Monthly Archives: September 2021

Ducati September 30, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing – 2012 Ducati 1199 Panigale S Tricolore

Update 12.6.2021: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Despite its light weight and minimal monocoque chassis, Ducati managed to fit many firsts, extremes and superlatives into the 1199 Panigale S.  RSBFS reader Jason has a one-owner Panigale S is in the Tricolore livery with a few choice upgrades and just 1,457 miles.

2012 Ducati 1199 Panigale S Tricolore asking price $19,500

No longer suspended from a trellis frame, the Superquadro engine in the Panigale is a structural member, and a small but robust aluminum casting carries the adjustable headstock.  The subframe holding the single-sided rear suspension connects to the back of the engine, and the integral aluminum seat carrier is above.  In between there’s an all-new L-twin, with cams driven by a gear/chain combination, and extraordinarily oversquare cylinders ( 112mm bore and 60.8mm stroke ).  Mitsubishi fuel injection and ride-by-wire throttle are in control of 195 hp, with the help of multiple electronic aids.  With engine braking control providing slipper functionality, the wet clutch has been fitted with a quickshifter.  Monobloc Brembo calipers appear to be poured over their 30mm pistons, on 330mm rotors and of course multi-mode ABS.  Öhlins dampers and lighter Marchesini wheels are part of the S package.  Designers spent plenty of time in the wind tunnel optimizing the riding position and bodywork with the goal of a superbike easier to ride fast.

Jason is a principal at Northwest European, a specialty dealer of mostly the four-wheeled variety, but has prepared this Panigale S beautifully.  Their full description is available – here – , but following are their comments about this Tricolore –

This particular example is a spectacular original 1199 Panigale S sold new with factory original Tricolore livery. Having covered a mere 1,457 miles since new, the owner, an avid motorcycle enthusiast, has maintained and serviced this Ducati with the utmost care. As many motorsports enthusiasts will do, the owner selected several specially developed upgrades for this bike, all of which can be easily removed and returned to the original state should the new owner wish to do so – Racing ECU upgrade, exhaust, ASV levers, and a multitude of carbon fiber bits are among the highlights.



As one should expect with this example, the condition of this Ducati is nearly like new. Every aspect of the bike from the colorful bodywork, carbon fiber details, and refined mechanical features are polished, preserved, and properly maintained to factory specifications. The still original tires show minimal use while the brakes, disc surfaces, and drive chain are all in excellent condition.

This Ducati is accompanied by a factory owner’s manual, an un-assembled Tamiya scale model kit of this bike still in the box, a spare seat, spare body pieces, and other original parts that were removed from the bike and upgraded per the original owner’s preference.

Northwest European asks $19,500 for this Panigale S Tricolore, and Jason can be reached at (206) 355-7727 or via email at jason@nweuro.com

As much as a motorbike is a zillion details flying in formation, Ducati appears to have looked at each one carefully, but never lost sight of the goal of lightness and maneuverability.  With a dry weight of 362 lbs., that success was quick and easy to see.  Riding reviews said that the harder to measure combination of a slightly longer swingarm, rotating the engine back a few degrees, centralized mass, and moving the rider a hair forward made for a quick and forgiving superbike.   Contact Jason at (206) 355-7727 for more information on this 2012 Ducati 1199 Panigale S Tricolore.

-donn

Featured Listing – 2012 Ducati 1199 Panigale S Tricolore
Laverda September 29, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC

This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

In case you thought race replicas were a recent innovation, Laverda set the world on it’s ear some 50 years ago, with its 750 Super Freni Competizione, first in endurance racing, and then on the road.  Presented by a Seattle area restorer, this 750 SFC has been restored to museum quality and is ready for its next display.

1974 Laverda 750 SFC for sale

A development of Laverda’s 650cc parallel twin ( itself a template of Honda’s 305 ), the 750 SFC immediately did well in competition, and was made in rather small lots from 1971-75.  For 1974, the factory blue-printed engine with two 36mm Dell’Orto carbs and 9.9-to-1 compression made a reliable 75 hp with Bosch electronic ignition.  The classic nickel plated chassis held the engine from above as a stressed member, stabilizing the 38mm forks with their Super Freni ( Super Brakes ) 280mm disks.  Orange was adopted as Laverda’s competition color at some point in the early 1970’s, and the small seat and long range tank on the SFC appear to have been the inspiration more than one generation of café racers.

Evidently a previous owner started the restoration using all factory Laverda parts, and Duncan has these notes about the SFC and this example in particular :

A Production Racer For Sale

Laverda 750 SFs achieved notable endurance racing success in 1970, including a win of the 500km of Monza, a 1-2-3 podium sweep at the 24 Hours of Oss in Holland, and a third and sixth in the Bol d’Or in France. These bikes improved incrementally, but so did the competition. By the end of the year, Massimo asked Luciano Zen to think about a production racer version of the Laverda 750 SF.

In May 1971, the Laverda 750 SFC, for (Super Freni Competizion) was launched. Compared to the 750 SF, the engine was extensively modified. The reworked cylinder head had bigger valves and a new cam profile (designated 2/C), rockers were polished and 36mm Amal concentric carbs replaced the 30mm Dell’Ortos. A close-ratio five-speed was fitted, and the crankshaft and rods were carefully balanced and polished. Power output was rated at 70hp, and each engine was dyno tested to ensure output. The frame was strengthened with gussets and the front brake was either standard Laverda item or an optional Ceriani four-leading-shoe unit. The bikes ran on Dunlop K81 TT100 tires.

Bodywork was also new, with a 23-liter (6.1 gallon) handmade aluminum gas tank, a single seat with fiberglass tail section and a half fairing, all painted in the now-famous bright orange, a color selected to make the bikes easy to spot on the track, especially at night. It was also chosen to please the Dutch importer, Jan Raymakers, orange being the national color of the Netherlands.

Laverda 750 SFC models were produced in small batches between 1971 and 1975. The first batch, built in May 1971, numbered about 20 bikes, all intended for factory competition. SFCs were hand built by a small team and with little regard to cost. They were built to meet exceptional standards of performance, and in particular were intended to excel in endurance races, where bulk and a relative lack of nimbleness would not be so much of a handicap and where their great strength and robustness would give them a competitive advantage.

In their first official race in 1971, the Six Hours of Zeltweg, SFCs finished first and second. That year, SFCs also placed first, third and fourth in the 24 Hours of Montjuic in Barcelona, first and third in the 24 Hours of Oss, and first in Vallelunga (Italy). They also placed second at the Bol d’Or in Le Mans, first and second at Imola, and finished first and second in the 500km of Modena. Not bad for the first year.

In November 1971, 80 more SFCs were produced, and some were sold to the public. The aluminum gas tank was now fiberglass (the alloy ones had a tendency to crack), and the bikes had revised gearbox ratios and exhaust systems. They also had a new Laverda drum brake, with the more effective Ceriani a popular option. Another batch of SFCs were produced in early 1972, with slight changes to the shape of the fairing and seat and a new exhaust with a crossover pipe.

By this time, the Japanese had made significant progress in the development of their machines, and while there were SFC victories in 1972, they did not match the stellar performance of 1971. Only three 750 SFCs were made in 1973, and these served as test beds for radical changes like magnesium crankcases, new cylinder head designs and even lighter crankshafts. The results were not impressive, the bikes becoming more fragile and difficult to ride.

1974 would see the largest single-year run of SFCs. For the first time, the Laverda 750 SFC was considered part of the normal product range offered to the public and was no longer reserved solely for racing. The SFC was promoted as a “Production Racer,” similar to Ducati’s 750SS or Norton’s Commando-based production racers, and the changes were numerous. The bodywork was improved, and the zinc-plated frame was lowered and modified with revised steering geometry, larger front forks, and triple 280mm Brembo disc brakes. A new, strengthened close-ratio gearbox was fitted and the engine was enhanced by a lightened crankshaft, slim, polished connecting rods, a new camshaft (5/C), a higher capacity oil pump, new 36mm Dell’Orto carbs (without accelerator pumps), modified valves and valve springs, a new exhaust system and higher, 9.9:1 compression ratio. Power was now rated at 75hp at 7,500rpm.

A total of 222 SFCs were built in 1974, with slightly less than half of them going to the U.S. To comply with federal regulations, U.S. models had turn signals, bigger taillights, side reflectors, adjustable handlebars and Nippon-Denso speedometers and tachometers. Even though the bike was being sold to privateers in 1974, factory-prepared racers were performing well in the national production class races.

During the 5 year production run, a total of 549 were made. The SFC being offered is one of only 100 SFCs made for the North American market in 1974. According to well-known SFC expert Marnix van der Schalk (in correspondence with the previous owner), the factory records state it was shipped to the USA on July 8, 1974.

The last version of the SFC was the 1975 Laverda SFC Elettronica, its name reflecting its Bosch electronic ignition. It had a new cylinder head, revised valve angles, re-shaped combustion chambers and a new, optional high-lift cam with 10.5:1 compression ratio. A contemporary magazine test produced a 12.5 second quarter mile at 180kph (top speed over 220kph). A final batch of 33 SFC Elettronicas featuring five-spoke cast-alloy wheels were built in 1976.

The following is a list of much of the work commissioned by the previous owner and performed by Ron Small in 2002-2003, with the invoices totaling nearly $6,000.  Previous owner noted that all replacement parts used on the bike were authentic Laverda SFC parts purchased from Wolfgang Haerter at Columbia Car and Cycle in British Columbia, Canada (receipts totaling $1,000).

Motor:

Re-sleeved cylinders

bore and size cylinders

valve job

new valve springs

new valve guides

new cam chain

new cam tensioner

new guide wheel

new rings

blast and clean heads

Cam and timing set correct.

 

Other items:

new gas tank

sealed new tank 

paint new tank

new fork seals

new swing arm bushings

paint swing arm

rebuild brake master cylinders

new clutch cable

new throttle cables

new tires

new brakes

Subsequent to the work being completed at Maximum Effort, the previous owner only rode the bike 900 miles. The current owner has ridden it less than 100 miles. It has spent the past 13 years on display in a climate-controlled garage. 

There is no knowing if the 6753 miles showing on the odometer is the actual mileage, but the condition of the bike, combined with the minimal miles ridden by the current and previous owner in the past 20 years would lend credibility to that number. 

There is a small amount of surface rust on center stand.

Recently recommissioned for the road, it has a new battery, new fluids, top end adjust and inspection. Carburation adjustments and tune. Bike has had complete nut and bolt, safety inspection and test ridden. 

Tires are 15-20 years old.  They are not dry rotted, but if the bike is going to be ridden, changing them would be a good idea. 

For at least the past 20 years, this SFC has been adult owned, never down, always maintained by marquee knowledgeable technicians. Makes big noise and runs flawlessly.

Being offered at $49,950 $42,500 in US Funds. Will assist on Worldwide Shipping.

Duncan asks $49,950 $42,500 and reminds readers – This bike is absolutely correct, adult owned, never down, never abused, maintained by the best techs, riders in the business. Makes big noise and runs flawlessly.  He can be reached via email – here –.

Early in the 1970’s the orange bikes sometimes captured multiple podium spots at championship events like Bol d’Or and Suzuka 8 Hours, but increasing competition from the east made it more of an occasion as the decade wore on.  Mostly made a handful at a time, production peaked at 222 in 1974, and total production is said to be 549.  As happens to race bikes, few survive to be restored, and just 100 of the federalized SFC’s were said to be imported in 1974.  But the SFC put Laverda in the exclusive company of a leading motorcycle manufacturer. 

-donn

Featured Listing:  1974 Laverda 750 SFC
Yamaha September 28, 2021 posted by

1991 Yamaha TZR 250 3XV For Sale!

1991 Yamaha TZR 250 For Sale on eBay!

Smoke’em if ya got’em!
I swear to you- every time I see a new 2 stroke up for sale I shake my piggy bank to see if more money has magically appeared. As usual, it just laughs at me and says “NOT TODAY!”

From the seller
SERIOUS COLLECTORS ONLY PLEASE.

SOLD ON BILL OF SALE, GREY-MARKET IMPORT.

CONCOURSE-LEVEL CONDITION IDEAL FOR A COLLECTOR. MECHANICALLY PERFECT, STARTS ON FIRST KICK.

Honestly- Tell me when the last time you rode or wanted to ride 280#’s of 30 year old sexiness that smoked and made a bunch of noise when you opened it up?


JDM only Yamaha TZR 250 3XV’s:
-45hp
-6 speeds
-A scant 280ish pounds
-V-Twin
-Adjustable Suspenders
-Upside Down Forks

Yes sir- Pure 2-Stroke Sport goodness right there! Now, I know you’re not going to stomp anyone a new mud hole drag racing, but you’d sure give them a run for their money in the twisties . . . that is, if you dared to ride this one. Parts for these are impossible to find and since this one looks to be in perfect condition I’m guessing I’d have a hard time taking it out of the garage. I’d probably just sit on it and make the BRAAAPPPPP sounds as I pretend to shift gears using the Yamaha name as the gears. Yammmmm (1st), Maaaaa (2nd), Haaaaa (3rd) BRAPPPPP!

$15,995 is steeeeep, but where else are ya gonna find one? I know where, but it’s not available yet – Our friends over at Iconic have one on deck- Yamaha TZR250 3XV, but it has A LOT more miles on it.

One thing I did notice worth mentioning is the sellers 66.7% eBay rating. I find that odd because most folks who sell these types of machines protect their ratings at all costs. With that said, if this one strikes your fancy make sure you do your DD and ask plenty of questions.

Did anyone else notice the tank sticker says “3MA” and the windscreen says “3XM”? Tim, can you offer any insight on this?

Damn, this one is nice!

Cheers!

dd

Check it out here!

1991 Yamaha TZR 250 3XV For Sale!
Aprilia September 27, 2021 posted by

2004 Aprilia RS250 Challenge Cup Race Bike!

2004 Aprilia RS250 For Sale on eBay!

There’s no doubt about it- Aprilia was the little Italian company that could from 1994 to 2007. Undersized and well under funded, Aprilia built a near perfect MotoGP racer and landed the best of the best to put the RS250 on top of the box for the majority of a 14 year span.

1994 Max Biaggi Aprilia
1995 Max Biaggi Aprilia
1996 Max Biaggi Aprilia
1997 Max Biaggi Honda
1998 Loris Capirossi Aprilia
1999 Valentino Rossi Aprilia
2000 Olivier Jacque Yamaha
2001 Daijiro Kato Honda
2002 Marco Melandri Aprilia
2003 Manuel Poggiali Aprilia
2004 Dani Pedrosa Honda
2005 Dani Pedrosa Honda
2006 Jorge Lorenzo Aprilia
2007 Jorge Lorenzo Aprilia

It’s not uncommon to hear the RS frame and banana swing arm to be perfect in every way. The RS motor was also said to be near perfect-cranking out around 60hp while producing around 30 pound feet of torque. This combination propelled the the RS to a top speed of about 130mph and was a strong enough package to lure in the hottest of young European talent. As previously mentioned, Aprilia won 9 our of 14 championships starting in 1994 and ending in 2007. Granted, I don’t think us mere mortals can compare to the likes of Biaggi, Capirossi, Rossi, Melandri, Poggiali or Lorenzo, but we can sure dream- right?

The seller of this Challenge Cup machine has some serious advice for any would be buyer. I feel it’s my duty to cover it before moving on to all things pictures, fantasy and drool.

The sellers warning
Don’t consider buying this if:
– The only 2-stroke you have ever started is a weed-whacker. This bike is the real deal.
– You have no idea what a carburetor does
– You want to ride it on the road. (This is only for the track). Has a 15 digit VIN (ZD4LDA5004S0043)
– You need electronic aids (ABS, traction control etc). There aren’t any.

Thanks to my buddy, Jay- former RSBFS.com writer and guru of all things Aprilia, I used to own one of these and I’d always park it next to my trusty Stihl FS85 line trimmer as a reminder that I wasn’t a worthy candidate for RS250 ownership.

Now that I’ve covered the disclaimer lets check it out-


 
Low mileage: Check!



 
Shiny bits and true Racer Boy exhaust: Check!



 
It has a motor: Check!
 


More from the seller
2004 Aprilia RS250 Challenge. (The last year this track-only bike was made)

Legendary frame and handling with huge Brembo brakes and nearly 60 BHP from its Suzuki 250cc engine
This machine is small and agile enough to teach you great track craft without ludicrous speeds. You’ll out-handle and out-brake almost anything on the track and still be able to reach 115mph on the straightaway

Never raced. Only used for track days by mid-level rider. I believe I am the second owner.
Used a few times a year, it now has only 3,765 miles

Run on 100% pure gas (no ethanol) 91 Octane with Motul 2-stroke oil. Has an oil pump so no need to premix.
Gas tank has been treated with epoxy
Original body work including tank and panels
Front and rear stand included

Owned by motorcycle enthusiast with 40 years of 2-stroke experience. I rebuilt the top end of the engine with advice and spares from TheTuningWorks (UK) who are renown experts in these engines. Used Evans coolant to prevent corrosion.
Nearly new Pirelli Diablo SuperCorsa tires with about four track days of wear.

There are pictures of the naked frame and subframe to show you that everything is straight, clean and undamaged.

The Aprilia forums reckon this is worth $9,000!

THIS BIKE IS THE REAL DEAL! TRACK-ONLY! NO REGISTRATION, NO PLATES, NO TITLE. Bill of sale only (as is always the case with track bikes).


 

And there you have it folks! If you fancy being like Rossi and kicking ass at your next track day- I’d highly suggest you skip the clapped out 2015 GSX-R and pick up this extremely nice RS250. I guarantee you’ll have more fun, track side conversation and a much higher resale value when you’ve had enough. Oh!, but let’s not forget, you must be pre-qualified in chainsaw or higher to purchase this machine.

Check out this track weapon here!

Ciao!

dd

2004 Aprilia RS250 Challenge Cup Race Bike!
Honda September 27, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing – 2006 Honda RS125R GP Racer!

Update 9.27.2021: SOLD IN JUST 4 DAYS to an RSBFS Reader! Congratulations to buyer and seller!

If you have a bike for sale that would benefit from this kind of exposure, contact us for a Featured Listing. -dc

There are sport bikes, there are track day bikes, and then there are full on GP racers. Today’s stunning Featured Listing is one of the latter. In fact, this RS125R represents the final build of the Honda 125cc two stroke bikes before the GP world turned to four strokes. And unlike some privateer machines which have been run hard, crashed often, rebuilt and thrashed again, this example is clean, complete, and rash free. If you are looking for that perfect man cave centerpiece, or if you fancy yourself some Valentino Rossi moves at your next track day or club racing event, you just might want to check this out. When you compare a kitted out street bike set up for the track, this 2006 Honda RS125 will stop quicker, handle better, and basically run rings around most non-race bikes for the same amount of coin.

From the seller:
Last of an era. About the model..
Factory HRC RS125R Grand Prix racer. These bikes ended production in 2004 but were assembled and sold until 2009. The bill of sale I have lists this example as 2006. It was superseded in 2010 by the NSF250R which was largely the same save for the 250cc four stroke engine and beefier swing arm. Overall power was down on the 250 compared to the 125CC but torque was up, so was weight…

SPECS
bhp 45
Weight 158lbs dry (yes you read that right)
Fuel 100 octane minimum

More from the seller:
Hello, you are viewing the last factory production two stroke Grand Prix road race motorcycle Honda ever made. These ended production in 2004 and were assembled and sold until sometime in 2009 without changes. It has a 125cc engine that makes 45hp and total bike weight of 158lbs dry. It requires premix fuel of 100 octane minimum. The engine was fully rebuilt at the end of its last racing season prior to my ownership. The only non-factory items are a VHM head, Moto Tassinari V Force reed valve, and Ceramic Wheel bearings. The bike is fully safety wired, and spares are readily available through several vendors in the USA.

I purchased this bike from a local dealership owner several years ago. His son had campaigned it briefly in the USGPRU series before outgrowing it and moving on to 600’s. As you can imagine being owned by a dealer it has been professionally maintained. I can see no evidence that has ever been down. It has been properly stored on display by its two included stands in a heated garage. The included stands are an OEM rear, and Battle Factory Front. This is the nicest RS I have seen in the US that is not still new in the crate. If your intent is to collect, display and occasionally fire it up its good to go. If you plan to track day or race it competitively you will need a new set of tires, as the Dunlop slicks that are on it though brand new, are at least seven years old.

More from the seller:
The extent of my ownership has been display and yearly warming up, function checks, then back to storage.
I would consider there to be two flaws on this entire bike, one the OEM windscreen has a crack which was drilled to stop the spread, and is missing a chip in upper left the corner, two it has a quarter sized hole in the upper fairing where the front stand was incorrectly placed into the bottom of the steering head, which fell off and punched through. This is not visible from above. If your seriously interested I can provide more specific pictures or schedule a time to view this piece of history in person. My price is negotiable in person within reason. I would work with you if you wished to ship it within the USA at your expense. A bill of sale will be provided as these motorcycles were never issued titles. Bring a gallon of VP C12 if you want a ride!

Asking Price: $8,000

The Honda RS125R is a pretty special machine. A factory-built racer intended for the sharp end of the GP grid, the RS125R was a weapon in the hands of heroes such as current stars Andrea Divizioso and Tom Luthi, or past multi-time winners like Dani Pedrosa and Loris Capirossi. Today these bikes are relatively rare (especially in this condition), collectable, and yet still very usable. The aftermarket has taken care of the concerns regarding spares, meaning that this is artwork you can fire off in anger a few times a year without fear of irreparable damage. And as the seller states, being previously owned by a Honda dealer certainly helped with the current condition and setup. For an asking price of only $8k you get history, speed, and a seductive silhouette – a bargain even before you fire it up! Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing – 2006 Honda RS125R GP Racer!
Kawasaki September 25, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Kawasaki 750R Ninja

Update 10.20.2021: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Location: Whitman, Massachusetts
Price: $5,500 $4,700 or best offer
Mileage: 19,100

Up for your consideration is a very well preserved 1987 Kawasaki 750R Ninja in a rarely seen Red and White color scheme.

In 1987, the 750R was crowned “The Best 750 of the Year!” That’s a pretty strong statement when you consider the other models it was up against. The middleweight Ninja offered a very nice balance between sport and sport-touring with it’s lower foot rests, plush seat and it’s comfier than most clip-on location on top of the triple clamp.

The 750R power plant was all new for 1987 and put out 106 horsepower at the crank and 85 at the rear wheel. I owned this exact model in 1989 and I can attest that it is a very capable machine for spirited sprints or all day two-up riding.

From the Seller:
1987 Kawasaki Ninja 750R rare Red and White color. The carburetors were gone through less than 100 miles ago. It sports a set of new Bridgestones with less than 100 miles on them, new spark plugs, air filter, fresh oil change less than 100 miles ago and brand new Zero Gravity windscreen. The original windscreen is included in the sale. I have some parts to go with the bike plus a factory owners and service manual. Also included is a period correct Vance and Hines 4-1 exhaust

As you know, most 34 year old motorcycles have been chopped up and sport truck cab lights for turn signals, but not this one. This one managed to escape the hacksaw and to maintain it’s rear fender and original directional blinkers.

If you’re into collecting 80’s sport bikes or need to add the first 750 Ninja to your H, J, K, L, M, N and P collection, you might want to give this one a look. This one averaged only 560 miles a year! I’d say the owners of this low mileage machine left a lot of fun on the table and a lot of life in this one.

See if you can park this one in your collection.

Cheers!

dd

Featured Listing: 1987 Kawasaki 750R Ninja
KTM September 25, 2021 posted by

Double Boom KaToom: KTM RC8 times two!

When the flash flood of ultra-rare and highly collected models at auction dries up, RSBFS attentions turn to unique and under-represented specimens such as today’s underrated KTM RC8. While the top of the line R model offers greater performance and rarity (for a price), the RC8 still offers striking good looks (if you’re into angular design language) and more than respectable performance in a package you simply do not find very often. Post 2010 all RC8 models were R bikes. Given that KTM has completely pulled out of the Superbike world – both in the showroom as well as the racetrack – these bikes are only going to become more coveted. As luck would have it, there are two different RC8 examples available right now to compare and contrast, so let’s jump into it!


Bike #1: 2011 KTM RC8 – 29,503 miles

Built between 2008 and 2015, the RC8 went through a few iterations during its time. The original prototypes were 990cc V-twins, then iterated to 999cc V-4, before KTM settled on the now famous 75 degree, 1190 designation (actual displacement 1148cc for the base, and 1195cc for the R spec), fuel injected V-twin mill. Some of this had to do with competition; KTM paired with Ducati to lobby the SBK powers that be to allow for bigger twins to compete against the current crop of fours. Hence, shortly after the introduction, KTM was in the deep end of the WSBK pool, swimming with the sharks. For the buying public, the RC8 represented an all-new, scratch built motorcycle specifically tailored for performance. The specs are pretty special: 155 HP, thanks to four valve heads, Keihin fuel injection with 52mm throttle bodies and dry sump lubrication (with no fewer than 3 oil pumps!). The R models post 2010 upped the spec considerably with more displacement and bigger ponies (170). The chassis took a KTM-interpreted page from the Ducati trellis frame approach, with a series of short, straight sections of chrome moly tubing and an aluminum subframe. WP suspension appears on both ends, and is fully adjustable. In fact, nearly everything about the RC8 is adjustable, ensuring that nearly any size rider can find a fitment that offers comfort and control once on board this 406 pound missile.

From the seller:
This 2011 KTM RC8 is an original. The owner has had it for 4 years. The vehicle runs great and is mainly used for weekend rides. Super Rare* 2011 KTM RC8R. Not for beginners, it’s a torque monster with a vtwin engine. It’s a Guaranteed attention getter at any even or ride. Priced to sell!!

Positive
Has new shinko tires,
new oil and oil filter,
The fuel pump was also rebuilt prior to this season
New featherweight lithium battery that still has warranty on it.
The plastic fuel quick release line has been up graded to the metal one.
new quick release fuel cap/door.
It has sato racing frame sliders.
Never been laid down on the street.
Starts right up and ready to ride.

Negatives
windscreen is dull, previous owner clean with wrong chemicals
custom exhaust melted bottom fairings and a few blemishes (all can be seen in photos).

Picture wise, there is really not much to say. Most of the photos do not contain enough precise detail to determine exact condition. I’m not a big fan of the added on stickers, but there is nothing to suggest that they are hiding anything. Clearly the seller has spent some time detailing the bike, as is evidenced by the photos. No shot of the command center and unique gauge stack, although the eBay advert lists the mileage as 29,503. That is pretty significant mileage for such a rare beast. It also sports some mods, including an unnamed exhaust and a tail tidy-up kit. On one hand it’s great to see these things ridden, on the other hand a collector would undoubted look for something closer to stock and fewer miles. But a collector would likely be looking for either an early RC8R or the last model year in the first place, making this more of a great rider option. Pricing is curious on these bikes, as they are bit of a no-man’s land due to infrequent sales and being lost in the gray area of unique but not on collector lists (and hence not appreciating… yet). Seller is asking $7,500 Buy It Now, and is open to offers. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!


Bike #2: 2014 KTM RC8 – 997 miles

The second bike for your consideration is another RC8, however this one is a newer model year and features a slightly different graphics package with the black lowers. Graphics aside, there is not too much to change between the earlier RC8 and one a few years later. Same great thumping engine, same WP suspension, etc. Perhaps the biggest change was a tweaking of the fuel injection to lessen the on/off throttle response, as well as the introduction of a slipper clutch. Otherwise you are looking at a newer – maybe more evolved – but not substantially different motorcycle.

From the seller:
This 2014 KTM RC8 is an original. This is offered for sale by the original owner. The vehicle runs great and is mainly used for weekend rides.

Bike rides like brand new. Barely driven. I am entering my 50s and not able to ride crotch rockets anymore. Have 1 other bike on eBay auto for the same reason. Rear brake light is not working. And missing a mirror on right side of bike. Bike was never laid down. I walked by it and broke the mirror. Matching leather motorcycle jacket from London, barely worn, XL for $500.

This bike has not seen many miles, but does sport a little bit of damage that is worthy of further investigation. The seller notes that the mirror was broken when he ran into it – which may well be the case. Potential buyers should shop for a spare, as the mirror stalks also contain the front turn signals, making them a bit pricey. There is also some paint/graphics damage on the right hand side of the fairing, with the stickers showing some bubbling. This looks like it could be the result of a brake fluid spill during service (conjecture on my part), because it does not really appear to be impact damage. No clear indication as to the brake light switch; perhaps some of our RC8-knowledgeable readers can chime in on if that is a common failure point. I really like that it has low, low miles, but it’s a shame that this example will need some replacement pieces before being considered mint. This bike is being offered for the nice, round sum of $15,695 in a Buy It Now format, with the seller open to offers. You can check out all of the details here.


If I was in the market for one of these big, rare KTM superbikes what would I look at? All are super rare R models (although in the end that was all you could get – other than a track version). That being said, pricing for R models is on the rise, and the capability of even the base earlier RC8s is impressive. Of the two bikes listed here, the second one with low miles would be my first choice for investigation, however there is a nearly $8200 price difference between the two of them. That is a LOT of cash. Still, I would be tempted to learn more about Bike #2 in order to ascertain the true condition, and work on a valid offer based on what was found. Any way you look at it, the big KTM makes for a wildly radical departure from the standard fare. Good Luck!!


Post script:
While prepping for this post, one of the RC8R examples featured on these pages was relisted. With 12,000-ish miles and in semi-modified condition, the seller is asking $10,500 – see it here. For those who are interested, the RC8R featured different graphics, a bigger motor (1148cc vs 1195cc) that has a lightweight, titanium valve train, and peaks out at a massive 170 crankshaft HP. Suspension is still WP, brakes are still Brembo but the RC8R comes in lighter, faster, and far more rare than the base model RC8.

MI

Double Boom KaToom: KTM RC8 times two!
Yamaha September 24, 2021 posted by

1998 Yamaha YZF R1 For Sale!

1998 Yamaha YZF R1 For Sale on eBay!

Yup, it’s 1998 and I’m itching to “upgrade” my F3 because, you know, I “need” a bigger bike. I have a choice to make- ZX-9R or R1? Sport Rider magazines, Kent Kunitsugu, says the ZX-9R is the first sub 10 second 1/4 mile production motorcycle. Woo Hoo! screamed the Kawasaki fan boy.
Yup, you guessed it, I succumbed to the BIGGER, BETTER, FASTER marketing machine and purchased the ZX-9R :sadface: #Merica


The YZF-R1 burst on to the scene with a massive HP to weight ratio, good looks and razor sharp handling. Yamaha engineers also gave it enough pointy styling to be relevant 23 years down the road – which might be more impressive than the 150hp under the hood . . . er . . . gas tank.

Let’s have a peek at what could have been mine . . .

Looking back, I think I would have been happier with the R1 and seeing this one brings back all of those missed “what if” memories. I still think the red and white 98′ R1’s are one of my favorite looking bikes of all time only being eclipsed by the R7.

Seeing a (basically) all stock 1998 R1 in great condition has this one tugging at me. Thank goodness my old rickety ass can’t handle the sport bike riding position anymore or I’d have to pinch open my old skool squeeze change holder and buy the wife a new pair of shoes for this one.

From the seller
1998 Yamaha R1 – Used

Rare and highly desirable red and white color combination
-17,598 Miles
-Lockhart Phillips tinted windscreen.
-Aftermarket tail tidy.
-Michelin Pilot Power tires that have 98% tread left.
-Almost unnoticeable ding in the right top rear of the gas tank
-Small scratch on right side of tank below the word “Yamaha”.
-Small chip in paint on the right lower side of the gas tank.
-Small chip in the top center of the gas tank.
-Rear passenger seat has been recovered and front corners are sewn.

-This gorgeous 1998 Yamaha R1 runs and rides fantastic and is perfect for any collection.

Okay, I have a confession: I had no idea having your corners of your passenger seat “sewn” was a thing and worth mentioning in a for sale ad. Anyone else? Beuller? Beuller? Beuller?

Moving on from my lesson of the day- The seller has supplied some very nice photos for your review and a start up/throttle blip video for your viewing pleasure.

There you have it! A pristine, stock 1998 Yamaha R1 in the most sought after color scheme. The seller has it at $8750 BIN over on the auction site. I don’t think that is too bad all things considered.

Let us know where you stand on these.

Cheers!

dd

1998 Yamaha YZF R1 For Sale!

Subscribe by Email

Get every post delivered by email! Your information will never be sold or spammed.

FB Like Box

Support Our Sponsors!



Archives