguably more successful in the intended theater of the racetrack thanks to the efforts of Colin Edwards (WSBK) and Nicky Hayden (AMA Superbike).

Featured Listing: 2001 Honda RC51

While badged as an RVT1000R, the RC51 actually displaces 999cc to allow it to squeak under the rule book cut off on swept volume. The Ducati killer’s short-stroke motor was built to rev, producing 133 HP . And while Honda copied Ducati in the use of the 90 degree vee configuration, they skipped on the desmo-drama and fitted the four-valve heads with conventional valve-train components. But don’t think that Honda simply phoned in a fake Duc replacement here; the aluminum perimeter beam chassis, the high-mount exhaust pipes, the aero bodywork complete with high-pressure intake, and the unique side-mounted radiators are all Honda tech. Built for the public at a fraction of the price of the Italian machine, the RC51 was a bit porkier in most dimensions (including weight). On the racetrack this was negated by minimum weight rules. On the street, the difference is negligible – until you sit in the cockpit. Unlike the Ducati- which demands rider conformity to a narrow, sharp and stretched position, the Honda is regarded as, well, comfortable. As a streetbike, the RC51 just works – and performs with the metronomic reliability you would expect from Big Red.

From the seller:
2001 Honda RC51 (RVT1000R) (PHX)
VIN: JH2SC45471M100004

Price: $9,000

I purchased this motorcycle in San Jose, CA, new in 2000 and rode it 286 miles and then parked it. I’m turning 80 years old in the next month and the time has come to find it a new, younger owner, hopefully someone that is a collector of motorcycles and that would appreciate the fact that it is 99.9% original (new batteries only and still on original tires), has been ridden 286 miles and has been in a climate-controlled environment from the very first day that it was bought and has had the best of care.

As always, RSBFS finds you the best of what is out there. And in this case, that means a basically NEW 2001 Honda RC51 with fewer than 300 miles. This bike is amazingly immaculate, and is completely original as new with the exception of a new battery. Drool over some of these pictures, and realize that the RC51 is the bike you really need, versus simply want. This is a do it all machine that can carve corners better than the best (unless you know better than Colin Edwards), has more than enough grunt to get most jobs done quickly, is comfortable enough to spend some time on, and has built-in legendary Honda reliability. Did I mention it sounds glorious? Seriously, what more could you want! Devoid of today’s game console electronic gadgetry, this is bike that expects you to ride it – and in exchange it will provide you with miles and miles of smiles.

If you are thinking that the latter SP-2 variant of the RC51 in Nicky Hayden livery is the most collectible of the lot, you wouldn’t be wrong. But when pen hits paper, it is what you can find that means the most. And in a model like this, where the “rarer” bike is essentially a sticker kit, the differences are not great. It is the difference in the condition of the bike that will contribute the most to the overall value in the near term, and likely well beyond that. And I would challenge you to find a cleaner, low mileage RC51 on the market today. Jump quickly before this twin-cylinder rocket is gone in a booming howl. Good Luck!

MI

Featured Listing: 2001 Honda RC51
KTM June 8, 2019 posted by

Different Perspectives: 2014 KTM RC8R 1190

In the world of different strokes, there are Japanese sport bikes and Italian sport bikes. And for a short while, there was a rational choice out of left field – Austria – with the KTM RC8R. With a unique blend of high-quality components and features not often found on bikes in the range, the RC8R was powerful, potent, very competent and largely ignored. Not even the impressive results of factory racer Chris Filmore in AMA Superbike competition could make the RC8R a commercial success. Ultimately KTM pulled the plug on the RC8 line – in part thanks to the CEO suggesting they should not build machines that could not be used sensibly on the street.

2014 KTM RC8R 1190 for sale on eBay

Powered by a 1190cc v-twin set at 75 degrees, the RC8R offered up a very healthy 175+ HP. With Keihin fuel injection via 52 mm throttle bodies feeding directly into the twin spark, four valve heads, power was instantaneous – if not a bit abrupt. Coupled with a 6-speed tranny and nestled in a unique trestle frame, the RC8R takes convention to a new level. Adjustments abound: the RC8R provided for a vast array of adjustments similar to what you would expect on a race bike. From levers to pegs, suspension and sub-frame height, the RC8R was an open book for a rider who knew what they wanted. Even the swing arm pivot angle is adjustable. And with WP suspension front an rear, the rider is availed to a dizzying array of potential changes that can be made in order to maximize the handling of the bike. When it comes time to stop, radial mount Brembos are up to the task. The seller is the original purchaser of this one-owner bike, and has quite a bit to share. Read on:

From the seller:
I am the original owner of this 2014 KTM RC8R 1190. I purchased the bike in March of 2014 from Thousand Oaks. The bike runs perfect and looks beautiful. I have taken excellent care of the bike keeping up on regular maintenance and always in my garage. Its always clean and waxed and has never seen rain. Never downed, raced, or abused, in like new condition and babied.

The fluids were changed last year including the oil, coolant, and brake fluids and have about a 1000 miles on them. I have only used Motorex Power Synt 4T oil in this bike per KTM’s recommendations. It has never been raced and most of the miles are highway from road trips with my buddies.

More from the seller:
I want to sell the bike with the accessories, but if somebody doesn’t want them I would let it go for less money as stock. Here are a list of the mods:

-Akrapovic EVO 4 Full Titanium Exhaust ($4600 and over 20lbs weight savings)
-K&N Air Filter
-KTM Factory EVO 4 Tune
-CJ Designs Block Off Plates
-KTM PowerParts Reservoir Covers
-KTM PowerParts Tinted Wind Screen
-KTM PowerParts Rear Seat Plugs
-KTM PowerParts Supersprox Rear Sproket
-KTM PowerParts Swingarm Protector
-KTM PowerParts Tank Pad
-Bestem Carbon Fiber Tank Guards
-Bestem Carbon Fiber Chain Guard
-Bestem Carbon Fiber Rear Fender
-Evotech Fender Eliminator
-Brand new Dunlop Q3+ Tires
-Clear Wrap on Front and Rear Tail Panels
-Fuel Tank Anti-Scratch Protector
-HID Headlamp
-DB Silencer for Akra Exhaust
-KTM RC8 Indoor Cover

More from the seller:
Factory Wise, the bike is set up very well. It has many adjustments with seat height, foot peg location and height, and handlebar height. WP suspension is stock and very good, Marschesini Wheels, Brembo Brakes, and hydraulic slipper clutch. This bike is a blast to ride, has so much torque and power I can only explain it as violent. This truly is a riders bike as there aren’t any rider aids and its all up to you. I am 6’1″ and 200lbs and this bike was comfortable for me on long road trips because of its adjustability and room to move around.

Only issue with the bike is a small burn mark I put into the lower right fairing when I installed the EVO 4 exhaust. The exhaust was missing a bracket, I was excited to ride the bike and the fairing was touching the header. But its fixed and only cosmetic. I was planning on replacing the fairing with the KTM race pan. The EVO 4 Headers also developed a crack at the intersection which was not uncommon. The crack was welded and is only cosmetic and doesn’t affect performance. I have all of the stock parts to go with the bike too.

Otherwise, bike really is 10/10 and still looks and rides perfect. Any questions please feel free to ask.

By then numbers, RC8 machines are relatively rare. Only a few hundred units were purportedly imported each model year, with the 2015 – and final – example being the rarest. But the RC8 is plagued by the worst of all collector bike syndromes; ambivalence. You see, these are great motorcycles swimming in a sea of lots of great motorcycles. The fact that the RC8 and RC8R failed to make a splash has more to do with economics and dealer reach than anything performance or quality related. No, the RC8R did not win an AMA Superbike race. Nor did one top the championship standings. But Chris Filmore was there and was close, and such speaks to the potential of this platform. As an out of the box offering from the Austrian manufacturer – their first big-bore sport bike – the RC8 was a refreshing alternative to the rest of the known crowd. And while the party ended too soon, there are plenty of good examples around. This particular RC8R looks to be well cared for, has some tasty updates, and fewer than 7,000 miles. The ask on it is a very strong $13k, but the seller indicates he is willing to entertain offers. The last few R bikes we have seen have been up in the $10k range – with exception units topping at $12k – but the dollars sunk into all of the KTM upgrades may bolster that price somewhat. It was a pity that the KTM street bike party ended too soon – it would have been fun to see what could happen at the WSBK level. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Different Perspectives: 2014 KTM RC8R 1190
Kawasaki June 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1

6.26.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Last seen on RSBFS in 2013 under the byline Kawgasm, the 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1 is off the rarity scales.  This S1 was found in a storage container, cleaned and assembled but not restored, then taken to the Quail Motorcycle Gathering in May, this might be the silk purse from a sow’s ear story for spring 2019.

Unrestored 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1 For Sale on eBay

The Kawi S1 is pictured in Webster’s next to the word unobtanium, and you would’ve had to know somebody in the motorcycle business then, and perhaps finance now to procure one. The race engine was quite different from an ELR with dual plugs, magneto drive on the right end of the crank, a bank of Keihin CR carburetors and a mammoth oil cooler under the steering head. The fabricated swingarm is supported by remote reservoir Works Performance shocks. Lockheed racing brakes made the solid 330mm disks, looking downright oversized even these days.

Evidently the original owner was a machinist and cooked up some beautiful light alloy parts for his new machine. The oil cooler brackets are bombproof but the brake rotor and caliper mounts have a serious look. Comments accompanying the before pictures:

n October, 2014, a friend of mine told me about a guy that was interested in selling his 1982 Kawasaki 1000. He said he bought it new in 1983. His wife said that he was getting on in age and if he passed away, she wouldn’t know what to do with it. He asked me to come by and see it. When he opened the storage container door, stuffed in the back was a green bike. I assumed it was a 1983 ELR. There was no lighting in the container and you could hardly move inside. I was able to get some pictures and realized it was truly an S1. I told him I was interested and he said he’d get back to me. It took him 5 years to get back to me. It took us 6 hours to move a machine and many boxes in order to get to it. But finally, it was extracted. Here’s a chance to own the Holy Grail of 80’s sport bikes.

A careful inventory and cleaning was in order, but you can’t call it a restoration. The original CR carbs were in a box and re-fitted. They still have yet to experience dino juice. The condition and documentation defies belief, and the owners’ restraint in the presence of a “new” S1 indicates this isn’t their first barn find.

1 of 29 produced. Frame #0080 Motor#030330. Arizona Titled. This bike was sold new in Tucson,Az.
Bike was originally shipped to Hill Kawasaki in Orlando, Florida

Then Transferred to Kawasaki of Tucson on 10/21/1983

Sold on 10/31/1983 by Kawasaki of Tucson

Never any track time. This one owner bike was played with on the street for less than 3 months and then stored away until January 2019. It was removed from storage and is now for sale. Unrestored and like new. A true “barn find”. Documentation includes the Predelivery (PDI) Form. The dealer information sheet from Kawasaki Motor Company regarding these bikes. The Dealer transfer form with pricing and serial numbers. The warranty forms filled out, even though there was no warranty. The Factory Chassis and Engine manuals. The Chassis and Engine parts pricing books. The Factory race stand . The original carbs were never run on the bike. The owner opted for 33mm smooth bore Mikunis. The original Keihin CR carbs were reinstalled at the time the bike was removed from storage. They are new and have never had fuel run through them. The owner was a machinist and made billet oil cooler mounts, billet caliper hangers and billet front brake rotor carriers. The original steel kerker muffler was replaced with an aluminum one. The slicks were replaced with street Dunlop’s in 1983. The condition of this bike is unbelievable. Unrestored !

Around thirty S1’s are reputed to exist, along with a substantial number of replicas in various states of correctness.  As the real deal, the fuel tank and carbs of this one will likely remain dry, some old slicks sourced, and some velvet ropes strung to keep it out of arm’s reach.  .

-donn

Featured Listing – 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1
Honda April 16, 2019 posted by

De-Stabilization – 1983 Honda CB1000F

This Florida owner shows a few other classic -80’s machines behind, but this unrestored CB1000F might be the one to cut away from the herd !

1983 Honda CB1100F for sale on eBay

Honda’s was looking deep into the corner and the vee-four 750 was brand new, but before the carburetted inline four left the sport category, displacement was increased to 1,062 cc’s and 38mm carbs delivered 110 hp.  Just oversquare 69mm stroke kept torque up there at 72 ft.-lbs.  Though still a typical twin-downtube, the chassis was beefed up and sported 39mm forks and a box-section swingarm.  Dampers were premium with air-adjustable anti-dive forks and adjustable twin rear shocks.  More UJM than sport, the 18-inch front and 17-inch rear wheel kept seat height low.  Brakes reflected the 543 lbs. dry weight with three 296mm disks.

Obviously a fan from the looks of the garage, this owner has taken nice care of his reference CB1100F.  The preservation of the deep blue paint and black engine finish is as rare as the factory black chrome exhaust.  Just a few rubs tell of its 21,000 miles.  The owner is correct that at this age, most have been disassembled, restored, and altered.  From the eBay auction:

Original bodywork with original paint and factory original 4-2 black chrome exhaust. All in excellent condition with only minor imperfections. Tank is dent free with no trace of rust inside original key opens all the locks, tool kit and original owners manual included,  seat is perfect, no nicks or anything. I put 3000 miles on it last year, just put on new tires, all carburetor O-rings have been changed, then carbs synced, only ethanol free gas used. new o-ring chain, old one was fine, but old is all, This bike is 100% ready to ride and enjoy, no modifications, just stock and original.

As you can see in the pictures, this bike is in excellent condition. hard to find one that has not been apart, repainted or screwed with especially in the awesome blue paint scheme. one minor scuff on right fairing, hard to get to show up in pics some oxidation under aluminum clear coat in spots as well, but a really nice bike, always get compliments. Tires are new Dunlops in original factory sizes.

Honda tweaked the CB1100F until it did pretty much everything well – it got high marks for usable power, stable handling, and comfortable cockpit.  Answering the escalating power competition, it ran a quarter in just over 11 seconds, and Honda quality insured popularity.  Starting out at a reasonable $4,900, this example should do better – last January a red one with less miles brought $9,350 at Mecum in Vegas.  Sure to be a hit at a show or cruise night, this CB1100F marks a sweet spot in Honda history and owner care.

-donn

De-Stabilization – 1983 Honda CB1000F