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Ducati February 4, 2020 posted by

Copy That: 2006 Ducati 999R Xerox

The Ducati R bike has always been a major factor in the history of Ducati. Renowned originally as homologation machines in order to go racing, the R brand has taken on a life of its own as a limited edition, high performance exclusive tier of the existing model line. And while there may be some scoffing that Ducati R models are simply marketing exercises, the truth is that the R generally represents the top spec for the brand, with components and upgrades to match. Such is the case with today’s bike, a 2006 999R in striking Xerox livery.

2006 Ducati 999R Xerox for sale on eBay

The 999 is known for a few parlor tricks. The first is that in the eyes of many, it is…. well…. ugly. Designer Pierre Terblanche had big shoes to fill when he was chosen to pen the successor to Massimo Tamburini’s 916/996/998 masterpiece. In photos, the 999 seems to indicate that Terblanche choked. The resulting bike simply did not flow like the earlier Ducati models. But in person the 999 is astonishing in its presence. All this considers a bike in a base color (i.e. red). Pop on the very limited Xerox racing livery, however, and this model truly comes visually alive. Gone are the huge expanses of one color across the side panels (they are long and flat compared to previous models). The diagonal placement of the side logo helps make the bike appear shorter than otherwise. Similarly, the red/white livery on the nose helps dampen the sharpness of the stacked headlight set up, and reduces the 999’s beaky profile. Of all the graphics available, the Xerox is the best looking of the 999s, although I do miss the peek-a-boo carbon bits of the fairing found on the non-liveried bikes.

From the seller:
Ducati made just 300 of the 999R models, and just a handful of Xerox livery versions.
With an MSRP of $29,995, it cost about $8,000 more than a 999S.

For the increased cost, the R model has;
145 HP Testretta engine, 25 hp more than the S
Radial brakes
Öhlins Suspension
Forged Marchesini wheels
Termignoni muffler
Weight reduction to 399lbs

The seller has done a decent job outlining how one makes an R bike. You start with the already potent 999S, you add horsepower and better brakes/suspension, bolt on some very glam farkles, and you put the whole thing on a diet. It’s a very simple recipe that Ducati has been following for decades, and results in some very iconic bikes. Going one step further, Ducati artificially limits the number of bikes produced, and attaches an exclusive production number on the headstock. The result is looks and performance with built-in exclusivity as a standard feature, right out of the Bologna factory.

More from the seller:
It was the ultimate track weapon in 2006. And still today, its a very impressive bike.

Hugely collectible, these are getting very rare to find in this condition. This bike is in almost flawless condition.

This bike is one of the most beautiful bikes that Ducati has ever built, and they just dont make special models like this anymore. If you set out to make a replica of this bike, the paint and graphics would cost a fortune. It’s not that hard to find a 999R, but the Xerox is really rare and special.

Comes with the Ducati plaque, and all keys. Owners manuals also.
5,353 miles
$20,000 OBO

So there is the other Ducati R model parlor trick: it’s expensive. R bikes have always commanded significantly higher prices than standard models. Some of this is due to the costs associated with the higher-spec components, and some is due to the drive for even more exclusivity. Regardless, R bikes are always more collectible than a base edition and will be the ones most likely to grow in value over time. And since many R bikes are riders, finding a low mile version with a rare graphics package and in sublime condition can be difficult. Today’s example has just 5,353 miles, looks to be in incredible condition, and is offered for a $20k Buy It Now. The seller appears to be open to offers, but I’m not sure I’d expect too much back pedaling. The dollar ask is strong, but so is the bike on offer – search the pages of RSBFS for another Xerox and you’ll only find a few – and all from some years back. Check it out here and then jump to the comments and share your thoughts on the best looking 999. Good Luck!!

MI


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Bimota February 3, 2020 posted by

Shogun in an Italian suit: 2000 Bimota SB8R

Taking Italian suspension, style and bespoke build quality know-how and shoving it full of deadnuts-reliable and prodigious power from the other side of the Atlantic, or in this case the Pacific, is a time-honored tradition. In the ’60s, the likes of Bizzarrini and Iso executed the formula to devastating effect in cars. But Bimota ported the practice over to bikes with racing success to back it up.

2000 Bimota SB8R for sale on eBay

In this case, the Italians hung a handbuilt frame and handmade carbon fiber bodywork around a Suzuki TL1000R engine, then threw Paioli springy bits at it to give it Bimota’s signature refinement. Before they were done, Bimota tweaked the big v-twin to push out just south of 140 horsepower at the crank. The result was a piece of industrial art that was made for race tracks but was almost too pretty to ride in anger.

This one, located at Speedart in Miami, Florida, has covered just 5,100 miles, and has been kept the way you’d expect for a collector’s piece of this caliber. There isn’t a surface on it that you’d be scared to eat off of. This one has a Power Commander III that was added by the second owner, which after a tune settled down some of the fueling issues these bikes can have thanks to those massive throttle bodies. It also wears a very stylish Arrow exhaust.

From the eBay listing:

Vehicle Description
Chassis No: ZESSB8R02YR000013

Odometer: 5,105 Miles

Engine: 996cc Four Stroke, V-Twin 8-valve, Liquid Cooled DOHC

Transmission: 6-Speed Gearbox

Performance: 135 bhp @ 9,750 rpm / 77 lb-ft – 0-60 mph 3.1 sec / 170 mph

Exterior: Competition Red/White

Interior: N/A

About This Motorcycle
“The first thing you notice about the SB8R is the striking exotic looks, thanks to passionate Italian design, hand-built craftsmanship, and the advanced, for its time, use of carbon fibre.”

The name Bimota is derived from the first two letters of the names of the three founders, Bianchi, Morri, and Tamburini.

Massimo Tamburini crashed his Honda 750 at the Misano race course in 1972, breaking three ribs. Finding himself with time on his hands while recovering, he designed and constructed a tubular steel frame that would eliminate the flex and handling problems that plagued the high horsepower machines of all the large Japanese manufacturers. Bimota’s first model, the HB1, was the result of his work and vision.

Only ten of them were produced, starting when the company was formed in 1973. In the early years Bimota produced mainly racing frames, then began manufacturing complete high performance machines as well as ones in “kit” form. When the now legendary KB1 was developed, the company was assured of commercial success. Bimota continued to be at the very leading edge of extremely high performance motorcycle design throughout the 80’s, 90’s and into the new millennia on both the track and the street.

Now more than forty five years after the firm’s founding, Bimotas of any era are sought after throughout the world because of their beauty, technological superiority and exclusivity.

The SB8R was the first production bike to use carbon fibre in the frame. There is plenty more additional carbon fibre elements, including the unusual but effective air intake system integrated into the front fairing, tail assembly and more. Bimota used engines from other manufacturers and constructed their own frame and body work to give it less weight and improved handling over the “donor bike”.

The Bimota SB8R uses a Suzuki TL-1000 motor, with Bimota’s own fuel and exhuast system that resulted in 135 hp. The motor and special designed rear suspension give the bike perfect balance resulting in a machine that is a joy to ride.

Even though the SB8R was designed for the track, most owners (true in the case of this motorbike), used them sparingly, riding on nice days, and the occasional bike show. This Bimota has only 5,100 miles after 16 years of ownership.

From the total of 150 hand-built examples spanning a two year period only 69 SB8Rs were exported into the US. It is questionable of how many are still in this pristine and original condition. Upon a closer examination it is easy to attest to the claims that it’s never been tipped over or any evidence of track time.

Speedart Motorsports is pleased to present this time capsule original SB8R in the configuration it left the factory in Rimini with a couple of small modifications in order to improve the ownership experience.

The light switch was modified so the headlight can be turned off, foot-pegs were replaced with European fixed position pegs, and the fueling system was modified to make it more rideable in street configuration.The fairings have original paint, carbon fiber parts have no cracks, all lights, turn-signals are original and working, tires have little wear, although they are at least 2 years old, so may want to consider replacing.Shocks don’t show signs of needing seals, engine has no leaks, runs great, once it warms up (these are cold-blooded beasts). Brakes have plenty of wear left, recommend oil change for the engine, something I intended to do, but haven’t made time.

This bike was purchased new from Ducati Bellevue on 3/2/2002. The 1st owner was a local Seattle aerospace engineer who rarely rode the bike. The last owner purchased the bike on 2015 prior to Speedart Motorsports acquiring the Bimota.

The 1st owner made only one modification to this machine. His one mod was having a custom fuel trimmer or potentiometer made to work with the existing wiring harness. These bikes were known to have fueling issues due to the massive throttle bodies and this is where the potentiometer helps out. Unfortunately the potentiometer is old technology and the adjustment range was limited. The second owner installed a PCIII that was tuned by Nels at 2 Wheel Dyno Works in Woodinville, WA.

PCIII was installed by second owner to permanently wash out some of the fueling issues that was typical of the SB8R model and its huge throttle bodies. This bike accelerates easier through the rev range than before. The fuel trimmer that had been installed by the first owner was only finite and could not adjust or reach some of these issues in the rev range. This modification alone makes it rideable even in heavy traffic.

As previously mentioned, the first owner added an out-of-production Evoluzione SB8R fuel trimmer provided by a Bimota enthusiast in Colorado. This unit is more precisely calibrated with nearly infinite settings between 0 and 999. The Bimota trimmer has 8 positions total.

The Arrow exhaust on the bike has been cored for better performance and sound. The result is outstanding in that it essentially replicates full racing pipes with much better performance and sound.

The stock tank on these SB8R’s is an Acerbis tank. The tank that’s currently installed on the bike was sealed and lined by Russ Foy in late 2014 to prevent any tank expansion. Furthermore braided steel clutch and brake lines were fitted in lieu of the stock rubber.

The sale of this race bred super bike is accompanied by owner manuals, service books and two keys.

The fortunate new owner will receive a galore of unobtainium spare parts worth thousands of dollars and who are no longer available. Such spares include, composite full fairing skins that can be painted with the desired livery suitable for racing, extra monoposto seat, additional OEM Acerbis Tank, OEM full exhaust system with silencers, lithium battery charger, rear pit stand and more, making this acquisition the ultimate SB8R package.

Disclaimer
Whilst Speedart Motorsports, LLC. (“We”) make a sincere effort to contain information that is accurate and complete, we are aware that errors and omissions may occur. We are not able therefore, to guarantee the accuracy of that information and we do not accept liability for loss or damage arising from misleading information or for any reliance on which you may place on the information contained in this website. We highly recommend that you examine the vehicle to check the accuracy of the information supplied. If you have any queries with regard to any information on our website, please contact us at . This disclaimer does not affect your statutory rights.

The buy-it-now for this beast is set at $23,000, and there are just a couple days left on the listing. With few owners in its history and one very carefully done modification, this thing is ready to make its third owner very happy.


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Suzuki February 2, 2020 posted by

Pre-Busa: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R 1100

The 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 earned a hairy reputation on their debut, as frame revisions or dodgy factory suspension meant their handling wasn’t what people had come to expect from the GSX-Rs, which even that early in their run had earned a sterling reputation. The handling was enough to scare some people away, but those who bit the bullet were rewarded with Suzuki’s gem 1127 cc air-oil cooled inline four.

1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for sale on eBay

Despite a fatality at the 1989 Isle of Man TT that caused organizers to ban big bikes for a few years, the big Gixxer made a huge impression on street bikers and drag racers alike. Even with modern tech and the likes of the Hayabusa floating around, the appearance of the twin-headlights strikes fear into straightline guys on lesser machines. With 122 horsepower stock and a very tunable platform, the engine made lots of friends very quickly.

This tri-color 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 has been in storage for the last little while, but had excellent compression numbers and looks like it was very well maintained over its 21,000 miles. It has avoided being hacked up, painted garish colors, slapped with an extended swingarm or chromed, polished and neon’d to death. If you love these bikes, this is your Huckleberry.

From the eBay listing:

1989 GSXR 1100, Well kept bike. New Pirelli tires, brakes, clutch, carbs just redone. Paint is showroom condition, 200psi in all cylinders. This is when bikes where bikes. Very rare to see in this condition. Top pad seat has some de lamination. Top tree is dull from keys (common). XL jacket included also bike stand included. This is no poverty sale so please no low ballers. Under ten feedback please stay away! The bike has no fluids in it right now as it is in storage. Bike runs and rides perfect. Please don’t ask what the reserve is, want auction to run in full!!

The days are getting longer, and even here in the heights of the Appalachians, the days are warm enough to get out and ride. This thing is ready to add a little extra steeze to your riding season.


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Aprilia January 31, 2020 posted by

And this time I mean it: 2003 Aprilia RS250 Final Edition GP-1

Moving on from booming V-twin, limited edition bikes from Italy comes this beautiful, well, uh, V-twin, limited edition screamer from, er, Italy. Sheesh. The big difference is that this one is a two stroke from Noale, and not the desmo- aspirated variety from Bologna. Specifically, this is the GP-1 branded Aprilia RS250, a final example of this legendary quarter-liter import for the street and track alike. A trio of well known racers were successful on the GP racer example of this model: Rossi, Biaggi and Capriossi. That is impressive company to be sure.

2003 Aprilia RS250 GP-1 for sale on eBay

The Aprilia RS250 owes much of its inception to Suzuki. The 90 degree V-twin is a direct pick-a-part from the Hamamatsu manufacturer. As is the six speed transmission. Sure, Aprilia made some changes to the unit to make it more theirs (i.e. airbox, programmable ignition, exhaust and logos on some of the cast pieces), but the roots of this family tree are Suzuki – right up to the leaves. Suzuki even assembled and shipped the Aprilia-spec motors to the Italian bike builter. But as we all know, it is not just the motor that makes these machines track-day fast. The RS250 (and the race bike that inspired it – the RSW250) is not popular by riders through accident. With a stout aluminum-magnesium allow frame, large adjustable front forks, an artfully shaped rear aluminum swing arm and the wind tunnel aerodynamics, the 70 HP twin is good for 130 MPH with handling and brakes to match.

From the seller:
This is a very near new 2003 Japan Market Aprilia RS250 GP-1, the very last of the road going 250cc two stroke models produced anywhere. 1100 original Km or just 683 miles. This bike is turn key and ready to ride or just park it in your collection and appreciate its history and great looks. There are few of these left, fewer still in this condition/miles and they won’t be making anymore!!

This is a 17 digit VIN bike and it has a clean and clear Montana street title and plate.

Recent full service to include, carbs cleaned and inspected, new air filter, fresh oil in trans, fresh coolant fresh brake fluid front and rear and the front forks were just serviced with new seals and fresh oil to rectify a leaky seal ( Motul fluids in everything ).

Bike is turn key and starts on 1 to 2 kicks when cold, the tires were replaced on it a few years back so they are not original, but they have few miles on them.

All electric works, lights, switches, good battery etc.

The bike is 100% stock. It shows some minor wear from the last 17 years but is as shown in the photos incredibly nice and original. I am missing the pillion pad, but that can be easily sourced if you want it.

It still wears all of the original warning decals and Japanese label stickers. I have included photos with the lowers off so you can have a good idea of what the bike looks like underneath the bodywork. There is some surface rust on the original chain, some light corrosion on the forks and various other really small marks or imperfections, but nothing that stands out.

Today’s particular example is not a run of the mill RS250 street bike, or even a converted RS250 Cup bike. Instead, this is the final model of the RS250 line created by Aprilia. Known as the GP-1, this edition was patterned after the livery of yet another famous Italian racer, Marco Melandri. Other than restyled bodywork and livery, mechanical changes are few. The engine and transmission remain unchanged from previous versions, as does the frame and rear suspension. Forks were updated to Showa units as opposed to the original model’s made-to-spec Marzocchi suspension. Along with this change the front hoop was widened by 1/2″, allowing for a slightly wider tire.

It is hard to tell if the GP1 is truly a more collectible version of the RS250, or if the market is simply responding to the newest of hte offerings (least older usually – but not always – equates to fewer miles, use, etc). If you are a rider that fits on the smaller bikes, any of the RS250 models will do you well – especially as the tach swings up past 9 grand. But only one model can be the last on of the breed, and the GP-1 it. This particular RS250 looks to be in fantastic shape, and has fewer than 700 miles. You read that right. Being a Japanese import the seller notes some minor corrosion – but this is nothing that we have seen from some grey bikes that have spent their lives on the Asian island. This bike definitely looks to have survived the curse of the sea air. Hard to tell how harsh the riding was to accumulate what is currently on the all kilometer clocks, but photos don’t show anything too abused that I can tell (and the photos are marvelous). Check it out here, but brace yourself: the cost of entry is a strong $14,500 USD. The bike has a Montana title and is located in sunny California – not a bad mix for an Italian bike with a Japanese heart. Maybe you can add another location to the history of this magnificent machine. Good Luck!!

MI


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Ducati January 29, 2020 posted by

More Than Skin Deep: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

We’ve been a little Ducati-heavy this week, but there’s no way I was going to skip this one: an Eraldo Ferracci-prepped and tuned Ducati 916 SPS. Sure, this might look like yet another boring 916, but the SPS is one of Ducati’s fire-breathing homologation specials, and this example has been endowed with a highly-tuned stroker motor from one of the era’s premier tuners.

If you’re not familiar with Ferracci, he was an east coast Ducati tuner whose bikes won several World Superbike and AMA titles. He eventually opened a well known Ducati/MV Agusta dealership, and the company still sells high-performance Ducati parts on their site, although the brick-and-mortar dealership itself is closed.

The SPS or “Sport Production Special” was basically a way for Ducati to begin racing their stronger, larger-displacement 996cc v-twin before the 996 was introduced. As with all the bikes in the 916/996/998 series, it might look like a regular 916, but featured extensive, evolutionary upgrades to the Tamburini superbike that was introduced way back in 1994. It used the close-ratio box from the smaller 748, along with updated suspension that included an Öhlins shock and a lighter frame.

But of course, the heart of the matter was the updated 996cc engine that included titanium connecting rods for 1998. Ducati found that the functional limit for their original Desmoquattro was 955cc: any bigger, and the cases tended to crack under racing stress. The new engine was a comprehensive redesign that saw the inclusion of new heads, barrels, pistons, injectors, and a lighter crank.

Combined with the usual tuning tricks that didn’t make it over to the regular 996, the changes all added up to an engine that was more than the sum of its parts, with a savage and aggressive character. It was very expensive, but made testers at the time struggle to find enough superlatives to adequately describe the lust it inspired. The seller borrows a good chunk of his description from a very nice history of the SP/SPS Ducatis over at OddBike, and it’s worth a read if you’ve never checked that site out.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

About This Motorcycle:

“The primary reason of building the 916 SPS was to homologate the new 996cc engine for Superbike competition but fortunately for bike fans, the installation of the 996 engine into the 916 setup produced a bike that was described as legendary, astonishingly good looking and a true Superbike. Only 404 examples were built with less than 50 of those imported into the States.

The SPS was released to homologate the new 996cc engine for Superbike competition. The previous 916 crankcases had been maxed out at 955cc, and had problems with cracking and stress fractures under racing conditions. So in 1997 Ducati tried again by taking their new 996 engine and putting it into the 916 frame. The result was the 916 Sport Production Special (SPS).

New reinforced crankcases were needed, and to accommodate a displacement closer to the 1000cc limit for twins in Superbike the case mouths needed wider openings and wider stud spacing to match. Thus the barrels and heads were new, made wider to match the new cylinder stud spacing. Bore was now up to 98mm, with the same 66mm stroke as before. The heads had larger combustion chambers and bigger valves. Compression ratio was now 11.5:1 inside a lighter crankshaft with tungsten plug balancing. The high pressure double injector fuel setup with P8 ECU was carried over from the SP.

Press reviews of the 996 powered SPS declared it to be something quite special, with some testers being able to crack 170 miles per hour with the Termignoni exhaust and ECU kit fitted, a pretty stunning speed for a twin with ‘only’ 120-odd horsepower. The new engine gave a much wider power delivery band but this together with neck-snapping torque was enough to push the limits of the chassis. The 916 models in general did not respond well to ham-fisted riders, so it is not surprising that the SPS and its significantly wider power band resulted in a bike that could be dangerous for even skilled riders.

Despite its somewhat dangerous reputation the SPS was still sexy as hell with a sound like the apocalypse, especially if the Termi pipes were installed. Price tag new was almost $25,000 USD, a significant amount above the $16,500 Biposto and nearly double the price of a 748 model. Most reviewers declared that despite its dangerous nature it was worth the extra investment and there was a lot of demand for the SPS but since these bikes were built for homolgation, just 404 examples were built and only a small number of those brought into the USA.”

Among these rare breed of motorcycles there is something even more special and quite possibly one of the most spectacular, modern era homologated Ducatis. Now that would be tough to believe except this is a FBF bike, but for those who know about Eraldo Ferracci and his relationship with Ducati will easily justify the aforementioned statement.

Speedart Motorsports acquired this motorbike few years back and it has been a highlight of our Ducati collection ever since.

The first owner of this stunning example took delivery in November 1998 from Mr. Ferracci and he commissioned FBF on November, 11 to transform the SPS in to one of their 1,026 cc stroker fire-breathing monsters at an exorbitant cost.

The following is a partial list of the work performed by Eraldo Ferracci with an FBF serial number stamped on the case, further attesting to the pedigree of this extravagant Production Special.

  • Renthal quick change rear sprockets carrier
  • Ferracci billet lightweight flywheel
  • High pressure fuel regulator
  • Ported and polished heads
  • Stage-3 Eprom chip
  • Corse rearsets
  • 37mm Intake valves
  • 31mm Exhaust valves
  • 54mm Ferracci Forza full stainless system
  • Ohlins shock revalved
  • Hyperpro spring
  • Ferracci billet clip-on handlebars
  • 98mm 12:1 Compression piston Kit
  • FBF power crank 68mm stroke
  • Ducati Performance carbon fiber under-seat oil vent tank
  • MS Production carbon air intake runners
  • Stage-3 cams
  • Pankl Racing titanium rods
  • Carbon fiber MS Production swingarm cover

During our custodianship at Speedart Motorsports, further enhancements were performed including Dymag carbon fiber wheels, ultra-rare Ducati Corse RS slipper clutch with DP carbon cover, NCR sprocket carriers, Poggipolini titanium fasteners, Samco hoses, Spiegler cables with fittings and much more.

The sale of this legendary Ducati is accompanied by extensive documentation, owner’s manuals, all Ferracci build records including Dyno sheets, fastidious maintenance receipts, stands, cover, etc.

Speedart Motorsports invites all serious inquiries of what is believed to be the most extraordinary 916 Sport Production Special in captivity, freshly serviced, in spectacular form both cosmetically and mechanically.

The high-compression pistons match the original 98mm bore, but the new crank’s 68mm stroke is up 2mm from the original for a total of 1026cc, compared to the original 996. That might bother some collectors, but it looks like only the very best parts have been used to upgrade and tune this very special SPS. Other than the gold plugs that don’t match the frame paint, this is a very nice, very trick bike, and one of just 1058 built in 1998. A nice SPS will generally sell for much less than the $34,500 asking price seen here, but they usually haven’t had as much attention lavished on them.

-tad


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Ducati January 26, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 2002 Ducati MH900e

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

A viral internet sensation, the Ducati MH900e (Mike Hailwood evoluzione) was launched online and sold online – and was an instant hit. Designed by oft-derided South African visionary Pierre Terblanche (also known for the Supermono and 888, as well as the 999 series), the MHe was intended to be a conceptual update to the original Mike Hailwood replica. By all counts Terblance knocked this one out of the park; from all angles – in photos as well as in person – the MHe is an impressive motorcycle. One can get lost all day in the details; from the tank to the abbreviated tail, the waspish waist, the huge shotgun exhausts, the intricacy of the single-sided swing arm to the simplicity of the center-dominated tach – some of the details are clever and downright devilish.

Featured Listing: 2002 Ducati MH900e

The MHe was built around a standard Pantah-based Supersport engine and transmission. The venerable air-cooled, two valve motor is well known for producing gobs of torque and the sort of wonderful noises you would expect from a Ducati. But with unique touches such as a remodeled oil sump that was designed as a nod to the older style of bevel drive Ducatis and a model-specific oil cooler, the MHe engine stands out as a unique entity and a critical design element of the motorcycle. Throw in some retro touches such as the round, chrome-ringed headlight and you have something very interesting that seems to exist both in the past as well as the present at the same time.

From the seller:
2002 Ducati MH900e
This rare collectable Ducati is 1807 of 2000 and is loaded with goodies. I purchased the bike in 2010. This bike comes with:
The owners’ plaque showing that the bike is number 1807 of 2000, pit bull stand, manual, and 2 keys.

Additionally this bike has a full Ohlins suspension including FG 845 titanium nitride forks specifically calibrated by Kyle Racing. Ohlins shock and Ohlins steering dampener. The upgraded suspension has transformed the bike and it tracks beautifully. ($4,000 + upgrade)

Full Staintune header/exhaust system. This bike was used to spearhead the header development by getting enough MH owners together with a group buy to put deposits on headers, and then a generous MH owner in Australia donated his bike for the R&D. Great improvement in throttle response, sound and looks. ($1,600 upgrade)

Ducati Performance clutch pressure plate (Red) $199
Ducati Performance clutch cover $175
Ducati Performance turn signals $175
Ducati Performance timing belt covers $350
Ducati Performance chrome valve covers $250
Ducati Performance bar end mirrors $250
Cycle Cat adjustable bar risers (way more comfortable)
California Cycleworks 5.1 gallon endurance fuel tank (not the battery tank) $899
Ducati performance bike cover $75

I also have all the original stock parts (except for the rear fender)

Asking Price: $20,000

Contact: David Edinger (Edinger.david@gmail.com) +1-317-908-2573

History clearly shows that the MHe was a success. Offered for sale just after midnight New Year’s day of the year 2000, the entire planned production line sold out before the day was even half out. Over the next couple of years, despite some ramp up and production issues, Ducati eventually built 2000 examples of the model (which was more than expected). Ducati initially planned to farm out production of this hand-built motorcycle to fellow Italian constructor Bimota, but when the Rimini firm fell into bankruptcy Ducati created a new assembly area and started to build the bike themselves. It took a couple of years for all of the MHe models to be produced, but even by late 2002 the fanfare generated by this enthralling machine had not abated.

Today’s Featured Listing is a 2002 MH900e serial number 1807. The year and number place it towards the end of production, but as there were virtually no changes throughout the model run it can be considered the same as an early bike. This particular bike has seen some very tasty upgrades, including a shift to full Ohlins suspension (original bikes had either Paioli or Sachs units in the rear). It also has a very expensive and rare Staintune exhaust, and a litany of Ducati Performance goodies. Nearly all of the stock pieces are available with the bike, so those fearing mods need not fret. Unlike some garage queens this one has been ridden, and shows 7,462 on the clock. The asking price is very much inline with current market values, and given the scarcity of these models interested parties should reach out and connect with David quickly. Good Luck!!

MI

Ducati January 25, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati PS1000LE

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

Even by Ducati’s impressive standards for special editions and factory customs, the 2006 Ducati PS1000LE is a masterstroke. It is, in a way, a special edition within a special edition, as it prowled showrooms at the same time as the Ducati Sport Classic line, which kicked off a wave of retro-look machines that has yet to crest.

The PS1000LE was extra special for Duc, as it celebrated Paul Smart’s historic win at the 1972 Imola 200 aboard a 750SS. The paint scheme apes Smart’s machine, and Ducati had Pierre Terblance pen the neoclassic machine to pay exacting tribute.

The exposed trellis frame, toaster tank, bulbous rear cowl and dustbin-style bikini fairing are brilliant touches. Under all that pretty is a 992 cc L-twin that put out just south of 100 horsepower. Never designed as an out-and-out rocket, the PS is still no slouch, as the torquey mill has less than 400 pounds to shove around. It’s all kept rubberside down by adjustable Ohlins front and rear.

From the seller:

2006 Ducati PS1000LE
I have owned this rare beauty since new. The Termignoni full exhaust system sound is music and the best sounding bike in my collection. Other mods are a Ducati performance racing ECU, open clutch cover, dark shield and clear belt covers and carbon fiber hugger. Original parts will go with the bike with the exception of the original exhaust. Included are two black keys, one red key & key Code Card as well as the Ducati owner’s manual. I have every receipt since it was purchased and it has only been serviced by authorized Ducati dealers. The bike also comes with the Ducati tank cover and tank bag.
These bikes were only made one year and they were limited to 2000 units. This bike was made as a tribute to Paul Smarts win at Imola 200 in 1972 which jump started Ducatis racing successes. The popularity of the limited production bikes led to the popular Sport Classic series.
The bike is a 992cc air cooled Desmodromic 2-valve L twin with 92 HP @ 6,000 RPM and a claimed 399 pounds day with a fuel capacity of 4 gallons with a top speed of 129 MPH.
Price $19,000
Contact
David Edinger
Edinger.david@gmail.com
+1-317-908-2573

These Paul Smart bikes will only go up in value, and while this one might not have the stock exhaust, it is priced to reflect that and is a beautiful example of a timeless bike.

Ducati January 24, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada

1.31.2020: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

The Ducati 851 is one of the all time greats; a watershed bike that defined a company, dominated a racing class, and lives on as a lust-worthy dance partner in the canyons. Everything about it screams “Ducati” from the miles of blood-red paint to the big, booming exhaust note that only a 90 degree v-twin can produce. The design silhouette is distinctive – and sexy. This is an Italian exotic at its finest, and at its most collectible. And yet this is a bike that you can buy without mortgaging your house, and you can live with day to day.

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada

What makes the 851 such a big deal is the manner in which it burst onto the scene. Ducati leapfrogged the evolutionary process by simultaneously moving the Pantah-based platform from air cooling to liquid cooling, from a two-valve desmo head to a four-valve arrangement, and switching from carbs to fuel injection. That is a lot to pull off in one fell swoop, but given the performance, reliability and longevity of these motors it is obvious that Ducati cut no corners. As a result the 851 is a great choice if you are looking for a collector that you can ride. It makes usable power (but not outrageous amounts), offers strong brakes and willing suspension, and a decently upright riding position.

From the seller:
1992 Ducati 851 Strada
This model 851 was only made for two years and only 1200 were produced. This is a two owner bike with the rare Euro tail section added. The original BiPosto seat is included with the sale of the bike.

The Ducati 851 was the successor to the air-cooled two-valve Ducati 750 F1. After buying Ducati, Cagiva invested in the development of anotherV-Twin, but with liquid cooling, and four-valve Desmdromic heads. Based on the Pantah motor, but with liquid cooling, fuel injection, and desmodromic four valve heads (with an included valve angle of 40°), the 851 made Ducati once again competitive in motorcycle racing.

Bordi collaborated with Cosworth to develop the heads, but in the time they had, they were only able to reduce the included valve angle of the desmodromic engine to 40°, while less than 30° was possible with valve springs. Ducati stuck with the desmodromics. The subsequent 851 road bike had stronger crankcases, while the heads and valves remained the same; designed to fit above the 88 mm bore of a 748 cc version.

1.31.2020: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

This particular 851 is a Strada (street) model, but has been uprated with a carbon front fender, carbon mud guard, a sweet Fast by Ferracci high-sweep carbon exhaust (sounds so good!), and a solo section tail. In other words, this particular model is well-suited as a rider. The asking price is right in the ball park for a clean and cared-for example. That is the interesting thing about these models; while the SP4 and LTD models have higher resale value, clean base model Stradas continues to trade strongly. This is a testament to how great these bikes are to ride and own (author confession: my wife rides one as her commuter). Check out the pics of this extremely clean example and then drop David a line – he would love to see this beloved ride from his collection find a good home.

MI

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