Posts by tag: 910

MV Agusta May 24, 2019 posted by

Et Tu, Bruté – 2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910

Displayed in a corner with no view to the tarmac, this 2007 Brutale 910 is nicely farkled and has just 1,211 miles.  A smashing MV roadster for a fan without the need for a fairing, or maybe with that base already covered.

2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910 for sale on eBay

Agusta joined the naked party in 2001, starting with their 3-cylinder supersport models, and presented the naked superbike in 2005.  The 908cc engine is derived from the F4 1000cc mill, sharing the radially arrayed valves and Weber-Marelli fuel injection.  Power is superbike level at 139hp, with good torque numbers at 71 ft.-lbs.  The frame is courtesy of the original Brutale, with whopping 50mm Marzocchi forks which are multi-adjustable along with the monoshock.  The package is surprisingly nimble, and accommodating to larger and smaller riders.

Too busy, the only explanation for a nice one owner bike, some sweet mods, and then hardly even break-in miles over the 12 years.  A few moments with the dealer’s option book, but not many for riding afterward.  Presumably the rear sprocket has two less teeth, with the effect of a higher gear ratio.  From the eBay auction:

It has only 1211 miles.  Yes, it’s no mistake, only 1211.  I bought it new in 2007 and have title in hand.  It has $3000 in accessories including a Arrow slip on and catalyzer tube replacement, front and rear fender, Matris steering damper, handlebar end mirrors, fairings from Germany, specially made windshield which is removable, rear pinion with two less teeth, better front brake pads and a special handlebar mounted on rubber to damp vibration.  All this was installed at buying, and I have all the original parts.  Not one scratch.

The Brutale is still on MV’s card, though it has ridden the displacement spectrum up and back down to an 800, of which there are several Special Editions.  More of statement than a practical ride – it’s spendy, just not the thing for a longer ride, a little finicky, but a real looker.

-donn

Et Tu, Bruté – 2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910
MV Agusta May 18, 2018 posted by

Handsome Brute: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale

Launched at almost the same time, MV Agusta’s Brutale has always lived in the sleeker F4’s shadow. Styling aside, it was just a little bit lower-spec, a little less focused, a little too practical. Like that’s a dirty word. I happen to love the design, although it’s hard to argue that the F4 isn’t a better-looking bike. But you have to suffer for that sublime style. The fact is, as much as I love the F4, it’s hard work: the riding position puts lots of weight over the front wheel, the pegs are high, and the suspension is stiff. The Brutale, while by no means plush, certainly can feel that way after spending time on an F4. Which makes sense, since the F4 was designed for the track. For the road? It honestly doesn’t get much better for canyon hooliganism than the Brutale.

Like the original F4 750, the Brutale 750S was considered by some to be “too slow,” as if 127 high-strung horses in a lightweight naked bike with a nearly dirt-track riding position isn’t a recipe for a good time. The 910R seen here followed the original Brutale and displaced… 910cc. At 136hp, claimed power isn’t up all that much, but midrange is improved and honestly, it’s all the power you need in a naked road bike. Seriously, who is riding these things and really thinks they’re not fast enough? Sure, moar power is great and all, but the later 1078 and 1090 versions just seem like overkill, making the 910R the Goldilocks of the Brutale range: not too fast, not too slow. Just right.

The seller of this very clean example mentions a Titanium exhaust, and it looks like a set of beautiful headers and a de-cat link pipe have been fitted, but the bike retains the original “shotgun” style end-cans. Not the worst choice, as the aftermarket never really did come up with anything that looks quite as elegant as these slash-cut bits, although the actual openings in the ends do look kind of… inadequate. But if you’re worried about a lack of noise, trust me: this one probably isn’t all that quiet.

The only problem I see here is a lack of a Power Commander. MV’s of this era can generally use fueling help. They’re typically very lean through most of the rev range, then run overly rich at the top end. It makes sense, given limited development resources and the fairly crude technology available when the bike was introduced, but an aftermarket fueling module and some dyno time gives the instant response and fluid midrange the bike was always designed to have. It’s perfectly rideable without one, but is well worth the investment.

From the original eBay listing: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale

Selling an MV Agusta Brutale 910R in excellent condition

KBB value at $5880 without considering the premium extras we have here. Price firm.

With top notch quality accessories
1. Titanium exhaust
2. Stock carbon fiber body parts (from MV Agusta)
3. Rizoma mirrors
4. CRG clutch and brake levers
5. MV Agusta cover and upright stand
6. Trickle charger

Title status: clean 
Transmission: manual 

Never down or raced/tracked. Low miles:4890 !!! 
Serviced at Ducati dealer every time.
Have the stock exhaust as well.

Have title in my name.

Good to know the title is clean, but did the seller really need to tell us the transmission is a “manual”? Does a constant-mesh, sequential gearbox even qualify as a manual? The seller also seems pretty impressed by all the “premium extras” included but honestly, this is basically a stock bike, by MV Agusta standards. And that’s really the appeal of this one: it’s clean, looks very sleek in the unusual black, and hasn’t been messed with too much, although the missing Power Commander is something I’d rectify as soon as possible if it were mine. Is it worth the maintenance hassles? Well that’s a different story: a Street or Speed Triple certainly handles as well, has plenty of character, and is much easier to maintain. I’d like to say those bikes are less expensive as well, except at the moment they’re not: the asking price for this particularly nice Brutale is $5,999. That’s pretty much bang-on for a good 910 these days, but Brutales in general are a screaming deal, considering the looks and performance. Anyone have $6,000 they can loan me?

-tad

Handsome Brute: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale
MV Agusta September 14, 2016 posted by

Et tu – 2008 MV Agusta Brutale 910S

After Cagiva’s purchase of MV Agusta’s storied name in 1999, the company decided to enter the boutique naked-sport market and developed the Brutale 750.  The model has been the subject of several limited production factory customs, and further evolution brought the Brutale 910S.  Though it will never have the utility or daily ridership of a Monster or SV, the Brutale is one of the very sportiest of naked sports.

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2008 MV Agusta Brutale 910S

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The 910S is powered by an inline four with MV Agusta’s excellent four-valve heads, pretty high compression at 13:1 and making 134 hp.  The rather sculptural trellis frame surrounds the engine and terminates in large cast swingarm connectors.  The front suspension is a pair of rather massive 50mm inverted Marzocchi forks, and a Sachs-damped single-sided swingarm is found under the seat.  Nissin supplies the 6-piston front calipers over 310mm rotors, with a single 210mm rear brake.  It’s unfaired except for the radiator shroud, though the double parabolic headlight looks aerodynamic enough.  Behind the teardrop instrument binnacle, a split level seat and low European handlebars complete the cockpit.

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This Colorado Brutale has less than 2,000 miles, and looks excellent.  Apparently the only mod, the HP Corsa exhaust is a lot shorter and likely quite a bit lighter than the factory dual mufflers.  From the eBay auction:

This bike only has 2,000 miles on it.  It runs and looks like it just rolled off the showroom floor. It only has one small crack in the paint in the tank, which is very difficult to see in the light.  I used a flashlight to take a picture and make it more visible for the ad.  You won’t find a nicer, lower mileage 2008 Brutale anywhere.  This bike has a custom exhaust that gives it an awesome look.

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The 910S reviewed as a nice handling standard with ergonomics favoring the smaller rider.  The low bars and nearly rear-set pegs make for an aggressive posture, the narrow seat helping the rider move around a bit.  The trademark star alloys identify it as an MV Agusta, and the fuel tank’s wings give you almost another gallon.  A distinctive and thoroughly modern take on the naked sport, the Brutale 910S uses Agusta’s potent transverse four, but otherwise makes its own road…

-donn

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Et tu – 2008 MV Agusta  Brutale 910S
MV Agusta February 6, 2015 posted by

Bargain Exotic: 2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910 for Sale

2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910 L Side

This entry may reignite the endless “what exactly is a sportbike” debate, but I’d argue that the MV Agusta Brutale is far more of a legitimate sportbike than a Ducati Monster or some other built-to-a-price bike designed to trade on an exotic name with parts-bin engineering. The Brutale is a full-on sportbike, fairing removed. It’s far less extreme than the F4 on which it is based in terms of ergonomics, but isn’t watered-down much at all.

It was almost unavoidable, really: in the same way that Triumph’s Street Triple ended up being far more aggressive than competitors from Japan simply because Hinkley’s budget was too small to create an entirely new bike. Triumph and MV Agusta simply did what you or I might have done with a crashed Daytona or F4 and pulled the shattered fairing, fitted comfortable bars, moved rearsets to a less punishing position, and called it done.

2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910 Front

The suspension could perhaps have been tuned a bit better for the new weight distribution, but is undoubtedly high quality, with almost ridiculously beefy 50mm front forks. There isn’t much room to move around on the bike: the seat sort of wants you to stay where you are and won’t let you slide forwards or backwards much and the ride is stiff, but feels very well controlled at all times.

And, because of its exotic name and initially high costs, many have been absolutely babied, making them an excellent buy on the second-hand market.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910 for Sale

Here is an extremely clean and original Brutale for your consideration. 

3200 miles with light use by an older gent owner. Sensible modifications include CQ mid pipe (Cat removal), removal of license plate hanging apparatus and large turn signals (bike has LED taillight with integrated indicators) 

Ferracci adjustable billet rearsets. 

Light custom accents include: Suede seat, Tommaselli grips, powder coated and machined heel guards and frame guards, custom plate holder, Carbon fiber passenger seat cover. Omission of passenger pegs – all original parts available. 

Bike had recent spark plugs, correct AGIP oil and filter service, brake pads, front & rear, complete injector removal and service. 

Bike is in excellent condition, paint on body panels, trim, frame, wheels is all excellent. 

This is a blisteringly fast (135hp) bike that has a comfortable upright seating and handlebar position…fantastic for weekend rides or commuting. It’s not uncommon to find Brutale owners with 20k – even 30k + miles on these bikes. 

2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910 Rearset

Unfortunately, if you’re a fan of “moar noise” I’ve yet to see an end-can choice that really replicates the slash-cut style of the stock pipes, although a cat-delete mid-pipe like the one on this bike will free up a very expensive-sounding snarl from the radial-valved four. But you really don’t need to do much of anything to these: they’re pretty great right out of the box, with quality components, and plenty fast. Deleting the hideous stock mirrors is a great start, and even though it’s probably a little bit gauche, I actually like the suede seat. It might impede side-to-side movement if you like hanging off in corners, but I’m sure you could find a second-hand stock seat for days when you want to corner-carve instead of pose…

And this will definitely do both. It makes plenty of power for a naked bike and the suspension has the chops to keep it under control.

Brutales are available for a song right now and are virtually indistinguishable from new bikes to the average onlooker. They’re beautifully engineered and very well finished bikes: up close, the details impress. The hard parts are very robust, although some details can require attention: headlight lenses can, um… fall out, and you should make sure the rear hub has been updated, since earlier examples did sometimes fail.

So this may not make a great everyday bike, and you should plan to spend some money on upkeep, but when properly maintained, these are pretty spectacular bikes and should be able to embarrass more than a few sportbikes on road, track, or anywhere top speed isn’t an issue.

-tad

2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910 Dash

Bargain Exotic: 2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910 for Sale