Search Results for “ducati superlight”

Ducati January 5, 2009 posted by

A Pair of Ducati 900SS Superlight’s For Sale

Mancation Seattle Dec 08 005

While I was up in Seattle recently for the International Motorcycle Show, we stopped by Ducati of Seattle. I spotted this nice looking Superlight for sale in their garage:

1993 Ducati Superlight For Sale in Seattle

according to the Ducati Seattle website:

Miles: 20,543 mi.
Kehin flat slide carbs, Arrow pipes, Very Clean Bike!
Price Reduced: $7,899.00*

And the second Superlight on the radar today I had originally spotted a year ago on my old blog. While fairly pricey, you can’t deny the miles:

1993 Ducati Superlight on Craigslist for $9500:

Ducati Superlight For Sale

quote from seller’s Craigslist posting:

1993 Limited Edition Ducati 900ss Superlight . Only 2200 miles. Certified and documented from original owner Bradly Krasus finding partners of Kinko . Currently registered and titled. Bike was purchased from Santa Barbara Dealership and remained in CA entire life. There are unique features on the Superlight limited edition and not easy to find in such condition and low miles. Excellent addition to any collection .

These are pretty rare bikes and I think it’s an interesting opportunity for a prospective buyer to consider a well worn example or the museum piece.

dc

Update: This post is pretty outdated. Check out these Ducati SuperSports on eBay right now:

[AffomaticEbay]Ducati Supersport[/AffomaticEbay]

Ducati November 20, 2020 posted by

All Sales Final: 1998 Ducati 900 Final Edition #104

Ducati has a long history of creating some very memorable motorcycles, many of which have been considered rolling artwork. They also have perfected the art of the limited edition, with exclusive models wearing limited and unique number plaques on the headstocks. The purpose of the special, super-exclusive badging is to drive demand via the perception of scarcity – thereby harnessing the law of supply and demand to turn a bigger profit. And in many, many cases the motorcycles wearing the “LE” badge are indeed special bikes (SP, SPS, LTD, Superlight, MH900e all come to mind). And what can be as special as the last model of the vaunted Tamburini-era 900 Supersport?

1998 Ducati 900 Final Edition #104 for sale on eBay

To be sure the 1998 model year was not the last Supersport – for these are still being built today. But the ’98 model was the final year for this particular design, which dates back to the 1980s and the introduction of the Pantah motor. With a big square headlight and both a half-faired as well as fully faired bodywork style available, the Supersport allowed customers who could not afford a 851/88/916 Superbike model a more wallet-friendly way to get into Ducati. And it worked. The air-cooled, two valve, desmo Ducati Supersports became a hot seller, overhauled only by the success of the Monster line. But the big deal here was not the past, but the future. For in 1998 the “new” Supersport design was launched – penned by Pierre Terblanche. Responsible for the polarizing design of the 999, Terblanche’s take on the classic 900 Supersport fell flat. That cliff dive of design continuity is what *really* makes the ’98 900 Final Edition special.

From the seller:
Final Edition – 1998 Ducati Supersport 900FE

To mark the end of its badass Supersport line, Ducati released a one-year run of 800 bikes around the world. They called it the Final Edition, painted it silver, and threw on a couple of goodies like 41mm FCR carbs and Ohlins rear shock. 300 of the 800 examples made it over the US – here’s number 104.

Ducati started with the Superlight variant of the SS, and then in addition to the silver paint, added a whole bunch of carbon: mudguard, chain guard, rear fender, countershaft drive cover, and dashboard cover. In addition, they raised the pipes for more cornering clearance, gave it new cast iron floating rotors, and some new parts (voltage regulator and alternator) were added, too.

Extremely rare Ducati, 14,895 miles in pristine condition. I am the second owner and it has been meticulously maintained.

From an ownership perspective, there is little not to love about the Supersport. Relatively simple, light, torquey and rock solid, the Ducati of this era gave up a little bit of creature comfort and polish to the Japanese competition, but offered the visceral sound and experience for which Ducati is known. Maintenance intervals are reasonable, and the 2v motors are much easier to work on than the desmoquattro Superbikes. All in all, these are reliable machines with a relatively low cost of ownership considering it is an Italian exotic.

From a collector perspective, the 900SS-SP (Sport Production) and 900SS-SL (Superlight) are the top dogs of the Supersport world. The Final Edition is essentially a specially-badged SP variant, which should certainly place it appropriately as unique. These are not necessarily valuable motorcycles as a whole (a basic 900 SS CR model remains a real bargain today), but values are certainly on the rise. Superlights are way up, and SP versions of the 900SS are climbing. This 900SS-FE has been slow on the auction side, and has a Buy It Now price of $9,000. That B.I.N. number is fair money for a clean and well-kept FE, so interested buyers should check out all of the details here. It’s hard to go wrong with a Ducati Supersport, be it bevel or Pantah, Tamburini or Terblanche. What’s your favorite Supersport model? Be sure and let us know in the comments. Stay safe, and good luck!!

MI

All Sales Final: 1998 Ducati 900 Final Edition #104
Ducati July 30, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: Air-cooled Ducati 749 hot rod superbike!

The phrase “Ducati superbike” is enough to strike panic into the hearts of most mortal bank accounts. Just breathing the name of the storied Italian marque conjures ghoulish visions of microscopic maintenance intervals, climbing cost of entry and woeful consequences should you play Devil-may-care with recommended services. Luckily, what we have before us is the exception to that rule. A Ducati superbike powered by an 1,100cc iteration of Bologna’s venerated L-twin, expertly hung in a thoroughly modern steel lattice chassis.

It’s a chicken-and-egg exercise to try and piece together what this bike started life as, so here’s what we know: Its mill is the stock engine from an 1,100cc Monster that has been treated to pod filters. The chassis is from a mid-aughts 749 Dark and the swingarm began life on a Monster S2R. The rest of the parts roster reads like a WSBK team’s grocery list, so we’ll let the seller describe it in a bit.

The result of all the trickery is a torquey, featherweight track weapon that looks and goes like nothing else. It eschews the usual superbike practice of stuffing five million peaky horses into an aluminum frame in favor of a sweet-handling, friendly torque monster. Fast and friendly is the name of the game. With 85 horsepower under your right wrist, you’re not likely to scare an R6 on the straights, but hold your nerve and momentum will carry the day.

From the seller:

I bought this bike in ’17 from the original owner who commissioned the build. Told Bruce Meyers put it together originally w/ 800 motor (hence the s2r swingarm). Chris Boy at Moto Corse then built and tuned it as it sits. Bike is 100% ready to ride.
749 Dark frame, modified for conversion / vin removed.
Stock 1100 monster engine, less than 2k mi, MWR Pod filters
749r subframe, custom front fairing stay.
S2r swingarm, 749 linkage.
Ohlins rear shock, stabilizer, & 25mm kit in 1098 forks.
Attack triples, 28deg offset.
M4 monoblocks, 320mm full floating rotors, progressive pads.
Yoyodyne slipper clutch and slave.
Woodcraft clip-ons, rearsets, lever guards, & clutch cover.
SC Racing oversized oil-cooler.
QD low-mount exhaust.
Microtec ecu, lightened harness.
Dynojet quickshifter, quick-turn throttle tube.
Shorai battery, Shorai charger included.
520 chain, Superlight sprocket & quick change carrier.
Carbon front fender, rear hugger.
Pirelli sc-1 slicks, ran 3 track-day sessions.
Sharkskin 749 bodywork, fresh paint, stickers over clear.
Plenty of Woodcraft spares and rear stand included.
Bike weighs 375lbs, 49.5%front 50.5%rear, 85hp & 71 ft/lbs at rear wheel.

Bad: Small blemish on fork slider but never blew seal or leaked. Extra 1098 forks (empty) included. Bodywork shows some damage through paint. Rear hugger tight clearance but still clears warmers. Stone chips and small nics, some rash (normal race bike condition).

All service work performed at Ducati Detroit. Belts 2 years old, valves adjusted w/ 1 track day. All fresh Motul fluids, MWR pods oiled, steering head bearings serviced, forks serviced. Fully safety wired.

Price is $7,500 firm. Buyer to arrange and pay for shipping. Located in Detroit Michigan. Contact me at ericfroh@gmail.com for more pictures or any questions. I kept up with built motors in AHRMA. I hope it goes to a good home, it was a dream bike.

Thank you, Eric

It’s clear that this machine has been well-loved over its life, and it deserves a next owner who can heap a similar level of care and attention on it. As track weapons go, it’s hard to think of something that will stand out the way this will.

Featured Listing: Air-cooled Ducati 749 hot rod superbike!
Ducati June 25, 2020 posted by

Silver Bird – 1998 Ducati 900SS/FE #287 of 300

In the 1990’s, Ducati’s SuperSport could be all things to some people – before the Monster and ST2 arrived, it could be an ok commuter and passable sport tourer.  This Final Edition has had some choice upgrades and considering the mileage looks very good.

1998 Ducati 900SS/FE for sale on eBay

The FE used the 904cc L-twin that had inhabited the SuperSports throughout the 90’s, air-cooled with 84 hp but peak torque at just 6,400 rpm.  The inverted forks and alloy swingarm were suspended by Showa, with Brembo supplying their gold-line 320mm brakes and cast iron rotors.  FE’s had a re-designed body with scoops to help cool the rear cylinder, and all were monoposto’s with a seat fairing courtesy of the earlier Superlight.  A new charging system brought 520 watts via a three phase alternator, and exhausts were swept high.  Carbon mudguards complimented the black alloys, and the dash was carbon as well.

Sounds like this owner is a knowledgeable SuperSport fan, and this FE has some key updates and neat NOS parts.  The Keihin flat-slide set-up appears to pre-date the seller and is tuned for Santa Fe (6,500 ft.) so chances are the carbs will have to be re-jetted for the new owner.  A few marks over the 17,000 miles, which is hard to confirm since the dash is new.  From the eBay auction:

The fork seals have just been replaced. 
It has a new Oberon clutch slave as the original was leaking. Works great.
It has brand new (NOS) front brake discs. These are unobtainium and super expensive when found – around $900!
It has a new factory windshield. $$
 
The gauge needles were faded as many vintage 900SS do over time. While hunting for less faded gauges I found another bit of unobtainium in the form of a complete NOS dash complete with gauges specifically for the FE with the carbon surround. It’s beautiful. Unfortunately, I can’t find my original speedo – I was going to include it in the sale for mileage history. I’m worried it got sold last year when I was clearing house of old used parts. It was in the mid 17000 mile range.
 
The bike is original except for the Keihin FCR41 carb set-up. This is a very popular upgrade that transforms the performance of the bike.  It runs great! There is no choke on these carbs – so the choke lever has been disconnected but is still there. I live at 7000 feet and the carbs are jetted for our high altitude. It may run a bit lean if you are close to sea level. No way to tell until the bike reaches it’s final destination. It has an open top airbox meaning it has a aftermarket frame that holds the K&N filter in place. It really helps the bike at our altitude as well.
 
The high mount Termignonis are beautiful. Sound great and the best period correct option for these. These are pricey if you can even find a set.
 
The Battlax tires have plenty of tread left front and rear. The belts were replaced by the prior owner about a year before I bought the bike. They are now around two years old.
 
It has a new fuel level sender ($250!). I have not put fuel back in the tank since replacing it, figuring if I sell the bike as planned, some shippers prefer empty tanks.

The 904 SuperSports were made from 1991-98 so you have to pick your spots for rarity, but the later SuperLights and FE’s fit the bill.  Not sure that seat is an all-day affair, but the riding position got high marks from reviewers.  Unusual to see such limited production with so many special parts on a no reserve auction, and it’ll be interesting to see where this FE winds up.

-donn

Silver Bird – 1998 Ducati 900SS/FE #287 of 300
Ducati May 7, 2020 posted by

Matched Set: A Special Pair of Ducati Supersports for Sale

The Ducati Superlight I posted up a few days ago was a classic barn-find, with an incredible 300 miles on the odometer and all the dust and neglect you might expect from a bike that has barely turned a wheel in nearly 30 years. The first of today’s two Ducatis is nearly the exact opposite, a Superlight with many more miles and a shedload of upgrades and modifications that suggest passionately enthusiastic ownership. The components that went into its construction are clearly well thought out and complimentary, much more go than show. Which is fine because the blinding yellow paint, gleaming white frame, and half-fairing have all the bling you’ll ever need.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati Superlight for Sale

1993 Ducati 900 Superlight #771 25193 original miles. All original carbon fiber is in perfect condition. As she sits: custom Ducati Kamna ¼ fairings. Termignoni carbon fiber mufflers with Rob North narrowed and flowed OEM header pipe. Ducati Kamna alloy exhaust rings. Lidless airbox mod. Original Marvic/Akront magnesium/alloy 2-piece wheels. Pro-Italia billet rearsets. 11.2:1 JE/Pro-Italia pistonsHeads ported and matched by Pro-Italia. Keihin 39mm FCR carburetors. Ducati Kamna alloy clutch basket. Ducati Performance gold alloy pressure plate. Barnett kevlar-alloy clutch. Galfer stainless brake and clutch hoses. Ferodo CP911 brake pads. Original cast iron rotors. Ohlins 46PRCL fully adjustable shock. Peterson PPS revalved forks. Brembo goldline clutch and brake master cylinders (from a Ducati 996). Pro-Italia seat support. Dr. Desmo alloy clip-ons. MagKnight tank bra. Corbin seat. K&N air filter. Pro-Italia billet oil cooler relocation valve cover. Fast by Ferracci alloy sprocket cover. DID ERVX gold chain/AFAM alloy 39-tooth rear sprocket. Shorai lithium battery. Nichols jewelry (alloy fairing buttons, billet “Flying D” timing cover). Also included: Storz steering damper. Stock rear shock. Stock exhaust header. Stock mufflers. Original full fairings. Stock rearsets. Stock carburetors. Original Ducati tool kit. Spare belt covers. Spare belts from California Cycleworks. Spare ignition coils from California Cycleworks and NGK spark plugs. Evoluzione billet clutch slave cylinder. Assorted spare small parts/hardware/etc. Original owner’s manual. Lots of documentation including service records, receipts, manuals, valve adjustment instructions, etc.

Obviously, this is not completely original and purists may turn up their noses, but the finished result is absolutely true to the Superlight’s spirit, and the upgrades are of high-quality. This is the Superlight I’d want to build. The stock parts are included, including the full fairings, but I’d just put those in a box and ride it as-is. The second bike is a teeny bit scruffier from a cosmetic standpoint, but is more of a Ducati hot-rod. It’s also much more red.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP for Sale

1996 Ducati 900 SS/SPI took ownership of the bike in 2017 with the intention of keeping it for a daily driver. I now have two kids, multiple Ducatis and no time to ride. This preloved has been under my ownership since 2017. Never rode it extensively, I put approximately 900 mi on it since purchase. Current mileage is at 22,345 mi. The Dunlop Q3’s were new upon my acquisition. Frame and swingarm are perfect, no cracks. Moving beyond the normal stuff, this isn’t a run of the mill, ordinary 900 SS/SP. The following improvements have been made to the bike: 944 pistons. Keihin 41mm FCRs. Ducati cast iron rotors. Termignoni high mount CF pipes and flowed header. Ohlins 46PRCL rear shock. Ohlins 20mm cartridge kit into the stock Showa adjustable forks. Ducati Racing magnesium engine cover – clutch side. CA Cycleworks coils. Dr. Desmo alloy clip-ons. Steel braided brake lines. Ducati Superlight solo seat with correct seat supports from the ’98 FE. Pro Italia rearsets. Kamna ¼ fairings. Dyno’d (10/13/2011 – at 21,410 miles) at Ferracci at 91.97hp. The suspension was redone by Markbilt Racing in 9/2011. This included rebuilding of the Ohlins rear shock and installation of the Ohlins 20mm cartridge kit into the stock Showa adjustable forks. The oil cooler has been relocated to under the headlight for better cooling. I had the bike professionally repainted, as the fairings were unpainted, to the tune of $1500. Stunning example of a true classic. No accident damage or history of damage.

It doesn’t look like it’s an original Superlight, in spite of the graphics on the tail. It’s still a worthy replica, considering the performance on tap. There’s some surface corrosion on the heads and barrels, but the bodywork is very clean and this thing should go like a stabbed rat: 92 whp is pretty impressive for an air-cooled, two-valve Desmo engine intended for street use. The 944cc mill should have an impressive midrange and launch out of corners with impressive urge and an even more impressive bellow…

Bidding is active on both bikes, with a couple days left on the auctions and the Reserve Not Met. If air-cooled Ducatis leave you cold, the seller also has a nice 888 SPO available for sale currently.

-tad

Matched Set: A Special Pair of Ducati Supersports for Sale
Ducati November 15, 2019 posted by

Who’s Next? 1995 Ducati 900 SS SP

The Ducati 900 Supersport series is one of those bikes that is just so solid that it persists in company that is far more exotic, expensive, and technologically advanced. Even in the day the 900 SS was a bit of a dinosaur – an air-cooled, 2-valved, carburetted throwback to the 1970s – while the competition was spending wildly on technology such as fuel injection, liquid cooling, multi-valve per cylinder, variable valve timing, turbocharging and more. But you can’t hide greatness – and the bones of the Supersport were truly great. Comparing the 900 Supersport to the same year 916 is a bit like comparing a basic cheeseburger to a dry-aged ribeye steak. But you know what? That cheeseburger can be a mighty satisfying meal in the end. And so too is it with the 900 Supersport – especially the SP model such as today’s example – it has all the basics to be a truly great bike. And continues to be to this day. If you are looking for a fantastic ride without the flash, farkles and other nonsense, you’ve come to the right place. Today’s seller is clearly an enthusiast and it is worth reading a few of his own words about this bike:

1995 Ducati 900 SS SP for sale on eBay

From the seller:
Ducati 900 Super Sport
1995
Sports Production (SP) Model with Fully-Faired Chassis Production Run #412
Desmodromic 90 Degree Twin-Cylinder Engine Six-Speed Transmission

Model Specific Details Per Owner
This motorcycle has been preserved exactly as one would want. Period. I have gone to great lengths to minimize any unnecessary changes that would otherwise compromise what Ducati intended this bike to be. Obviously a blood-red Italian work of art needs nothing in the way of cosmetics, so let well enough alone.

I felt the best use of any improvements would be more of personal expressions such as un- restricting the exhaust to allow the bike to actually sound like a Ducati should with a set of Remus canisters. These match the factory equipped carbon fiber components much better than any others in my opinion. To facilitate the most from the exhaust, I perfectly jetted the carburetors. No flat spots, nor burning eyes, and of course the results are impressive for the torque curve of an already excellent engine.

To welcome more fresh air into the carburetors, I added the Genuine Ducati air-box cover. I’m sure others with hole saws and hack-saw blades get the same results, but i chose OEM whenever possible. As far as the Slave Cylinder, the stock one seemed to lack feel and a clean return. Off it went and was promptly replaced by the excellent unit from Pro Italia. Regarding the braking system, it is what it is. Nobody was impressed when new, the same remains today. I added Ferodo pads at both ends and have felt these are aggressive enough for a spirited run through the curves. The brake lines are shockingly original. I’ll leave YOU to replace them with fresh, likely stainless-steel braided models. They will certainly be an amazing upgrade.

More from the seller:
The dry clutch is holding its own in the fully enclosed carbon cover and has been gently used. The tires are fresh, new Metzler’s, of the sport touring variety. The chain has plenty of life in it, and the sprockets are newly replaced. All good stuff to head out with confidence.

In 2013, I decided to have the fine factory trained mechanics at The Motor Cafe in Sunnyvale, California pull the top end off the Duc and take a look around to see what it needed to keep on living. Not surprising to me, because of my impeccable maintenance schedule, and my gentle albeit, frequent abuse of the mountain roads, three out four of the valves, and their many clearances were just at, but not over recommended tolerances. One valve was now due for adjustment. I decided to go the full service treatment and get a bit more done.

This is what was performed: cylinder heads stripped and cleaned. Checked for cracks. New copper/beryllium seats. New Del West valve guides. New OEM Ducati valves and hardware such as keepers and rings to hold it together. The pistons were cleaned up and received new rings and the cylinder bore was prepped appropriately. It was all buttoned back up leak free for the next go round.

More from the seller:
Following this, the carburetors were checked for synchronization. The fuel filter was replaced in the tank and the gasket around the filler as well. A new front odometer drive unit was installed which I purchased back in 1998 when still available along with a fresh set of wheel bearings to smooth things out. Out back, the linkages were greased too.

A few additional things too mention about this machine. I have replaced the original clear windscreen which is still in excellent shape, with an OEM Ducati “smoke” model to help preserve the appearance of the instrument cluster. With that in mind, please take note in the accompanying photos the genuine Ducati carbon fiber gauge enclosure. This is not a common item as far as I’ve come to notice. Also, the front fender is BRAND NEW. I still have the original, which also is in good shape. All the carbon on this bike is better than most for the amount of actual miles enjoyed in real sunlight. Anyone could certainly sand and clear coat the existing carbon if they would like too as a restoration option.

There is a LOT more text from the seller in the advert (I recommend you go check it out), but from what has been shared it is obvious that this was a well loved machine. And what is not to love? The basic bike feels like it has been hewed from solid rock. The big L-twin lumps a bit at idle, and thrashes in the upper RPM ranges. But in between the two is a wave of throbbing torque that grabs you out of one corner and launches you towards the next. And when you get to the next the excellent Brembos and the stiff, chrome molly trellis frame chassis do a great job of making the corner a no-brainer. Every bike should make you feel this good – but few do. This is a bike to be ridden… and by the looks of it, this one has. There are no fewer than 32,000+ miles on this bike, and it still looks new and ready for the next go around. And did I mention it is an SP? In the case of a 1990s Supersport, that means adjustable suspension (a great improvement, especially up front), floating front disks, remote reservoir brake and clutch masters, carbon fiber mudguard, and a wider rear tire thanks to a special aluminum swing arm. And let’s not forget the most important bit: a SP-specific serial number plate on the triple clamp. Some folks go so far as to call the SP model a Superlight with a passenger pillion.

Despite the low tech and the basic nature, 900 SS SP models continue to be desired by riders. That is no surprise as the basic SS platform is extremely forgiving and very capable. It is also very reliable. This particular example has a lot of miles, but it has obviously been lavished on as well. It has some upgrades, and some very serious maintenance. That is all very positive, as these are bulletproof bikes if kept up, as this one appears to be. This one just hit eBay with a Buy It Now price of $5,500. That is strong money for a CR model, but probably well in the ballpark for an SP that shows like this one. And did I mention the spares? There appears to be quite a lot. Check it out and let us know what you think. I believe someone will pick it up relatively quickly, as this is the kind of bike worth holding on to. So who is the next owner? Good Luck!!

MI

Who’s Next? 1995 Ducati 900 SS SP
Sport Bikes For Sale September 14, 2019 posted by

The King in Yellow: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP for Sale

Not too many bikes look good in yellow, and that very short list is mostly made up of Italians, Ducatis in particular. Red may be the most traditional color for Ducatis but the 916, Panigale, and this 900SS/SP look so striking in the bold yellow seen here, especially with the half-fairing that reveals most of the classic, air and oil-cooled v-twin. Most of the half-faired bikes here in the US were the lower-spec CR model with much more basic suspension, but some apparently did come that way from the factory, and I’d definitely configure my dream-build SP that way. Yes, I do have a dream-build SP, and it’s basically this one, with a two-up seat.

The Supersport was a mainstay of Ducati throughout the 90s, and was available in 900, 750, and even 400cc flavors, depending on the market. Here in the US, we got the 900, although 750cc examples do show up for sale from time to time, apparently sneaking in over the border. The 900SS came in two flavors: the SS/SP and the SS/CR. The motors for both versions were in an identical, as was most of the bodywork. As mentioned earlier, bikes could be had with a full or half-fairing and the SP generally had a carbon fiber front fender for, you know, weight savings. The aluminum swingarm doesn’t look quite as trick, but probably offered a greater performance benefit.

The biggest difference was the suspension. The CR or “cafe racer” came with non-adjustable suspension, because apparently cafe racer people don’t really care about handling all that much? Anyway, the SP or “sport production” came with a fully adjustable Showa front end and shock. Parts are completely interchangeable, so some CRs have been updated, but this example does have the plaque on the top triple that indicate this is an original SP.

It’s not completely stock, with a white frame, solo tail, and graphics meant to evoke the very limited-production Superlight, along with a low-profile LED taillight instead of the chunky 90s piece, but this 900SS still has the brackets for the passenger pegs, so it would be a relatively simple thing to put it back closer to stock. The Öhlins shock is a welcome update and the bike appears to be very nicely put together, as long as you’re okay with the non-standard paint.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP for Sale

1996 Ducati 900 Supersport SP Half Fairing Monoposto 

I’m selling my 1996 Ducati 900 Supersport SP.
The bike was rebuilt by Johann Kaiser of Moto Motivo in Raleigh, North Carolina in 2017. 
The bike is powered by a 904cc desmodromic V-twin paired with a six-speed transmission. 
It features yellow bodywork with a white-colored trellis frame, and features include new Brembo brakes, upgraded Ohlins rear shock, cast aluminum wheels, and a carbon fiber exhaust and fenders.
The bike has a clean NC title in the seller’s name.
Has been garaged and has about 1000 miles after rebuild, and runs great.

You can find the bike on Moto Motivo’s website:
https://www.motomotivo.com/restorations

As mentioned above, I have a soft spot for these bikes. I’m a huge fan of the engine and the looks are a little bit retro and a little bit modern at the same time. It’s not really sleek, but solid and handsome, a practical sportbike that doesn’t overwhelm with power but can still handle well enough to entertain. With nice, original examples beginning to increase in value, the $6,000 asking price is a steal, if it’s anywhere near as nice as it looks in pictures. I’d look for a set of classic Termignoni cans to really finish it off and just enjoy the two-valve boom and midrange shove while bombing along a set of canyon roads.

-tad

The King in Yellow: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP for Sale
Ducati May 2, 2019 posted by

Simple Pleasures: 1996 Ducati 900SS SP for Sale

Ducati’s two-valve “Desmodue” may not be the most powerful engine, or the lowest-maintenance, but there’s a reason it’s stuck around from the 1980 Pantah all the way through to today. Besides the obvious budgetary reasons: some of that tooling is probably long paid off… Joking aside, today’s Desmodue is heavily evolved, compared to the original version, now punched out to 1100cc and packing dual plugs per cylinder and modern electronics. But the qualities of the original are still there, and make for a very entertaining ride. Ducati’s mid-90s 900SS SP may not have been a powerhouse and was handily outclassed by every Japanese sportbike available at the time, but the aging thoroughbred still offered stable handling, good brakes for the period, a punchy midrange, and plenty of dry clutch rattle.

At the time, the 916 was making headlines for its ferocious performance on and off track, but the Supersport of the same period was a much better motorcycle to actually live with. Compared to the painfully focused 916, the 900SS almost felt like a sport-tourer. Along with the Monster it gave Ducati a range of bikes with real racing heritage, but without the expensive maintenance, high-strung histrionics, and performance most riders didn’t really need anyway, especially on the road.

By 1996, the 900SS was available in two flavors: the cost-cutting 900SS CR that generally came with a stylish half-fairing, and the higher-spec 900SS SP seen here. The engines were the same, but the CR used non-adjustable forks from either Showa or Marzocchi on later machines, while the SP had a carbon front fender and three-way adjustable suspension up front and at the rear. There were other minor details as well, like a narrower 4.5″ rear wheel on the CR, versus a 5.0″ hoop on the SP. If you’ve got a CR, don’t despair: suspension swaps between models and even years is pretty simple, and upgraded valving kits for the Showa forks are available. Unfortunately, the famously horrible Marzocchi units on the later CR models are pretty much best abandoned in the wilds to be savaged by wild dogs.

Ownership isn’t necessarily as much of a headache as you’d expect. In spite of their reputation, the two-valve Ducatis are generally pretty bomb-proof, and you’ve got to be riding like a bit of an idiot to overrev one. First of all, no valve springs means no valve float! And second of all, in spite of an indicated 9000rpm redline, any remotely standard carbureted 904cc Ducati engine runs out of puff way before that. Power was a claimed 80hp with a pair of Mikuni CV carbs, and 75hp at the wheel from a strong example. More is available via head work and tuning, since these were originally built to race, although performance gains won’t be particularly cheap.

As for Ducati’s infamous lack of reliability: the valves do require regular maintenance, although they tend to stay in spec after the first couple adjustments. The toothed rubber timing belts require biennial replacement to prevent an expensive transformation from motive force to paperweight, but many competent home mechanics find these tasks aren’t too difficult to tackle. Italian bike electrical components, however, generally deserve their poor reputation, and it’s worth regularly checking connections and using a bit of dielectric grease to make sure your lights light and your starter starts.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Ducati 900SS SP for Sale

Excellent Condition, always well cared for, Ducati Limited Edition  500 SS SP SUPERLIGHT.  Low production number 47 of 500 made.

Full fairing, floating cast iron rotors and original factory oil temp gauge. New tires, carbon fiber mufflers. Includes owners and shop manuals, Hand written previous Owner records of services dating back to 8/12/97 with 2363 miles. 

Fresh timing belt, starter relay. Runs excellent sounds even better. Also have stock pipes to go with sale. This is a beautiful , air cooled, dependable, dry clutch classic example that will put a smile on your face.

Bike is currently on consignment at local Dealer in S.F. Paperwork to be  handled by them upon sale. 

The 900SS used to be an amazingly affordable entry into Italian bike ownership, especially if you’re fairly handy with basic tools. The only cheaper Ducatis are the original Monsters, but both have started to climb in value, especially for nice, low-mileage examples. This one has 13k or so on the clock which, if it’s been maintained by the book, means it’s barely broken in. Higher-resolution pictures would be nice but, from what I can see, it looks to be a very clean example. Get one now, while they’re still fairly cheap, since clean examples are getting hard to find.

-tad

Simple Pleasures: 1996 Ducati 900SS SP for Sale

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