Posts by tag: 748

Suzuki July 8, 2017 posted by

Suzuki Saturday – 1988 Suzuki GSX-R750

1988 brought the first comprehensive update to the 750 Gixxer, with a revised frame and shorter stroke engine, “slingshot” carburetors and 17-inch wheels.  A little heavier than the introductory GSX-R, the 1988 was still lighter than the competition and had the more rigid chassis and additional power to improve overall performance.   Looking very original and excellent for its 22K miles, this GSX-R750 has had some nice mechanical care as well.

1988 Suzuki GSX-R750 for sale on eBay

 

In the engine re-design, Suzuki took 4mm from the stroke and added 3 to the bore, more oversquare and with lower reciprocating losses than before.  Peak power and torque are at 11,000 rpm, while the redline is at 13,000.  The high-volume SACS oil cooling system was also heavily revised, with larger, less restrictive tubing, and a 4-into-2 exhaust was required to limit muffler size.  Brakes and forks are built for the era, and dual headlight fairing has fresh air intakes running back to the airbox.

 

The Illinois owner of this GSX-R has preserved the cosmetics, and actively maintained the running gear.  Suspension has been updated in the rear, rebuilt in the front, brakes improved, and engine maintenance is up to date.  From the eBay auction:

This gorgeous GSX-R is completely stock except for tasteful/safety modifications, including:
-New Pirelli Rosso II tires
-Galfer steel brake lines, front and rear pads
-Penske rear shock
-New EBC clutch and springs
-Forks are serviced, new oil, new seals
-Swing arm and link have new bearings and seals
-New oil and filter
-New wheel bearings
-Valves adjusted
-All electrical components work as they should

 

The GSX-R750 reviewed as a quick-handling powerhouse, with serious racebike ergonomics, and very nearly beat the company’s own 1100 to the 1/4-mile traps.  A nicely resolved update to a ground breaking design.  This particular GSX-R is a win-win, great factory cosmetics and all maintenance issues addressed…

-donn

Suzuki Saturday – 1988 Suzuki GSX-R750
Ducati March 11, 2017 posted by

Rebuilt Racer: 1999 Ducati 748RS for Sale

The Ducati 916/748 was the poster child for performance motorcycles throughout its production, with the same sort of ubiquity the Lamborghini Countach enjoyed in its heyday. With so many of them made over such a long timeframe, it’s easy to forget how huge an impact the bike had when it was new: Tamburini’s creation may have been uncomfortable, temperamental, and expensive, but Ducati sold streetbikes so they could go racing, not the other way around. Which makes today’s 748RS one of the purest Ducatis you can buy, aside from a used World Superbike machine.

The 748 was the baby-brother to the 916 and came in standard, S, R, and RS flavors. Naturally, the RS was the trickest of the bunch, a pure factory racebike with plenty of trick parts and a highly-strung engine with maintenance requirements to match. The 748cc v-twin was pitched against 600cc inline fours and the displacement bump allowed by World Supersport rules helped the Ducati compete, but heavily-revised internals were also required to keep them on relatively equal footing. Wild cams opened RS-specific valves to make the 124hp needed, while a 54mm Termignoni exhaust ferried exhaust gasses to the undertail “mufflers.”

As you’d expect, the bike features a close-ratio gearbox, high-end suspension, and extensive use of lightweight materials, including bodywork and a simplified wiring loom, as this was never intended to be used on the road and obviously didn’t need connections for lights and other legal requirements.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Ducati 748RS for Sale

A motorcycle like this only comes up for sale once in a blue moon. This is a completely rebuilt 1999 Ducati 748RS (Corsa) factory race bike. This particular machine was used in the AMA Pro Thunder Championship which was won by Shawn Conrad. The machine as it sits, is effectively new. It has been rebuilt from the ground up and any part not 100% has been replaced. The engine was rebuilt by Chris Boy’s team at Motocorse Ducati in Fort Lauderdale and has zero miles, zero time on it. Everything has been refurbished except the side panels which are original and “as raced”. This is again, a factory race bike and ready for your living room or to take racing or for track days. There is no title as this is a factory race bike.  The Ducati factory can confirm it is as stated. I can assist with shipping but the costs are all to the buyers account.

Those of you without deep pockets, beware: this is no tarted-up roadbike converted to track duty, and parts can be very expensive, even if you’re used to Ducati’s regular belt changes and valve-adjustment: rumor has it, you’ll be swapping out those valves [and rockers!] out every 750 km or so. The bike is listed with a $13,499 starting bid, no takers and several days left on the auction. That’s big money for a 748 but seems pretty reasonable for an RS, especially one with legitimate race history, a complete rebuild, and a bit of as-raced patina. From the seller’s description, this one’s basically ready to race or display!

-tad

Rebuilt Racer: 1999 Ducati 748RS for Sale
Honda January 5, 2017 posted by

Local Hero – 1986 Honda VFR750F

Responding to spate of valve train failures in the original Interceptors, Honda made a new design for the engine and chassis, and produced a more powerful, lighter, and Cycle World’s best 600-800cc streetbike for 1986.  It was also the basis for the AMA superbike ridden to the championship by Fred Merkel.  Pretty sharp for 40K miles, this 30-something looks to have been well cared for.

1986 Honda VFR750F Interceptor for sale on eBay

Honda’s new design was an early adopter of the aluminum twin spar, with similar aluminum swingarm.  Almost every internal engine part was lightened, the reliable gear-driven cams helping bring 104 hp from the V-four.  The VFR750F was lighter than its predecessor but still has air-assisted forks with anti-dive, bigger tires and good-sized brakes.  Patriotic paintwork accents the full fairing, camouflaging the staggered 16-inch front and 18-inch wheels.

Sparkling despite the high miles, this Interceptor comes out of Florida looking great.  Some wear is seen on the crinkle-painted engine cases, but mostly its immaculate and stock down to the mufflers and factory pillion cover.  The owner states in the eBay auction:

Not to be confused with the far more common VFR700 “tariff cheater” bike. The 750 was a limited production homlogation special for AMA road racing but also a fun and fast everyday rider.

It was the first aluminum framed sport bike, first production Honda with gear drive cams, it set an FIM world endurance speed record in 1986 and won the Daytona 200 in 1988.
This example is a local bike that has been owned by friends or family since new. It is in mechanically excellent condition with minor nicks and dings as seen in the photos.

Reviewed as a bike that handles, steers, and stops like something half its size, the VFR750F still had class leading power, and everyday rideability.  All that shaving in the engine bay has led to long-lived powerplants, but they hardly ever look young like this.  A few bids, but the tempting buy-it-now makes it a great way to start in the hobby…

-donn

Local Hero – 1986 Honda VFR750F
Ducati December 14, 2016 posted by

Two Up – 1988 Ducati F1B

With an eye on several “Battle of the Twins” races series, Ducati brought the 750 F1 forward with a minimum of new engineering and development dollars.  The bikes are now revered for their stripped down sensibilities and this particular F1B is a gem with under 4,000 miles.

1988 Ducati F1B for sale on eBay

  

Descendant from the Pantah and 600TT2, the 750F1 used cam belts and twin Dell’Ortos to achieve the landmark 100 hp per liter, or 75 hp from the 748 cc L-twin desmodue.  The fuel tank rests in the steel trellis frame with fabricated swingarm.  Almost vintage in character, the right-side up forks complement single-adjustable monoshock, with 280mm Brembo brakes.  Very light but full coverage fairing has seat fairing as well.

  

This F1 looks very, very good, as it should for the high starting bid.  Some mishap has befallen the solo seat but the SoCal owner has a replacement biposto, which might actually make the bike more enjoyable with its more flexible seating position.  As the eBay auction states:

RARE LAST YEAR DUCATI F1 750, F1 750S, THE LAST OF THE REAL DUCATI’S, THERE WERE ONLY 134 1988 F1 750 IN USA, NEAR MINT CONDITION, ONLY 3972 ORIGINAL MILES, I LOST THE COVER FOR SINGLE SEAT WHILE MOVING, I THINK IT’S AVAILABLE IN EUROPE, IF I KEEP THIS F1 750S, I’LL CHANGE TO THE RACING SINGLE SEAT, ABOUT 150.00…

  

Of course the “last real Ducati” is entirely a matter of perspective, but one can hardly argue the lack of mission creep in the short F1 model run.  No concessions to touring or daily utility, it’s all you need for an afternoon in the twisties and nothing more.  Sure there are a handful of race replicas existing with their circuit city names, but the 750 F1 presented here would be an outstanding rider or nice addition to the collection…

-donn

Two Up – 1988 Ducati F1B
Ducati July 2, 2016 posted by

#becauseracebike: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale

1984 Ducati TT1 L Front

What looks good doesn’t always work well: some of the most beautiful cars ever built were created by eye, without the aid of modern aerodynamics. Sleek machines like the Jaguar E-Type and the Corvette Stingray may look impossibly fast, but often try to leave the road at elevated speeds… Racing machines on the other hand are often strange and awkward-looking, designed to perform ahead of all other considerations. The Ducati TT1 may not be the prettiest bike ever built by the company, but you can’t argue with its performance.

1984 Ducati TT1 L Engine
Although the earlier TT2 machine was more successful in terms of race results, the bigger-engine TT1 seen here still has some serious competition credentials and was successful in endurance racing as well. The bike was powered by a bigger 748cc version of the Desmo Pantah engine that used toothed belts to drive the overhead cams instead of the bevel-drive engine’s tower-shaft arrangement. A front-mounted oil-cooler behind the fairing kept temperatures under control, with holes drilled in front to allow sufficient airflow.

1984 Ducati TT1 Dash
This package eventually evolved into the air/oil-cooled L-twin Ducatisti still know and love today, although in this case it was still carbureted, with the rear head rotated 180° from more modern configurations: later bikes had intake for both in the center of the “V,” allowing Cagiva to fit the engine with an automotive-style carburetor in the Paso. The frame was an extremely lightweight, stiff, sculptural masterpiece by Verlicchi and a 16” and 18” wheel combo meant riders could exploit the bike’s extreme lightweight and agility.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale

Unimpeachable provenance and beautiful patina

One of three ex-works 1984-season European endurance race bikes, then bought from the factory direct by American enthusiast Dale Newton for AMA BoTT racing in the USA

Frame no. 6 (on steering head), engine no. DM600L*702481*

Sold on a Bill of Sale. Five miles approx. since restoration.

This well documented TT1 is the rarest of the rare. Three chassis were taken from the production run of 50 600 TT2s and built as endurance racers for the 1984 European championship. Essentially two of the three – this is one of the two – were replicas of Tony Rutter’s factory team TT1. Based on the belt-drive, desmo Pantah, the TT1 had a 88mm bore and a 61.5mm stroke for a capacity of 748cc, with a factory quoted 80 horsepower. At under 300 pounds dry, they were built with Italy’s finest contemporary components such as Marzocchi magnesium forks, wider aluminum (extrusion) cantilever swing arm (with strengthening rub running along the bottom) – one of only two bikes known to have this feature – and Brembo brakes all round. The compact TT1 was both ground breaking fast and exquisitely handsome. It features a unique lower mounting point for the engine vapor catch tank on the right side. As a new bike it attended the Imola test day. The engine has the “Ascension” kit installed that upgraded the TT2 motor to full race 750. The bike retains its endurance racing quick-release rear wheel kit.

American Ducatisti patron Dale Newton (he owned the Phil Schilling/Cook Neilson “California HotRod” Daytona superbike, too) bought the bike from the factory at the ’84 season’s end (still with its headlamp sockets etc. intact; Dale removed the lights as the AMA rules did not require them) and proceeded to run the bike in the USA and was the last bike he restored before his untimely death. Dale’s goal was to beat east coaster Jimmy Adamo in BoTT.

Brian Dietz purchased the bike from the Newton estate in September 1999 selling it on to Ralf Stechow in November 2008. It was acquired by the (private) seller shortly thereafter.

The Newton Ducatis were raced by legendary riders such as Tony Rutter, Kevin Schwantz and John Williams and were featured in Cycle magazine on several occasions. Next is a listing of the articles; January 1984 “Messenger in Red: Ducati TT2 600”; October 1984 “Ducati Pantah TT1”; April 1985 “Aboard Sunday’s Child: Ducati 750 TT1”; April 1985 “Desmo-Ships on a Time Belt: Ducati 750SS and TT1 750 F1”. “Dale Newton’s ex-factory TT-F1 (this bike) is representative of Ducati 750 potential, and on the Axtell dyno it generated 83-86 horsepower.” Kevin Cameron, February 1990.

This bike has also been featured in two of Ian Falloon’s books. “… the diminutive TT2 and TT1 were among the finest of all catalog Ducatis…they epitomized Taglioni’s philosophy of maximum performance through light weight and simplicity.”- Standard Catalog of Ducati Motorcycles, and Ducati Racers. And in Alan Cathcart’s Ducati, the Untold Story.

1984 Ducati TT1 R Engine

This TT1 is from a very limited run of competition-only Ducatis and has a well-documented owner history, the bike is in beautiful cosmetic condition for a race bike and is certainly very rare and valuable, although there’s been no real bidding activity so far and the auction is almost over. The more desirable TT2 might be worth six figures, but it’s pretty clear from the limited interest that the seller is aiming a bit high here.

-tad

1984 Ducati TT1 R Side

#becauseracebike: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale
Ducati January 13, 2016 posted by

Flak Bait – 2002 Ducati 748

Probably going to light up the switchboard with this pick, an older, junior Ducati – non-S ( let alone -R ), PITA to ride in town.  But this last-year base model, lightly ridden with a lot of nice updates, and – wait for it – cam belt maintenance ! – has a lot of good attributes and is kind of pushing my buttons.

20160112 2002 ducati 748 right

2002 Ducati 748 for sale on eBay

20160112 2002 ducati 748 front left

20160112 2002 ducati 748 left rear

Accompanying the 916 to the showrooms from 1994-2002, the 748 used the chassis and crankcase from the 916 and smaller heads.  The resulting 97 hp came at a higher 11,000 rpm, and the bike used lower overall gearing, increasing it’s street fun factor.  The 748 has close ratio transmission and of course a dry clutch.  43mm front forks are from Showa, with a Boge monoshock on the progressively linked single-sided swingarm.  Two-into-two exhaust snakes around the swingarm and up under the seat.  A picture of the now-classic fairing is next to the word Ducati in the encyclopedia, this one with monoposto seat fairing and number plate.

20160112 2002 ducati 748 cockpit

20160112 2002 ducati 748 right front

Offered by the original owner with just 3,400 miles, this 748 was obviously somebody’s baby.  Beside the Arrow titanium exhaust and Power Commander, there has been attention to the clutch, rear sprocket, and chain.  The body updates include seat fairing, body-color mirrors, Dzus fasteners for the side fairings, and carbon here and there.  As listed in the eBay auction:

  • Arrow Titanium Exhaust
  • Power Commander Fuel Injection Module with Custom Dyno Mapping
  • Ducati OEM Mono-Tail Body & Seat Conversion
  • Ducati OEM Red Mirror Conversion
  • OEM Quick Release Fairing Fastener Conversion
  • Billet Aluminum Brake Reservoir Covers
  • Hardened Aluminum Rear Sprocket
  • Titanium Sprocket Bolts
  • Billet Aluminum Sprocket Carrier Conversion
  • RK 520 Gold Chain
  • Ducati Performance Carbon Fiber Chainguard
  • Pauli Moto Billet Aluminum Clutch Cover
  • Pauli Moto Billet Aluminum Clutch Pressure plate
  • Pauli Moto Billet Clutch Pressure Plate Spyder
  • Ducati Performance Carbon Mid-Pipe Heat Shield
  • Ducati Performance Carbon Sprocket Cover
  • Ducati Performance Carbon Heel Guards
  • New Pirelli Diablo Tires
  • Carbon Fiber License Plate Frame
  • Ducati Performance Soft Cover

20160112 2002 ducati 748 front

20160112 2002 ducati 748 right peg

Not super high-res photos, but the bike looks excellent.  Maintenance on the easy-revving engine shouldn’t be deferred because of rocker arm concerns, and the bike has recent cam belts and tires.  A little easier on the cooling system, the 748 is friendlier to road use, as long as you can handle the racey ergonomics.

20160112 2002 ducati 748 right rear

20160112 2002 ducati 748 left peg

Because of their long model run it’d be hard to call a 748 rare, but as always really nice ones are never around when you’re looking.  Many found their way to the track and the slippery slope of modification and the generation’s very successful competition history.  The similar way the two sizes of superbike are built you’d have to think Ducati either lost money on the lower priced 748, or made a bunch on each 916 or 996.  Though an -R or -S would be nice, the 748, especially cared for as this one, is a lot of bike for the money…

20160112 2002 ducati 748 rear

-donn

Flak Bait – 2002 Ducati 748
Ducati May 3, 2015 posted by

White Elephant: 1988 Ducati Paso 750 Limited for Sale

1988 Ducati Paso Limited L Side

The Paso has long been the low-cost entry into Ducati ownership, an often overlooked bike maligned for its slab-sided styling. Shockingly different when introduced and unfairly shunned by the oddly conservative Ducatisti, sales were disappointing.

1988 Ducati Paso Limited Front

But in spite of its red-headed-stepchild reputation, the bike has the usual Ducati pedigree: it was designed by Massimo Tamburini, named after the famous rider Renzo “Paso” Pasolini, and powered by the classic Taglioni-designed belt-drive Pantah L-twin. The 748cc version in the Paso made a claimed 72hp and could propel the Paso to 130mph top speed. The Paso even has Ducati’s traditional trellis frame hidden under all that bodywork, although it’s welded up from square cross-section tubing and not particularly nice to look at.

1988 Ducati Paso Limited Dash

Unfortunately, Ducati owners Cagiva elected to use a Weber automotive-style carburetor in the Paso that caused no end of headaches. The 16″ wheels can also present a bit of a problem when selecting tires today. An upgrade to 17″ wheels is possible, but fairly involved, so if you like the Paso’s look but absolutely need top-shelf rubber, just go find a later, fuel-injected 907 IE that basically solved all the Paso’s mechanical quirks but kept the styling.

1988 Ducati Paso Limited Tank

Today’s bike is the “Limited” model that came with very 80’s white bodywork. It has a few minor cosmetic flaws and does need a bit of mechanical attention, but the mileage is very low and the work that needs to be done is very straightforward and can be easily tackled by a half-decent shade-tree mechanic.

1988 Ducati Paso Limited Lower Fairing

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Ducati Paso 750 Limited for Sale

TIMS has a very rare (only 50 imported into the us) 1988 Ducati Paso 750 Limited Edition for sale with only 5095 miles on it- this is the rarest of the US import Pasos made back in the day, a must for any  collector- the bike runs great and everything works-it is mostly original including extremely nice OEM pipes- it does have the tri color Corbin seat and i do not have the original seat-it also has the upgraded flat slide carbs on it so that gets rid of the terrible factory carbs that came on the bike-there are a couple issues that need to be addressed  -1 at around 6000 rpm the clutch starts to slip so it  needs new fiber  plates 2- there are  some cracks in both mid fairing vents as well as the front windscreen fairing but I’m including a like new front fairing  with the bike that only needs painting and you can source the mid fairing vents cheaply on eBay as well-the tires are like new and the chain and sprockets are in good condition also-the timing belts are 3-4 years old so they may need replacing in the near future  -TIMS will help with shipping any way we can at new owners expense-don’t miss this rare low mileage Ducati as they definitely don’t come up for sale often

First of all, let’s clarify: “the timing belts are 3-4 years old so they will need replacing in the near future.” Conventional wisdom says 2 years or 12,000 miles for these items and the job is fairly simple, but very important: the Pantah twin is very durable when properly maintained, but snap one of those belts and you’ll lunch the motor. The clutch plates are a very straightforward job as well. Parts should set you back just a couple hundred bucks, although replacing the steel plates at the same time would make sense as well while you’re in there.

1988 Ducati Paso Limited Rear Wheel

Also, those don’t look like the “OEM pipes.” Instead, they appear to be the F1 pipes that were a popular choice to replace the stock “Silentium” mufflers that unfortunately lived up to their name…

Flat-slides should fix that aforementioned carburetor issues and provide a nice boost to performance as well, although they usually end up deleting the choke and can’t just be whacked open at low revs. Many owners replaced the factory setup with a pair of Dell’Orto’s that should solve the rideablilty issues nicely and be a bit nicer for day-to-day use.

1988 Ducati Paso Limited Front Wheel

All-in-all, this is a rare, low-mileage Ducati from an overlooked era that just needs a bit of cosmetic TLC. I’ve always liked the Paso, and I think it’s aging pretty well and, considering what the earlier F1’s are currently trading for, now might be the time to snap up a nice example.

-tad

1988 Ducati Paso Limited R Side

White Elephant: 1988 Ducati Paso 750 Limited for Sale
Ducati December 18, 2014 posted by

Nearly New 2001 Ducati 748 For Sale in Scottsdale

Ducati 748 for sale

Following the even lower miles Ducati 851 we posted the other day, here is another virtually unused Ducati superbike. This one is typically even lower on the desirability scale than even the 851, especially since it’s not the uprated S model. But with just 60 miles on the clock and the reserve met at a mere $6,200, I think you’d be hard pressed to better for less even if some refreshing is in order.

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2001 Ducati 748 for sale on eBay

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From the seller:

This 2001 Ducati 748 Monoposto

This is a brand new bike.it only has 61 miles on it and I put most of those on it. What can I say it speaks for it self it is a flawless beautiful bike that has been crated its whole life until last week when I opened it.

Nearly New 2001 Ducati 748 For Sale in Scottsdale