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Featured Listing November 24, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1990 Honda VFR750R / RC30

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

Even if not fans, RSBFS readers will acknowledge Honda’s long history of success in motorcycle production and racing.  These days, Honda seems to have the engineering chops ( and resources ) to do almost whatever they put their minds to – witness their Formula 1 winning V6’s for Williams and McLaren, several years as CART’s engine of choice, and more recently the HondaJet aircraft ( with turbofans developed by Honda and GE ).

The VFR750R/RC30 from 1987-1990 is just one more example, where engineers and designers pulled a winning concept together, and the manufacturing side of the company executed beautifully, about 3,000 times.  As testament, the factory team won the inaugural WSBK season in 1988.  This rare example has been in a collector’s display since new, and occasionally exercised, turning under 1,200 miles.

As their homologation special for the Superbike World Championship, the RC30 really was the mythical race bike with lights.  From the sharp-steering alloy chassis to the 296mm front disks to the single-sided Pro-Link swingarm, the RC30 provided the racers what they needed.  Shocks and forks on the single seater were only adjustable for preload, since the race teams would be putting their own special parts.  The compact V-4 looked similar to the preceding VFR750F, but shared almost no internal parts.  Even the exhaust note with the new 360-degree crank was specific to the RC30.

Resting in the motorcycle wing of a large auto collection, this RC30 has received excellent care and not even break-in miles.  The pictures show an apparently new machine, even though a generation has passed since it was built.  The owner tells of a mid-life cosmetic refurbishment:

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

An exception would have to be my super low (under 1,200) miles, almost perfectly like-new 1990 Honda RC30.

Yes, there are a few exceptions to what I call my Italian collecting rule and one of those would be the 1990 Honda RC30. This 1990 Honda RC30 needs no introduction or explanation by me as it is such a famous Honda, that the only thing you need to know about an RC30 is if you are getting a good one or a really great one or one of the very best.

The RC30 in this listing was purchased for the collection several years ago and is an extremely low mileage bike. It was absolutely 99% perfect, however, some of the detail parts that were white rubber or painted white had become slightly discolored. At that time, almost ten years ago, Honda was still had these parts in stock and we purchased each and every part to bring the cosmetic looks of the bike back to 99%. This 1990 Honda RC30 has not been raced or abused or messed with in any way. It currently looks like new, runs just as it should and is kept on a trickle charger and is exercised thoroughly during the spring, summer, and fall; and again it has never been raced or abused (most have been!).

As you may already know, there is nothing more exciting nor handles better than the Honda RC30. The looks, graphics, and colors of the bike need no apology either. They are absolutely a stand-out in any crowd of motorcycles. Most RC30s were extensively raced and it is very hard to find one that has not been modified or raced. You are looking at one that has not been abused in that way shape or form. This bike is always kept on a trickle charge and ready take a trip to any bike show at a moment’s notice. This is truly a bike for a serious collection and it would be a shame to abuse it. Oh yes, it comes with a new Honda rear wheel stand still in the box.

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.

Honda might be accused of an obsession with the V-4, which brought it multiple WSBK titles along with TT and endurance racing wins.  After Superbike rulesmakers made a short dalliance with the V-twin an offer they couldn’t refuse, Honda returned to the four with the RC212V.  But for road riders, the RC30 was a moment when you could buy something very special from the local dealer, even though it cost twice as much as the nearest competitor.  That moment is reflected in recent asking prices even for fairly well-used examples.  But in this case, we have an RC30 that has been in a collector’s hands from day one, without damage history and in impeccable shape. 

-donn

Honda November 24, 2019 posted by

Ride like the wind: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo

In the early 1980s Honda was flexing some serious technological muscles. Sure, they nearly single-handedly created the big bore standard with the CB750 in the 1970s, but the avenues they pursued in the 1980s were a fantastic mix of avant-guarde ideas seeking performance. Imagine the breadth and scope of Honda’s R&D department during this time: From the simple, air cooled single FT500, the wild six cylinder CBX, the sublime V45 Interceptor, the more conventional Hurricane, two strokes like the NSR250 or 400, the narrow angle v-twins, and even the mighty GoldWing touring rig. Every engine configuration was different. And on top of that blows in the amazing CX500 Turbo – the world’s first fully-backed factory Turbo effort. Heady stuff indeed.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo for sale on eBay

With everything that was going on, Honda leveraged an existing platform for the Turbo. In this case, it was the CX500 series, better known as a cruiser in US parlance, but available in a number of different forms (including sport tourers and sporty models) in world markets. This is the same platform that spawned the GL500 SilverWing, the smaller displacement touring bike. So obviously the bones of the Turbo were mighty flexible. But simply bolting a turbine wheel to the exhaust pipe does not a functional motorcycle make. Honda went all out in the quest to tame the bugaboos lurking in the mythological sphere of boost. Tricks included a tiny IHI turbocharger, liquid cooling (already present in the CX series), computerized fuel injection with knock detection that could retard timing, an improved 4-valve cylinder head, forged pistons, different connecting rods and a beefed up bottom end including a stronger crank. With a reported 82 horsepower, the 80 degree, pushrod V-twin had come of age.

From the seller:
1982 Honda CX 500 Turbo. This is a clean titled original condition vehicle as pictures show. It runs very well with no issues. All lighting and accessories operate as designed. Motorcycle was used for land speed record attempts. 3 official records were set with documentation included. Steering damper, boost gauge, AFR meter are installed. Final drive gearing has been changed for top MPH. Original gearing included. Motorcycle is fully legal and can be ridden normally on the street.Tires were new and motorcycle was running when stored. Fuel has been treated and battery has been maintained. Vehicle is sold as is.

Also included is a spare parts bike, engine and many extra parts.

Did you read the seller’s text? Maybe you want to go back and read it again. Yes, this bike was used for land speed record attempts. In some ways, this is a very strange choice. With a top speed of 125 mph, the stock CX500 Turbo is not going to set the salt alight. There is no indication of what the records might have been, but I would love to see them. No notes on what has changed on the bike other than gearing, a steering damper, and an air/fuel ratio meter. Beyond the text, I spy an extra boost gauge and fuel pressure monitor. None of that is a deal killer in my book, although Honda Turbos are pretty heavy on the handlebars at slower speeds – I’m not certain the damper is necessary if you are riding in a legal manner. This one even comes with a spare parts bike!

We have seen a spate of Turbos on RSBFS as of late, and I’m amazed at how dirt cheap they are for the technology Honda invested in their production. These are rare motorcycles that stand out and really do perform, yet they remain unloved and underappreciated. Prices have come up slightly over the years, but we are still near the bottom if you are in the market for something worth holding on to. Check it out here – and contemplate if you need to pick up yet another hobby, such as land speed record collecting. Good Luck!!

MI


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Featured Listing November 23, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

When it rains, it pours, and the past couple weeks have seen us feature several different Laverdas. Bikes this old are usually a bit too “classic” to feature regularly on the site, but certain models are just too important not to include at RSBFS, and the hairy-chested Lavereda Jota like today’s featured listing is one of them. As a followup to their successful parallel-twin models, Laverda introduced a three-cylinder in 1973 after teasing prototypes for several years. It wasn’t just a twin with an extra cylinder grafted on, it was an almost entirely new design, with a twin overhead-cam head.

The earliest three-cylinder bikes used a large drum brake at the front, but that was soon updated to a twin-disc setup, although a drum was retained at the rear for a bit longer. Although it wasn’t tuned as aggressively as it could have been, the new, unimaginatively-named “3C” was one of the best-performing bikes available, with a 133mph tested top speed. But stock performance, however impressive, is never enough for some people, and UK Laverda importers Slater Laverda saw plenty of untapped potential and decided to build a bit of a hot rod.

Slater fitted factory racing cams and high-compression pistons, an updated exhaust, and SFC yokes for different front-end geometry. The resulting bike impressed Laverda’s management, and limited production began in 1976. Power for the 981cc engine was up to 90hp and the bike could clear 140mph, making it the fastest production motorcycle at the time. After success racing the bike in the UK, Laverda expanded distribution, and eventually the bike found its way to the US, although bikes originally intended for us were of lower-spec than the UK machines.

The Jota, named for a Spanish dance, is often characterized as a “man’s bike” but could more accurately be described as “a bike for tall people with strong hands.” The triples weigh in at nearly 500lbs dry, with a very tall seat 32″ high, no side stand fitted as standard, and a brutally stiff clutch-pull. Like all Laverdas of the period, they’re solid and overbuilt with power and handling to spare, but a Jota takes work to ride quickly. Or slowly.

Slight clarification of the seller’s information below: all of the early Laverda three-cylinder models, including the 3C and the original Jota used a 180° crank that basically fired “like a four with a miss.” The Jota was basically a hotted-up version of the regular production triple and used the same crank as the 3C. The “two up, one down” crank was great for power and made a pretty distinctive noise, but vibrated a bit more than than was considered acceptable. Later triples switched to a 120° crank after 1981 for increased smoothness, but purists feel like only the 180° bikes are the only “real” Jotas. Personally, I think the 120° bikes sound pretty cool too, but the 180° bikes are definitely more desirable to collectors.

From the Seller: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased. 

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari. 

When you decide, as I did, that the rare, large Italian Sports bikes of the 1970s are a great place to be for collecting. You will for sure want to have a Laverda Jota in your collection. 

Make sure that your Jota is a real Jota with 180 degree firing order, which distinguishes the Jota from other Laverda models. Again, the 180 degree firing order means that the 3-cyclindar engine fires off when two of the cylinders are up and then 180 degrees later when one cylinder is up, it again fires. In other words, the Jota fires two times per 360 degrees and not three times per 360 degree rotation, like the lesser Laverda models. This is what gives the motor its unique power and especially its unbelievable thundering exhaust note. These are big, heavy, and handsome bikes. This one was restored by a Laverda guru a little over 10 years ago and was put in our collection shortly thereafter. If you are talking about these Italian bikes that are designed to look like they have big muscles the Jota certainly exemplifies that. Of course, any of the rare Italian 1970s and 1980s iconic bikes are always great garage art and most often wonderful bikes to ride. The Jota is a man’s bike and not meant for the faint of heart unless you are going to just put it in your living room to look at it.  

There is plenty of information on the Internet about the Jota. There is a very large international club for them. This Jota was restored to perfection and is still in wonderful cosmetic condition and riding form. 

This is certainly a bike for serious collectors and for those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as the Ferrari automobile. I spent a decade looking for the best one and this is the best one I have ever seen.

The real Jotas seldom become available and you should always get the best. When they are available, they are almost never in highly restored condition.  All my bikes are kept on trickle chargers ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice. The Jota is one of those.  

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.  

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

The seller clearly knows bikes, and the collectability of the Jota is undeniable. The only Laverda model more valuable is the earlier SFC, and the Jota is a bit more civilized, although that probably isn’t saying much. Many Jotas came with a half-fairing, but I much prefer my big, burly bruisers to be naked! Wait, that came out wrong… Anyway, the additional wind-blast will be perfect for bulking up your neck muscles to match your newly-muscled hands: I’ve got a couple friends with Laverda triples and the effort required to pull that clutch still blows my mind.

-tad

Featured Listing November 22, 2019 posted by

Featured Listings: Pair of 1994 Suzuki RGV250R VJ22 Lucky Strikes

It shouldn’t need to be explained how deliciously apt the Lucky Strike livery was for the Suzuki RGV250R, a competition terrorizing, rule-bending hooligan of a lightweight sportbike that smoked like a chimney and is as un-PC as grandad at an open bar. These little Suzukis are the stuff of my mid-1990s bedroom wall, and our friend Gary in Utah has not one, but two of the little curs. For the price of a new Hyundai, you can have a brace of the finest oil-burning track machines Japan ever spat out.

Built around a 90-degree v-twin that was good for around 70 horsepower uncorked, the 1994 Suzuki RGV250R VJ22 made its name shirking tiered licensing rules and treating roadracers to quick, precise handling that you just couldn’t match on a bike with loads of horsepower and a big waistline. On these bikes, the heritage as a racetrack terror is carried to the bodywork, where the big Lucky Strike logos ape Kevin Schwantz’s 500cc GP World Championship machine. We could think of few people to better personify the RGV250R than the waifish, aggressive Texan.

The pair here, in true Gary fashion, are immaculate, though one is ever so slightly nicer than the other. The bike with the Arrow pipes and black passenger seat is a little straighter, and has newly powdercoated wheels wearing a new set of Dunlop Sportmaxes. It comes with a standard exhaust should you want to take it back to stock. The bike with stock cans and a red seat needs a powdercoat and comes with an aftermarket exhaust if the stocker is too tame.

As with anything Gary touches, they have recently had all mechanical systems checked and refreshed.

From the seller:

Both bikes are 1994 models. Vin numbers confirmed genuine lucky strike models. L.S. With Arrow exhaust system has newly powder coated wheels and new Dunlop sport max tires. New drive chain. All fairings are 100% genuine OEM Suzuki factory. Genuine OEM new black passenger seat. Bike comes with OEM stock exhaust system. Customized with gold anodized bar ends. 7,427 kilometers.

L.S. with stock pipes and red passenger seat has 4,903 kilometers. Aftermarket exhaust comes with the bike. All stock condition. All fairings and components are 100% genuine OEM factory Suzuki. Bike could use the wheels powder coated but still looks very nice. Tiny ding in the front right side gas tank. Both bikes are minty low mileage examples. Both come with Utah state titles and are titled as street bikes for road use.

Both L.S.’s run like new. Both have had carb cleans….They both have new engine fluids, new brake fluid and both have had fork seals replaced and new fork fluid. Electrical components are 100% operational as new.

Askng $11,900 each.

Contact: rmurangemasters@aol.com (Gary)

Maybe you and a friend are in search of the next track day thrill, or maybe you want a buddy bike for weekend canyon carving, or, hell, maybe you just want one to ride and one to polish. Whatever floats your boat, these things have you covered.

Featured Listing November 22, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

If ever there was a bike to show up to a cruise night on, surely the 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport is at or near the top of the list. The pundits all say it is the defining cafe racer shape, leaving the factory in the era before two-foot long license plate holders and 10,000 candlepower turn signals crept in to defile more modern machines’ lines. We tend to agree.

The V7 sport is adorned with absolutely nothing extraneous, its thin-tube frame, shapely tank and minimalist bodywork seem to embrace the prominent heads on the unmistakable Guzzi v-twin. Low bars, spoked wheels and twin chrome megaphone pipes complete the purposeful package.

Though it was made to celebrate and recall Guzzi’s mid-century racing successes, the V7 provides antiquated performance, with just 70 horsepower running through a very tall gearset. The mill revs quickly, but the eagerness is deceptive. Couple that with slightly scary drum brakes and a right-side-shift transmission and you’ve got a bike more suited to cruise nights than track days.

This 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport is in immaculate condition. All the paint and brightwork have a brilliant shine and appear to be blemish free. The seller says he stores her bikes in a climate-controlled facility on trickle chargers, so there should be no worries about the mechanical condition of the bike.

From the seller:

1973 Moto Guzzi V7

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

If Italian collector sports bikes could be rated for handling, the Motor Guzzi V7 Sport would certainly score a 98 out of 100 points. They can just read your mind in terms of negotiating the curvy roads. If motorcycles were rated for sex appeal the 1973 Motor Guzzi V7 would score 101 out of 100 points. I don’t know of anything that is quite so simply designed yet pleases the visual senses so much. And, yes, this bike has the rare original exhaust pipes with the fins, and the sand cast brake drums (not the ‘not so pretty’ disc brakes) which is just a little frosting on the cake.

This bike is in top flight condition and runs like a Swiss clock, it is kept on a trickle charger at all times. There are no known issues. Just try and find a nicer one!

This is certainly a bike for serious collectors and for those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as the Ferrari automobile. I spent a decade looking for the best one and this is the best one I have ever seen.

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.

Check out the pictures and be a little amazed – you are seeing the best!

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

Even though it doesn’t fit our traditional fare, we’re in love with this classic Goose, thanks mostly to those magnificent lines. Though it may not be an adept canyon carver, there is a place in any collection for a classic, sexy cruise night machine like this one.

Suzuki November 22, 2019 posted by

Real / Rough – 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750R Limited Edition

Not often seen but always appreciated, the GSX-R homologation special for 1986 had a single seat, alloy fuel tank, and dry clutch.  This SoCal example might have some questions better left unasked, but has great potential as a riding or racing restoration.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750R Limited Edition for sale on eBay

Suzuki had only just introduced the GSX-R750 in 1985 when its light weight and rugged reliability made it a natural for the race course.  To homologate for Superbike racing, the -R was built, not changing the alloy chassis or oil-cooled engine, but adding a few special parts.  To help cope with a 106 hp race machine, brakes and anti-dive were borrowed from the 1100cc model, along with 18-inch wheels front and rear.  The oil-cooled four was coated in a dark gray, and the steering damper is needed more on a 1985 short swingarm model.

The first owner must’ve been hard on a bike, since this auction pictures a past salvage title and damage to lowers on both sides.  It’s a study in contrasts, with the good-looking frame and swingarm but a massive gash in the tank.  Luckily the VIN can be researched and the dry clutch is undeniable.  Many comments in the eBay auction, here are just a few:

When I bought it the fairing was scraped up. the lowers were missing as well as the turn signals along with a few other small bits.
Fluids have been regularly checked and replaced
The carbs have been removed and cleaned
Brake fluid change
Clean fuel added
New battery
Tires have plenty of tread and no cracking
Electrical works as it should
The exhaust is a first gen Yoshimura from R &D America, USA.
It’s loud even with fresh packing
The drive-chain is near new but marks show in the middle of the adjustment of the swing-arm

The scratches on the gas tank and wind screen are compliments of the original owner. I was having the upper fairing repainted by guy that didn’t know what the heck he was doing, the color was wrong and the paint was super thin so I stopped and just left it as you see it.

I have an extra set of the NLA OEM stickers for the gas tank and for the upper fairing.
The lowers and middle side covers are livable.
The ask seems out of line for such a project until you look at some recent listings, these very rare -R’s arrived in just the hundreds, and are likely down to only dozens.  This R750R might return to trackday duty while the restoration is planned, perhaps never to begin.
-donn

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Featured Listing November 21, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

In the wonderful world of Turbo motorcycles, there are the “make your own” types, and the factory turbo offerings. But this special model, the mighty Kawasaki Z1R TC, not only blurs the lines between the two camps, it is also the very first in the factory turbo column. You see, the Z1R TC was sold through Kawasaki dealerships as a new model. However it was not (technically) a factory effort. The offspring of a mixed marriage, ex-Kawi exec Alan Masek convinced the Big K brass to ship bikes to his Turbo Cycle Company (TCC). Given the sluggish sales of the warmed over Z1R, this was no big feat. TCC applied an American Turbo Pak kit to the stock machines, and shipped the resultant mutants to select dealerships with a $1,400 premium tacked on to the sticker price. Appearing to be a factory effort – but devoid of the factory warranty – the Z1R TC went on to gain an incredible reputation for speed, on/off switch turbo boost behavior (Jeckyl & Hyde anyone?), and questionable longevity. For Kawasaki it was a huge win with very little risk. Today, these rare bikes are coveted by collectors world wide.

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC!

The original Z1R TC bikes went out the door in stock Kawasaki colors; they were literally converted by TCC and kicked out of the shop. As the operation matured, several changes occurred. The first was a change to the exhaust plumbing and collector – in an effort to tame the boost. The next change was a new wastegate that limited boost to 6 PSI (the Gen I bikes had a fully adjustable wastegate). And finally the classic 1970s paint scheme emerged. These are all Gen II bikes, and can be identified by the “Molly Designs” logo on the tail section. With the new graphics the Z1R TC finally had the appearance to show off the induction upgrades. Today these Molly graphic bikes are the most desired of the Z1R TC set.

From the seller:
You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. Many years ago when the best of the best was available, and that is what I was buying, these motorcycles were targeted for my collection by me.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened with the Ferrari market.

An exception is the Kawasaki Z1RTC.

More from the seller:
The rare bike in this ad is the 1978 Kawasaki Z1RTC. To me it is one of the greatest and rare motorcycle you can collect. It is a very limited production motorcycle especially in the Molly Graphics configuration. It is unbelievably fast and has an exhaust that is a thrill to listen to as it winds up through the gears. I purchased this Z1RTC from the original owner and it has not been taken apart or restored or manipulated. The original owner explained to me that this ZR1TC turbo is a Stage 3 which is the best of the best for Z1RTC turbos. The original owner told me he took the bike to a drag strip only once and turned 9.9 seconds in the quarter mile and described the feeling by saying, “it felt like his eyeballs were pinned to the back of his head”

The Z1RTC is all original except for the upgraded pressure gauge. Always kept on a trickle charger and ready to fly down the road.

They are only original once.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale.

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

While the Z1R TC put Kawasaki on the map, not all was tea and roses. This was a serious motorcycle that demanded the best riders. Boost was not easily manipulated and the remainder of the stock Z1R pieces were not engineered for the upgrade. The complete lack of engine controls that we take for granted (computer controlled fuel injection, programmable ignition modules, rev limiters) made for a very fragile existence. There was actually recommendations in the manual that new owners upgrade to stronger valve springs, weld the crank and upgrade the clutch if the bike were to be used aggressively. When was the last time your owners manual made those types of modification suggestions? But given that there was no factory warranty, there was apparently little to lose.

These are mean, aggressive yet beautiful motorcycles. They chronicle an era where experimentation and entrepreneurship could coexist with a larger factory effort. And the epic bikes that resulted from these strange bedfellows strike awe and wonder in the hearts and minds of viewers – and riders. To find a totally stock Z1-R TC is an amazingly rare sight. This bike is very, very close to perfectly original, and has a very limited list of owners. It looks absolutely pristine and clean enough to eat off of – should you dare to commit such sacrilege. For those in the market for something unique and special, few bikes can compete with this beautiful 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC. If previous listings of this model are any example, this one will go quickly. Boost on, and good luck!!

MI

MV Agusta November 21, 2019 posted by

Femme Fatale: 2009 MV Agusta F4 1078RR 312 for Sale

A very sexy bike with a very un-sexy name, “MV Agusta F4 1078RR 312” is at least descriptive. It tells you that it’s a premier Italian superbike displacing 1078cc and capable of 312kph, or nearly 194mph. “RR” generally stands for “race replica” in the motorcycling world and frequently adorns homologation machines, but the nearly 1100cc would make the 1078RR ineligible for most production racing series, so it’s probably here just to signify the bike’s uncompromising nature. High quality components litter the bike: Sachs shock and steering damper, Brembo Monoblock brakes, a Marzocchi fork, and MV’s EBS engine-brake system that works with the slipper clutch to improve rear grip during rapid downshifts.

These bikes are not easy. They aren’t especially light by modern standards. They run hot, and vent scalding air at your inner thighs in traffic. The riding position is cripplingly uncomfortable. The mirrors are useless, unless you’re tucked in with your head behind the screen, and barely adjust at all. The throttle is wickedly crisp, especially with a properly-tuned aftermarket ECU. Have you ridden an Aprilia RSV4? The F4 is basically the complete opposite of that: where an RSV4 is friendly and confidence-inspiring, the F4 is intimidating. One bike flatters you, the other highlights your inadequacies. As a rider, and possibly as a human being. The RSV4 is your partner, an ally that helps you look like a hero. The F4 a femme fatale in a slinky black dress with a stiletto strapped to her thigh that will make you feel like you’re not worthy. Or stab you. Or both. The MV Agusta F4 does not suffer fools gladly.

That’s not to say that the 1078RR isn’t fast, or that it doesn’t handle. It’s just that it takes hard work and commitment to get the best out of an F4. There’s a reason so many of these bikes are barely broken in: everyone lusts after them, but they work much better as garage art than as bikes to actually ride, unless you’re a masochist or are willing to risk one on track. The 190 horsepower may seem to barely qualify it for a place among today’s superbikes, but the increased displacement gives it massive torque [91.5lb-ft!] to go with the high-rpm power, making it a beastly motive force.

Honestly, unless you’re chasing lap times, any F4 is plenty challenging and entertaining on road or track. Even better: nice ones are usually shockingly affordable. A GSX-R1000 is still a better bike by every quantifiable performance metric, but these days you can buy an F4 for the same price. And as a bonus the F4 is one of the best-looking motorcycles ever designed. This particular example is not shockingly affordable, although it is very, very nice and features some very choice updates that should improve both performance and reliability.

From the original, colorful eBay listing: 2009 MV Agusta F4 1078RR 312 for Sale

1 of 6: red/silver Monoposto 1078 312RR sent to USA

This auction is for the following 2009 MV Agusta F4 1078 312RR (pictured)

Only 60 of the 1078 312RR were sent to the USA. They offered them in 3 color combinations. And also offered them in Monoposto and 1+1. This bike is 1 of only 6 RED/SILVER Monoposto bikes out of the total 60.

This bike has the following UPGRADES added:

  • Magnesium oro swingarm that has been finished in a brilliant titanium color
  • Marzocchi front forks
  • Bitubo rear shock
  • Ohlins steering damper
  • Titanium rear sprocket flange with upgraded cush lugs
  • DID chain
  • Titanium rearsets/levers
  • Full titanium BODIS exhaust
  • Microtec ECU (dyno tuned)
  • OZ forged aluminum wheels
  • NEW tires
  • 320mm full floating Brembo T-drive rotors with titanium bolts
  • Titanium caliper bolts
  • Brembo Z04 pads
  • Stainless brake and clutch lines (blue)
  • Titanium Staubli Quick Disconnects on front brake line
  • High temp silicone hose kit
  • High flow water pump conversion
  • Oberon quick fuel cap
  • Various carbon parts
  • Suede seat
  • Titanium Dzus fasteners for body

Bought NEW in 2009 ($25,000)

Adult owned, never tracked, never raced, never crashed

Serviced by MV dealer at all intervals

Over $30,000 in aftermarket parts added

Selling to make room for another project… It’s been a great bike!

Okay, so the $37,500 asking price is pretty eye-watering, and the seller seems to make the whole “the aftermarket parts and labor add to the value” mistake that afflicts so many people. The 1078RR is a very rare MV, but honestly all MVs are pretty rare, even the the ones that aren’t part of some limited edition. The aftermarket bits seen here appear to be of the highest quality, and the dyno-tuned Microtec ECU is a very nice bonus: it should make this F4 the bike it always should have been, at least in terms of the power and response. Combined with the Bodis exhaust, this MV really should be the quite an event to ride. Unfortunately, that same money would buy you a clean Tamburini, a bike that will probably be even more collectible. Or you could pick up a clean 1078RR for around a quarter of the price and get it properly tuned…

-tad


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