Search Results for “929-666-2243”

Featured Listing November 29, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 MV Agusta 750 S America

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

Back in 1974, there was no other bike to have, really. Regardless of what you were able to shop for, the MV Agusta 750S America was the bike you wanted. First of all, it was Italian, and red, which meant it had that little something extra that nobody else had. Temperamental, yes, and expensive to be sure, and perhaps not even the fastest thing on two wheels, but none of that mattered. It would more or less keep pace with the cruder, brawnier two strokes, and it would go around corners without killing you. Then there was the noise.

Whether you’re listening to a Colombo V-12 at full song, or the rorty throb of a Lancia Fulvia’s V4, or the percussive pop and rattle of a Ducati 900 SS/SP, the Italians long ago mastered the art of the proper internal combustion sound. The 750 S America may have them all beat, with a rhythmic, tachycardic and slightly uneven throbbing at idle cracking into a full-chested wail at higher revs. It’s quite the song and dance for 90 horsepower, but in its day the MV’s voice was the siren song of speed.

This 1974 MV Agusta 750S America is in magnificent shape, and appears to be all or almost all-original. The classic red-and-gold livery is without blemishes, and the bike’s numerous nooks and crannies appear to be clean enough to eat off of. The condition is thanks in large part to a fastidious seller, who has kept the bike stored in a heated facility and made sure that it remains ready to run.

From the seller:

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection.  I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection.  These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles ‘70s, ‘80s, and ‘90s.  Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one.  These motorcycles were targeted for by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best was available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the ‘70s and ‘80s are the future Ferrari’s of motorcycle collecting.   We all know what has happened to Ferraris.

For many people the MV Augusta American is like the Ferrari of motorcycles.  It is a typically great Italian design that when new cost an unthinkable amount of money and has been held in the highest esteem since it was produced.

In the world of motorcycle collecting it is one of the most prestigious Italian bikes that you can have in your collection.   This bike, as far as we know, is entirely original.  It runs perfectly, and, is, without question, one of the best sounding motorcycle that were ever made and yes, it is kept in fully heated storage when not in use.   It is always kept on a trickle charger. It is ready to travel 500 miles on the first day.

If you ever heard of Ferrari GTO run through the gears you will know that the 1974 Augusta MV 750 S America has a very similar melodic sound of authority which is just music to the ears.

This is a very expensive bike for serious collectors.  It is a very limited production bike.  By searching the Internet, you can read all the accolades that have accumulated over time for this particular breed, this is for serious future collectors.

They are only original once.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

Back in ’74, these things were the most expensive bikes on the street, with a raft of super-expensive parts keeping them out of the hands of you average grocery bagger. With just 550 or so MV Agusta 750S Americas built, the story is more or less the same today. If you have the means …

Featured Listing: 1974 MV Agusta 750 S America
Benelli November 27, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1976 Benelli Sei 750

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

Benelli and Honda exchanged flattery in the 1970’s, which began with Benelli creating a six cylinder look-alike of Honda’s CB500 Four in 1972.  Their flagship Sei began as a 750 and progressed to a 900 by 1979.  Honda returned the compliment in 1978 with their CBX.  Restored by a previous owner, this Sei is a magnificent labor of love.

Benelli made a careful study of the air-cooled Honda and made a few changes – the gear-driven alternator, located behind the cylinders, keeps the engine’s width manageable.  With three Dell’Orto carburettors, 76 hp was almost effortless and the Sei created usable torque from 2,000 rpm.  The chassis is a hefty downtube with right-side-up Marzocchi forks, and twin Sebac shocks.  Dual front disks make up for the tried-and-true rear drum.  Styling is dominated by the six-way calliope, with a few angular details on the instrument cluster, side covers, and cylinders.

A bottle of chrome polish might be on the new owner’s shopping list, since the Sei is all metal, with not even the side covers executed in plastic.  On display since shortly after the restoration was completed, it shows almost as a new machine, with sparkling finishes and new rubber parts, like the carburetor boots.  The owner shares these notes:

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

The 1976 Benelli SEI 750 six-cylinder is another one of those iconic Italian motorcycles. It was the first six-cylinder production motorcycle, and, yes, those six exhaust pipes not only sound great but look phenomenal. The bike was restored by a gentleman that spent what looks like half a lifetime to get it to such perfection. This bike starts and runs as it should and I don’t personally know of one important criticism that I could make on the bike for show or riding.

The Benelli winding through the gears sound like a Gran Prix rarer and the slick handling is something has to be experienced. These six cylinder Benelli bikes have a long way to go in terms of collector appreciation. When you buy a first series Benelli six cylinder you will find a crowd wherever you stop.

Then just wind up through the gears and it seems that the roar of those six exhaust pipes can be heard a mile away.

Check out the pictures of this Benelli it has to be one of the best, if not The Best, restored 1976 Benelli SEI 750’s ever!

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.


Check out the pictures and be a little amazed – you are seeing the best!

As the 1970’s opened, industrialist Alejandro DeTomaso had high hopes for his new acquisition, and funded the development of the magnetic Sei.  The big-band sound of six individual 125cc cylinders is more like a fleet of motorcycles than just one.  Never destined to be in every garage, the bright light in the Benelli showroom was reflecting off the Sei’s six chrome mufflers.  The owner has curated and preserved this example to a high standard, and not insignificantly, kept it ready to ride. 

-donn

Featured Listing – 1976 Benelli Sei 750
Ducati November 25, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1977 Ducati 900SS

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

We’re on a roll over here with rare Italian beauties from our buddy Joe, and this 1977 Ducati 900SS is no exception. It might not quite carry the provenance of his MV Agusta 750S America, but a ‘77 900SS is absolutely nobody’s idea of plain.

The Ducati Super Sports entered the market just as Ducati had finished establishing itself as a maker of world-beating race bikes. Paul Smart won the Imola 200 aboard a Ducati Super Sport in 1972, after which the 90-degree v-twins became synonymous with Italian racing prowess. The early SS bikes had right-side shift and almost no provisions for DOT-legal street equipment. Such as, you know, turn signals.

Fast forward to 1977, and Ducati decided that the American market was primed for its desmodromic-valved beasts, and the 1977 Ducati 900SS made its way to our shores in extremely limited numbers. Just 137 of the featherweight, 80-horsepower repli-racers landed here that year, but they had an immediate and forceful impact.

This Ducati 900SS has been restored completely with gorgeous paintwork.

From the seller:

1977 Ducati Super Sport

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large and important motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for adding to my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is exactly what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

It doesn’t take much introduction to talk about a 1977 Ducati 900 SS. They seldom come up for sale and when they do they generally look like they have been ridden hard and put away wet.

This particular bike was restored in Chicago and definitely under the supervision of the famous Dr. Desmo. It is kept on a trickle charger and exercised regularly during the warm weather. Restored to perfection and still makes an outstanding presence and performance at any show and is equally prepared to go on any extended ride and tour at a moment’s notice.

We all know what’s happened to the prices of the Ducati 750 SS’s and the 900 SS’s are not far behind. If you want the best just take a look at the pictures of this bike. You will see that it is the best of the best and then some. If you want technical information about the bike just check the Internet. It is loaded with that and plenty of road tests shortly after the bike was introduced to the public. As I have mentioned in some of the other bike ads for bikes coming out of our collection there is not question that the 900SS is the Ferrari of the future for motorcycles.

This bike is always kept in climate controlled storage and kept on a trickle charger and ready for a 500-mile trip on a moment’s notice. Check out the pictures and you will be impressed!

Most everyone would agree that the 750SS and the 900SS are the epitome of motorcycle design.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

Given its rarity, condition and position as the spiritual birth of the American Ducati market, you’re not going to get this one for a steal. But the cash outlay will well be worth it to have this gem in your collection.

Featured Listing: 1977 Ducati 900SS
Featured Listing November 24, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1990 Honda VFR750R / RC30

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

Even if not fans, RSBFS readers will acknowledge Honda’s long history of success in motorcycle production and racing.  These days, Honda seems to have the engineering chops ( and resources ) to do almost whatever they put their minds to – witness their Formula 1 winning V6’s for Williams and McLaren, several years as CART’s engine of choice, and more recently the HondaJet aircraft ( with turbofans developed by Honda and GE ).

The VFR750R/RC30 from 1987-1990 is just one more example, where engineers and designers pulled a winning concept together, and the manufacturing side of the company executed beautifully, about 3,000 times.  As testament, the factory team won the inaugural WSBK season in 1988.  This rare example has been in a collector’s display since new, and occasionally exercised, turning under 1,200 miles.

As their homologation special for the Superbike World Championship, the RC30 really was the mythical race bike with lights.  From the sharp-steering alloy chassis to the 296mm front disks to the single-sided Pro-Link swingarm, the RC30 provided the racers what they needed.  Shocks and forks on the single seater were only adjustable for preload, since the race teams would be putting their own special parts.  The compact V-4 looked similar to the preceding VFR750F, but shared almost no internal parts.  Even the exhaust note with the new 360-degree crank was specific to the RC30.

Resting in the motorcycle wing of a large auto collection, this RC30 has received excellent care and not even break-in miles.  The pictures show an apparently new machine, even though a generation has passed since it was built.  The owner tells of a mid-life cosmetic refurbishment:

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

An exception would have to be my super low (under 1,200) miles, almost perfectly like-new 1990 Honda RC30.

Yes, there are a few exceptions to what I call my Italian collecting rule and one of those would be the 1990 Honda RC30. This 1990 Honda RC30 needs no introduction or explanation by me as it is such a famous Honda, that the only thing you need to know about an RC30 is if you are getting a good one or a really great one or one of the very best.

The RC30 in this listing was purchased for the collection several years ago and is an extremely low mileage bike. It was absolutely 99% perfect, however, some of the detail parts that were white rubber or painted white had become slightly discolored. At that time, almost ten years ago, Honda was still had these parts in stock and we purchased each and every part to bring the cosmetic looks of the bike back to 99%. This 1990 Honda RC30 has not been raced or abused or messed with in any way. It currently looks like new, runs just as it should and is kept on a trickle charger and is exercised thoroughly during the spring, summer, and fall; and again it has never been raced or abused (most have been!).

As you may already know, there is nothing more exciting nor handles better than the Honda RC30. The looks, graphics, and colors of the bike need no apology either. They are absolutely a stand-out in any crowd of motorcycles. Most RC30s were extensively raced and it is very hard to find one that has not been modified or raced. You are looking at one that has not been abused in that way shape or form. This bike is always kept on a trickle charge and ready take a trip to any bike show at a moment’s notice. This is truly a bike for a serious collection and it would be a shame to abuse it. Oh yes, it comes with a new Honda rear wheel stand still in the box.

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.

Honda might be accused of an obsession with the V-4, which brought it multiple WSBK titles along with TT and endurance racing wins.  After Superbike rulesmakers made a short dalliance with the V-twin an offer they couldn’t refuse, Honda returned to the four with the RC212V.  But for road riders, the RC30 was a moment when you could buy something very special from the local dealer, even though it cost twice as much as the nearest competitor.  That moment is reflected in recent asking prices even for fairly well-used examples.  But in this case, we have an RC30 that has been in a collector’s hands from day one, without damage history and in impeccable shape. 

-donn

Featured Listing – 1990 Honda VFR750R / RC30
Featured Listing November 23, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

When it rains, it pours, and the past couple weeks have seen us feature several different Laverdas. Bikes this old are usually a bit too “classic” to feature regularly on the site, but certain models are just too important not to include at RSBFS, and the hairy-chested Lavereda Jota like today’s featured listing is one of them. As a followup to their successful parallel-twin models, Laverda introduced a three-cylinder in 1973 after teasing prototypes for several years. It wasn’t just a twin with an extra cylinder grafted on, it was an almost entirely new design, with a twin overhead-cam head.

The earliest three-cylinder bikes used a large drum brake at the front, but that was soon updated to a twin-disc setup, although a drum was retained at the rear for a bit longer. Although it wasn’t tuned as aggressively as it could have been, the new, unimaginatively-named “3C” was one of the best-performing bikes available, with a 133mph tested top speed. But stock performance, however impressive, is never enough for some people, and UK Laverda importers Slater Laverda saw plenty of untapped potential and decided to build a bit of a hot rod.

Slater fitted factory racing cams and high-compression pistons, an updated exhaust, and SFC yokes for different front-end geometry. The resulting bike impressed Laverda’s management, and limited production began in 1976. Power for the 981cc engine was up to 90hp and the bike could clear 140mph, making it the fastest production motorcycle at the time. After success racing the bike in the UK, Laverda expanded distribution, and eventually the bike found its way to the US, although bikes originally intended for us were of lower-spec than the UK machines.

The Jota, named for a Spanish dance, is often characterized as a “man’s bike” but could more accurately be described as “a bike for tall people with strong hands.” The triples weigh in at nearly 500lbs dry, with a very tall seat 32″ high, no side stand fitted as standard, and a brutally stiff clutch-pull. Like all Laverdas of the period, they’re solid and overbuilt with power and handling to spare, but a Jota takes work to ride quickly. Or slowly.

Slight clarification of the seller’s information below: all of the early Laverda three-cylinder models, including the 3C and the original Jota used a 180° crank that basically fired “like a four with a miss.” The Jota was basically a hotted-up version of the regular production triple and used the same crank as the 3C. The “two up, one down” crank was great for power and made a pretty distinctive noise, but vibrated a bit more than than was considered acceptable. Later triples switched to a 120° crank after 1981 for increased smoothness, but purists feel like only the 180° bikes are the only “real” Jotas. Personally, I think the 120° bikes sound pretty cool too, but the 180° bikes are definitely more desirable to collectors.

From the Seller: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased. 

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari. 

When you decide, as I did, that the rare, large Italian Sports bikes of the 1970s are a great place to be for collecting. You will for sure want to have a Laverda Jota in your collection. 

Make sure that your Jota is a real Jota with 180 degree firing order, which distinguishes the Jota from other Laverda models. Again, the 180 degree firing order means that the 3-cyclindar engine fires off when two of the cylinders are up and then 180 degrees later when one cylinder is up, it again fires. In other words, the Jota fires two times per 360 degrees and not three times per 360 degree rotation, like the lesser Laverda models. This is what gives the motor its unique power and especially its unbelievable thundering exhaust note. These are big, heavy, and handsome bikes. This one was restored by a Laverda guru a little over 10 years ago and was put in our collection shortly thereafter. If you are talking about these Italian bikes that are designed to look like they have big muscles the Jota certainly exemplifies that. Of course, any of the rare Italian 1970s and 1980s iconic bikes are always great garage art and most often wonderful bikes to ride. The Jota is a man’s bike and not meant for the faint of heart unless you are going to just put it in your living room to look at it.  

There is plenty of information on the Internet about the Jota. There is a very large international club for them. This Jota was restored to perfection and is still in wonderful cosmetic condition and riding form. 

This is certainly a bike for serious collectors and for those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as the Ferrari automobile. I spent a decade looking for the best one and this is the best one I have ever seen.

The real Jotas seldom become available and you should always get the best. When they are available, they are almost never in highly restored condition.  All my bikes are kept on trickle chargers ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice. The Jota is one of those.  

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.  

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

The seller clearly knows bikes, and the collectability of the Jota is undeniable. The only Laverda model more valuable is the earlier SFC, and the Jota is a bit more civilized, although that probably isn’t saying much. Many Jotas came with a half-fairing, but I much prefer my big, burly bruisers to be naked! Wait, that came out wrong… Anyway, the additional wind-blast will be perfect for bulking up your neck muscles to match your newly-muscled hands: I’ve got a couple friends with Laverda triples and the effort required to pull that clutch still blows my mind.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale
Featured Listing November 22, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

If ever there was a bike to show up to a cruise night on, surely the 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport is at or near the top of the list. The pundits all say it is the defining cafe racer shape, leaving the factory in the era before two-foot long license plate holders and 10,000 candlepower turn signals crept in to defile more modern machines’ lines. We tend to agree.

The V7 sport is adorned with absolutely nothing extraneous, its thin-tube frame, shapely tank and minimalist bodywork seem to embrace the prominent heads on the unmistakable Guzzi v-twin. Low bars, spoked wheels and twin chrome megaphone pipes complete the purposeful package.

Though it was made to celebrate and recall Guzzi’s mid-century racing successes, the V7 provides antiquated performance, with just 70 horsepower running through a very tall gearset. The mill revs quickly, but the eagerness is deceptive. Couple that with slightly scary drum brakes and a right-side-shift transmission and you’ve got a bike more suited to cruise nights than track days.

This 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport is in immaculate condition. All the paint and brightwork have a brilliant shine and appear to be blemish free. The seller says he stores her bikes in a climate-controlled facility on trickle chargers, so there should be no worries about the mechanical condition of the bike.

From the seller:

1973 Moto Guzzi V7

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

If Italian collector sports bikes could be rated for handling, the Motor Guzzi V7 Sport would certainly score a 98 out of 100 points. They can just read your mind in terms of negotiating the curvy roads. If motorcycles were rated for sex appeal the 1973 Motor Guzzi V7 would score 101 out of 100 points. I don’t know of anything that is quite so simply designed yet pleases the visual senses so much. And, yes, this bike has the rare original exhaust pipes with the fins, and the sand cast brake drums (not the ‘not so pretty’ disc brakes) which is just a little frosting on the cake.

This bike is in top flight condition and runs like a Swiss clock, it is kept on a trickle charger at all times. There are no known issues. Just try and find a nicer one!

This is certainly a bike for serious collectors and for those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as the Ferrari automobile. I spent a decade looking for the best one and this is the best one I have ever seen.

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.

Check out the pictures and be a little amazed – you are seeing the best!

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

Even though it doesn’t fit our traditional fare, we’re in love with this classic Goose, thanks mostly to those magnificent lines. Though it may not be an adept canyon carver, there is a place in any collection for a classic, sexy cruise night machine like this one.

Featured Listing: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport
Featured Listing November 21, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

In the wonderful world of Turbo motorcycles, there are the “make your own” types, and the factory turbo offerings. But this special model, the mighty Kawasaki Z1R TC, not only blurs the lines between the two camps, it is also the very first in the factory turbo column. You see, the Z1R TC was sold through Kawasaki dealerships as a new model. However it was not (technically) a factory effort. The offspring of a mixed marriage, ex-Kawi exec Alan Masek convinced the Big K brass to ship bikes to his Turbo Cycle Company (TCC). Given the sluggish sales of the warmed over Z1R, this was no big feat. TCC applied an American Turbo Pak kit to the stock machines, and shipped the resultant mutants to select dealerships with a $1,400 premium tacked on to the sticker price. Appearing to be a factory effort – but devoid of the factory warranty – the Z1R TC went on to gain an incredible reputation for speed, on/off switch turbo boost behavior (Jeckyl & Hyde anyone?), and questionable longevity. For Kawasaki it was a huge win with very little risk. Today, these rare bikes are coveted by collectors world wide.

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC!

The original Z1R TC bikes went out the door in stock Kawasaki colors; they were literally converted by TCC and kicked out of the shop. As the operation matured, several changes occurred. The first was a change to the exhaust plumbing and collector – in an effort to tame the boost. The next change was a new wastegate that limited boost to 6 PSI (the Gen I bikes had a fully adjustable wastegate). And finally the classic 1970s paint scheme emerged. These are all Gen II bikes, and can be identified by the “Molly Designs” logo on the tail section. With the new graphics the Z1R TC finally had the appearance to show off the induction upgrades. Today these Molly graphic bikes are the most desired of the Z1R TC set.

From the seller:
You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. Many years ago when the best of the best was available, and that is what I was buying, these motorcycles were targeted for my collection by me.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened with the Ferrari market.

An exception is the Kawasaki Z1RTC.

More from the seller:
The rare bike in this ad is the 1978 Kawasaki Z1RTC. To me it is one of the greatest and rare motorcycle you can collect. It is a very limited production motorcycle especially in the Molly Graphics configuration. It is unbelievably fast and has an exhaust that is a thrill to listen to as it winds up through the gears. I purchased this Z1RTC from the original owner and it has not been taken apart or restored or manipulated. The original owner explained to me that this ZR1TC turbo is a Stage 3 which is the best of the best for Z1RTC turbos. The original owner told me he took the bike to a drag strip only once and turned 9.9 seconds in the quarter mile and described the feeling by saying, “it felt like his eyeballs were pinned to the back of his head”

The Z1RTC is all original except for the upgraded pressure gauge. Always kept on a trickle charger and ready to fly down the road.

They are only original once.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale.

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

While the Z1R TC put Kawasaki on the map, not all was tea and roses. This was a serious motorcycle that demanded the best riders. Boost was not easily manipulated and the remainder of the stock Z1R pieces were not engineered for the upgrade. The complete lack of engine controls that we take for granted (computer controlled fuel injection, programmable ignition modules, rev limiters) made for a very fragile existence. There was actually recommendations in the manual that new owners upgrade to stronger valve springs, weld the crank and upgrade the clutch if the bike were to be used aggressively. When was the last time your owners manual made those types of modification suggestions? But given that there was no factory warranty, there was apparently little to lose.

These are mean, aggressive yet beautiful motorcycles. They chronicle an era where experimentation and entrepreneurship could coexist with a larger factory effort. And the epic bikes that resulted from these strange bedfellows strike awe and wonder in the hearts and minds of viewers – and riders. To find a totally stock Z1-R TC is an amazingly rare sight. This bike is very, very close to perfectly original, and has a very limited list of owners. It looks absolutely pristine and clean enough to eat off of – should you dare to commit such sacrilege. For those in the market for something unique and special, few bikes can compete with this beautiful 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC. If previous listings of this model are any example, this one will go quickly. Boost on, and good luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC
Ducati November 20, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

In 1978 Mike Hailwood won the Isle of Man TT riding a Ducati. This was 11 years after his last motorcycle race, the previous period during which he was firmly on the Honda payroll. Everything about the event spelled disaster – an old timer long past his glory years on a make of bike nobody really associated him with – and nobody believed he would be competitive. But this was the stuff of heroes; and heroes always win. Hailwood went on to win what can only be considered the comeback of the century. This cemented the legend of Mike “the Bike” Hailwood’s connection with Ducati, and provided for some wonderful bikes. Today’s Featured Listing – a 1985 Ducati MHR – is one such factory offering that celebrated the success of Mike Hailwood.

The Ducati MHR is a bike built in the tradition of homage; it was built to celebrate the famous TT win. But given that the TT was for street-based machinery, the factory replica was not simply a graphics package. Yes, Hailwood won in 1978. Yes, the Pantah (which introduced the next generation belt-driven cams vs. bevel-driven) was introduced way back in 1980. Then why, you might ask, was a MHR being built in 1985 and based on the older hardware? The answer is that Ducati, still a relatively small company, focused on bevel drive for the big bikes (750 – 1000cc), while the Pantah was initially offered in 600cc and below variants. The bevel-drive motors were still very much in the forefront during this time, even though they may seem slightly archaic today. So the MHR is based on the “square case” 900SS of the day – which was a capable machine in its own right. But why still offer a homage bike in 1985 when Hailwood won the TT back in 1978? Simple: the public demanded it. While the MHR was a very limited edition, it was a tremendously successful marketing effort and a strong model for Ducati. Today’s seller has some good details about this bike, so I will let him take it over from here:

From the seller:
1985 Ducati Hailwood Replica

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

More from the seller:
The Ducati Hailwood Millie shown here was made in two series. The first one being a short fairing and only 900 cc with a kick starter and this model, the Hailwood Millie (1000 cc) with the electric starter and the large fairing; one is one of the most beautifully designed fairings ever. It is a big bike not meant for the meek. Of course, it has the electric starter and exhaust note that will thrill any motorcycle enthusiast. It is in absolutely near perfect condition. It is always on a trickle charger and ready to give you a thrill of a lifetime as you wind through the gears and open it up on an open road. This is another Italian bike that, in our opinion, can be classified as the Ferrari of bikes of the future.

This is certainly a bike for the serious collectors. For those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as a Ferrari. Ten years ago, I spent a long time looking for the best Hailwood Millie and believe me this was the beat of the best, hands down.

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

These second generation MHR machines are truly beautiful motorcycles. Whereas the original offering utilizes a fiberglass cover over a stock SS tank, the latter bikes use a tank that is unique to the model. The rest of the bodywork is all MHE, evoking the spirit (and the livery) of the racer. And while the underpinnings are SS items, some performance items such as the Conti exhausts are model specific. The solo seat is a non-race item; in reality it is a rear pillion cover, making this a two-seater and enhancing the usefulness of the bike. But people who lust after a MHR are not concerned with practicality – they want the booming V-twin soundtrack and the waves of torque that have made Ducati victorious and famous. You may not be able to ride with the effortless agility of Mike Hailwood, but you can still rock the livery and the sound while paying homage to the great man with this stunning 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica

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