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Featured Listing November 7, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000

We are lucky at RSBFS to be helping to offer this gorgeous 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 after a 15-year stay in a private collection. Though collection dwelling generally means a bike has sat long-term, this Goose shows 32,000 miles on the clock, which means it has been ridden and loved as much as it has been preserved.

The Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 was not really built to win races itself, but to celebrate Guzzi’s victories in a spate of endurance contests in the 1980s, and to show off the Italian firm’s ability to engineer and execute a jewel of a motorcycle from somewhat unlikely sources. The bike was designed by dentist-turned-privateer racer John Wittner, and was powered by a very tweaked version of Guzzi’s enormous longitudinal high-cam v-twin. Tweaks included bigger jugs and a longer stroke, which helped the mill push out 95 horses.

From the seller:

1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 $14,995 (32K miles)

First time ever offered via the web, this has been in a private collection for the past 15 plus years, never seen rain. Custom rear cowl and paint scheme, the wheels have been redone in gold to match. Stunning spotless example of this Italian beast, Termignoni Carbon pipes makes great deep thumper noise from the motor and fuel injection tubes.
MG Daytona 1000
Claimed power: 95hp @ 8,000rpm
Top speed: 145mph
Engine: 992cc air-cooled high-cam 8-valve 90-degree V-twin
Weight: 451lb (dry)

After his team of modified Moto Guzzis won the 1984 and 1985 U.S. Endurance Championship and the 1987 Pro Twins series, U.S. Moto Guzzi guru Dr. John Wittner was made an offer he couldn’t refuse. Summoned to Italy by Guzzi godfather Alejandro de Tomaso, Wittner, a former dentist turned endurance racer, was asked to help develop a new world-beating superbike. Guzzi revealed a prototype at the 1989 Milan show and named it for the famous Florida circuit (where they won the 250-mile endurance race in 1985), but in typical Italian fashion it took until late 1991 for the Daytona to go into production.
Although the hot rod Daytona engine was based around the classic “big block” air-cooled Moto Guzzi transverse V-twin, in the end it retained only the crankshaft and crankcases of the standard engine. Using the 78mm stroke of the 948cc Le Mans 1000 combined with new plated alloy cylinders with a 90mm bore, it displaced 992cc. A bright red sport fairing melded into the gas tank just above the Daytona’s all-new cylinder heads, grandly marked “OHC 4V” for overhead camshaft 4-valve. In truth, the cams were carried high in the cylinder heads, not on top, so the engine could also be considered a high-cam design overhead valve.
From the crankshaft, a reduction gear train drove a pair of toothed belts, each spinning a single camshaft in each cylinder head, which in turn opened four valves via short pushrods operating rocker shafts. Fueling was by Weber-Marelli electronic injection, and the exhaust system was in stainless steel. The engine drove a revised version of the 5-speed transmission used on most Guzzi twins through a beefed-up clutch (with 10 springs versus eight) and a driveshaft to the rear wheel.

The powertrain hung from a new spine frame based on Dr. John’s race bike design, constructed from 1.5mm chrome-moly tubing with a cantilevered rear swingarm and a fully adjustable Koni (later WP) monoshock under the seat. Marzocchi supplied the “conventional” three-way adjustable fork, and Brembo four-pot calipers with 300mm dual discs (two-pot/260mm rear) provided stopping power. Cast alloy 17-inch wheels ran on 120-section front and 160-section rear tires.

With a claimed 95 horsepower available at 8,000rpm, the Daytona was the most powerful road-going Guzzi to date, returning a top speed of 145mph. “The result is excellent rideability, with big-time low-end and midrange power available whenever you open the throttle,” Cycle World said of the big twin in 1993. On the road, they found that being long and low in Guzzi tradition gave the Daytona reassuring stability at high speeds: “The Daytona proved unflappable, with well-damped suspension, plenty of cornering clearance, premium tires and a relatively flickable yet very stable nature.” You will not see another one anytime soon. Be different and add this thumper to your collection. This investment will only increase over time.

Contact the seller here: sennaducati79@gmail.com

Though the performance is more than enough for mortals, the Daytona 1000’s real claim to fame is its scarcity, build quality and looks. It is a true gentleman’s road racer, made more for comfortable canyon carving than dicing at the sharp end of a club race. The previous owners of this machine clearly took that mandate to heart, given the beast the exercise it deserves.

Despite its mileage, the thing looks absolutely mint, with nary a blemish, nick or streak of grime. The rear cowl wears custom livery, and the wheels have been painted gold to match the accents. That might deter the hardest-core originality freaks, but we love the look. With pedigree, acres of charm and tons of special bits, this thing is not to be missed at $14,995. Contact the seller here: sennaducati79@gmail.com

Featured Listing November 7, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 2003 Yamaha FZ1 with just 661 Miles !

Yamaha sent their 2nd generation R1 across the hall to the Naked department, where they transformed it into an all-rounder, with a tune, handling, and ergoes for an afternoon around town.  This FZ1 has been customized back toward the edge with choice accessories and mods, but hardly even break-in miles.

2003 Yamaha FZ1 for sale on eBay

A showcase for the R1's 998cc 5-valve engine, the FZ1 put it all on display, but with a few changes to enhance the various roles.  Carburetors are slightly smaller at 37mm, and internal changes make 143 hp available, and stretch out the band in which the 78 ft.-lbs. of torque is available.  The steel cradle frame holds a more raked steering head and fully adjustable suspension front and rear.  A classic 4-into-1 exhaust escapes below the generously sized radiator, making its way to the off-side.  Dual-piston front brakes are right-sized at 298mm, and the expected pillion required a 268mm rear disk.

 

The owner has made some choice updates to this FZ, professionally done with a focus on black.  The pillion is history, thanks to the neat monoposto seat and cover.  Signals have been reduced to a manageable size and reflectors removed.  The exhaust is now a 4-1-2, recalling a smokier era.  Looking entirely new and unused, it might have never spent a night outdoors !  From the eBay auction:

The list is as follows: 

Lower smoked windscreen. 

Rizoma billet bar end mirrors.

Misc. pieces from side of bike and motor sent out for additional powder coat and anodize for complete Murdered out look.

Rear taillight conversion/ all amber blinkers/ side reflectors stream lined and tightened into the bike.

Frog Specialties rear tail cover, painted black to match the bike, cleans up the rear section behind the seat.

Devil twin carbon, stainless mufflers, sound is unreal.  

All work performed by the original dealer plus Ducati of Seattle. 

Rizoma plate frame.

Black anodized bar risers. Black bars.

 

Up against its more 1200-ish competition, the FZ1 reviewed sportier and more engaging, but still capable of a weekend trip with a good tank bag.  The massaged superbike engine required more shifting, but could take the upright rider  ( ducking behind the windscreen ) to 150 mph.  This example presents as a new bike, blacked out except for the always appropriate yellow and black livery.  The owner asks $7,800 and requests offers and can be reached here: sennaducati79@gmail.com

-donn

Suzuki November 7, 2018 posted by

Ready to roll: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750

Ah, the 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750. There are plenty of reasons to love "slabbies," from their awkward-but-functional bodywork that signalled a move to full fairings for the sportbike crowd, to their no-apologies approach to out and out speed, to the fact that decent ones are fast becoming prized collector bikes. This example is a clean but well-used base model with no frills add-ons or special treatments. It's in a sweet spot where it can still be ridden and enjoyed, but will hold its value as these things get rarer.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 for sale on eBay

With an aluminum frame, air-oil cooled 750cc four pot and a rack of flat slides, even the entry-level Gixxers were meant for the pointy end of racing grids, in an era when good amateur AMA racers could still rake in a pretty decent living in contingency money. And even if knee-down work wasn't your bag, Gixxers were top of the heap street bikes well into the 1990s.

From the eBay listing:

Good Running GSXR750 Slabside

has had some fairing work in the past but is original paint and nice fork seals done last year
carbs cleaned this summer and a new Battery installed last week.

The speedometer and odometer work correctly , sometimes the side stand light stays on
Can ship if needed in the USA for a flat Fee of $600

to an airport depot near you ( you will need to pick it up)

For the $6,200 buy-it-now, you'll get a clean and honest rider-quality 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750. A collector and a rider. Can't say fairer than that.


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Honda November 6, 2018 posted by

Spitting Image – 1987 Honda NSR250R

Honda's early NSR-250's were nicely templated on the winning RS250R race machine, in race livery almost hard to tell apart.  This one went from road to private collection and has been made ready for the new owner's choice.

1987 Honda NSR250R for sale on eBay

Honda's MC16 used a 249cc V-twin, with cylinders slightly turned to ease intake and exhaust routing.  Exhaust port sizes are adjusted, and torque band extended, by Honda's RC Valve.  Almost any frame could cope with the legislated 45 hp, but Honda built a twin spar from alloy extrusions welded to cast connectors and headstock.  In-house suspension used air adjustable forks and Pro-link monoshock, with the straight swingarm that pre-dates the banana.

Evidently this collector is more than proverbially thinning the herd, and has auctioned several over the past few months.  Not a virgin with over 15K miles, but still looks excellent.  Beside one cracked corner on the right fairing and a couple of paint chips, it appears complete and original.  A lot of new wear parts were installed when the NSR was taken off the road, though we don't know when that was, cables and pads should be ok to sit.  Here is the list of freshenings that were done to make it ready for sale, from the eBay auction:

New Battery & amp; Battery Tender Hookup - which can also be used to run Electric gear

New front and rear brake fluids flushed and replaced with Honda Pro DOT 4

Carbs were Digitally Synchronized

New Spark Plugs Installed

Perfect Mechanical and Great Cosmetic condition and needs nothing

Replaced the fork oil with 15W

New transmission oil

Oil Injection Tank filled up

Coolant flushed and replaced

New set of tires have 250+/- miles on them in 3 rides this last summer

Honda continued with the NSR250R for another ten years, so the early model is less collectible, but also doesn't have the harder to defeat PGM ignition controller.  Not the lightest small sport, but Honda build quality took sales away from Yamaha, who had been ruling the two-stroke market.  Not exactly museum quality, this NSR looks like it could be a great rider.  Interest in the auction is high with 5 days to run...

-donn


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Suzuki November 5, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki RGV250Γ VJ22 for Sale

Update 11.6.2018: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Today's Featured Listing 1991 Suzuki RGV250Γ has styling cues very much like the four-stroke GSX-R of the period, and help the bike stand out as a Suzuki among the other bikes in the very competitive 250cc two-stroke class, even without their traditional blue-and-white graphics. Of course, if you're missing out on shouty graphics, there's still the RGVΓ, SAPC, and Made with the Grand Prix Spirit logos. This is actually a VJ22, the second generation of the little Gamma, and features a number of changes from the earlier VJ21.

The RGV250Γ followed the 250 two-stroke class template: a light and stiff aluminum beam frame, with an asymmetrical "banana" swingarm that allowed clearance on the right side for the twin "shotgun" expansion chambers in the case of the later VJ22 version seen here. The engine was a liquid-cooled, 90° two-stroke v-twin that eventually found its way into the Aprilia RS250 as well, along with Suzuki's six-speed gearbox. The Suzuki version used "SAPC" or "Suzuki Advanced Power Control," an electronic power valve and ignition timing system to boost the Japanese-market RGV's out put from 45hp all the way to... 45hp. Yeah, these were restricted in their home market. Export models got more like 55-ish horsepower from the 249cc twin.

Combined with the bike's sub-300lb dry weight, the bike offered plenty of performance for anyone willing to put in the effort to extract it. But straight-line power isn't the point with any quarter-liter two-stroke: the RGV is all about corner speed and eats twisty roads for breakfast. The earlier VJ21 used a 17" front and 18" rear wheel like other bikes of the era, but the VJ22 used matched 17" wheels front and rear, making it easier to fit modern rubber. Overseas, the RGV was a very popular little thrasher and fairly common, but these can be difficult to find. It's ironic that, here in the USA anyway, the Suzuki-engined Aprilia RS250 seems much easier to find than the RGV250Γ that donated its engine.

From the Seller: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22 for Sale

Very rare in North America the Suzuki RGV 250 is a close as you get to a street legal bike from the golden era of GP racing. This example was imported from Japan and has Utah street legal title. The bike is runs well and was recently serviced with all fluids changed. This bike is un-restored and has several scratches and scrapes but for a bike of its age its in good condition. All mechanical parts function well. The bike has 8,837 kilometers on the gauges. Comes with a set of brand new Bridgestone tires that have never been mounted. $6,500 + buyer pays shipping.

The bike seems honestly presented and is in good, if not perfectly original condition. The levers, grips, rearstand spools, and brake lines aren't stock and the color choices aren't particularly subtle, but that's fine, since you'd end up replacing them anyway if you're going to ride it, or if you're restoring it. The minor cosmetic flaws should be easily rectified without having to tear the bike down, and it would make a great, usable example.

-tad

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