Search Results for “ducati f1”

Ducati August 9, 2018 posted by

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca

The 1980s were a period of gestation for Ducati, hitting their sportbike stride with the move from the bevel drive motors to the now-ubiquitous rubber belt-driven desmo valve train. And while Japan focused on technology such as four valves per cylinder, liquid cooling and a constantly changing array of multi-cylinder configurations, Ducati stuck to what they knew: a robust L-twin with simple (and light) air cooling, desmodronic valve actuation, and a steel trellis frame. The F1 lacked the refinement and outright power of the Japanese competition, but the magic was in what wasn’t there; the F1 weighed less than the competition, and the narrow configuration of the twin made for a compact and very agile racer. Although time and technology left it behind, the F1 and its variants remain a significant era for the Cagiva-owned company.

1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

Sitting on the cusp of the next era (the legendary 851 was released this very same year), the F1 was becoming long in the tooth before its time. To bridge the gap to the next model and keep interest in the F1 alive, Ducati released three special editions: The Santamonica, the Montjuich and the Laguna Seca. These limited edition models consisted of unique paint schemes and minor changes (some cosmetic, some performance related). Power across the three remained identical, while some of the running gear changed based on markets and need. All of these special edition bikes run 16″ wheels front and rear, and all have special cosmetic touches to highlight the fact that they are unique. The Laguna Seca utilizes a steel gas tank (unlike the aluminum model on the Montjuich), and the wheels, brakes and fender are Paso items. Yet despite the archaic configuration and Cagiva parts bin raiding, any of the F1 specials remain collectible high-points in Ducati model history.

From the seller:
This bike is a 1987 Ducati Laguna Seca, one of 200 produced to commemorate Ducati’s victory at that California track. From ’86 to ’88 Ducati would release a trio of special edition F1’s in celebration of the machine’s various successes around the world – the Montjuich, Santa Monica, and Laguna Seca. The Laguna Seca spec commemorated Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli winning the 1986 “Battle of the Twins” at the iconic, technical Northern-California circuit . In addition to wearing a Lucky Lucchinelli livery, the F1 Laguna Seca also boasts a decal of Lucchinelli’s signature on the tank of the limited edition Ducati. I purchased this machine in 1999 from the original owner’s estate in Southampton, NY with 614 kilometers on the odometer.

Currently this bike is in excellent condition and has travelled a mere 848 kilometers since new. It has been made more streetable by the conversion to Mikuni carbs, but the original Dell’Ortos are included in the sale price. All other parts of the bike are original except for the tires. The original Pirelli MP7S tires are included as well. It has been started regularly and taken for occasional local rides. I believe this to be the 189th Laguna Seca produced as evidenced by the VIN ZDM3GA3M0HB750189. This is a classic, rare Ducati that is difficult to find in any condition and would make a great addition to any sophisticated collection of Italian motorcycles or a great weekend ride with sympathetic Ducatisti.

In the past these F1-based specials have generated strong interest and stronger prices. There has not been too much interest in this particular example, which is strange due to the low mileage and clean, excellent condition. The opening ask is $15k; and while not exactly pocket change it is far from the highest opening for one of these models. In fact, I would consider it right on the money based on history. The paintwork looks clean and where modifications have happened (i.e. carb replacement, new tires) the originals are included in the sale. That is important for a collector, but maybe less so for someone intending to ride this beast. And who wouldn’t want to? I can practically hear the bark of the exhaust through the Conti pipe, feel the rumble of the L-twin loping just off idle, and imagine what my neighbors might think. Raw and crude in many respect, this relative relic is a riot riding on 16″ rubber.

Unfortunately, this looks to be another low mile icon destined for a comfy parking space somewhere inside. One can always hope to see and hear it run in anger, but at this price that will likely be a rare occasion. Still, it is nice to see that this Laguna Seca example did rack up some mileage up to this point. It has also survived the ravages of time and corporate changes that befell Ducati. This is a wonderful and rare survivor that deserves a good home. And despite the fact that the historic track for which it was named has itself gone through some naming changes, the Ducati F1 Laguna Seca will remain a significant model for the brand and a major collectible for those with the means and taste. If you are among that group, be sure and check it out here. And then you can jump back to the comments and share your thoughts: which F1 model do you covet – if any? Good Luck!!

MI

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca
Ducati July 23, 2017 posted by

Two Faced: 1986 Ducati F1B

The Ducati F1 series is considered by many the last of the very basic, Pantah-based steeds from Bologna. Consisting of a trellis frame, a rubber-band Desmo Due engine displacing 750cc and not much else, F1 bikes emulated factory competition bikes as much as possible – except they had lights and DOT hardware. As such, these are bare bones, thinly disguised racers of the old-school variety. No electronic trickery and little in the way of high-tech, but full of character and that classic, booming Ducati sound.

1986 Ducati F1B for sale on eBay

We see the occasional influx of F1B model Ducatis here on RSBFS; they pop up from time to time – in varying condition – showcasing their glorious tricolore livery of red, white and green. This one sports the same three colors, but utilizes asymmetry that is unique and polarizing. Like red? Step over here to the right side of the bike. Prefer green? Better stand on the left. Prefer the tricolore like it appears on the Italian flag? Best to position yourself ahead or astern this beast. The wheels remain F1 red as with the stock bikes, but the solo tail section is an add on.

From the seller:
Rare 1986 Ducati F1B. Super trap tail pipe, repaired gauge mount, last ridden Donner Pass Hwy 40 hill climb 2000. Fresh oil, new battery, petcock eliminated, runs good. Liquidating collection.

The F1 is the base model of this Ducati lineup, with a few extra special models slotting in on top: the F1 Laguna Seca and the F1 Montjuich. Still, a base F1 is a great bike that talks to you straight. The L-twin is a willing partner, with tons of low end torque and fantastic engine braking. With conventional forks, small disks and single piston calipers, nobody will confuse this with the latest hypercycle from Japan. But that is exactly the draw here; this is a bike that needs to be ridden – nay, to be commanded – in order to produce it’s best. This is a visceral experience, and aural experience and a workout all in one.

Ducati F1s are fetching bigger dollars every year. This is definitely a model that is on the ascension, and from what we have seen there appear to be no signs of that abating anytime soon. Green frame 750 or a 900SS out of reach? The F1 may well be the next best thing – at least from the prices we have seen. This particular example is interesting in that it is not a stock machine, yet seems to exude the exact qualities that make these bikes desirable (although history and more details would be nice). If you can live with the bi-polar paintwork, the solo bodywork and the unknowns, this sub-7,000 mile specimen has a lot of life left to give. Bidding has been slow, and the reserve is still in place at $7,100 USD. Check it out here, and then break out your inner art critic and let loose with your thoughts on this tricolore interpretation. Good Luck!!

MI

Two Faced:  1986 Ducati F1B
Ducati December 14, 2016 posted by

Two Up – 1988 Ducati F1B

With an eye on several “Battle of the Twins” races series, Ducati brought the 750 F1 forward with a minimum of new engineering and development dollars.  The bikes are now revered for their stripped down sensibilities and this particular F1B is a gem with under 4,000 miles.

1988 Ducati F1B for sale on eBay

  

Descendant from the Pantah and 600TT2, the 750F1 used cam belts and twin Dell’Ortos to achieve the landmark 100 hp per liter, or 75 hp from the 748 cc L-twin desmodue.  The fuel tank rests in the steel trellis frame with fabricated swingarm.  Almost vintage in character, the right-side up forks complement single-adjustable monoshock, with 280mm Brembo brakes.  Very light but full coverage fairing has seat fairing as well.

  

This F1 looks very, very good, as it should for the high starting bid.  Some mishap has befallen the solo seat but the SoCal owner has a replacement biposto, which might actually make the bike more enjoyable with its more flexible seating position.  As the eBay auction states:

RARE LAST YEAR DUCATI F1 750, F1 750S, THE LAST OF THE REAL DUCATI’S, THERE WERE ONLY 134 1988 F1 750 IN USA, NEAR MINT CONDITION, ONLY 3972 ORIGINAL MILES, I LOST THE COVER FOR SINGLE SEAT WHILE MOVING, I THINK IT’S AVAILABLE IN EUROPE, IF I KEEP THIS F1 750S, I’LL CHANGE TO THE RACING SINGLE SEAT, ABOUT 150.00…

  

Of course the “last real Ducati” is entirely a matter of perspective, but one can hardly argue the lack of mission creep in the short F1 model run.  No concessions to touring or daily utility, it’s all you need for an afternoon in the twisties and nothing more.  Sure there are a handful of race replicas existing with their circuit city names, but the 750 F1 presented here would be an outstanding rider or nice addition to the collection…

-donn

Two Up – 1988 Ducati F1B
Ducati September 12, 2015 posted by

Raw Materials: 1987 Ducati F1 For Sale

1987 Ducati F1 L Front

Ducati’s 750 F1 was intended to closely resemble their competitive TT1 racebike, and was the very last bike introduced before the company was taken over by Cagiva, when Ducati was on the ropes financially. It was the very last of the old-school Ducatis, and is finally starting to find its value because of that.

1987 Ducati F1 R Rear2

The F1 displaced 749cc’s and produced a claimed 76hp with the typical 16″ front and 18″ rear combination for impressive agility. Unlike later Ducati’s, the F1 still featured the older, less compact carburetor configuration, instead of the more familiar arrangement with both carburetors situated in the vee of the engine.

1987 Ducati F1 Dash

There’s plenty of potential in these motorcycles and handling was exceptional, but that’s kind of the problem: it’s almost like Ducati assumed that they were selling roadbikes to race teams, who planned to tweak and tune and set them up to suit, instead of to normal, everyday consumers. It’s like they thought they were just supplying the raw materials out of which you could build a very nice sportbike.

1987 Ducati F1 L Fairing

This one looks to be in very nice condition, although as a display piece, you’d obviously have to put some work in before riding it.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Ducati F1B for Sale

A complete frame up restoration. This bike retains all original equipment including mirrors, original brakes, turn signals, air box, two into one exhaust (stock exhaust available). Engine dismantled and serviced as required. New battery, tires, brake cylinder kits and more. Only displayed since being renovated. A show quality motorcycle. Lying in Ft Lauderdale inspections welcome. One of the last true Ducati custom designs.

I’m really not sure what “one of the last true Ducati custom designs” is supposed to mean: this is neither custom, nor the last of anything. And period tests were not especially kind to the F1, nor were they especially popular.

1987 Ducati F1 Controls

Sure, go find some nice, period suspension upgrades and have Loudbike tune your 750 for 100hp and you’ll have yourself a nice, vintage firebreather: air/oil-cooled Ducatis are fundamentally tough, race-bred motorcycles. But as stock, the F1 was a raw material than finished product. In spite of that, these early Pantah sportbikes have rocketed in value recently, so this might be a good investment or the perfect bike to complete your collection.

-tad

1987 Ducati F1 R Side

Raw Materials: 1987 Ducati F1 For Sale
Ducati April 11, 2015 posted by

Fresh Tricolore: Recently restored 1987 Ducati F1

f1 restored1

When considering buying an older sportbike, maintenance history is always a bit of a black box.  Sure pictures, videos and ebay seller feedback rating all help mitigate the risk yet you never actually know what could be lurking behind the bodywork.

However there is one way to help reduce the risk; looking for a bike that has been restored by a dedicated owner.   Depending on the owner’s level of obsession and willingness to purchase OEM parts, you can end up with a bike that is incredibly close to what it was when it left the factory.

This lovely 1987 Ducati F1B has undergone a major restoration from the frame up with OEM parts which means there shouldnt be any major maintenance related issues.

f1 restored3

1987 Ducati 750 F1B Tricolore for sale on ebay

For anyone not familiar with the Ducati F1B,  the bikes predecessor was the F1A which was released in 1985 and was essentially a street going version of the Ducati four time world champion TT2.   The F1B (this model) followed in 1986 after the purchase of the company by Cagiva and the major difference were cosmetic, with the F1B’s red wheels replacing the F1A’s gold and different script graphics along with some minor mechanical changes.

f1 restored4

This particular Ducati F1B tricolre looks incredibly clean.  The only thing that jumps out is the rear end fairing/bodywork but from what I have been able to learn this bodywork was the standard bodywork for the US-edition F1B  Tricolre.

Here is what the seller has to say.

  • Just completed frame up restoration. Almost impossible to find an example of this model with all original equipment still in place.
  • Stock motor new valve job, cylinders and side covers remove looks like new inside.
  • New belts.
  • New tires and battery.
  • Rebuilt kits replaced in brake hydraulics.
  • Parts usually not available are with this bike mirrors, turn signals,Brembo brakes, air box, 36 mm carbs,.dual seat, passenger foot pegs come with it.
  • All systems in working order. Available for inspection in Ft Lauderdale, Florida

 

f1 restored2

So whats this freshly restored 750F1B Tricolore worth?  At first the $22,000 USD Buy-It-Now price seems high given that recent versions of the tricolore have sold for around $17,500 USD.  The asking price seems more in line with the limited edition versions that were based on the F1B such as the Montjuich and Laguna Seca verions.

Then again, last year at the annual Las Vegas motorcycle auction a similar F1B tricolore was sold for over $20,000 and that bike had more miles than this one and hadn’t been through a full restoration.   Personally I think the price for this one is a bit high but not outrageously so and would be a good addition for any collector interested in the mid-80’s Ducati lineup.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Fresh Tricolore:  Recently restored 1987 Ducati F1
Bimota March 4, 2013 posted by

Italian Treasures: 1987 Ducati F1 750 Laguna Seca & 1987 Bimota DB1 W/Corsa Kit

laguna right

db left

If you only had money for one, which would you choose?    The seller that brought us the Ducati Santamonica at the end of February has found some other gems in the back of his garage.  Like the Santamonica, these bikes are actually located in Italy but listed on Ebay UK.

 

laguna right

Another fine example of an F1.  The bike is listed with 10,000 KM’s but the seller also mentions a complete restoration.
 
laguna clutch

Hmm, a dry clutch and folding rubber foot pegs.  That just seems like an odd combination to me.

 

laguna carb

 Who has ridden one?  Do they make a lot of intake noise?  Is it the equivalent to a mechanical symphony?

 laguna left rear

 The auction on the Duc is winding down but the reserves has yet to be met.  Check out the auction here.

 

db left

 Apparently also taking up too much space in his garage is this interesting ‘Corsa’ kitted DB1.  The seller states only two DB1’s were produced in 1087 with this kit.  I could find no mention of the kit on the internets.

It sounds like this is what the kit included:

Engine specs as the Ducati F1 Montjuic: special cammes, special pistons, 41mm Dellortos, 2into1 exhaust, delivered also with road exhaust and double front fairing, race and road/headlight.
Mileage is a scant 2,900 miles.

  db dash db bodywork

Road bike dash but with a pretty race upper.  Who is into the tech on the forks?  Is that whole contraption on top some sort of air bleed off system?

 

db tank

As soon as I saw ‘Corsa’ I thought we had a full on race bike (DB1R) but as you can see from an earlier post on a DB1R Corsa, they are quite different.  If you were curious, there was the DB1, DB1S, DB1SR,  DB1SR Serie Finale and DB1R.  It looks like toal production of all the models combined was under 700.

 

db frame

Nice, simple and tidy.

db engine

No dry clutch here my friends.  That is not not slowing the bidding though.  The bidding has jumped over $21,000 and still not hit the reserve with only a little over a day remaining.  Here is the auction.

 

 

 

Ian

Ducati February 22, 2013 posted by

Nothing To Do With The Beach: 1988 Ducati F1 750 Santamonica

sm left 2 sm left

I know I would be quickly ejected from any Ducati gathering for even considering these bikes were named after a sunny California beach town.  Maybe all those pictures of Bimota Santamonica’s bathed in California sun have influenced me.  As the Ducati faithful surely know, these bikes were named in honor of Lucchinelli’s  TT-F1 victory at the Autodromo Santamonica in 1986.  They are very similar to the F1 Laguna Seca with just wheels, brakes and passenger seat setting them apart (of course the paint is different).

sm tank 2

 When you think back to 1988, Cagiva had a lot going on.  It is basically stock except for the race exahust.  The seller does have the orignal for the “stock is best” crowd.

 

sm frame

 Although time was starting to pass the F1 design by in 1988,  the Santamonica’s are highly collectible with under 150 being produced.

 sm forks

The Santamonica borrows the Muntjuich wheels and has full floating brake calipers.

sm clutch

It has had some use (13,000KM’s) but looks in great overall condition.

sm front

 If the cobblestones didn’t give it away, this one is located in Italy and listed on Ebay UK.  Bidding is ongoing and the reserve has yet to be met.  This isn’t one for the budget minded. 

Take a shot at it here.

 

How often do you see all these together?

 

Ian

Cagiva May 23, 2012 posted by

Classic Duck: 1986 Ducati F1

For Sale: 1986 Ducati F1

Update 5.23.2012: We first saw this Duc in November of last year and it’s be relisted. Last time we saw bidding cross $10k with the reserve still in place. Currently at $5700 reserve not met. Links updated. -dc

From San Francisco, California comes this fantastic Ducati 750 F1 “B” model, with engine internals breathed on by the legendary Fast by Ferracci crew. While this is not a pristine example of the breed, it is in very nice condition and appears to have enjoyed considerable “experience” unknown to many garage queens. For more museum quality F1s, consider these posts HERE and HERE.

The Ducati F1 was as close to a race bike with lights that you could purchase back in the day. Patterned after the TT racers, the F1 was the base model of this stripped down series of bikes. Although the F1 is exclusive in its own right, the Montjuich, Laguna Seca and Santa Monica models were built upon the F1 base and offered more exclusivity and more performance. Still, the F1 was a strong runner for its day, and offered torque, light weight and nimble handling (thanks in part to the 16-inch front wheel).

Today’s bike has a paltry 6,000 KM on the clock – that is approximately 3,700 miles for us metric-challenged US-based riders. This is not terribly high mileage, as this bike is pushing on 25 years of age. That works out to be about 148 miles per year, or about one tankful of gas per annum. That is not much at all.

From the seller:
This is a very nice example of a Ducati F1B “survivor” in original condition. The F1 is the epitome of Ducati’s racing-bred efforts from the company’s early resugence in the 1980s. The F1 is basically a factory-made, low-production racing motorcycle with added lights and turn signals. This one has very low miles.

The F1B was an evolution of the original F1A of the late 1980s- the F1B’s have more engine development including a better combustion chamber and bigger valves that boosted performance. The earlier F1A’s were slightly anemic by comparison as the earlier bikes merely borrowed the 650 Pantah/Alazzurra motor with the same sized valves and merely a larger 88mm bore. The F1B rectified this lower performance with these noted modifications.

The motor in this F1 was built by Ducati experts Fast by Ferracci. It uses quick- responding flat slide 38mm Keihin carbs, NCR #7 cams, and significant head work to squeeze the most from the high performance cams. The bike runs very well ….especially above 5000 rpm- It’ll definitely straighten your arms, and it’s noticeably quicker than a stock F1!

On top of the built motor, this F1 is outfitted with some very nice period racing equipment. A Silentium 2-into-1 racing exhaust system, a vented clutch cover, twin 280 mm full floating Brembo rotors. Menani front brake adapters with 3034 Brembo 4 piston brakes. Forks are 40mm Forcella Italias, the best period forks available. Tires are in good shape- approximately 60% left. The motor was recently serviced with fresh oil, a valve adjust and new belts. You can jump on and ride it home if you so desire.

The paint, particularly on the fairing panels and tail section, is in very good condition with nice patina developing. I would conservatively rate the cosmetic condition as a 6.5 out of 10, well above average. There are paint dings on the frame in the area near the rear wheel, from thrown gravel and road debris. Other paint dings are shown in the photos.

Like many F1’s , this bike has some racing history. I was told that this bike was raced, when new, by an editor of an automotive magazine ( “Road and Track” is what I was told) Its racing number was #88.

F1’s are rapidly appreciating, period superbikes. With the recent interest in and support for these fine machines at Ducstock and the TT2 symposium, prices will continue to rise.

Check out the multiple photos, and video of this fine example of a great running F1B. This would be a great daily driver, cafe racer, weekend canyon carver, or Sunday morning coffee- getter. It would be equally at home on display in your garage, office, or living room. Very few bikes draw as much attention or sheer awe as the F1.

——————————————————————————–
The odometer reads in kilometers, so this has 6000km, not miles.

I added the VIN number to the bike’s description per your requests. PLEASE note that the bike is a 1986 model, not a 1988.

The eBay auction lists this bike as a 1988, but the VIN checks out as a 1986. The seller has made a correction in his text which seem to indicate a simple mistake. The F1 was introduced in 1985 and ran through 1988, so this bike certainly looks to be legit. However as well caution all of our RSBFS readers: if are interested in a particular bike, do your homework and ask lots of quetions. In this particular case, I would love to know more about the racing history of this particular bike as I find vintage racers quite interesting.

The value of the 750 F1 series has been pretty solid in the $9,000 – $12,000 range as of late. Perfect bikes with no miles will go for higher (between $13k and $15k according to history) , and well used models a little less. We have seen some bikes listed for as high as $25k, but thus far I have no knowledge of one selling at that stratospherical price. This bike is up to $10,000 relatively quickly, and the reserve is still in place. The modifications and racing history may make up for the lack of “perfection” that some collectors desire. For me, this is *exactly* what I would hope to collect, as it is a bike that has been used and can be ridden. For your chance at this California beauty, click the link and jump over to the auction. Good Luck!

MI

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