Search Results for “zx7 rr”

Kawasaki March 5, 2020 posted by

Dark Horse – 1996 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R with just 5,800 miles !

One of Kawasaki’s alternative livery used basic black instead of championship lime, but this carefully tended example is an eye-catcher even so.

1996 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R for sale on eBay

Right in the middle of the 1989-2003 model run, the ’96 was the first year where the rest-of-world and North American models had the same ZX-7R name.  The classic 748 cc inline was carburetted and boasted 111 ponies.  Intake runners were dialed back a few mm to improve throttle response, and mid-range torque was augmented by a crossover pipe between downpipes 1 and 4.  Not messing with the good, the alloy twin-spar chassis can handle whatever comes its way and the conservative headstock geometry takes it all in stride.  Components like the 6-piston front brakes and piggyback reservoir rear shock were definite improvements.

This Virginia owner took super care of this baby, and the detailed photos show no wear or corrosion, not even a rub on the heel guards.  Rarely seen OEM mirrors and signals might actually work as intended.  The rims look as though they’ve been subjected to just one tire change.  From the eBay auction:

Bike still has over 99% of its original OEM parts – Bridgestone Battlax Hypersports and stainless steel front brake lines are not.  Extremely well preserved and under 6K there’s not much of a service record here.  Maintenance done recently – MOTUL 10W40 100% synthetic, OEM Kawasaki oil filter, MOTUL 7.5W 100% synthetic fork oil, MOTUL MC CARE chain clean and lube, OEM Kawasaki air filter, NGK spark plugs, OEM Kawasaki fuel filter, rear 41 PSI, front 37 PSI, P21S Carnauba Wax – check!

Clearly this bike is ready to show or ride to the beach, canyon.  Runs like it looks, INCREDIBLE.  Items included in sale: original owners manual, clear Exempt title, 2 keys and 1 spare, original sales ad, period correct never used tank bra, 100% original never used OEM Kawasaki tool kit.  Rare was the factory Ebony with reflective iridescence decals that color morph in sunlight but rarer here is a true survivor time capsule ready to take you back – don’t miss it.

Though the street-going ZX-7R had grown up into a slightly overweight kit, the AMA Superbikes had to make room for Doug Chandler and his Team Muzzy special, who repeated in 1997.  For a fan, this might be a perfect redux – hardly used, perfect shape, serious rather than flashy, and sensibly priced.

-donn

Dark Horse – 1996 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R with just 5,800 miles !
Kawasaki September 28, 2019 posted by

Survivor: 1994 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7 for Sale

It came up recently in the comments section, but I got into motorcycles relatively late in life. I mean, I always thought they were cool, but they just seemed so dangerous, and I knew I’d never hear the end of it from my family and friends. They’re also of limited practical value in the northeastern US as primary transportation, unless you’re a masochist or have Yeti DNA. When I finally got one here in California, I used economics to justify it: just $500 got me a runner. And that still holds true: if you’re into motorsports and have a limited budget, just what kind of worthwhile car can you get for five to ten grand? And if you live in Southern California, where would you keep a fun hobby car anyway? But you can fit a small collection of bikes into a single parking spot. And a nice, classic superbike like this 1994 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7 can be had for that kind of money.

The late 1980s and 1990s were a golden period of superbike development. The basic formula was set, and the Japanese manufacturers were hard at work perfecting their creations. Only Ducati really went their own way with a v-twin: Suzuki, Kawasaki, Yamaha, and Honda all stuck with inline fours for their mass production machines, with the very limited-production RC30 and RC45 homologation machines from Honda being notable exceptions. Kawasaki’s ZX-7, known in other markets as the ZXR750, used a 748cc four that squeaked in under the 750cc limit for four-cylinder superbikes, a move that allowed the machine to be used in production-based racing series.

That engine was hung in a stiff aluminum frame, and backed by a six-speed gearbox. Power was rated at 105hp and the bike wasn’t especially lightweight at 450lbs dry, but there was the potential for more in the hands of skilled tuners, and the ZX-7 was famously terrific under braking and had excellent mid-corner stability. It might not have been the best bike on paper, but the Kawasaki found plenty of success in a variety of racing here in the US and abroad. This example isn’t perfect, or even stock, but looks like a sharp rider or a rolling restoration project. It’s not flawless, but has low miles and appears to have been sympathetically maintained.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7 for Sale

1994 ZX-7 (ZX750L) with 9,812 original miles.

Original plastics – All VIN tags in place.

Engine/Frame/etc. all very clean.  No leaks.

New tires, fresh oil change (Mobil 1), new sprockets all this year.

Runs and Rides great (see video).

Light damage on left side from falling off lift while stationary.

Muzzy full system with correct jetting.

Original turn signals etc. will be included.

CLEAN NC TITLE IN HAND.

The seller has also helpfully included a nice, high-res video of the bike. So what’s to like here? The low miles, the likely reasonable final price, compared to a more exotic ZX-7RR, the period Muzzy pipe, and classic superbike looks. What’s not to like? The fact that it’s just a standard ZX-7 and the minor damage the seller mentions. The front and rear turn signals are also missing, along with the rear fender, although those shouldn’t be too hard to source if you want to switch things closer to stock. I doubt these will ever be worth crazy money, but it’s certainly a bike that should go up in value and you’ll be able to ride it in the meantime without worrying too much about either damaging an ultra-rare exotic or devaluing it by adding too many miles.

-tad

Survivor: 1994 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7 for Sale
Kawasaki July 27, 2019 posted by

Peer Pressure: 1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo

The 1980s were wild time of experimentation. There was a technology explosion as liquid cooling, computerized fuel injection and other performance enhancers hit the scene. The sport bike battleground became a dizzying array of different configurations, each manufacturer vying for top honors on the racetrack and the showroom. Nowhere was this more evident than the brief window of the Turbo craze; the promise of liter bike power in a mid-sized sport bike never materialized, but the Big Four made seemingly every effort to make it so. Today what remains are the carcasses of the aftermath; an antiquated reminder of how quickly technology moves forward.

1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo for sale on eBay

Honda Turbos followed the route of the 500 & 650 cc CX twins, Suzuki went with a 650cc Katana rip-off that originated the air-oil cooling later made famous by the GSX-R series, Yamaha phoned in a warmed over Seca with a unique blow-through, carbureted 650 cc configuration, and Kawasaki built the Top Dog of the bunch with the GPz750 Turbo. Rated by motorcycle magazines as the fasted bike in 1985, the Kawi Turbo did deliver on the 1/4 mile promise of turbocharging. However the drawbacks of forced induction – weight, cost, complexity, turbo lag, lack of power predictability, etc – quickly sunk the ship. Buyers weren’t interested in paying the premium for the Turbo, and riders preferred the real world performance of the less expensive liter bikes. The year of the Turbo was over.

From the seller:
1985 KAWASAKI GPz750 TURBO (ZX750E), RARE and ORIGINAL
Manufacture Date – 08/84. One of 1,500 1985 GPz750 Turbos produced!!

An ALL ORIGINAL example of the fastest production motorcycle made in 1985, per Kawasaki. OEM motor, bars, seat, pipes, turbo, levers, mirrors, signals, brakes, fairing, wheels, etc. The ONE exception is an after-market uni-shock (single shock) the previous owner installed. I have the OEM uni-shock for it too and it still works great.

CLEAN and CLEAR TITLE!

Runs great! Looks great! Collector quality! This rare bike has already surpassed collector and vintage status. And, dependent on who you ask or where you look, has reached Antique status at 35 years old. Does NOT run like an old, decrepit bike….no way. ONLY 10,846 original miles on the odometer (see pic). There may be a few more miles on it when it sells. A RARE TURBO ANTIQUE YOU CAN RIDE! And ride fast…if you’re into that sort of thing. How cool is that? Fresh gas. Fresh battery. Newer front and rear brakes. Turbo works like it should. All electrics work like they should. Good compression. Good tires. All those little OEM Kawa stickers and decals are still in place; see RPM gauge, chain guard, base of tank, etc. Dual helmet locks! Original, original, original. If you are tired of looking at GPz 750 Turbo’s that are not original and in great condition, you can now stop looking. You have found The One.

This Turbo was last ridden in 2012 – see pic of temp tag – with annual fuel and oil changes. Basically long-term storage. New battery installed and starts right up. Currently has 92 octane in it (premium). There is very, very light surface rust around the base of the tank neck filler hole – see pic. Tank is very, very clean.

This bike isn’t new (obviously) but in very, very, very excellent condition with SUPER LOW miles on it and the starting bid reflects that condition.

More from the seller:
Many OEM Kawi parts and accessories go with this antique GPz750 TURBO motorcycle. Items such as (see pics):
OEM Kawa Uni-shock absorber
OEM Kawa GPz750 Turbo tool kit!
OEM Kawa Ignition keys, 2 each
OEM Kawa SERVICE MANUAL (1984)
OEM Kawa WORKSHOP MANUAL; SERVICE MANUAL SUPPLEMENT (1985), TWO EACH
OEM Kawa GPz750 TECHNICAL TRAINING MANUAL, TWO EACH
OEM Kawa 20-page “PRESS KIT”. This is cool. An OEM (copy) of a 1985 Press Kit, authored and published in Japan but written in English. Used for the roll-out introduction of the 1985 GPz750 Turbo for the Press
OEM Kawa “750 Turbo” sticker (bumper sticker)
OEM Kawa Fuel filter, NEW, 1 each
OEM Kawa Air filter, NEW, 1 each
OEM Kawa Clutch Cable, NEW, 1 each
OEM Kawa Horns, dual set, 1 each

Kawasaki-branded key fob; color matched to bike
Mini-turbo key ring ornaments, color matched to bike, 2 each – Super Cool!
Bike cover with custom Kawasaki patch
Master Lock wheel disc lock; color matched to bike, 2 keys
OEM equivalent NEW battery, 14L-A2 (replaces 12N14-3A); just installed
Deltran “Battery Tender Automatic” (full size) WITH pigtail connection already installed on bike
K & N oil filters, NEW, 2 each
Canyon Carver handlebar tie-down set, 1 each
Custom aluminum license plate bracket
Some extra high-pressure fuel line hose

As stated previously on these pages, Factory Turbos are rare. But they are rare for some of the wrong reasons; nobody wanted them. The big Four quickly realized the poor ROI this direction was offering, and pivoted back to more mainstream sport bikes. Nearly 35 years later the song remains the same. Yes, prime examples of the XN, CX, XJ and ZX have slowly gained in value in recent years, but certainly not any faster than a super-clean example of any other 80’s era sport bike. It seems completely unfair, given the rarity, uniqueness and performance of these puffer bikes – but the public votes by wallet share, and these machines have proven to have a narrow focus of interested buyers. This particular GPz750 Turbo looks awesome and has some cool stuff that comes with it. But is it worth the opening ask of $9,999? Historic values would say probably not, but the market is constantly changing and conspires to make fools of us all. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Peer Pressure: 1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo
Kawasaki July 10, 2019 posted by

Privateer Superbike: 1995 Kawasaki ZX-7R for Sale

We don’t post too many racebikes here on RSBFS. Ex-racebikes are tricky to value. By their very nature, they evolve and change over time to remain competitive and, unless a bike is retired immediately after an historic race win, it’s not likely to be in anything like “original” condition. That very word contradicts what racing is about: if something doesn’t work, it’s discarded, if something better is introduced, it goes on the bike. They get crashed and blown up and rebuilt and raced again. But this particular Kawasaki ZX-7R had too many impressive names attached to it to pass up.

This Kawasaki is a bike from the glory days of World Superbike racing, when 750cc fours were pretty much the go-to configuration for everyone but Ducati. In stock form, the ZX-7R was a bit heavy at 450lbs dry, and the 748cc engine’s 105hp is decidedly underwhelming by today’s standards. But the bike made an excellent racing platform, and this version was kept in production for 7 years, a near eternity in terms of sportbike development and a testament to its sound design.

Of course, this isn’t anything like a stock motorcycle. The claimed 150+hp is impressive and the WSB-spec Öhlins forks and Brembo brakes that replace the stock Nissin six-pots are all very, very tasty, but it’s the frame that makes this particularly interesting: it was supposedly used in World Superbike racing by Anthony Gobert and obtained from famed tuner Rob Muzzy. The seller’s description goes into more detail below.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Kawasaki ZX-7R Racebike for Sale

1995 Kawasaki ZX7R Superbike. Works frame (WSB Gobert frame, Purchased from Muzzy in ’99), 2 Superbike motors: 800cc (for ’03) and 750cc. Fully kitted, Ohlins WSB forks, brembo brakes, everything. Spare valve springs (2 sets), valves, rods, pistons. 800 has Carrillo rods. Hasn’t been run for 15 years. Gets turned over now a couple times a year.

This is probably the finest privateer 1995 Kawasaki ZX7R Superbike ever built. The works frame (purchased from Muzzy in December of ’99) was supposedly Gobert’s. It was a World Superbike frame; done in Japan by Kawasaki. It was black when we got it. A work of art, they added a oil catch tank in the frame and welded a frame around the frame. It turned the bike from a pile of crap nightmare that would wind up and launch you at any second (with the fully built 150+ hp superbike engine) to a dream that is predictable and smooth. Which is why they won. Unfortunately those weren’t available to any of us, and we were lucky to get it for the 2000 season. After we got the frame, that bike won every club race and set track records in 2000 (beating the 1000s) until we had a Brembo rotor explode and put me in the ICU… ending that season. I raced it a few times since and we built a 800cc motor that put out 170hp (on the juice, no ram air) that ran with the 1000s of ’03. Unfortunately the KLS shifter broke during that national and we DNF’d. Later, it had a “tip over” in a practice due to a leak in a front tire, and it never got repainted. I got bodywork for it and never fitted it or painted it. Unlike the “works” bike Chandler rode and got claimed in the F-USA in 1996 (was just for sale on bringatrailer.com), these engines do NOT have the “works” gear driven cams. Those are not serviceable for privateers. This bike makes a ton of power with the conventional chain driven cams, works oil pickup, etc. Further, we still have a couple sets of valve springs (and tons of spares) which are now unobtainable. These motors can be serviced and freshened up. This will be an AHRMA killer.

This is obviously a well-developed package and should be a blast to ride. It also includes extra engines and spares to keep them running, although at that $25,000 asking price, you’d hope it would. There are cheaper ways to get into vintage [?!] racing, but none quite as evocative…

-tad

Privateer Superbike: 1995 Kawasaki ZX-7R for Sale
Kawasaki May 1, 2019 posted by

Beast of Boost: 1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo

During the wild years of the decade known as the 1980s, there was a lot going on. Legwarmers were hot. The brat pack were hot. And most importantly, Turbos were hot. Every major Japanese manufacturer played with the puffer configuration at least once (Honda tried it twice) before giving up on induction-enhanced motorcycles. Honda built a pair of large, heavy sport touring bikes. Yamaha built a lazy Seca with futuristic fairing in a “me too” effort. Suzuki took the bonkers approach and built a no-apologies sport bike like a Katana on turbo steroids. And Kawasaki watched, learned, and eventually dipped their toes into the water with an updated GPz.

1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo for sale on eBay

The largest of the turbo bikes by displacement, the Kawasaki GPz was also the fastest. The only factory turbo bike to break into the 10s in the quarter mile, the GPz 750 Turbo was not only faster than all its forced-induction peers, it was the fastest street bike tested in 1984. With an estimated 112 HP on tap thanks to the Hitachi turbo unit sitting low down and in front of the inline four. With ideal turbo placement for short exhaust primaries, Kawasaki’s approach minimized lag and maximized horsepower. Even then, power windup changes suddenly as the engine builds boost – making for a fun ride, but a less than predictable mount for tight canyons. Like all but the Yamaha, the Kawasaki Turbo introduced fuel injection in an effort to better control engine operations and promote rideability and longevity.

From the seller:
1985 KAWASAKI GPZ750 TURBO

Here’s a real nice Kawasaki 750 Turbo for sale. Bike is in near perfect original condition except for 1 flaw/crack on right lower side of faring. Always stored inside and covered. Runs and rides excellent with fresh oil and filter change. It is all original with factory owners manual and tool kit and has 530 chain conversion to get rid of the factory heavy 630 chain, see last 2 pics. Newer tires and battery.

While the Kawasaki Turbo takes after the GPz models, it differs in many ways. Engine internals, chassis geometry and suspension, and custom factory lowers were all bespoke to the Turbo, although Kawasaki did raid the GPz750 and GPz1100 parts bins to keep costs down. The resultant looks made it familiar to the GPz, yet officially it was known as the ZX750E and referred to simply as the Kawasaki 750 Turbo. Lasting only a couple of years with no significant changes, the Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo shared a similar life cycle with the rest of the Turbo packing offerings. Expensive, complicated and generally unloved, they all failed to sell well in the showrooms – despite the flash and the speed.

Today’s Turbo example is a 1985 model, and it looks like a true survivor. It does not appear to be scuffed, dropped, hot rodded or significantly modified. The seller states that the chain was downsized; the 530 chain is pretty stout, and the factory 630 size was incorporated no doubt due to concerns over longevity. Other than that, this appears to be an honest machine presented to us by a turbo collector (notice the XN85 in the background). The opening ask is a fair $6,999 – but there do not appear to be many bidders as of yet. Not terrifically valuable when compared to more elite machinery (RC30s, OW01, MHe, etc), Turbo bikes are slowly gaining ground as well as the respect of riders and buyers. If you are in the market for one of these unique time pieces, this 10,000 mile machine might be your opportunity. Check it out here, and then jump to the Comments to share your Turbo thoughts. Good Luck!!

MI

Beast of Boost: 1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo
Kawasaki March 23, 2019 posted by

Low-Mileage Rider: 1999 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R for Sale

If you see the phrase “classic sportbike,” your head may suddenly be filled with John Player Nortons and bevel-drive Ducatis… But tempus fugit and disturbingly, bikes like this Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R are rapidly becoming “classics” in their own right. But owning an old Norton requires you recalibrate your brain in terms of handling and performance, and even getting one started can present its own challenges. Superbikes of the 90s, on the other hand, are modern enough that you can still use one to hang with modern tackle on a back road or track day. Just remember the choke lever before you fire it up…

Sure, the 105hp from the 748cc inline four may seem a bit underwhelming if you’ve been riding the cream of the literbike crop in recent years, but that’s probably a good thing, since those bikes have also been saving your bacon with a host of rider aids. No, this is an analog bike: the throttle pulls a cable [?!] that operates a linkage that opens the slides of four 38mm CV carburetors to mix air and fuel. Six-piston Nissin front calipers can still pull the nearly 500lb wet Ninja down from speed effectively. And while a 90s 750 can barely compete with a modern 600 in terms of outright power, the additional displacement should give it a wider spread of torque, along with Kawasaki’s famed intake roar, and the handling should be relatively familiar to sportbike pilots, even if the riding position is a bit different and stretched out.

Properly set up, an old-school superbike like the ZX-7R should still be able to hang with the younger kids on road and track. This isn’t the sexy, very desirable homologation-special ZX-7RR, but the roadbike’s CV carburetors should make it better to ride at anything other than wide-open-throttle and anywhere other than a race track, compared to the RR’s flat-slides.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R for Sale

1999 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R, Only 6150 Miles, All Original, Beautiful Classic Motorcycle, Looks and Runs Great!

There’s not much info there, as you’d expect from a dealer listing. But mileage is very low for a Japanese sportbike of the era, and it appears to be in pretty solid condition, with non-standard turn signals and a fender eliminator, along with some minor scrapes along the edges of the fairing. But that $2,995 asking price is a great deal if you just want a classic sportbike to ride, or maybe do a mild rolling-restoration. This version of Kawasaki’s superbike was introduced in 1996 and was the final iteration of the bike before production ended. As you’d expect, collectors prefer the earlier bikes, but I think this era is better-looking. Considering this one is very affordable, you can just buy it and have it painted to match the RR’s classic green, white, and purple scheme or, even better, the UK version’s green, white, and red!

-tad

Low-Mileage Rider: 1999 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R for Sale
Kawasaki January 20, 2019 posted by

Angry Ninja: 1993 Kawasaki ZX-7R M1

It’s not that hard to come across clean Kawasaki ZX-7Rs these days, even after many of them were used and abused and thrown away. But this 1993 Kawasaki ZX-7R M1 is a lot more special. It’s not quite an RR, but the M1 is an early homologation special of the ZX-7R, and it wears a plethora of very sexy race track-oriented bits. To wit: an aluminum gas tank, a rack of four 39mm flatslide carbs, adjustable suspension front and rear, an adjustable swingarm pivot and a close ratio gearbox. There’s also a solo seat cowl to really hammer home the idea that this ain’t your average street bike.

To take full advantage of the bike’s potential, you needed to spring for the race kit, which would get the thing ready for whatever series you wanted to throw it at. With 121 horsepower at the crank pushing around about 440 pounds, the M1 was no slouch. This one has been in the care of a Kawi tech for the last decade, and he says he purchased it from his friend who is the original owner. He claims it has never been raced, and all 21,000 of its miles were racked up on the roads around Burnaby, BC, where it lives. It got an extensive going over last year, with a catalog of new parts listed below.

The bike is in beautiful condition, with the exception of a very scarce few blemishes.

From the eBay listing:

Motorcycle is a Canadian M1 model.
Originally purchased new from my local Kawasaki dealership, Burnaby Kawasaki in BC Canada, est. 1975.
Previous owner is a friend and I have always wanted my first love, a 1993 ZX7R M1.
I purchased the bike June 2009.

Currently has 37,385 kilometers / 23230 miles

Wheels do have some minor light scratches where balance weights were removed when changing tires in past. Front fairing, above headlights, where Kawasaki silver lettering / black decal has, small Nick in decal. See pics.

Two things are missing:
Bike is missing fuel filter bracket, I’ve never had it, didn’t really bother me, but I ordered one last year, it never showed up. Bit disappointed. They are used ones out there.
The remote idle adjuster is bit shorter than the original. I do not know what happened to the original, I bought it like this, and again, never really bothered me. Its just short to reach the holder bracket.

All service work completed in 2018 by myself, factory Kawasaki trained tech.
All the fluids and oil filter have been changed.
Valve adjustment, shims changed as needed.
Carbs cleaned, adjusted as needed and synced. Bike runs great, see video of running operation, link below.
Brakes front and rear rebuilt, oem seals.
Fork seals replaced oem.
New sparkplugs.
New oem air filter.
New oem butt pad.
New brake pads and new oem brake rotors front and back.
Replaced the brake lines with spieglers, I do have the oem brake lines front and rear.
Zero Gravity tinted screen.
I do not have oem windscreen. These can be made to exact oem match by a company in Florida, www.bikescreen.com
New Michelin pilot tires with less than 300kms.
I do have the side fairing left and right side reflectors.
Two ignition keys plus the key code tag.
New chain and sprockets, went with blue chain, reminds me early 90’s. Stock oem gearing.
New battery, new thermostat. New brake reservoirs. All the lights, speedo lights etc work, nothing burnt out. Charging system checked, ok.
Bike starts up, idles, operates properly. I do have video https://youtu.be/M0ofJBc2JXI

Call me if you have any questions, Jason @ 1-604-816- 2915 Try to call between 9am-10pm PST
Much appreciated.

Buyer is responsible for shipping. Bike is located in Vancouver, BC, Canada,
1 hour north of USA border.

Motorcycle is listed for sale locally as well, so auction can end anytime.

Since the bike is in Canada, it will take a little bit of paperwork for U.S. buyers to get it on the road, but for a bike this cool and in condition this nice, it should be worth the hassle.

Angry Ninja: 1993 Kawasaki ZX-7R M1
Yamaha August 23, 2018 posted by

Great bike, bad timing: 1992 Yamaha YZF 750SP with 4,017 miles

Today’s post is a bit of homolgation era goodness, a 1992 Yamaha YZF750R/SP.  The SP isn’t currently as desired by collectors as other 750cc machines, such as a 1st/2nd generation Suzuki GSXR-750R or Kawasaki ZX7RR, nor is it as technologically important as the OW01 or R7.  Yet the YZF750SP was dominant for multiple years in Superbike racing and was recently rated as possibly the best 1990’s 750cc homolgation machine by Practical Sportbikes (April 2017).  Combine this with it only being produced from 1993-1996 and with this one showing only 4,017 miles, it certainly seems worthy of a post here on RSBFS.

1992 Yamaha YZF750SP with 4017 miles

Ask a group of sportbike fans what the “best” 1990’s 750cc machine was and you will no doubt get a variety of answers.  Some will say it was the GSX-R750, the bike that really launched the repli-racer craze and the last of the air cooled monsters.  Others might say it was the Yamaha OW01, R7 (Ow02) or perhaps the Kawasaki ZX7RR…you might even get a few votes for the landmark Honda VFR750, a progenitor of the V4 philosophy that now rules MotoGp.   Ask this same group about the Yamaha YZF750R SP and perhaps you get a few comments of “um..yeah..nice bike” or shrugs but very few would probably initially list it as the best 750cc of the 1990’s.   But consider this…it won the Suzuka 8 hour in 1996 which made it the the only non-Honda to do that in over 10 years and it dominated in Superbike Racing in the UK from 1996-1998.  Think about that timeframe for a second..notice anything?   It means the SP was dominant on the track for 2 years after the company stopped making it, a truly amazing result.

In case you are wondering how Yamaha achieved this the answer is in typical Yamaha fashion the SP was developed as an evolution, not a revolution.   Like the preceding OW01, the SP came equipped with Yamaha’s EXUP system which delivered both high rpm performance and good mid-range.  The 3/4 liter powerplant was wrapped up in a new deltabox frame designed by the same man who would lead Yamaha’s R1 effort. And handling was done by adjustable forks and 6 piston calipers, a first on a production machine.  The SP also came with flatside carbs, a close ratio gearbox, adjustable swingarm pivot and lots of other trick goodies designed to help it dominate on the track.

Now let’s turn out attention to this particular offering.  Listed as a 1992 model imported from Japan, this one looks to be in excellent condition.  The seller does provide some  recent maintenance history, the summary of which is as follows:

  • 4017 miles (6465 kilometers)
  • Imported from Japan and now has a legal Washington State clear title
  • Carburetor was recently ultrasonically cleaned and adjusted, and a full service tune-up was performed which included new, tires, spark plugs, chain, air filter, brake pads, an oil change, and fluids flushed. All of the lighting, switches and electrical components work as they should
  • No cracks on any of the body panels, but there are some minor nicks and scrapes on a few of the panels. The wheels are perfect with no rock chips or scratches anywhere. The frame and engine have no corrosion and are nice and clean

NOTE:  I did note a fairing scuff on the riders right side lower (zoom in on the pic below on the ebay auction, you can see it in the ‘Yamaha’ Blue lettering) and I am not sure if the exhaust is OEM or aftermarket but other than that this bikes looks completely OEM.  I do wish the pics were taken in more direct sunlight though.

\

So this brings us to the question, is this bike worth the $13,000 USD asking price?  Well when it was new the YZF asking price was $15,000 so the asking price is actually not outrageous and finding one in this condition and mileage seems unlikely anytime soon so the price seems right on.  Still this is a 26 year old motorcycle so its not going to appeal to a lot of people/the chances of major price appreciation from this point seem small.   Personally I think this one will appeal most to a homologation-era collector. I can envision it parked between a OW01 and R7 or maybe gleaning in the sun next to a ZX7RR.

Marty/dallaslavowner

Great bike, bad timing:  1992 Yamaha YZF 750SP with 4,017 miles

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