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Ducati March 23, 2020 posted by

Can’t Ride 55 – 2000 Ducati 996 SPS

Though you would had to have been a racer or one of your Ducati dealer’s best customers to rate a 996 SPS back in 2000, they are starting to appear with some regularity.  Most have just introductory miles like this one, and are carefully tended.

2000 Ducati 996 SPS #1214 for sale on eBay

Ducati and Carl Fogarty were working hard to continue their championship-winning ways, and the SPS was their homologation special for the turn of the century.  Not radically different than a base 996, it’s just a little more powerful with 123 hp.  Suspension was top-of-the-line Öhlins for 2000, and worked well with the adjustable frame geometry to suit a rider’s preference.  Marchesini forged their 17-inch wheels for the occasion, and likewise Brembo supplied their best 4-piston calipers up front.  A sea of racing red gives way to white number areas behind the single seat.

For whatever reason this short-term owner didn’t warm up to the red experience, fortunately the previous completed a major service last summer.  Miles are not significant at 4,565, and it looks very stock, right down to the clutch cover.  Condition looks great save one near miss on the right seat console, and the belt buckle / key guard is cheap insurance.  Some SPS’s come with their original tires, but thankfully this one has new rubber.  The owner’s comments from the eBay auction:

The bike is all original, it’s been ridden and well cared for. 

-4570 miles with almost new tires (under 400 miles)

-went through a thorough inspection in September 2019 (when purchased). All fluids and fuel system were flushed and replaced. Switched water tank to carbon fiber one. 

-battery, spark plug, belts were serviced July 2019

Foggy’s 2000 season ended early in a collision at Philip Island, but the work he did developing the 996 paid off with Troy Corser’s 2001 championship.  Though the 996 could be a chore around town, as speeds exceed highway normality and the wind lightens the load on the rider’s wrists ( and makes the cooling system work ), it turns into a great pleasure.  Maybe the next owner will take the new tires at their word and put a few miles on this millennial beauty.

-donn


6 Responses.
magni March 20, 2020 posted by

One for the Count – 2002 Magni Sport 1200S

Virtually bespoke with total production countable on just two hands, Arturo Magni’s Sport 1200S was a reverent styling based on the MV Agusta 750S.  Though the SACS-cooled Suzuki 1200 took flak from European cogniscenti, it turns out the drivetrain was a perfect choice.

2002 Magni Sport 1200s for sale on eBay

The first in a series of Magnis to pay homage to – MV Agusta’s 750S –, the Suzuki-based Sport 1200S used Magni’s typically beautiful frame, this time finished in red.  Ceriani forks mount big Brembo brakes, and the swingarm is a historical dual-shock arrangement.  Owners got their money’s worth just in the craftsmanship of the alloy tank, fenders, and side covers.  Suzuki’s late oil-cooled engine was handed down from the GSX-R generation, tuning relaxed in concert with an increase in displacement, and promised 98 hp with the more important 68 ft.-lbs. torque.  And Suzuki’s reputation for staying in the ring when beatings were handed out.  Maybe not Agusta music, but the sculptural 4-into-4 exhaust must’ve made an auditory statement.

Not sure how this Magni came to have 17,000 km, maybe before it was imported or with dealer plates.  Either way, it shows like the exotic it is, nothing detracting from Magni’s metal artistry despite being college-age.  From the eBay auction:

This is an extremely rare (probably nonexistent in the U.S.) handmade model. The Sport 1200S is a machine that recreated the style and presence of the MV 750 Sport. The Magni hand crafted chrome-moly frame, Ceriani forks and Brembo brakes and a pair of Showa shocks at the rear. The engine breathes through a set of signature black curved four-into-four megaphone exhausts. The alloy swingarm was taken from the GSX 1200 Inazuma. Engine modifications included a 1mm overbore to give 1156cc, mild cams, and a 9.5:1 compression ratio, making 100hp. This example is a 17,000 km example that is extremely clean and has been lovingly owned and cared for – this an incredible handbuilt exotic, which is simple to service at any Suzuki or independent mechanic.

Magni went back to MV Agusta for drivetrains after the Sport 1200S, but continued to commemorate the 750S successfully.  Not bad company, the Suzuki-powered Magni is in the second row with Honda, Moto-Guzzi, and BMW.  Though not Magni’s raciest model, the Sport 1200S is a lovely tribute to the 750S, a peculiar combination of rarity and easy maintenance, and might pique the interest of a Suzuki fan as well.

-donn


3 Responses.
Honda March 19, 2020 posted by

Bantamweight Racer: 1981 Honda RS125RW for Sale

Today’s Honda RS125RW might be a bit obscure for most of our readers, and is certainly older than the bikes we usually feature here, but a genuine Honda Grand Prix machine is certainly worth a look whenever one comes up for sale! This one has plenty of patina, period stickers, and an apparently rare dry clutch for less weight and extra noise!

Honda’s Grand Prix racing motorcycles were based around four-stroke engines until the two-stroke MT125 was introduced in the 1970s. The MT125 was replaced in 1980 by the RS125RW seen here, and that machine soldiered on until it was replaced in 1987. The significantly updated RS125 introduced in 1987 was eventually developed into the dominant machine more familiar to most of our readers.

Powered by a motocross engine borrowed from the RC125M, the RS125R’s liquid-cooled, reed-valve engine made 30hp from 124.9cc with a bore and stroke of 56 x 50.6mm. The frame was a twin shock, steel duplex design, had disc brakes at both ends, and weighed in at 170lbs dry. It wasn’t considered cutting edge when new, but it was reasonably successful in competition and Honda continued to develop the bike and its successors as an over the counter racing machine available to younger racers honing their skills.

From the original eBay listing: 1981 Honda RS125RW for Sale

1981 Honda RS125R-W located at our shop in Santa Ana, California. The pictures in this auction were taken at our shop in Japan. This RS125R-W is in very good condition for its age. Engine has a super rare dry clutch. The previous owner said he rebuilt the engine before it was put away many years ago. RS125R-W are very hard to find now. This bike is the best we have had for many years now. And the only one we have had with a dry clutch. Bike will come with a new windscreen not mounted to the bike. There are no spares with this bike. Bike is sold as is, no returns. Look at the pictures carefully and ask questions before you bid. Sorry, no Paypal on this item. Again, bike is sold with a bill of sale, no title. Bike comes with what you see in the pictures in this auction.

The starting bid is $6,995 with a few days left on the auction and no bids as yet. This one is obviously a bit of a gamble, since parts to keep one running will be difficult to source. The engine is said to have been rebuilt, but I’d be prepared for the worst if it was my money. Experts might have a line on what they might need to actually ride it, and this bit of Honda racing history would obviously make an awesome display piece for your living room or the lobby of a business, if you just want to show it off in all its period patina.

-tad

Ducati March 18, 2020 posted by

Great Unwashed – 1999 Ducati 996S

Probably the root of more Ducati obsessions than any other bike, the squinting headlights of Massimo Tamburrini’s 1994-2002 masterpiece say ‘Faster’.  This 1999 single seat 996S shows beautifully with just over 3,000 miles.

1999 Ducati 996S #098 for sale on eBay

The increase from 916cc led Ducati to specify a new Weber fuel injection system, and it required dual fuel injectors to achieve its 123 hp.  But the new system could be a bit rich around town, and some owners took to re-programming to disarm the second injector.  Elsewhere, a few things from the base 996 that had been plastic were now carbon, dampers were upgraded to adjustable Showa forks and Öhlins monoshock, and wheels were of course alloy but lighter Marchesini forgings.  The -S was always a monoposto, and not sure if I’ve ever seen anything but red.

This San Diego owner doesn’t tell the ownership history, but it’s clear this 996S has been protected from the garage elves and updated in very good taste.  Comments from the eBay auction:

This 21 year-old is in amazing condition with only 3,017 miles on the clock!  The original date coded Michelins are still on the bike as a testament to it’s condition.  One is dated the 10th week of 98 the other the 52nd.  The bike has never been washed with water, if you look closely in the pictures, all of the original factory grease torque marks are in place!  All of them.  It has always been stored in a climate controlled garage and it is absolutely free from corrosion.  It has been kept upright it’s entire life completely free from ANY blemishes.  At 1,959 miles, the timing belts and a full service was performed at Ducati of Newport Beach.  Currently registered and insured in my name with a clear California title.
This 996S is sporting a few period correct upgrades.  It sounds evil thanks to it’s obligatory open clutch cover, classic Termignoni exhaust and Ultimap chip.  Steel braided lines throughout including brakes, clutch and oil cooler.  Lastly there were a few extra carbon bits added including chain guard, sprocket cover, chin spoiler and license plate holder.  The tank guard on there is magnetic so there is no sticker residue.  I have the original ugly red reflectors that go on the front fender as well. 

While you could just take a spin on those old tires, how would you ever explain it should one come apart ?  Might be good to date the belt service as well, before requesting take-off power.  In a issue of just 200 machines, a 996S is very collectible, but having ridden a nicely updated base 996, the next owner will not want to relegate their new purchase to display without at least one great afternoon.

-donn


10 Responses.
Ghezzi-Brian March 16, 2020 posted by

Gorgeous Guzzi: 2001 Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin for Sale

The Daytona/Sport 1100i were very entertaining machines, with plenty of grunt from the nearly 1100cc v-twin, matched with quality suspension and brakes. Unfortunately, they were also burdened with shaft drive and nearly 100 extra pounds of weight, compared to other Italian sportbikes of the era. So basically a charismatic engine in an overweight package. Sadly, Colin Chapman wasn’t available to help out, but Giuseppe Ghezzi and Bruno Saturno, two halves of the Ghezzi-Brian team, stepped up to build the lightweight, but very pricey Supertwin that cost nearly $15,000 in 2001 money.

There’s a lot of clever engineering going on here, and the completed machine supposedly weighed in at nearly 70lbs less than a Daytona or Sport 1100i. The bike certainly looks lighter and more agile than a Sport 1100i, although I feel like the colors on this example date the bike a bit. Perimeter brakes similar to Buell’s ZTL or “zero tortional load” system supposedly reduce unsprung weight up front and look really trick, the frame channels air through to the airbox below the rear shock, and a redesigned rear suspension helped to reduce the torque reaction of the shaft drive.

I have an old “all Italian” issue of Bike magazine that features one of my favorite comparison tests of all time: an Aprilia RS250 versus a Ducati 748 versus a Bimota YB9 versus a Moto Guzzi Daytona RS. Obviously, the “big old bus” Guzzi didn’t fare well in such light-footed company, but their big, longitudinally-mounted v-twin could still be entertaining slotted into something like this Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin. And this wasn’t the end of the line for Ghezzi and Guzzi: in the Supertwin you can see the kernel of ideas later used in the stunning MGS-01.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Ghezzi-Brian 1064cc Supertwin for Sale

Frame no. FP1239

As Roland Brown of Motorcyclist puts it:

“I’m carving through a series of immaculately surfaced bends in the hills near Lecco in northern Italy, aboard a stunning new V-twin whose jutting cylinders, grunty power and off-beat exhaust could only come from Moto Guzzi.

“The Guzzi factory at Mandello del Lario is only a short ride from here, but this bike isn’t the first dramatic result of Guzzi’s recent acquisition by Aprilia. This is the Supertwin 1100, now being hand-built in small numbers by Ghezzi & Brian, a specialist firm from the nearby village of Perego.

“As you ride it, carving through the twisties, the aural clues don’t match the experience. The grunty power and off-beat exhaust could only come from Moto Guzzi. But this isn’t just a Guzzi from the Mandello del Lario factory, this is the Supertwin, a hand-built, low production superbike from Ghezzi-Brian, the specialist firm from the nearby village of Perego.

“Moto Guzzi is one of the oldest and most storied motorcycle manufacturers in existence, but they’ve drifted pretty far from their sporting roots, owing to their purchase by Piaggio, a move that has kept them afloat, but forever relegated to building vintage-styled and cruisers to prevent them competing with more sports-oriented bikes from sister-company Aprilia. Really though, the downward slide began long before that, as Guzzi just couldn’t keep pace with the ruthless development of modern sportbikes from Japan. Luckily, there’ve been a few bright spots along the way, like this Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin that point out just how much life is still left in Moto Guzzi’s v-twin.

“Produced by Giuseppe Ghezzi and Bruno Saturno this is a race-replica designed around Ghezzi’s successful racing machine, the Supertwin features quality suspension at both ends and clever engineering designed to reduce weight. The slim bodywork reveals the iconic longitudinal v-twin and contrasts nicely with the hulking mechanicals. The huge perimeter front brakes look incredibly trick on the OZ Racing wheels and should offer up excellent stopping power to go with the increased straight-line performance that comes mostly from a huge weight reduction: the Supertwin weighs in at a claimed 427lbs dry, down 55lbs from the largely stock V11 Sport that donates its engine. Power is a modest 91hp but the 1064cc motor puts out impressive torque to match the amazing soundtrack. 

“Ghezzi’s frame is based on a steel spine and uses the motor as a stressed member, but that’s where the similarities end. The Supertwin spine doubles not as the oil tank but as the airbox, taking in air under the tank to feed the intakes that run back from those jutting cylinders.  There’s plenty of clever engineering rearward, too, where a multiadjustable Bitubo shock lies horizontally and is worked by a rising-rate linkage. In Guzzi fashion the Supertwin’s box-section steel swingarm incorporates a parallelogram arrangement to cancel torque reaction.  But this bike’s real innovation is up front, where its multiadjustable, inverted Paioli fork holds a 17-inch wheel whose twin discs are a massive 420mm in diameter and are fixed to the rim rather than the hub. The entire system, incorporating four-piston calipers biting on thin discs that are fully floating to allow for heat expansion, has been developed by local firm Braking.”

The bike offered is presented in truly excellent condition throughout with the gentle patina of a sparingly used, but meticulously kept near 20-year-old machine. The odometer reads an original 7,500 kms from new, most of which were enjoyed earlier in its life, as it has been on static display in three prominent private California collections for the last half of its existence.

The bike is offered in a Bill of Sale, but I can assist with titling. Please contact me.

For additional photos and details, please visit Classic Avenue.

The $24,900 asking price is a lot of cash for a Guzzi-powered special with pushrods and two valves per cylinder. In the plus column, 90hp should provide plenty of poke in the relatively light machine, the design is extremely exotic, and Guzzi engines are very durable and easy to service. Unfortunately, the bodywork is nearly unobtainable, and I’m not sure where you’d pick up a set of those perimeter brake discs, or a replacement wheel if you ding a rim.

-tad


11 Responses.
BMW March 14, 2020 posted by

Glad Rarity – 2004 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika

Despite its /S provenance and signed fairings, this R1100S hasn’t been allowed out much.  The only thing between this BCR and a great day is some new fluids and tires, and a weekend detail.

2004 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replica for sale on eBay

BMW has had the R1100S in their catalog since 1998, and put the Replikas together to capitalize on their investment in the mostly European race series.  But the BCR wasn’t just a cosmetic exercise – the later dual-spark engine made 98 hp available, and the stainless Laser exhaust is both lighter and flows better.  As nice as it is to have that flat twin low CG, the dual-adjustable suspension on the Replika works by raising the ride height to allow more lean angle on the track.  A whopping 5-1/2 inch rear wheel and braided brake lines help manage the 500-lb. ready-to-ride weight.  Carbon belly pan, front fender and head covers contrast with the factory white/blue racing livery.

Seemingly a little young to be a barn find, this R1100S looks good especially compared with its homely storage mates.  Not seeing any mods or damage, though a detailed examination for garage rash can’t be done with the pictures provided.  No belts or water system to worry over, not much to be done but all new expendables and hope the fuel injectors haven’t been affected by their long nap.  The owner acknowledges possible rubs from storage in the eBay auction:

This bike has 569 Original Miles.
It has had only one owner, never track raced.
This has normal ” Shelf Wear “.
It is a good running cycle.
This a very nice collectable especially at this low mileage.
Randy Mamola might be happier to see his signature on a concours contender or neo-café racer, as any AMA hall of fame inductee deserves.  Mamola started racing a generation before the Boxer Cup, but was in their “race of champions” field early in the series.  Without most of the user-friendly bag racks and heated grips this BMW is one for an afternoon blast and back.  The ask is a ways above recent sales, but a low or no-mile BMW is an oddity in its own right – usually they have tens of thousands of miles and look almost as good !
-donn

10 Responses.
Bimota March 13, 2020 posted by

Extra, EXTRA Exclusive: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale

This Bimota SB4S is the epitome of an Italian exotic: long, low, lean, and fast, stuffed full of the best componentry and radical thinking available at the time. Imagine it sitting next to nearly any other early 1980s machine and it’s almost like a MotoGP bike just dropped by your local bike night. Note the one-piece tank and tail section attached by just a few fasteners to help simplify maintenance, the quick-release axles, high-spec suspension, eccentric chain adjuster, and lightweight 16″ wheels that were fitted with then-rare radial tires. Most SB4s used modular units similar to Honda’s Comstar wheels, but this example is fitted with beautiful Campagnolo hoops.

Bimota’s reputation was built around their race-inspired frames, and the SB4’s is no exception. The chrome-moly trellis unit with machined aluminum side-plates is a gorgeous piece of engineering, once the lightweight bodywork is removed, and wrapped around the utterly massive 1074cc powerplant borrowed from Suzuki’s GSX1100. Air-cooled, with four valves per cylinder and Suzuki’s Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber technology, it was left largely stock in this application because the main performance advantage of the SB4 came from a reduction in weight: the Bimota came in at a claimed 405lbs, 130lbs less than the 535lb GSX1100!

Significantly, the SB4 was available with both three-quarter and full fairings. Looks are subjective, but the three-quarter design is probably the better bet if you plan to regularly use your Bimota: the full fairing apparently traps lots of heat, and the air-cooled mill has a hard time managing the resulting elevated temperatures. That being said, this example has 15,000 miles on the odometer, so previous owners have either ridden it fast enough to keep temps down, or spent a lot of time rolling it around their garages…

I’ve seen a number of different directional indicators, or even no indicators fitted to the SB4. I’m assuming that none were originally included, because Italy, but different solutions were found to suit the requirements of different markets. These flush indicators seem to work as well as any, and are a damn sight less obnoxious than the DOT-approved bits fitted to many later motorcycles. I’d fit some bar-end signals and get rid of these barnacle-looking things, but that might just be me.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale

1984 Bimota SB4S, 1 of only 34 produced

Bimota’s significant reputation was forged in the creation of fast, exclusive motorcycles oozing with Italian style. That reputation began in the 1970s when founders Giuseppe Morri and Massimo Tamburini shifted their successful heating and ventilation firm’s focus to that of their passion – motorcycles. 

Japan’s offerings of the time often consisted of a wonderfully smooth, powerful engine mounted in a frame of limited performance. Moto Martin of France, Bakker of Holland, and Harris and Spondon of England, all saw the potential of these engines. But Bimota exploited the situation with Italian flair, building exotic, exclusive, innovative machines in very limited numbers. Technical innovation too has long been a Bimota hallmark, as exemplified by the hub centre-steered Tesi models, while on the world’s racetracks Bimota-framed machines have won hundreds of races and numerous championships. 

Utilizing the Suzuki GSX1100 powerplant, the Bimota SB4 was priced at approximately $11,000, making it one of the world’s most expensive motorcycles. And one of the most exclusive with only 272 built, 34 of which were the even-more-exclusive SB4S models with full fairing. And one of these SB4S is on offer here. In perfectly original condition, the bike has covered a little more than 15,000 miles from new. Having been on static display for several years, the bike was recently re-commissioned and serviced, and now starts easily and rides perfectly. Brakes work well and all electrical systems function as they should.

This is a perfect opportunity to add an exclusive, very limited production Italian exotic with the ease of ownership and outright power and pace of a Japanese superbike.

For further information, video of the bike running, and additional photos, please visit ClassicAvenue.com

The SB4S is extremely rare, rare enough it’s hard to find actual pictures of one. Just 34 were built, and I’m not sure how consistent they were in terms of specifications. It supposedly differs from the “regular” SB4 with its four-into-one exhaust, oil-cooler, and other details. This example has the standard dual exhaust, and I can’t tell if there’s an oil-cooler hiding behind the full fairing. I’m also curious about the adapters that apparently allow larger, four-piston front brake calipers to be fitted. They appear to be a period-correct update, so I’d love to know more: did the bike come this way from Bimota? Was it modified when new? We’ve featured this particular bike a couple times in the past, but this is a heavily revised listing with much nicer photos, so it seemed a good time to revisit it. The seller is asking $21,900 this time around, so maybe the third time is the charm?

-tad


8 Responses.
Featured Listing March 12, 2020 posted by

Featured Listings: Pair of 1994 Suzuki RGV250R VJ22 Lucky Strikes

Update 3.12.2020: The VJ22 with Arrow exhaust has sold. Gary’s FINAL gray market bike from his outstanding collection is now on eBay with No Reserve. This last Lucky Strike is a fitting way to close. Links updated – act quickly before it’s gone!

It shouldn’t need to be explained how deliciously apt the Lucky Strike livery was for the Suzuki RGV250R, a competition terrorizing, rule-bending hooligan of a lightweight sportbike that smoked like a chimney and is as un-PC as grandad at an open bar. These little Suzukis are the stuff of my mid-1990s bedroom wall, and our friend Gary in Utah has not one, but two of the little curs. For the price of a new Hyundai, you can have a brace of the finest oil-burning track machines Japan ever spat out.

Built around a 90-degree v-twin that was good for around 70 horsepower uncorked, the 1994 Suzuki RGV250R VJ22 made its name shirking tiered licensing rules and treating roadracers to quick, precise handling that you just couldn’t match on a bike with loads of horsepower and a big waistline. On these bikes, the heritage as a racetrack terror is carried to the bodywork, where the big Lucky Strike logos ape Kevin Schwantz’s 500cc GP World Championship machine. We could think of few people to better personify the RGV250R than the waifish, aggressive Texan.

The pair here, in true Gary fashion, are immaculate, though one is ever so slightly nicer than the other. The bike with the Arrow pipes and black passenger seat is a little straighter, and has newly powdercoated wheels wearing a new set of Dunlop Sportmaxes. It comes with a standard exhaust should you want to take it back to stock. The bike with stock cans and a red seat needs a powdercoat and comes with an aftermarket exhaust if the stocker is too tame.

As with anything Gary touches, they have recently had all mechanical systems checked and refreshed.

From the seller:

Both bikes are 1994 models. Vin numbers confirmed genuine lucky strike models. L.S. With Arrow exhaust system has newly powder coated wheels and new Dunlop sport max tires. New drive chain. All fairings are 100% genuine OEM Suzuki factory. Genuine OEM new black passenger seat. Bike comes with OEM stock exhaust system. Customized with gold anodized bar ends. 7,427 kilometers.

L.S. with stock pipes and red passenger seat has 4,903 kilometers. Aftermarket exhaust comes with the bike. All stock condition. All fairings and components are 100% genuine OEM factory Suzuki. Bike could use the wheels powder coated but still looks very nice. Tiny ding in the front right side gas tank. Both bikes are minty low mileage examples. Both come with Utah state titles and are titled as street bikes for road use.

Both L.S.’s run like new. Both have had carb cleans….They both have new engine fluids, new brake fluid and both have had fork seals replaced and new fork fluid. Electrical components are 100% operational as new.

Askng $11,900 each.

Contact: rmurangemasters@aol.com (Gary)

Maybe you and a friend are in search of the next track day thrill, or maybe you want a buddy bike for weekend canyon carving, or, hell, maybe you just want one to ride and one to polish. Whatever floats your boat, these things have you covered.

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