Posts by tag: 900SS

Ducati October 7, 2017 posted by

Dusty Project: 1982 Ducati 900 Mike Hailwood Replica

This 1982 Ducati 900 MHR has certainly seen better days, but if the seller is to believed, it comes with an interesting international history and has met the family and friends of its iconic namesake.

1982 Ducati 900 MHR for sale on eBay

Let’s swing back to the whole “better days” thing right quick before we go much further. The engine appears to be in pieces, though the bottom end is in the frame. Apparently, a noisy gearbox bearing prompted a teardown, but a fly-by-night mechanic seems to have halted progress immediately thereafter. The seller says all the parts are safely stored, but they’ll need a thorough inspection before they get stuck back together.

Still, if the layer of dust is indeed just a layer of dust, and the parts have been stored properly, there is no reason to shy too far from this project. It is still pretty far from being a basket case, and in good condition these bikes are truly glorious.

The engine is the 863-cc unit from the contemporary 900SS, in this guise fed by two 40-mm Dellortos. The 1982 bikes were the second iteration of the MHR series, which was born in 1979 to commemorate Hailwood’s 1978 win at the Isle of Man TT.

From the eBay listing:

Here is your chance to buy an extremely rare Ducati that simply does not come up for sale very often. I have owned this bike for over 25 years including back in Australia and brought it to the USA over 15 years ago. I never bothered to title it here as it was in my personal Ducati collection and I rode it very rarely, it had a noisy gearbox bearing on 5th gear so I gave it to a friend who was starting his own European bike repair shop and he was going to take his time and replace the bearing and freshen it up a bit…5 years later I had to take it back in the condition you see it here, I have all the parts safely stored in a plastic tote and it is complete, and the engine covers etc have all been polished. This motorcycle was invited to a special event of hailwoods held at daytona speedway where I got to meet nobby Clarke, Pauline and David hailwood and they all signed my tank, sadly those signatures have all faded but there is pics on the internet somewhere of the meeting and then signing my tank, I also got to ride this bike in the procession lap on the banked track where I got to open her up..I always swore I would never sell this bike and if I don’t get the money I’m asking I doubt I will.this is a matching numbers bike.. I have taken pics of the bike before I cleaned it…it has been in my air conditioned warehouse for the last 10years and will need a good going over, new Tyres etc…cleans up extremely well..

With a $30,000 starting bid, this machine demands the attention of a well-heeled and very dedicated collector, but should be worth a thought if the sale price stays fairly close to that mark. Let us know in the comments if you think we’re taking crazy pills.

Dusty Project: 1982 Ducati 900 Mike Hailwood Replica
Bimota August 13, 2017 posted by

Italian Charm: 1999 Bimota DB4

Bimotas are not exactly known for their scary antics and cartoonish horsepower. They are instead renowned for being rolling exhibitions in balance, handling and craft mastery. The brand has had it share of screamers — the 1100cc SB6R and the Suzuki TL-1000R-powered SB8 come to mind — but it isn’t their stock and trade.

1999 Bimota DB4 for sale on eBay

This 1999 Bimota DB4 is right in the brand’s wheelhouse: a pretty, handmade frame, boutique suspension pieces and hand-laid bodywork wrapping a character-rich and adequately powerful engine.

Sporting the mill from a 1990s Ducati 900SS, which had its fuel injection jettisoned for a set of carbs, the DB4 claimed a modest 80-odd horses when new. Even with the torque available from the big twin, this thing won’t make you a light-to-light hero.

Those ponies, though, must only haul around about 365 pounds, and a fully-adjustable Paioli fork works in concert with an Ohlins shock to allow the bike to carry what speed it can muster with little drama and maximum efficiency.

The low-mileage example here looks to be in excellent condition, albeit with signs of use and a few marks that show its age. The seller notes some changes from stock, but provides little detail.

From the eBay listing:

SPECIALIZED MOTORS and SPECIALIZED MOTORCYCLES
Specialized is offering another limited collectible Motorcycle out of our Museum. This Bimota DB4 is a ART as well as PERFORMANCE . Please feel free to call with any questions thanks specializedmotors.com anthony -954-540-8495 cell

900cc V Twin
Very Limited Production Motorcycle
Ducati Powered
Keihin Carb Conversion
Billet Adapters To Raise Handlebars
Brembo Brakes Front And Rear

Buy-It-Now is set at $10,500, which is right in line for these bikes. It’s a stack to pay for a nearly 20-year-old bike, but the rarity and artistry are second-to-none, and certainly could not be replicated for that money. The sale concludes in 18 days, giving you plenty of time to arrange the funds and shipping.

Italian Charm: 1999 Bimota DB4
Ducati July 4, 2017 posted by

First Year Legend Alert: 1975 Ducati 900 SS

The 1975 Ducati 900SS is something every serious collector has on their list and given that 1975 production was less than 250 units, today’s post is quite an occasion.  This nice but not pristine version is located in Manhattan Beach, California USA but I wouldn’t be a bit surprised to see it go to an international sale.

1975 Ducati 900SS For Sale on eBay

To understand the significance of this bike and why it is so prized, you need to look back to 1970 when the top level GP racing class was pretty much a battle between MV Agusta (with legendary rider Agostini) and Japanese two-strokes.  Ducati had left racing over 10 years earlier due to budget constraints but was now flush with new backing and had a new series of larger displacement machines under development.  In 1970 the company decided it would be going back to the track, in part to help increase visibility to their new machines but also to help in development.

Ducati hit the track in 1970 with a new 500cc L-twin engine with two-valve desmo heads but the new machines were still no match for the then dominant Agostini and MV Agusta.   In 1972 Ducati announced a new 750cc machine that incorporated the lessons learned over the last 2 seasons along with special racetrack-oriented cams, twin spark plugs, 40mm Dell’Orto carbs and billet connecting rods.  Other top shelf bits included Marzocchi forks and triple-disc brakes.

The new 750cc machine was set to debut at Imola on April 23, 1972.   Did it work?  Well, here is what happened when GP rider Paul Smart (yes, THAT Paul Smart) took the new Ducati out for qualifying:

“On the last lap I wound it up as fast as I felt comfortable.  I wasn’t going completely flat out because it was basically just a safety-wired street bike..it still had the Dunlop TT100 street tires and even still had the centerstand lugs in place.   When I brought the bike back to the pits all the Ducati mechanics were jumping up and down…it turns out I had just broken Ago’s track record.”

 

The new Duc actually finished 1-2 at Imola and the public immediately clamored for a 750ss for the street.  At the end of the 1972 season Ducati promised to make replicas of the Imola winning machine available to the public but  Ducati was still a small manufacturer so this didn’t actually happen until 1974.  During this 2 year period the Japanese were undergoing a crash course in development and quickly catching up to its European rivals so when Ducati finally delivered the promised Imola replica 750cc machines they also introduced a new 860cc machine, the 900 SuperSport/SS.   The new “big” Duc was essentially the 750 series machine with more power and fortunately for Ducati, this wasn’t a case where more power upset the balance of the bike. The new 900ss was able to continue the performance success of the 750 for several years.  Consider this – it was on a 1978 900SS that a just-out-of-retirement 38 year old Mike Hailwood would ride to a legendary victory at the Isle of Mann TT.

Okay, we have covered the history and ties to famous racers like  Paul Smart and Mike Hailwood, but you may still be wondering why this bike is so high on so many collectors lists.  The answer is that not only is it a first year bike but it also had some unique to the year components    The 1975 edition actually had many of the same components as the the 750cc Imola race replicas.  These components were offered on the 900ss for the 1975 year only.

A quick comparison of the components for the 900ss model years is below as an example:

1975 900ss  1976 900ss
 Gas Tank  Fiberglass  Steel
 Carbs  40mm  32mm
 Exhausts  Conti Lafranconi
 Turn signals  No  Yes
 Shift  Right side  Left side

 

Simply put, for many Ducati fans and collectors the 1975 900ss is considered to be the closest you can get to the race bikes ridden by people like Smart and Hailwood.

One final factor to consider regarding the why the Ducati is so highly prized by collectors is the generally acceptance that the 750/900ss Ducati along with the Laverda 750SFC and the Norton Commando were the first modern “GP-bikes-with-lights and a horn.”  You could even think of the Ducati as the progenitor of bikes such as the Ducati 888SP3 and Desmosedici.

Now as for this specific example, here is a summary of what the seller has to say

  • #214 of 246 produced in 1974
  • Has only 12,000 kilometers/roughly 7,500 original miles in its 42 year lifespan.
  • Brembo disc brakes front and rear with all new brake pads, front forks were rebuilt and new seals added.
  • DMC electronic ignition installed as well as new voltage regulator.
  • It is a 42 year old survivor and it has some imperfections. At some point in the past Ethanol cause the gas tank to leak. It also caused a “bubble like” line at the base of the gas tank. It has since been treated by GTL of Los Angeles and DOES NOT LEAK anymore. The leaks caused paint to come off the swingarm, and some other areas of the frame.  There are also, “blemishes” on both side covers and gas tank.  
  • Also, the right underside of the muffler is scraped and the left has some light scratches.

So then, what’s this first year bit of Italian goodness going to cost?  A quick search of Classic Sport Bikes for sale  shows 1970’s 900SS going for around $32,000 USD a few years ago, but those weren’t first year bikes.  Bonhams had a pristine 1974 750cc version that went for about $50,000 USD a few years ago as well but that was in better condition and wasn’t a 900SS.   I am thinking  this one is going to attract attention from serious collections and wouldn’t be at all surprised to see this one go for between $45,000-60,000 USD right from the listing.

One final note- there is no Buy-It-Now option on this one.  While patience is a virtue for collectors, given the rarity of this bike I think someone is going to make the owner an offer they can’t refuse/the chances of this one being relisted are low.  To put in simply, if this one is on a list for your collection you might want to move quick.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

Post Script:  Happy Canada Day and 4th of July ya’ll!!!

First Year Legend Alert: 1975 Ducati 900 SS
Ducati March 30, 2017 posted by

Silver Bullet: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

This is it. The end of the line. The last hurrah. The final countdown. The Ducati 900SS FE or “Final Edition.” Well, not really: 1999 saw the introduction of a brand new-ish, fuel-injected, Pierre Terblanche-styled SuperSport that carried over most of this bike’s strengths. But this is the very last of the old-school, carbureted SuperSports that carried Ducati through the Cagiva era and into the present: following a bit of a gap left after the Terblanche machine, Ducati is back with the introduction of a very Panigalesque SuperSport for for folks who want Ducati style and handling without the terrifying top-end power and chiropractor bills.

With slab-sided styling reminiscent of Ducati’s earlier 851/888, the SS FE evoked an era of less frantic performance: Ducati couldn’t hope to compete with the Japanese Big Four’s never-ending cycle of restyles and cryptic performance acronyms, so they didn’t bother. This is the sportbike distilled, with power accessible to mere mortals and superior handling. Built around Ducati’s famous trellis frame and powered by their two-valve, air-cooled L-twin engine, the Final Edition was basically a 900SS/SP with silver paint and a solo tail, along with some carbon-fiber and other lightweight bits. While most modern sportbikes discourage actual passengers by limiting accommodations to a tiny cushion and a set of pegs designed more as tie-down mounts, older sportbikes that might otherwise make decent bikes for ferrying significant others simply got rid of the seat entirely to convey Maximum Sportiness. The solo tail and deleted passenger pegs on the Final Edition also allowed the use of a high-mount exhaust that provided additional cornering clearance for spirited riding or track days.

Straight-line performance was never this bike’s strong suit: with a claimed 84hp pushing the bike’s 424lb wet weight, an SS would get positively murdered by any Japanese inline four of the period. But the Ducati had charisma to spare, handling, comfort, and that glorious v-twin sound that only gets better with a set of carbon-fiber exhausts. Or, if you’re on a budget, you can simply drill out the rivets on the standard exhaust, remove the stock guts, and presto: booming Ducati noise for the cost of a few screws! Luckily, this particular example comes with a quality set of carbon mufflers included so, unless you’re a Termignoni snob, there’s not much to add.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

Ducati 900 Supersport Final Edition, this bike has covered 12366 miles, fresh service at AMS Ducati Dallas which included oil change Motul 300V, fuel filter, hydraulics flushed, etc. Bike is in excellent cond with a small crack under the Michellin Man decal on the right hand lower fairing. Bridgestone tires have 1000 miles on them, upgraded clutch slave cylinder from Yoyodyne, Ducati Performance carbon mufflers, carbon tank protector. The 900 FE is limited edition and this bike is #193 of 300 bikes imported to USA in 1998. The carbon fibre fenders and clutch cover are all standard 900 FE parts. This was the last Supersport to have Mikuni carbs which have been re-jetted and matched to a K&N air filter. Bike makes 76 rear wheel horsepower on the AMS dyno. Selling bike to reduce collection. Spare key and owner’s manual and toolkit included. Crating service available.

This bike’s dyno’d 76hp is pretty much bang-on for a carbureted two-valve Ducati at the rear wheel and, unless you want to splurge on a set of 944cc pistons and some Keihin flat-slide carburetors, you’re better off just enjoying the package, rather than chasing horsepower numbers that will still get creamed by anything remotely modern. The photos in the listing aren’t the greatest, considering that the bike’s silver color hides imperfections and dirt pretty well, although it’s pretty obvious that some of the carbon is a bit faded, but that’s nearly unavoidable at this point. The FE is a bit of a top-shelf parts-bin-special, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing and these are very rare motorcycles, if collectibility is your bag. I personally prefer the half-faired model in scar-your-retinas yellow, but this FE is undoubtedly the classy choice.

-tad

Silver Bullet: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale
Ducati December 22, 2016 posted by

Low-Mileage Future Classic: 1995 Ducati 900 SS/CR for Sale

If you want a machine with charisma, humane ergonomics, and a dash of tradition, the early 90s Ducati 900SS is a modern classic that offers a less frantic experience than similar bikes from Japan. Straight-line performance for the two-valve v-twin is modest, but these were all about midrange power and torque. Powered by a 904cc version of Ducati’s air/oil-cooled Pantah-derived engine, the 900SS came in SS/SP and SS/CR flavors. The SP was equipped with some carbon bits and adjustable suspension components, so handling for the more entry-level CR is pretty basic.

I happen to love the half-faired version of the bike seen here, although I’d probably try to find a nice SP version and just fit the abbreviated fairing: the non-adjustable Showa forks found on some CRs aren’t great, but even those are better than the much-maligned Marzocchi parts… I’m not sure which are fitted here, but it really shouldn’t matter since you either won’t use the bike for serious canyon-strafing and live with the stock parts, or will just bin them and get something better. But plenty of parts exist to sort that out: a set of forks from the SP, an adjustable Öhlins rear shock and some good rubber should see things improve significantly.

As always with a Ducati: condition is key and maintenance is critical: valve adjustments every 6,000 miles and timing belt changes every 12,000 miles or two years at the very least. The air/oil-cooled Ducati engine is fundamentally rugged, but needs more attention than many other machines and neglect is your enemy: the 900SS may be cheap to buy, but putting a bad one right can quickly exceed your purchase price, so this one looks like a pretty good deal.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Ducati 900SS/CR for Sale

Ducati’s Supersport line has a pedigree that unmatched, its lineage traceable all the way back to the original 750cc racing Supersport of 1972. That bike won the famous Imola 200 race under rider Paul Smart, cementing respect for the Italian motorcycle manufacturer. The early 1990’s were special years for Ducati’s 900SS.  With the re-designed frame, improved Brembo brakes, the 900SS had the handling to accompany the booming 904cc desmodue. Powered by an air-cooled desmodromic 2-valve 90° V-twin is nicely carbureted by Mikuni, and has a wide power band.

This 900 SS/CR has had a pampered life, one owner, 5888 original miles, dealer serviced and always garaged. Basically stock with the exception of carbon fiber exhaust by D&D, bar end mirrors and rear fender eliminator. Recently serviced with belts replaced and carbs rebuilt. Includes all stock parts, both original keys and original manuals. This your opportunity to own a beautiful example of Italian engineering.

I happen to think the air/oil-cooled Ducati twins are some of the nicest-sounding engines of all time, but if you buy this one you’d better hope your neighbors agree, as those D&D cans are pretty loud… I’d keep them, but the seller indicates that he has “all stock parts” so you can always fit the original, much quieter pipes if you prefer. The Pantah-engined 900SS has been at or nearly at the bottom of the Ducati food chain for a while now, but prices are starting to creep up for good examples. The Buy-It-Now for this very clean example is a reasonable $5,200 but as always, a few folks are really jumping the gun on values: there’s an SS/SP that’s been sitting on eBay for a while now, with an asking price of almost $9,000… But nice, reasonably-priced examples like this one are still out there if you look.

-tad

Low-Mileage Future Classic: 1995 Ducati 900 SS/CR for Sale
Ducati September 9, 2016 posted by

Old School Class: 1980 Ducati 900SS for Sale

1980-ducati-900ss-r-side

This very classic black-and-gold Ducati 900SS represents the polar opposite of the little two-strokes that have been cropping up on our site lately. Both are motivated by v-twin engines, but that’s where the similarities end. One was a product of ruthless and very close competition between arch rivals and used cutting-edge technology to eke out the barest advantages over competing machines. The other is a slightly long-in-the-tooth thug that uses thumping big cylinders, past glories, and oodles of Latin charm to win friends and influence people. Guess which one is which?

1980-ducati-900ss-r-side-engine

Powered by the restyled “square case” motor that was introduced in 1975, Ducati’s 900SS actually displaced 864cc. The evolutionary 900SS also came with improved or modified features to improve performance and make the bike more palatable to US buyers, including quieter stock mufflers and a shift mechanism meant to improve on the the version available on previous models that crudely relocated the lever to the left side of the bike.

1980-ducati-900ss-dash
Ducati’s 900SS was far from cutting-edge technology by the time the 1980s rolled around: twins were pretty passe in the new era of inline-four superbikes from Japan. And Ducati’s famous desmodromic valve-actuation was probably no real advantage for a twin with a redline of 8,500rpm. But European bikes still represented the pinnacle of handling at this point, and although the bevel-drive, Desmo twin probably had just an insignificant performance advantage over comparable rivals, the Swiss watch-like arrangement of shafts and gears and cam lobes used to open and close the bike’s four valves seems like engineering overkill. Not practical, but inherently cool.
From the original eBay listing: 1980 Ducati 900SS for Sale
I bought this bike brand new in late 1979, and have owned and maintained it this entire time.   This bike is unrestored, so the decals show cracking (typical), and the bike has it’s share of minor scuffs (see pics).   This 900SS was delivered with 36mm carbs and Silentium pipes, which were exchanged for the Delloro 40s and authentic Contis you see in the pictures a few years into it’s life.   I also put on the factory solo seat at the same time.    Other modifications (all typical) are SS brakelines, WORKS suspension front and rear from BevelHeaven, longer clutch actuation arm (you really want this!), V-Two Gear Gazer, and Dyna Coils.  All original parts come with the bike, except for the Silentiums (they were typically tossed in the trash) and the wimpy 36mm Dellortos. 
Mechanically the bike is excellent.   It’s starts easily, idles at about 1,500rpm (good for a 900SS with 40s and Contis), and pulls strong.  The carbs and ignition are very well sorted.  Inside, it’s had new rings and clutch some years back, refreshed pickup wires (they all need this eventually), and MBR collets on the last valve adjustment (totally worth it).  Common for the period, the low dogs on the 1st gear slider were removed in it’s first year or so.  Since I’ve owned this bike it’s entire life, I have (nearly all) the maintenance records from new, which are available on request. 
Motorcycle Classics did a nice feature article on this bike about 8 years ago:   search “motorcycle classics moto-guzzi-le-mans-versus-ducati-900-ss”
Hit me with any questions.   I have mixed feelings about selling this bike, but over the last 8 years it’s only been out once or twice a year, so time for someone else to enjoy it.

His asking price is $39,000 for this very nice example, although bidding is up to just over $15,000, with the reserve not met. The 900SS was produced in much greater numbers than the preceding “round case” 750SS, but values are still going through the roof for all bevel-drive Ducatis, and even the much-maligned 860GT has been increasing in price steadily in recent years. While the blue-and-silver paint on other examples may have a stronger link to Ducati’s racing success, you can’t argue with the black with gold striping seen here and, for all the grief Giorgetto Giugiaro got for his styling on the 860GT, he also designed that classic Ducati logo.

-tad

1980-ducati-900ss-l-side

Old School Class: 1980 Ducati 900SS for Sale
Ducati September 5, 2016 posted by

Classic or Crock?: 1998 Ducati 900CR

The 900CR is a bit of a forgotten Ducati.  Offered as part of the late 1990’s Ducati range, the 900CR and its sister 900SS weren’t objects of lust like the Ducati 916/996/998 but also weren’t the companies sales leader like the “standard” Monster series.  The 900 series was targeted towards non-hard core sport rider, a smaller market segment that wasnt as interested in having the latest tech or bolt ons. The result was that the 900 series bikes were never the most technologically advanced bikes in the Ducati lineup nor did they have the most aftermarket bits/offerings created for them.  Furthermore, most buyers at the time seemed to prefer the full fairing look of the 900SS so the CR is a bit of a rarity.

While the 900CR didn’t enjoy huge sales success back in the 1990’s, nowadays it is enjoying a bit of a resurgence in popularity.  This is probably due its exposed/cafe racer style aging better than the bulbus 900SS and the fact that CR’s are a bit less common.

900ss1

1998 Ducati 900CR for sale on ebay

The genesis of the the CR is that back in 1989 Ducati engineering boss Massimo Bordi set up two separate production lines; one for the liquid-cooled, four-valve, fuel-injected 851 range and the other for air-cooled, 600/750/900cc two-valve carburetor twins. This was done because while the 851/888 range was the one that formed the basis of the companies racing efforts and future tech, the air-cooled twin powered bikes were actually what kept the coffers full/were the most popular selling Ducati’s.

For 1998 the Ducati 900 SS/CR series came with a pair of 38mm Mikuni CV carbs, an aluminium swingarm to shorten the wheelbase, Showa shocks and forks and 320mm Brembo discs.  None of this technology was revolutionary at the time it was introduced nor was it discontinued after the bikes production run ended.  The benefit of this is that the 900SS/CR series are easier to live with than their liquid-cooled brethren.  Simply put, the 900 series are a way to have the Ducati experience without breaking the bank.

90ss2

This particular 900CR looks to be in good condition but isn’t pristine.  There are some aftermarket parts (exhaust, seat, bar ends?) and the fluid reservoir caps look to be either replacements or have had the paint come off due to fluid leaks.  Mileage is approximately 18,000 and the maintenance info is very limited with the seller indicating only that “maintenance locally at an established Motorcycle Dealership here in Nashville, TN” so there might be some belt replacement costs for the desmo engine. The seller also indicates that the bike went down at 15mph which is perhaps why the pictures don’t show the other side of the bike?

900ss5

So is this Ducati 900CR a future classic or a future crock? Sure the 900SS/CR series will never be as desirable as other Ducati’s such as the Supermono, Desmosedici or even 916, but prices for the late 1990’s 900 series bikes do seem to be creeping up in value. Bidding for this one is currently at $2500 USD with the reserve not met and previous listings of these on RSBFS have shown prices slightly under $5000 USD.

Perhaps if this one interests you an email and then phone discussion to the seller would be a logical next step.  Personally I think this one is a bit of a gamble; it might be a future “classic” or it might be a “crock”…perhaps some of our more experienced readers will share their opinions in the comments section.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Classic or Crock?:  1998 Ducati 900CR
Ducati April 22, 2016 posted by

Silver Bullet: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

1998 Ducati 900SS FE L Side

The 90s iteration of Ducati’s famous SuperSport wasn’t exactly a fast bike, even by standards of the day. And by the time the Ducati 900SS “Final Edition” rolled around, it likely appealed mostly to die-hard Ducati fans and collectors. Which is a shame because, although the 900SS didn’t offer cutting-edge performance, it did offer plenty of charisma, great handling, and accessible real-world performance.

1998 Ducati 900SS FE R Side Fairing

The chase for abstract performance numbers has always obsessed the world of motorcycles and cars. But the truth is that peak horsepower numbers are often pointless. Since these machines are only fully exploited by .01% of riders, and what works in ad copy isn’t always all that useful on the road, it’s not always the most powerful bikes that make the most rewarding bikes to ride, especially on the road. Look at the endless praise heaped on the K5 GSX-R1000 by modern reviewers and see how this year’s Brutale 800 actually produces less horsepower than the previous version to make it a better roadbike, and it becomes easier to see why this Ducati might win your heart, even if it won’t win any bench-racing sessions…

1998 Ducati 900SS FE L Side Fairing

Powered by Ducati’s long-lived two-valve Pantah engine, the FE featured a solo-seat tail that allowed upswept pipes for increased cornering clearance and some carbon-fiber parts ostensibly because of their light weight, although the savings on a front fender are probably negligible… With a claimed 80hp on tap and a big fat midrange these are very rewarding to ride stock and a huge range of aftermarket support means you can modify the bike to suit if that’s more your thing.

1998 Ducati 900SS FE Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

Here we have a 1998 Ducati 900ss FE.  #246 of 300 imported to North America.  The FE stands for ‘Final Edition’,  Based on the 900SS SP, the FE comes dressed in elegant silver bodywork and black wheels, with carbon fiber rear fender, dashboard cover, and countershaft drive cover. A solo (monoposto) seat completes the stunning visual impression.

But there’s more than just skin deep beauty in the FE.

To back up the race-bred look, a few additional changes were made as well. The exhaust pipes have been raised to provide improved cornering clearances. New cast iron floating brake rotors have been fitted with remote reservoirs and adjustable levers. New cylinders, alternator, and voltage regulator have been added. The resulting combination will assure that the thrill of the ride matches the beauty of the machine. Limited to just 300 bikes in North America, the 900SS FE is the last of the 2nd generation SuperSports to be produced by the Bologna factory. To further secure it’s place in the DUCATI legacy, the top triple clamp of each FE is fitted with a consecutively numbered commemorative plaque. There is no doubt as to the special position the FE will assume in the heritage of the most sought after sport motorcycles in the world.

 

1998 Ducati 900SS FE Plaque

The 900SS was certainly dated when new, a nearly retro-performance machine before that was really even a thing. Certainly, it was intended to appeal to collectors and designed to shift the moribund hardware while a replacement was being prepared, but the package can provide plenty of smiles if you’re more of a back-road rider than a track-day warrior. The seller is asking $8,999.00 for this sub-10,000 mile example which, although premium money for a 90s 900SS, seems pretty much on-par for an FE these days.

-tad

1998 Ducati 900SS FE R Side

Silver Bullet: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale