Posts by tag: 2 stroke

Honda April 26, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1985 Honda NS400R

Update 4.28.2018: SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Despite giving up 100cc to the competition, Honda’s mid-’80s GP replica made waves when it was new for its build and ride quality, which proved hard to match for the 500cc offerings from Suzuki and Yamaha. Though the bigger bikes easily outpaced the Honda, Big Red’s homage to Freddie Spencer made a pretty sweet street bike in its own right.

Loaded with mouthful acronyms, the bike was tech-heavy, featuring anti-dive forks and exhaust valves that aided the characteristic low-RPM torque woes. The bike put out 72 horsepower, which had a little under 400 pounds to push around, so its lack of performance was purely relative. There are still plenty of ways to scare yourself aboard an NS400.

This 1985 Honda NS400R recently was imported from Japan, and by the looks of things has been fairly well maintained and is fairly clean. The obvious caveat is that it does not have its lower fairings, which will be a dagger for serious collectors.

From the seller:

1985 Honda NS400R / NC19 – a street-legal 3-cylinder 2-stroke GP race-replica of Freddie Spencer’s GP winning NS500 – somewhat similar to the contemporary Suzuki RG500 Gamma (I have one as well) and Yamaha RZ500 – both of which I have had many over the years. What the NS400R gave up in power, it made up for with sweet handling.

Unmistakable sound, smell and performance of a two stroke road bike. Rare when new – this is a lot of history and performance for the money. Here is a quick walk-around – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17iRwpVf8TE

I do not have the original belly pan, but parts are available out of Yahoo Japan. Well priced for a collectible / rider and easy to enjoy at this price.

1985 Honda NS400R Specifications

Engine – liquid-cooled 3-cylinder 2-stroke
Capacity – 387cc
Bore/stroke – 57 x 50.6mm
Power – 72bhp @ 9500rpm
Torque – 37ft-lb @ 8500rpm
Carburetion – 3 x 26 mm Keihin flat slides
Transmission – 6-speed, wet clutch, chain final drive
Frame – Box section alloy
Suspension – 37mm telescopic forks TRAC anti dive. Pro-Link rear
Brakes – 256mm discs, 2-piston, floating-calipers. 220mm disc, 2-piston, floating-caliper
Wheels – 100/90 x 16, 110/90 x 17
Weight – 163kgs
Top speed – 135mph
Wheelbase – 1362mm
Fuel capacity – 19ltrs

If you’re in Seattle, run by seller Sodo Moto and take a look at this rare and interesting machine. Asking price has been reduced from $8,500 to $6,750.

Featured Listing: 1985 Honda NS400R
Yamaha March 26, 2018 posted by

Race ready: Deus-restored 1973 Yamaha TD3

As a road racing icon, the Yamaha TD series really needs no introduction. The internet is positively lousy with rhapsodic accounts of its achievements on a racetrack in the hands of big names and amateurs alike. Not just screamingly fast, the 250cc parallel twin TDs were reliable as the sunrise, which made them very hard for contemporary iron to top.

1973 Yamaha TD3 for sale on eBay

They’re still darlings of vintage racers, aided by simple air-cooled architecture and widely available parts. This 1973 Yamaha TD3 has been made race ready by Woolie’s Workshop, an arm of the Deus Ex Machina classic bike franchise. It has been updated with a front disc brake and an Ohlins steering damper to edge it closer to modern spec.

From the eBay listing:

Fresh from Deus’ Woolie’s Workshop

c.1973 Yamaha TD3 250cc Racing Motorcycle

The mainstay of 250cc and 350cc class racing at national and international level for many years, the twin-cylinder two-stroke Yamaha well deserved the title of ‘privateer’s friend’. The 250cc TD2 arrived in 1969, replacing the TD1C, and immediately proved capable of winning Grands Prix, privateer Kent Andersson triumphing in the German round at Hockenheim that year, one of Yamaha’s most significant classic victories. The giant leap forward from the TD1C had been achieved thanks to a comprehensive redesign that saw the porting and exhaust system updated, superior Mikuni carburettors adopted and the chassis, suspension and brakes greatly improved. Looking like a scaled down Norton Featherbed, the TD2’s chassis was a development of that used for the RD56 works racer. Kel Carruthers on the works Benelli ‘four’ denied Kent Anderson the 250cc World Championship in 1969 but the following year the TD2 came good when Rod Gould, riding a works machine entered by Yamaha Motor NV of Holland, took the title.

The TD3 was an evolutionary step forward in the long line of successful Yamaha air-cooled two-strokes, and as it happens it would also be the last in its line. Released by the Japanese marque in 1972, the TD3 benefitted from a horizontally split crankcase, which holds the 247cc internals, producing about 50bhp and a redline in excess of 10,000 revs, which can propel the diminutive little racer’s 230 pounds to blistering racing performance figures with incredible reliability.

Fresh from Deus Ex Machina’s “Woolie’s Workshop”, this 250cc Yamaha 2-Stroke screamer was built to be competitive. Like all the builds out of Woolie’s Workshop, it has that ‘final 5%”, which is always the most assiduously earned and separates the great bikes from the mere good ones. Every component was addressed, rebuilt, refinished and restored with Woolie’s exquisite attention to detail, including engine, gearbox, and all cycle parts. Upgrades include the Ohlins steering damper and disc front brake. Built to race, but with no track time since the build, this is a fantastic opportunity to own a custom purpose-built race bike to be a class winning AHRMA machine. Tuck in, hold on, and safety-wire your bum to the seat….

Sold on a Bill of Sale.

For further information and additional photos, please visit: GloryMotorworks.com/Motorcycle-Sale

The bike has been run but not raced since it was finished, so it is just waiting for a vintage racer to give it the neck wringing it so richly deserves.

 

Race ready: Deus-restored 1973 Yamaha TD3
Suzuki March 23, 2018 posted by

Two stroke restomod: 1986 Suzuki RG500

The problem with owning classic sportbikes is that even in their best shape, they perform like they would have 30 years ago, which can be a terrifying affair if you’re used to modern suspension and tires. Couple that with a take-no-prisoners 500cc two-stroke powerband, and you’re really playing with fire. This 1986 Suzuki RG500 has had those concerns addressed, with mods to allow it to run modern tires and reworked suspension and brakes.

1986 Suzuki RG500 restomod for sale on eBay

The work was done by renowned RG500 tech Rick Lance, and the seller says no stone was left unturned. The bike was taken down to the chassis and gone over from top to bottom. The forks have been rebuilt and the anti-dive bypassed, and the engine has been treated to a mild tune, including a rare set of aftermarket expansion chambers.

From the eBay listing:

1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma. Full Rick Lance Gamma build “resto mod” from the frame up, in excellent condition, mods inc 17 inch wheels, GSXR brakes, Fox remote shock, upgraded forks internals, anti dive block off, plus all the usual Lance Gamma mods, filters, taps, clutch. Rare Tommy Crawford expansion chambers, motor has stock bore with mild tune, lightweight bodywork with single seat with excellent stock style paint scheme, less than one thousand miles since full build including the engine, suspension, gearbox, etc etc, as you would expect from a Rick Lance build it runs and rides perfectly, carburation is spot on pulling cleanly from idle to the red line.

Hard to find these now especially in this condition with everything being practically new, gets lots of attention where ever it goes, sounds amazing, from an era when GP bikes were 2 strokes and four cylinders there will never be anything like it again, own a piece of history!

Clean GA title in my name, located in North Georgia USA Can assist with shipping

The price is an eye-watering $26,500, which is staggering even as the price of nice stockers is climbing. That said, if a modern-style two-stroke superbike is your thing, we doubt you could build your own for cheaper.

Two stroke restomod: 1986 Suzuki RG500
Yamaha March 18, 2018 posted by

Wild Kingdom – 1974 Yamaha TZ750

No less a rider than Giacomo Agostini abdicated his dynasty at MV Agusta when Yamaha introduced the 4-cylinder 2-stroke 700cc racebike. He won the 1974 Daytona 200 with it, and its 750cc progeny went on to a 12-year run on the beach.  This newly restored example has matching numbers and a nicely documented race history.

1974 Yamaha TZ750 for sale on eBay

As ever, specs for a race machine are a liar’s poker affair.  The engine had a nasty tone even at idle and was good for 140hp at full song.  The frame was a twin downtube arrangement and the swingarm was all new, spread at the rear wheel but converging at the bottom pivot and top where the shock mounted, the Monocross went on to bigger and better.  Initially a pair of RD350 race engines joined at the hip, the TZ750 was more purpose-built, water cooled though the crankcase bristles with fins.  Expansion chambers mostly taking the path of least resistance – except for the left which wound around and through the frame.  Triple hydraulic disk brakes provided the retro-force.

The owner has treated this TZ750 to a rare level of restoration, both mechanically and cosmetically.  Just part of the eBay auction’s comments :

This bike has The Holy Trinity for the most discerning collectors and enthusiasts: Provenance, Rarity and Condition! What you see here is the culmination of a 10 year, no cost spared, meticulous frame-off restoration. The resto was done on a complete, running, period correct, and ‘as raced’ TZ from the 1970’s. Amazingly, during the bike’s campaign both here and abroad, it appears to have never been crashed or blown-up. The exact Factory paint scheme and colors were precisely replicated from Factory original. The Shipping Invoice (see pic, courtesy of NATS Forum) shows #159 being a genuine 1st batch racer. There were a total of 219 TZ750A’s built;  few remain today.

Rather too specialized for a hobbyist, exercising the TZ-750 will take commitment.  Maintenance hours will be more numerous than “flight” hours.  But this race veteran is sorted and shouldn’t bring too many surprises.  As the owner states:

The bike was built to run, but assembled primarily for display and ease of cleaning.

Successful to the point of domination, the TZ-750 will likely be invited back to any event it attends.  The fairing’s well-drawn lines are sure easy on the eyes.  Mechanically, it’s better than new – improvements to the exhaust system made and impossibly light brake disks, with blank livery as shipped.  Likely never to turn another hot lap, the velvet ropes beckon.  But once photographed, the years of racing history are in the books, and the soundtrack from a demonstration lap or two is all that’s missing…

-donn

Wild Kingdom – 1974 Yamaha TZ750
Aprilia March 14, 2018 posted by

Last Wild Stallion: 0-mile 2003 Aprilia RS250GP-1

The 2003 Aprilia RS250GP-1 represents the absolute pinnacle of two-stroke technology and the final gasp of the format’s street-legal heyday. Quite simply, these are the most advanced mass-produced street two strokes that ever roamed the Earth. Since they were never sold in this country officially, finding a decent one is a feat.

2003 Aprilia RS250GP-1 for sale on eBay

But this 2003 Aprilia RS250GP-1 doubles down on its rarity by having never covered a single kilometer. Down to the whiskers on the tires, it is perfect and all original. It was imported from Australia with all the dealer and compliance paperwork, but is being sold in California, where ever getting it plated is a distant fantasy.

From the eBay listing:

Once in a lifetime opportunity to buy an Aprilia RS250 GP-1 with 0 miles! You now have the chance to own the final and most advanced release of the Aprilia RS250, the final version of the RS 250 GP-1 replica motorcycle. This bike is sporting official Colin Edwards and Nori Haga team decals, the colors and graphics add to the bike that represents GP 250cc class racing. This is a collector’s motorcycle.

The look of the 2003 RS250 is dominated by its wrap-around fairing, designed and tested in a wind tunnel. The front mudguard blends perfectly with the fairing, and enhances the Aprilia RS 250’s streamlined looks, the characteristic aerodynamic tail completes the Aprilia RS 250’s racing image.

The bike was only sold in Europe and Australia. The bike has completed its new vehicle delivery and prep and has 0 miles. The tires are original (complete with tire whiskers) as is every part on this bike. The bike comes with a clear Australian registration and license plate for your collection only. It has never been registered in the USA as it was intended solely for my collection. The bike cannot be registered in California due to smog laws. I have a huge amount of Aprilia dealer promotional material for the bike that would be available to the buyer. It has an Australian compliance plate fitted as well.

Another super rare 2003 Aprilia RS250 sold offline from an eBay listing last month for $11,500 with 10,968 miles. I don’t know how many 0 miles Aprilia RS250’s are left in the world, but it couldn’t be more then a just a few.

In addition, this bike was judged the best European Two-Stroke bike at Motocarrera’s famous Two Stroke Extravaganza held in 2005 in Los Angeles, California. This event was the largest gathering of two-stroke vehicles in America when it was held. The bike was also displayed at the famous Quail Lodge Motorcycle Gathering Carmel, California in May 2016.

Contact me with serious inquiries only. I don’t need to sell, so I won’t accept any low ball offers.

APRILIA RS 250 TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Engine type

two-stroke 90° V twin, liquid cooled, lamellar intake in crankcase, separate lubrication. Two sequential stage valve on exhaust electronically regulated by digital control unit, controlled by a step motor

Pistons

in special high silicon content alloy

Bore and stroke

56 x 50.6 mm

Total displacement

249 cc

Compression ratio

13.2:1

Carburetors

two Mikuni TM 34 SS flat valve carburetors, electronically controlled by solenoid valves partially shutting maximum throttle and tick-over circuits

Ignition

digital CDI, with mapping of programmed spark advance according to three parameters (carburetor valve opening, opening speed, engine revs)

Starter

pedal

Generator

12V – 180 W

Lubrication

separate, with automatic variable mixer (0.9-2%)

Clutch

multiple disk in oil bath

Gear box

completely removable, six ratio, forced lubrication with positive displacement pump

Primary transmission

gear

Secondary

chain

Frame

aluminum magnesium alloy double sloping beam with thin wall shell structure. Stem and plates in cast aluminum magnesium alloy

Front suspension

upside-down fork in high tensile steel, 41 mm dia. adjustable in rebound, compression and preload, wheel travel 120 mm

Rear suspension

cast aluminum magnesium alloy swing arm with differentiated design arms, single hydraulic shock absorber with separate tank, adjustable in rebound, compression, preload and length, wheel travel 130 mm

Brakes

front: floating disk, 298 mm dia., calipers with four differentiated diameter pistons;

rear: disk, 220 mm dia., two piston caliper

Rims

five tangential spoke aluminum alloy,

front 3.50 x 17”, rear 4.50 x 17”

Tires

tubeless radials

front 120/60 ZR 17”, rear. 150/60 ZR 17”

Dimensions

max length 1,980 mm max. width 710 mm

wheelbase 1,365 mm

Dry weight

140 kg

Tank capacity

19.5 liters (3.6 liter reserve)

Colors

GP-1 Replica

Instrumentation

digital analogue with instantaneous, maximum and mean speed measurement, scale in kilometers and miles, programmable “red zone”, water temperature in degrees C and F, battery voltage, clock and chronometer with 40 memories

Generally speaking, I am a proponent of riding sport bikes like they have been stolen, more or less regardless of provenance. They were, after all, built to go fast. This little Aprilia strikes a different chord, though. With such untouched splendor, it should be left as is for posterity.

Last Wild Stallion: 0-mile 2003 Aprilia RS250GP-1
Suzuki March 13, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Suzuki RGV250-SP VJ22

Update 3.13.2018: SOLD in 3 hours and 19 minutes!! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Our friends at Speed Werks have almost completely rebuilt this Suzuki RGV250-SP, to the point that it’s almost too pretty for the rapidly advancing riding season. Almost.

The Lucky Strike livery on this bike isn’t a sticker package, it has been painted onto the new Sharkskinz bodywork. It looks sharp, but it’s what’s under the plastic that’s important here. The chassis has been rebuilt, and the engine is literally as good as new.

It also wears a raft of critical aftermarket parts, to include Jolly Moto cans, a derestricted ignition box and stainless steel brake lines.

From the seller:

Suzuki RGV250-SP VJ22 Lucky Strike For Sale.
Freshly rebuilt Chassis with a complete ‘brand new’ Aprilia motor. 500 Miles since completion. Jolly Moto exhaust, derestricted ignition, adjustable suspension front and rear, Brembo master cylinder, steel lines, JDM rearsets. Sharkskinz bodywork with a phenomenal custom paint job, all graphics are painted, not stickers. New Michelin Power RS’s, gold X-ring chain, all fluids replaced, oil injection intact and a complete service/safety check. ready to ride.

Price: $10,900 delivered anywhere in the continental USA, world wide delivery available with quote on request.

Contact: 302-672-RACE or steve@speedwerks.com

Featured Listing: Suzuki RGV250-SP VJ22
Yamaha March 11, 2018 posted by

All chassis: 1992 Yamaha TZR250R 3XV4

This 1992 Yamaha TZR250R 3XV4 is the last of a bunch in our buddy Gary’s extensive collection of grey-market machines. He’s right up front that this one looks good in a parking space, but shows its age up close. He notes that it has its fair share of scratches and cracks, and says that it looks like the tank has been repainted.

Be that as it may, the bike has had a mechanical once-over and is low mileage, which makes it a good candidate for just about anything. It would be easy enough to restore to showroom, or it could be ridden without a lot of worry.

And what a ride. The TZRs upheld Yamaha’s long-standing reputation for sweet-handling steeds. The brakes are good, the bikes are light, and corner speeds can get hairy very quickly, provided you keep the revs up. Unfortunately, uncorked TZRs are rare beasts, as it takes more than a pipe and a jet kit to extract more than about 40 horsepower.

From the eBay listing:

Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE is a 1992 Yamaha TZR250R 3XV4 with 15,214 kilometers (9,454 miles). Bike looks very nice and has great curb appeal but has scratches, scrapes and a crack in the upper left fairing. Appears the tank has been professionally resprayed. This bike would make a great candidate for restoration since it has such low miles. All fairings are 100% genuine OEM factory Yamaha. Bike is completely stock except for hand grips. Bike runs excellent and was just serviced with new tires, carbs cleaned, new battery, new fork seals and new engine fluids. This TZR has so much potential. Fairings are nice. There are no dents in the gas tank and the windscreen is very clear. Bike is solid. This is the last TZR250R I have. My collection is almost gone. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use. $200 deposit due immeadiatly after auctions end thru PayPal. Remaining balance due within 5 business days by check, bank wire or cash in person. Please text 801-358-6537 for more photos and questions.

There’s no buy-it-now set for this bike, so the auction will run its full course. Jump in early and stay in late to get your best shot at this little beast.

All chassis: 1992 Yamaha TZR250R 3XV4
Sport Bikes For Sale March 7, 2018 posted by

Handful of bees: 1985 Yamaha RZ350

The Yamaha RZ350 represents the last available road-going two stroke available in the U.S., and it brought to bear the full might of Yamaha’s research and development into oil burners up to that point. In ’85, the bikes paid tribute to King Kenny Roberts, sporting his factory bumble bee livery and his signature on the upper bikini fairing.

1985 Yamaha RZ350 for sale on eBay

The RZs reviewed well, as sharp-handling, powerful street bikes. They didn’t shine until above 6,000 RPM, but above that threshold they got down the road with aplomb.

This 1985 Yamaha RZ350 has had a recent once over, during which it got a new chain, tires, brake pads, fluids and a carb clean. The seller says his mechanic gave the top end a clean bill of health. The bike has done just 4,500 miles from new, so it should be fully ready to be an occasional summer mount.

From the eBay listing:

Really nice running low mileage Rz350. I had my mechanic who knows these well go through it last fall. He changed all the fluids, cleaned the carbs, new front brake pads, new tires, new gold 520 chain. He said the top end was like new. There are a couple of very small dings on the left side of the tank. These bikes are really fun to ride and they handle great. Bike is for sale locally and I reserve the right to end the auction early if it sells. Deposit at auction end through PayPal, balance by certified check or wire transfer. I can keep the bike for a while until shipping arrangements are made. Here’s a link to see it running.

 

Handful of bees: 1985 Yamaha RZ350