Search Results for “Vdue”

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We have 15 years of archives. Please note that posts over a year old may have been updated to point to similar bikes available to bid on eBay.
Laverda November 28, 2017 posted by

Collector Alert: 1998 Laverda 750SF/Formula with updates (UK)

Note:  This listing was removed from ebay (sold?) while in the queue for posting here on RSBFS but the post contains some interesting info so we decided to put it up anyway.  If we hear from the seller as to what price it went for, we will update in the comments.

Here is a zane-era Laverda 750 Formula which is probably the most collectible model of the later Laverda models.  Only produced in 1998 and 1999, the Formula was the top shelf bike in the lineup during the brief-rebirth of the Laverda marque.  This one is especially rare due to its having the updated/Type 3 crank installed of which less than 100 were produced.

1998 Laverda 750SF/Formula in the UK

For anyone not familiar with the zane-era of the Laverda marque, its a typically Italian motorcycle manufacturer story.  In the mid-to-late 1980’s Lavera was a small motorcycle company that didn’t have the financial resources to do continuous development.   Instead, designs were evolutionary, focused on the parallel twins and triple engines the company was known for.  In 1992 a new series of sportbikes were designed and ready to launch when the the company hit yet another financial problem which this time proved un-resolvable with creditors.  The result was Laverda filed for bankruptcy in late 1992 but after a multi-year trip through the courts local businessman Francisco Tognon bought the marque and re-started production.  The purchase included the designs for the “new” bikes but this meant that when the Laverda relaunched in 1994/1995 their bikes designs were already about 3 years old.

Note: The motorcycles produced in this post bankruptcy period are often referred to as zane-era Laverdas.  This is due to the fact that while the prior production was at the old factory in Breganze, the new bikes were built in a new factory located less than 6 miles away in Zane Italy.

The new lineup included a 650cc trellis framed bike known as the Ghost that was very similar to the Ducati Monster.  Another offering was a 650cc sportbike known simply enough as the 650 and a top shelf racer called the 650 formula that came with a new beam frame designed by Nico Baker.   Regardless of the model, the entire lineup came with the same basic engine (although the formula had upgraded cams and ecu mapping).    The reason for this was that Laverda had decided to follow the business model established by John Bloor’s reborn Triumph motorcycles; offer a series of model options all based around a common engine architecture.  This business model means that no single model can break the company (cough-Bimota VDue-cough) and the monies from these early bikes could keep the lights on and also go into the development of new designs.   The business model actually worked for a bit with updates to the 650 air cooled engine being implemented in 1996 and capacity bumped slightly to 668cc’s.  A new water cooled 750cc parallel twin engine was launched in in late 1997 and the modular philosophy continued with a standard bike known as the 750 Ghost, a street oriented sportbike known as the 750S and finally a “top shelf” 750cc Sportbike known as the Formula or 750SF.  All the new 750cc machines came wrapped up in lots of top shelf goodies including the beam frame design by Nico Baker, Paoli shocks, Marchesini wheels and lots of carbon fiber bits.  The 750SF/Formula edition got some extra bits including hotter cams, revised ECU mapping for better top end performance and termignoni exhausts as an option.

The 750 Laverda Formula was a solid competitor to the Ducati 748 of the era, down on power due to its older engine design but making up for it with better handling due to better suspension, braking and a neat letterbox fuel tank system that lowered the center of gravity of the bike as the fuel tank emptied.   Reviews were positive but not outstanding, with most comments saying the new 750cc model was equal to or slightly better than its Italian competition and a good step forward but not a world beater.

Sadly, even with the positive reviews and moderate sales success, Laverda was still a small European maker trying to compete against the well-funded Japanese and a resurgent Ducati (which had just gotten a large influx of private equity investment).  Development of the long-awaiting 3 cylinder engine dragged on and by early 1999 Laverda was again struggling financially.  New financial partners came in with the condition that Franciso Tognon relinquish his majority control.  Tognon instead decided to exit the concern completely, selling his interest but somehow managed to take the rights for the design of the new triple engine with him (which became the new powerplant of the reborn Benelli Tornedo Tre 900) and within a year the entire Laverda concern was bankrupt yet again in 2000.   A brief flicker of hope for a rebirth occurred when Laverda was acquired by Aprilia in 2001 with Aprilia even showcasing a new Aprilia powered SFC model in 2003 but Aprilia soon ran into its own financial difficulties.  The entire Aprilia group, which also included Moto Guzzi, was soon acquired by the Piaggio Motors who quickly made the decision that Laverda was the weakest brand of the 3 and in 2004 the Laverda marque was mothballed.

Ok, now that we have covered the history, what does all this mean to prospective collectors?   Its simple; the 1998-1999 750SF/ Formulas can be thought of as the last official development by Laverda, the model that contains all the final updates.  Bikes that represent the last of a marque are sometimes referred to as a “legacy” model and are usually a good investment opportunity, especially if they look as good as the Formula does.

As for this particular Formula, mileage is approximately 12,500 kilometers but the seller indicates it hasn’t run in a few years so a reconditioning might be required.   Condition looks to be good with all the carbon bits in place and while I did notice that some bolts appearing to be non-OEM I don’t see any major damage.  The seller indicates it does come with the optional Termignoni exhaust system including the chip but probably the most important aspect of this bike is the fact that it comes equipped with an updated/Type 3 crank.  This is important because depending on how they were ridden and maintained, the zane-era Laverdas could experience lower bearing failures/oiling issues which could cause engine failure by 25,000 miles.   These problems were most pronounced in the earlier 650/668 air cooled engines and while the risk of this could be partially prevented by an update to a stainless oil filter system and regular maintenance, the company did redesign the crank for the later 1998 and 1999 models to further reduce the chances of this issue occurring.  The seller indicates this bike has been equipped with one of the updated factory cranks which is quite rare and an important value add for the bike.

So now to the question – what’s this bit of turn-of-the-century-possibly-tempermental-carbon-fiber-accented-Italian goodness worth?   Well its a 1998 model which means it not quite as desired by collectors as the final edition formulas from 1999 that came in a truly beautiful blue/orange or silver/orange color scheme.   Parts will be a bit of concern, although several suppliers are available and there always seems to be a 750s model being broken on ebay.uk.com.  Givn that only an estimated 600 formula editions were built over the two year model run and the fact that this one has had the crank issue resolved, I would say this is a solid opportunity for a collector.

I would guess reserve somewhere around 4500 GBP/6000 USD.  Value won’t probably shoot up, it will be more of a slow gainer but its still a rare sportbike and probably a solid long term investment opportunity.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

Addendum:  I feel its only fair to note that I personally have a zane-era laverda collection and make a bit of money on the side selling parts/doing restorations/helping people mechanic their issues.

Collector Alert: 1998 Laverda 750SF/Formula with updates (UK)
Bimota November 16, 2017 posted by

Still Fuel Injected: 1998 Bimota V-Due

There were a lot of things that led to the Bimota V-Due’s inauspicious fall from grace, mostly related to costs and hype that would ultimately spell disappointment when the bike finally broke cover. But by far the bike’s worst flaw was its positively heinous fuel injection system, which was designed to keep the bike in compliance with emissions regulations while keeping a two-stroke’s characteristic light weight and simplicity.

1998 Bimota V-Due for sale on eBay

The fuel delivery system was so poor that many of the bikes were retrofitted with carburetors at Bimota’s expense, which not only sank the company, it rendered the bikes offroad-only toys for the well-heeled, and not the stylish, fancy street racers the factory had envisioned. Added to the injection problems were oiling issues that seized pistons, electrical gremlins and poor crankcase sealing as the result of badly-cast engine cases.

The 1998 Bimota V-Due shown here is one of the few that runs well, with both its fuel injection and street legality intact. The seller says this bike was one of a handful that were purchased out of the company’s unsold stock by Piero Caronni, who set about fixing the promising-but-terrible machines. It has 417 kilometers on the clock from new, though the 500cc v-twin has zero miles on a rebuild that apparently fixed its original gremlins.

From the eBay listing:

Please see video (link below) and if you need more pics or information just let me know.

For most reading this you know all about the Bimota V-Due for those that don’t a quick google will tell you all you need to know. There were less than 500 Bimota V-Due’s built.

I’ve had this V-Due for 18 months and bought it from a UK V-Due collector with the intention of preparing it for trackday use. The reality is that its far too good to be used on track hence the reason for selling it.

What makes this bike rare, and the one to have, is that not only does it run, and run well but its one of what is believed to be less that 100 injection V-Due’s left in the world. On another point most of the V-Due’s seem to end up in private collections and never used and I’m hoping that this bike will find an owner wanting to take it on and develop it further. Obviously it’s not my concern once it’s sold.

When I bought the bike I knew it had electrical problems preventing the bike running for more than a few seconds. I’ve spent the past year diagnosing the problems and a combination of improving earth connections and other wiring, changing HT leads and fuel line connectors have solved the problem and the bike runs well and now just needs run in. The engine has Zero miles…..

This V-due would have a been an unsold stock bike when the Bimota business failed in 2001. Piero Caronni the then technical director for the V-Due at Bimota bought all the V Due stock when the Bimota factory closed. It was then first “sold” by him to Mr Sascha in 2005 in Germany. The German owner then sold it to the previous UK owner before me in 2016. In 2014 the previous owner sent the engine back to Piero to have it rebuilt. All the mechanical issues relating to the original engine was sorted and left perfect, Piero’s words, not mine. The previous owner then purchased new twin ECU’s, again a problem area in the original bike, bought new coils, and rather than refurbishing the original fuel injectors bought new improved ones from Piero.

The bike has a total of 417kms from new, with zero miles on the engine and it is in original condition and specification other than the rear indicators having been changed to something less obtrusive. Original indicators are still available new from Classic Bimota Parts in Italy. Also included in the sale are the original coils, HT leads, and twin ECU’s. I’ve also got the original owners handbook – with wiring diagram intact. The German transport documentation (from Mr Sascha) to allow a new V5 to be applied for in the UK. Also comes with a rare Bimota V-Due brochure and magazine pull out. Bike also has both keys.

The next owner may want to consider what to do next? Thankfully there is a keen and growing following of developers and riders and just recently released from promap-europe.com is a new improved “piggy back” ECU along with revised injectors that further improves ride-ability. Check out their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/BIMOTA500/?ref=br_rs this is the way to go if you want to ride this bike regularly.

There is a small pin head chip to at the front of the tank that could be dabbed in, personally i’d leave it. The right hand side of the fairing mid section has had a repair to a stress crack (known issue) that could be improved on at some stage. Other than that and a very few light scratches associated with being 20 years old the overall condition can only be described as “as new” certainly the bike with a little detailing could be presented as concours.

In summary this is a serious collectors bike that can be used and enjoyed, one of the last remaining fuel injected bikes, an appreciating asset. Only a change in my needs for a trackway bike mean this bike is for sale.

The bike is located in Lisburn just outside Belfast, Northern Ireland, just 10-20mins from all airports or ferry terminals. I can arrange transport to anywhere in the UK at cost if required. Viewing recommended.

While I have make an offer really the price is what I’m prepared to sell for, if you want to offer me your RC30 and a bucket of cash, well yes then i’d have to rethink. If you have something special then let me know.

Armed with new ECUs, wiring and fuel injectors, the bike should (emphasis on should) be ready to enjoy. For those in the EU or Britain, registration should be a relative breeze. The story will be different on this side of the pond, though that will change once the bike meets the 25-year mark.

To further make his point, the seller has included a video of the bike starting, idling and revving:

Even as a track or display-only machine, the Bimota V-Due is odd and interesting enough to warrant serious collector consideration.

 

Still Fuel Injected: 1998 Bimota V-Due
Sales Report October 18, 2017 posted by

Sales Summary – February 2017

Whether you are a collector or simply interested in values, let’s take a look back and see what sold and for how much. Links to the original post on RSBFS included.


SOLD Bikes


2008 Buell XB12R Firebolt – SOLD for $4,200




1980 Ducati 900 MHR – SOLD for $15,778.90



1979 Honda CBX – SOLD for $9,999



1989 Honda CBR600F – SOLD for $3,050



1991 Honda NSR250 SP – SOLD for $9,299



1986 Moto Morini K2 – SOLD for $4,200



1984 Yamaha RZ350 – SOLD for $7,500

Unsold Bikes


2000 Aprilia RSV Mille R – No Sale with bids up to $4,000


2007 Aprilia RSV 1000 Bol D’or – Listing ended with a $5,260 ask

2009 Aprilia RS125 – Listing ended with a $6,000 opening ask.

1984 Bimota KB3 – No Sale with bids up to $7,100

1999 Bimota VDue Trofeo – No Sale with bids up to $15,100


2009 BMW HP2 Sport – No Sale. Zero bids at a $17,500 opening ask.

1987 Cagiva Allazzura 650SS – Listing ended with a $4,450 ask

1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale – No Sale with bids up to $16,100

1990 Ducati 750 Sport – No Sale at $3,450 with 23 bids

2001 Ducati 748RS – No Sale with a $12,400 ask

2007 Ducati Monster S2R 1000 – No Sale – listing ended with bids up to $6,000

2007 Ducati Monster S4RS – No Sale at $8,100

2007 Ducati Sport 1000 Biposto – No Sale at $12,499

1989 Kawasaki ZXR250R – No Sale at $5,000

1984 LAVERDA JOTA – No Sale with bids up to $12,285.85

1985 Laverda RGS1000 SFC – Listing ended with a $14,500 opening ask

1999 Laverda 750S Formula – No Sale with bids up to $5,000

1983 Moto Guzzi LeMans III – Listing ended with 9 bids at $7,300

2000 Nico Bakker Barracuda 1000 – Listing ended with a $22,500 ask. Later relisted and failed to sell.

1977 Suzuki RG500 Grand Prix Race Bike – No Sale – bid up to $34,101, reserve not met. Relisted and bid to $20k with No Sale.

1982 SUZUKI GS1000 KATANA – No Sale at $9,000

1997 Suzuki Katana 750 – No Sale at $1,200

1985 Yamaha RZ500 – No Sale. Auction ended with bids up to $8,800.

1988 Yamaha FZR400 – No Sale. Zero bids at a $5,000 opening ask.

1994 Yamaha YZF750R – No Sale at a $5,000 opening ask.

Sales Report October 1, 2017 posted by

Sales Summary – January 2017

With the season winding down we’ll be looking back to recap 2017 at RSBFS over the next few months. Here’s the first report. -dc

Whether you are a collector or simply interested in values, let’s take a look back and see what sold and for how much. Links to the original post on RSBFS included.


Aprilia


1995 Aprilia RS250 Loris Reggiani Replica
No Sale and zero bids with a $3,000 opening ask


Bimota


1998 Bimota 500 V-Due
No Sale – auction ended with a $34,900 ask


BMW


2007 BMW R1200S
SOLD for $9,700


Cagiva


1989 Cagiva 500GP V589
No Sale at $55,000 ask


Ducati


1993 Ducati 888
No Sale


1994 Ducati Monster M900
SOLD for $3,500


1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP
No Sale at $8,995


1997 Ducati 900SS CR Supersport
SOLD for $8000


1998 Ducati 996 Factory Superbike
No Sale at $65,000


2000 Ducati 996S for Sale
Zero bids with a starting ask of $7,000


2006 Ducati 999R Xerox #243
SOLD for $18,150


2007 Ducati PS1000LE Paul Smart
SOLD at $30,000


Honda


1979 Honda CB900F DHOLDA Edition
SOLD for $5,300


1982 Honda CB900F Super Sport
No Sale at $2,550


1983 Honda CX650 Turbo
SOLD for $5,400


1983 Honda MVX250F
No Sale at $5,800


1986 Honda VFR750F
SOLD for $2,900


1990 Honda NSR250R
No Sale at $6,310


1990 Honda RS125
No Sale and zero bids


1991 Honda CBR1000F
SOLD for $2,325


1995 Honda CBR900RR
No Sale at $5,400


Kawasaki


1974 Rickman Kawasaki CR1000
SOLD for $4,500


1983 Kawasaki GPz550
No Sale at $1,725


1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R Eddie Lawson Replica
SOLD for $17,665


1990 Kawasaki ZXR400
SOLD for $2,000


Suzuki


1983 Suzuki RG250 Gamma
No Sale and zero bids at the $3,500 opening ask.


1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo
No Sale at $3,200


1986 Suzuki GSX-R750
SOLD for $5,800


1987 Suzuki GSX-R1100
SOLD for $5,000


1988 Suzuki GSX-R750
No Sale and zero bids with a $5,600 opening ask


1999 Suzuki GSX 400S Katana
No Sale and zero bids with a $4,895 opening ask


2001 Suzuki TL1000R
SOLD for $2,850


Triumph


1996 Triumph Daytona Super III
No Sale at $3,000


Yamaha


1990 Yamaha FZR250R in Japan
No sale at $3,800


1992 Vance & Hines Yamaha FZR 600
No Sale at $4,500


1994 Yamaha TZ125
No Sale and zero bids with a $5,500 opening ask


1996 Yamaha FZR400RR SP
No sale at $4,500


2011 Yamaha Moto3 Racebike
No Sale at $6,000


Suzuki August 21, 2017 posted by

Tu Meke TL: 1998 Suzuki TL 1000R in New Zealand

While the majority of RSBFS posts are tied to North American ebay listings we really do like to showcase bikes from all over the world.   You could even say we seek to span the globe to bring you a constant variety of RareSportbikes…the thrill of the Britten V1000…the agony of  the Bimota VDue (NOTE: Bonus points to you if you read that bit of text and heard the voice of the dearly departed Jim McKay).

Today’s post is a very nice 1998 Suzuki TL1000R located far from the RSBFS offices in Wellington New Zealand.  This one looks to almost completely OEM and has the lovely and cleanly-styled phlolina-yellow bodywork which seems to be the most desired by collectors.

1998 Suzuki TL1000R in New Zealand

For anyone unfamiliar with the TL series, lets begin by saying there aren’t many motorcycles that have been through such a roller coaster of desirability.  It all began in the late 1990’s when Ducati V-twin powered machines were killing it on the track and the sales floor.  In response Suzuki announced they would deliver their own V-Twin powered sportbike, including both a WorldSuperBike/WSB capable machine to compete against the Ducati on the track and a street version for everday use.  The result was the TL-S/R series.

Anticipation for the new Suzuki V-Twin was very high and the TL-S/street version was launched in 1996 with the R version scheduled for the next year.   The quick verdict was that the new 90 degree v-twin engine was equal to or better the Ducati .  However, while the engine was good,  a significant handling issue quickly reared its head; front wheel lift (no pun intended).   The problem was quickly traced to the rear suspension, which was an offset rear shock with a separate rotary damper, a setup that had been chosen due to the reduced space caused by the new V-Twin configuration.  While this configuration worked in day to day riding,it could become overwhelmed by heat and heavy loads, which obviously happen on a sportbike quite a lot.  The result would be front end lift and when a rider rolled off/dropped the wheel, major tank slap and high side crashes could happen.   The problem was so significant that Suzuki offered steering stabilizers as standard on both the TL-R launched the next year and TL-S’s but the entire TL lineup never really shook its reputation as a “widowmaker”.

Note:  For anyone interested, a really good explanation of the rotary suspension function on the TL can be found here.

The handling wasn’t the only challenge the TL1000R had to deal with.  Another major issue was that the R version never really delivered on its promise to rival the Ducati as a WorldSuperBike/WSB machine.

“The real killer though was that the R never came close to being the Ducati-beating WSB-contender Suzuki intended it to be.  Despite its stumpy wheelbase, the R was confoundingly both heavier and larger than the S and too bulky all around.  Equally problematic was the motor: although producing a claimed 135 bhp in stock TL-R trim. it proved difficult to tune…After only 2 seasons Suzuki decided it’d be too expensive to develop/race successfully and re-focused its race development efforts on its proven inline 4 GSX-R750 series instead.”  – Practical Sportbikes 2017

Perhaps the final issue that set the TL1000R up for sales failure was that Suzuki never developed a unique identity for the bike.  The TL1000R was even offered in the Suzuki traditional blue/white color scheme which made it hard to distinguish from the its GSX-R sister bike.  Since a large part of the appeal of the TL was supposed to be that it was NOT an inline 4, making it look just like one seems to be quite an odd decision.  The result of all this is that the TL1000R developed a reputation as a big failure for Suzuki and some models were left on the sales floor for quite a while.

Now despite all the issues noted above and the bikes general reputation as a failure, the TL1000R was still a very good bike for 98% of riders.  While it didn’t live up to the hype at the time it was launched, it still had a bonkers engine that was significantly easier to live with than its Italian competitor (no belts!).  It was also surprisingly comfortable and was quite attractive.  Later models came with the aforementioned steering damper which solved much of the handling problems and many of the concepts introduced on the TL1000R can be seen in the later Hayabusa.

Unlike many late 1990’s Sporybikes the TL1000R has managed to maintain an active community of owners on the web and the fandom for the bike never really went away.  More importantly from a collectors standpoint, the TL was recently named as one of the top 10 collectible bikes to acquire “before prices get stupid”.

OK, now lets turn our attention to this particular 1998 Suzuki TL1000R.   First, location means this one is probably only going to appeal to one of our Australian or New Zealand readers, or perhaps someone who is willing to incur some shipping costs.   The seller indicates that was previously a Japanese bike but unlike a lot of bikes we see from Japan, this one it looks to have been well cared for/not treated as a disposable item and kept in stock trim.  The only non-OEM pieces I am seeing are some rear turn signals/indicators and some stickers on the rear fairing hump.  NOTE:  The rear seat cover/”hump” is a fairly rare item so bonus points for it being in place and looking to be in good condition.

Mileage is stated as just about 14,000 miles/22,000 kilometers.  A new battery and rectifier have also been fitted and rubber looks to be in good condition but no mention is made of age and fluids would probably be due for a refresh.

So what’s this V-Twin bit of Suzuki history going to cost you?   Prices for a pristine TL1000R have definitely started to climb but aren’t reaching stupid money yet.  The asking price for this one is $6,900 USD which is towards the high side of recent TL1000R’s listed on ebay but given the condition of this one and the fact that its in the best looking color scheme, the asking price doesn’t seem to be out of wack.    Also the seller does appear to be a dealer so some negotiation wouldn’t seem unreasonable.

Let me just conclude by saying this –  I have always liked this bike a lot; I think it looks like a meaner and more manageable Hayabusa.  Also I think most potential buyers will admit that a large part of the TL1000R appeal is that its different and its reputation for not suffering fools gladly.   While a TL1000R probably won’t experience a dramatic appreciation in value, if it was located closer to my current location I would definitely be considering trying to acquire it for my personal collection.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

Tu Meke TL:  1998 Suzuki TL 1000R in New Zealand
Bimota August 9, 2017 posted by

Unobtanium alert: 2008 Bimota 3D Carbonio

Here’s one that meets all the major RSBFS criteria, a 2008 Bimota Tesi 3D in the rare carbon bodywork.  Enjoy!

2008 Bimota Tesi 3D Carbino on eBay

Ah the Bimota Tesi 3d…an evolution of an idea that began in 1991 with the 1D, continued with the 2D/Vyrus in 2005 and then reached its final form in the 3D in 2007.  The original Tesi was the work of Bimota founder and legendary designer Massimo Tamburini, the same person responsible for the Ducati 916 and MV Agusta F4 and a tesi is probably on every rare sport bike collectors “bucket list”.

While the 3D certainly looks the business, in typical Bimota fashion the result didn’t quite quite live up to the promise of the design concept.   It wasn’t a major failure like the V-Due, but most reviews expressed a sentiment of it not being all that it could have been in large part due to the power limit of a 95 bhp Ducati engine.  Reviewers also noted a lack of front end feel which was no doubt due to the hub-centered front fork design.  But on the plus side, the same fork system offered improved braking due to no front-end dive and it still looks amazingly cool.

The seller indicates this is one of 29 Tesi 3D units.  While experience has taught us that any official production number information from Bimota should be taken as  leap of faith (cough-VDue-cough-SB6-cough) the Tesi is certainly something you don’t tend to see at bike night.  Oh, and one additional note –  from what I understand, the carbon-skinned bodywork makes this a much rarer model.

This low mileage of this particular Bimota Tesi 3D seems to indicate it was a bit of a toy for the current owner.  As for condition, the seller indicates the standard Ducati belt service has not been done, the brake fluid looks dark and no mention is made of tire age so I am thinking this one has been standing for a while.   The seller does mention oil changes in the questions section of the ebay listing but overall I would expect to spend $1000 to put it back on the road and a few more thousand if the intent is to make it a concours-level machine.

Here is a recap of the info provided in the eBay post:

  • Mileage 4,355
  • Due for a timing belt/ inspection replacement
  • Has Zard carbon fiber slip-on’s with the stock exhaust included
  • Last serviced in 2010 by Rockwell Cycles (dealer bike was purchased from) at approximately 2,500 miles.
  • I have personally changed the oil and filter several times since the initial dealer servicing.
  • Excellent condition except for small cracks in -pain at fuel tank fill (see photos).  Other than the paint crack near the tank it needs no other work and is basically a new motorcycle.

So let’s just to the big question – is this bit of carbon skinned Italian goodness worth the current $30,000 USD Buy-It-Now asking price?   Well lets look at the positives and the negatives

  • Positives –  the Tesi 3D is probably the ultimate iteration of the hub-centered philosophy and given its low production number, this one will likely hold its value.  Also this is the carbon edition of which suposedly very few were produced and for collectors of factory offered carbon-skinned Italian exotics of this era, this is right up there with the Aprilia Nera, Benelli Tornado Tre and Ducati MH900e.
  • Negatives – the asking price is well above what we have seen other carbon Bimota Tesi 3D’s go for on RSBFS. Furthermore, if the intent is to buy it as an investment, bringing it back to concours-level condition will probably involve a few more thousand in cost.

I have to admit that I am a fan of the 3D Tesi but I prefer the non-carbon version as it seems to be a more dramatic presentation of the hub-centered technology.  This carbon skinned Tesi 3D seems like it will appeal most to either a collector focused on Bimota’s, someone who is already familiar with the Tesi/Vyrus lineup, or an investment oriented collector who is willing to put it into dry storage for a bit.

One additional note – the seller indicates offers are being accepted but I wouldn’t expect to see any serious reduction from the asking price simply because even though its almost 10 years old, its still a damn cool bike.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Unobtanium alert:  2008 Bimota 3D Carbonio
Bimota June 21, 2016 posted by

Affordable Exotic: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

1995 Bimota SB6 R Side

Aside from the disastrous VDue, Bimota’s stock-in-trade was wrapping lightweight frames and fantastically exotic bodywork around reliable powertrains from established manufacturers. The magical formula that led to bikes like the Bimota SB6 seems so simple, it’s a wonder it took so long for other manufacturers to catch on: wrap too much engine in too little motorcycle, fit quality suspension, profit. But it’s obviously more difficult than it looks to make that formula work, and the Japanese tendency to overbuild was clearly blunting the otherwise very butch GSX-R1100’s performance: the SB6 made virtually the same power, but weighed a stunning 90lbs less than the donor Suzuki.

1995 Bimota SB6 Cockpit

With 1,700 built, the SB6 was one of Bimota’s most successful models, and that means that prices are relatively low for this Suzuki-powered blaster. It’s not a cutting-edge performer anymore but, with almost 150hp from the 1074cc inline four, huge midrange, and light weight, a well-ridden SB6 will certainly keep up with modern machines.

1995 Bimota SB6 Front

There are some very minor blemishes on this example, just some small chips around fairing fasteners. But aside from that awful touring seat pad that’d be in the garbage before I even got the bike home, the bike is pretty much immaculate and looks great in the very Italian tri-colore paintwork on the swoopy body panels. I personally prefer the look of the later SB6R, but there’s no doubt this is a very striking motorcycle.

1995 Bimota SB6 Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

9809 miles
excellent condition
72 year old owner can no longer ride
Well, that’s not all that much to go on, but considering the low mileage and the condition evident from the photos, maybe it’s all we need. This is a new listing, and there are no takers yet at the $4,800 starting bid. From what I’ve seen in the past couple years, an SB6 could be a very nice way to get a fast, relatively reliable motorcycle with exotic credentials, distinctive looks, and big, four-cylinder power. Keep in mind that, although the Suzuki powertrain should be easy to service, at least once you get access to it, some other parts like bodywork, electricals, and suspension parts could be hard to come by. It’s a real bummer when your beautiful Italian exotic is sidelined by unobtainable seals for those snazzy Paioli forks… So you’d never want one as your only ride but, considering what these Bimotas are going for, they’re looking very, very tempting at the moment.
-tad
1995 Bimota SB6 L Side
Affordable Exotic: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale
Bimota August 29, 2015 posted by

Bimötaheads: 1986 Bimota DB1 and 1998 Bimota YB11

“Like any habit that becomes a vice, you think you can handle it.  Just the one.  That’s what you tell yourself.  As a man of fortitude and strong character, you can take it or leave it.  But before too long you’ve crossed a line.  You don’t even know where that line was and now you’re hooked, unsure of how you got here not sure you even want to go back.   No one ever stops at just one Bimota”. – Alan Seeley, Practical Sportbikes, August 2015

binota111

Call it common sense or logic or whatever you want, there is a legitimate argument that says pre-bankruptcy Bimotas aren’t worth the money, that modern day sportbikes are better at everything the Rimini factory produced back in the day, and that the company has more misses than hits.  It is true the Rimini firm’s pre-bankruptcy operations resulted in some goods bikes (YB4, S8R) and some not-so-great (Mantra, VDue, Tesi 1D) but Bimotas still seem to appeal to a lot of collectors.

For this post, we have a Bimota collector located in Norwalk, Connecticut with a large collection of Bimotas who has decided to let two go; a 1986 Bimota DB1 and a 1998 Bimota YB11.

Note:  The collector indicates that the rest of the collection will be up for sale shortly so I suggest you favorite the seller if a Bimtoa is something you have on your wish list – Marty/Dallaslavowner

db11

1986 Bimota DB1 for sale on ebay

The DB1 was notable as the first “all-Italian” Bimota as it was the first effort with a Ducati engine.  While the DB1 came with a 750 cc Ducati powerplant, it was the frame that was a big improvement over the Ducati it was based on. Made of special steel tubing and using a triangulated “Birdcage” design, the frame used the engine as a stressed member.  The DB1 also had trick parts such as a triple-tree/fork top, clip-ons, rear-sets made of aluminum.

Several DB1 models were produced, this one appears to be the standard version with 36 mm carburetors and the quieter exhaust.

Here is a summary of the bike:

  • One of only 400 DB1’s produced
  • 13,000 miles/19,000 kilometers
  • Custom two-in-one exhaust system
  • Belt service,and all fluids a few years ago
  • Special two piece custom wheels.
  • Few small stress cracks but nothing that would cause me to get the body refinished.
  • Bike will be sold with a bill of sale, but I believe it can be titled because its over 25 years oldv(never titled).

Opening Bid of $20,000 USD has already been met but reserve is not met.  Previous listings on RSBFS seem to show a price ranging between $35,000 for a used race bike to $45,000 USD for a new-in-the-crate edition.   This DB1 looks to be pristine, so expect the upper end of the range to be required to take this one home.

Now here is the second offering, a 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera.

yb11

1998 Bimota YB11 for sale on ebay

While the the YB 11 had the same engine as the Yahama YZF1000R, the Bimota was 33 pounds (15kg) lighter than the Yamaha, hence the name Superleggera/”Superlight”.  The reduced weight gave the YB11 neck cracking acceleration, with a flick of the throttle sending the YB11 ripping towards a top speed of 170mph.  The YB11 also came with a sophisticated Paioli rear shock and a new aluminium rear swingarm.  Overall, the Bimota was more race oriented than the YZR1000R it was based on, with a stretched-out riding position, flat seat and firmer suspension. Only 650 were reported to have been built.

Here is what the seller has to say

  • Has just over 3,000 miles.
  • Totally stock, includes the single seat cowl and passenger seat.
  • Only flaw is a crack in the windshield which I repaired with a high strength epoxy.

The opening bid price of $10,000 USD for this YB11 has not been met.  Previous YB11 listings on RSBFS seem to show a price ranging between $8,000 and $10,000 USD so this one might be priced a bit high but the YB11 is certainly one of the best looking pre-bankruptcy Bimota models.  Also Bimotas tend to depreciate very slowly but I have to say I don’t think it will increase in value as a collectors item ala the VDue or Tesi editions.

yb112

One last note – while these two Bimotas will likely appeal more to someone already experience with Bimotas,  the seller indicates that the rest of his Bimota collection will be up for sale shortly,   If a pre-bankruptcy Bimtoa is something you have on your wish list, I suggest you favorite the eBay auction seller id.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Writers Notation/shameless plug for which I will receive no type of compensation: The title of this post and some of the content are based on an article in the latest edition of my favorite magazine, Practical Sportbikes which is published out of the UK.   If you don’t have a subscription and are a fan of late 1980’s/1990’s sportbikes, then you are missing out.   I urge you to get a subscription, you won’t regret it – Marty/Dallaslavowner

Bimötaheads:  1986 Bimota DB1 and 1998 Bimota YB11

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