Search Results for “929-666-2243”

Laverda November 23, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

Update 2.4.2020: This bike has SOLD at Bonhams Las Vegas for $18,400! Congratulations to all parties! -dc

Update 12.23.2019: Joe’s bikes have been newly photographed by Bonhams in preparation for their upcoming auction at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction, and the photos are now in this listing and gallery. 

The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

When it rains, it pours, and the past couple weeks have seen us feature several different Laverdas. Bikes this old are usually a bit too “classic” to feature regularly on the site, but certain models are just too important not to include at RSBFS, and the hairy-chested Lavereda Jota like today’s featured listing is one of them. As a followup to their successful parallel-twin models, Laverda introduced a three-cylinder in 1973 after teasing prototypes for several years. It wasn’t just a twin with an extra cylinder grafted on, it was an almost entirely new design, with a twin overhead-cam head.

The earliest three-cylinder bikes used a large drum brake at the front, but that was soon updated to a twin-disc setup, although a drum was retained at the rear for a bit longer. Although it wasn’t tuned as aggressively as it could have been, the new, unimaginatively-named “3C” was one of the best-performing bikes available, with a 133mph tested top speed. But stock performance, however impressive, is never enough for some people, and UK Laverda importers Slater Laverda saw plenty of untapped potential and decided to build a bit of a hot rod.

Slater fitted factory racing cams and high-compression pistons, an updated exhaust, and SFC yokes for different front-end geometry. The resulting bike impressed Laverda’s management, and limited production began in 1976. Power for the 981cc engine was up to 90hp and the bike could clear 140mph, making it the fastest production motorcycle at the time. After success racing the bike in the UK, Laverda expanded distribution, and eventually the bike found its way to the US, although bikes originally intended for us were of lower-spec than the UK machines.

The Jota, named for a Spanish dance, is often characterized as a “man’s bike” but could more accurately be described as “a bike for tall people with strong hands.” The triples weigh in at nearly 500lbs dry, with a very tall seat 32″ high, no side stand fitted as standard, and a brutally stiff clutch-pull. Like all Laverdas of the period, they’re solid and overbuilt with power and handling to spare, but a Jota takes work to ride quickly. Or slowly.

Slight clarification of the seller’s information below: all of the early Laverda three-cylinder models, including the 3C and the original Jota used a 180° crank that basically fired “like a four with a miss.” The Jota was basically a hotted-up version of the regular production triple and used the same crank as the 3C. The “two up, one down” crank was great for power and made a pretty distinctive noise, but vibrated a bit more than than was considered acceptable. Later triples switched to a 120° crank after 1981 for increased smoothness, but purists feel like only the 180° bikes are the only “real” Jotas. Personally, I think the 120° bikes sound pretty cool too, but the 180° bikes are definitely more desirable to collectors.

From the Seller: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased. 

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari. 

When you decide, as I did, that the rare, large Italian Sports bikes of the 1970s are a great place to be for collecting. You will for sure want to have a Laverda Jota in your collection. 

Make sure that your Jota is a real Jota with 180 degree firing order, which distinguishes the Jota from other Laverda models. Again, the 180 degree firing order means that the 3-cyclindar engine fires off when two of the cylinders are up and then 180 degrees later when one cylinder is up, it again fires. In other words, the Jota fires two times per 360 degrees and not three times per 360 degree rotation, like the lesser Laverda models. This is what gives the motor its unique power and especially its unbelievable thundering exhaust note. These are big, heavy, and handsome bikes. This one was restored by a Laverda guru a little over 10 years ago and was put in our collection shortly thereafter. If you are talking about these Italian bikes that are designed to look like they have big muscles the Jota certainly exemplifies that. Of course, any of the rare Italian 1970s and 1980s iconic bikes are always great garage art and most often wonderful bikes to ride. The Jota is a man’s bike and not meant for the faint of heart unless you are going to just put it in your living room to look at it.  

There is plenty of information on the Internet about the Jota. There is a very large international club for them. This Jota was restored to perfection and is still in wonderful cosmetic condition and riding form. 

This is certainly a bike for serious collectors and for those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as the Ferrari automobile. I spent a decade looking for the best one and this is the best one I have ever seen.

The real Jotas seldom become available and you should always get the best. When they are available, they are almost never in highly restored condition.  All my bikes are kept on trickle chargers ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice. The Jota is one of those.  

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.  

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

The seller clearly knows bikes, and the collectability of the Jota is undeniable. The only Laverda model more valuable is the earlier SFC, and the Jota is a bit more civilized, although that probably isn’t saying much. Many Jotas came with a half-fairing, but I much prefer my big, burly bruisers to be naked! Wait, that came out wrong… Anyway, the additional wind-blast will be perfect for bulking up your neck muscles to match your newly-muscled hands: I’ve got a couple friends with Laverda triples and the effort required to pull that clutch still blows my mind.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale
Moto Guzzi November 22, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport

Update 2.4.2020: This bike has SOLD at Bonhams for $14,950. Congratulations to all parties! -dc

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

If ever there was a bike to show up to a cruise night on, surely the 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport is at or near the top of the list. The pundits all say it is the defining cafe racer shape, leaving the factory in the era before two-foot long license plate holders and 10,000 candlepower turn signals crept in to defile more modern machines’ lines. We tend to agree.

 

The V7 sport is adorned with absolutely nothing extraneous, its thin-tube frame, shapely tank and minimalist bodywork seem to embrace the prominent heads on the unmistakable Guzzi v-twin. Low bars, spoked wheels and twin chrome megaphone pipes complete the purposeful package.

 

Though it was made to celebrate and recall Guzzi’s mid-century racing successes, the V7 provides antiquated performance, with just 70 horsepower running through a very tall gearset. The mill revs quickly, but the eagerness is deceptive. Couple that with slightly scary drum brakes and a right-side-shift transmission and you’ve got a bike more suited to cruise nights than track days.

This 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport is in immaculate condition. All the paint and brightwork have a brilliant shine and appear to be blemish free. The seller says he stores her bikes in a climate-controlled facility on trickle chargers, so there should be no worries about the mechanical condition of the bike.

From the seller:

1973 Moto Guzzi V7

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

If Italian collector sports bikes could be rated for handling, the Motor Guzzi V7 Sport would certainly score a 98 out of 100 points. They can just read your mind in terms of negotiating the curvy roads. If motorcycles were rated for sex appeal the 1973 Motor Guzzi V7 would score 101 out of 100 points. I don’t know of anything that is quite so simply designed yet pleases the visual senses so much. And, yes, this bike has the rare original exhaust pipes with the fins, and the sand cast brake drums (not the ‘not so pretty’ disc brakes) which is just a little frosting on the cake.

This bike is in top flight condition and runs like a Swiss clock, it is kept on a trickle charger at all times. There are no known issues. Just try and find a nicer one!

This is certainly a bike for serious collectors and for those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as the Ferrari automobile. I spent a decade looking for the best one and this is the best one I have ever seen.

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.

Check out the pictures and be a little amazed – you are seeing the best!

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

 

Even though it doesn’t fit our traditional fare, we’re in love with this classic Goose, thanks mostly to those magnificent lines. Though it may not be an adept canyon carver, there is a place in any collection for a classic, sexy cruise night machine like this one.

Featured Listing: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport
Kawasaki November 21, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC

Update 2.4.2020: This bike has SOLD at Bonhams Las Vegas. Congratulations to all parties! -dc

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

 

In the wonderful world of Turbo motorcycles, there are the “make your own” types, and the factory turbo offerings. But this special model, the mighty Kawasaki Z1R TC, not only blurs the lines between the two camps, it is also the very first in the factory turbo column. You see, the Z1R TC was sold through Kawasaki dealerships as a new model. However it was not (technically) a factory effort. The offspring of a mixed marriage, ex-Kawi exec Alan Masek convinced the Big K brass to ship bikes to his Turbo Cycle Company (TCC). Given the sluggish sales of the warmed over Z1R, this was no big feat. TCC applied an American Turbo Pak kit to the stock machines, and shipped the resultant mutants to select dealerships with a $1,400 premium tacked on to the sticker price. Appearing to be a factory effort – but devoid of the factory warranty – the Z1R TC went on to gain an incredible reputation for speed, on/off switch turbo boost behavior (Jeckyl & Hyde anyone?), and questionable longevity. For Kawasaki it was a huge win with very little risk. Today, these rare bikes are coveted by collectors world wide.

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC!

The original Z1R TC bikes went out the door in stock Kawasaki colors; they were literally converted by TCC and kicked out of the shop. As the operation matured, several changes occurred. The first was a change to the exhaust plumbing and collector – in an effort to tame the boost. The next change was a new wastegate that limited boost to 6 PSI (the Gen I bikes had a fully adjustable wastegate). And finally the classic 1970s paint scheme emerged. These are all Gen II bikes, and can be identified by the “Molly Designs” logo on the tail section. With the new graphics the Z1R TC finally had the appearance to show off the induction upgrades. Today these Molly graphic bikes are the most desired of the Z1R TC set.

From the seller:
You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. Many years ago when the best of the best was available, and that is what I was buying, these motorcycles were targeted for my collection by me.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened with the Ferrari market.

An exception is the Kawasaki Z1RTC.

More from the seller:
The rare bike in this ad is the 1978 Kawasaki Z1RTC. To me it is one of the greatest and rare motorcycle you can collect. It is a very limited production motorcycle especially in the Molly Graphics configuration. It is unbelievably fast and has an exhaust that is a thrill to listen to as it winds up through the gears. I purchased this Z1RTC from the original owner and it has not been taken apart or restored or manipulated. The original owner explained to me that this ZR1TC turbo is a Stage 3 which is the best of the best for Z1RTC turbos. The original owner told me he took the bike to a drag strip only once and turned 9.9 seconds in the quarter mile and described the feeling by saying, “it felt like his eyeballs were pinned to the back of his head”

The Z1RTC is all original except for the upgraded pressure gauge. Always kept on a trickle charger and ready to fly down the road.

They are only original once.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale.

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

While the Z1R TC put Kawasaki on the map, not all was tea and roses. This was a serious motorcycle that demanded the best riders. Boost was not easily manipulated and the remainder of the stock Z1R pieces were not engineered for the upgrade. The complete lack of engine controls that we take for granted (computer controlled fuel injection, programmable ignition modules, rev limiters) made for a very fragile existence. There was actually recommendations in the manual that new owners upgrade to stronger valve springs, weld the crank and upgrade the clutch if the bike were to be used aggressively. When was the last time your owners manual made those types of modification suggestions? But given that there was no factory warranty, there was apparently little to lose.

These are mean, aggressive yet beautiful motorcycles. They chronicle an era where experimentation and entrepreneurship could coexist with a larger factory effort. And the epic bikes that resulted from these strange bedfellows strike awe and wonder in the hearts and minds of viewers – and riders. To find a totally stock Z1-R TC is an amazingly rare sight. This bike is very, very close to perfectly original, and has a very limited list of owners. It looks absolutely pristine and clean enough to eat off of – should you dare to commit such sacrilege. For those in the market for something unique and special, few bikes can compete with this beautiful 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC. If previous listings of this model are any example, this one will go quickly. Boost on, and good luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC

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