Monthly Archives: January 2020

Aprilia January 31, 2020 posted by

And this time I mean it: 2003 Aprilia RS250 Final Edition GP-1

Moving on from booming V-twin, limited edition bikes from Italy comes this beautiful, well, uh, V-twin, limited edition screamer from, er, Italy. Sheesh. The big difference is that this one is a two stroke from Noale, and not the desmo- aspirated variety from Bologna. Specifically, this is the GP-1 branded Aprilia RS250, a final example of this legendary quarter-liter import for the street and track alike. A trio of well known racers were successful on the GP racer example of this model: Rossi, Biaggi and Capriossi. That is impressive company to be sure.

2003 Aprilia RS250 GP-1 for sale on eBay

The Aprilia RS250 owes much of its inception to Suzuki. The 90 degree V-twin is a direct pick-a-part from the Hamamatsu manufacturer. As is the six speed transmission. Sure, Aprilia made some changes to the unit to make it more theirs (i.e. airbox, programmable ignition, exhaust and logos on some of the cast pieces), but the roots of this family tree are Suzuki – right up to the leaves. Suzuki even assembled and shipped the Aprilia-spec motors to the Italian bike builter. But as we all know, it is not just the motor that makes these machines track-day fast. The RS250 (and the race bike that inspired it – the RSW250) is not popular by riders through accident. With a stout aluminum-magnesium allow frame, large adjustable front forks, an artfully shaped rear aluminum swing arm and the wind tunnel aerodynamics, the 70 HP twin is good for 130 MPH with handling and brakes to match.

From the seller:
This is a very near new 2003 Japan Market Aprilia RS250 GP-1, the very last of the road going 250cc two stroke models produced anywhere. 1100 original Km or just 683 miles. This bike is turn key and ready to ride or just park it in your collection and appreciate its history and great looks. There are few of these left, fewer still in this condition/miles and they won’t be making anymore!!

This is a 17 digit VIN bike and it has a clean and clear Montana street title and plate.

Recent full service to include, carbs cleaned and inspected, new air filter, fresh oil in trans, fresh coolant fresh brake fluid front and rear and the front forks were just serviced with new seals and fresh oil to rectify a leaky seal ( Motul fluids in everything ).

Bike is turn key and starts on 1 to 2 kicks when cold, the tires were replaced on it a few years back so they are not original, but they have few miles on them.

All electric works, lights, switches, good battery etc.

The bike is 100% stock. It shows some minor wear from the last 17 years but is as shown in the photos incredibly nice and original. I am missing the pillion pad, but that can be easily sourced if you want it.

It still wears all of the original warning decals and Japanese label stickers. I have included photos with the lowers off so you can have a good idea of what the bike looks like underneath the bodywork. There is some surface rust on the original chain, some light corrosion on the forks and various other really small marks or imperfections, but nothing that stands out.

Today’s particular example is not a run of the mill RS250 street bike, or even a converted RS250 Cup bike. Instead, this is the final model of the RS250 line created by Aprilia. Known as the GP-1, this edition was patterned after the livery of yet another famous Italian racer, Marco Melandri. Other than restyled bodywork and livery, mechanical changes are few. The engine and transmission remain unchanged from previous versions, as does the frame and rear suspension. Forks were updated to Showa units as opposed to the original model’s made-to-spec Marzocchi suspension. Along with this change the front hoop was widened by 1/2″, allowing for a slightly wider tire.

It is hard to tell if the GP1 is truly a more collectible version of the RS250, or if the market is simply responding to the newest of hte offerings (least older usually – but not always – equates to fewer miles, use, etc). If you are a rider that fits on the smaller bikes, any of the RS250 models will do you well – especially as the tach swings up past 9 grand. But only one model can be the last on of the breed, and the GP-1 it. This particular RS250 looks to be in fantastic shape, and has fewer than 700 miles. You read that right. Being a Japanese import the seller notes some minor corrosion – but this is nothing that we have seen from some grey bikes that have spent their lives on the Asian island. This bike definitely looks to have survived the curse of the sea air. Hard to tell how harsh the riding was to accumulate what is currently on the all kilometer clocks, but photos don’t show anything too abused that I can tell (and the photos are marvelous). Check it out here, but brace yourself: the cost of entry is a strong $14,500 USD. The bike has a Montana title and is located in sunny California – not a bad mix for an Italian bike with a Japanese heart. Maybe you can add another location to the history of this magnificent machine. Good Luck!!

MI

And this time I mean it:  2003 Aprilia RS250 Final Edition GP-1
Ducati January 29, 2020 posted by

More Than Skin Deep: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

We’ve been a little Ducati-heavy this week, but there’s no way I was going to skip this one: an Eraldo Ferracci-prepped and tuned Ducati 916 SPS. Sure, this might look like yet another boring 916, but the SPS is one of Ducati’s fire-breathing homologation specials, and this example has been endowed with a highly-tuned stroker motor from one of the era’s premier tuners.

If you’re not familiar with Ferracci, he was an east coast Ducati tuner whose bikes won several World Superbike and AMA titles. He eventually opened a well known Ducati/MV Agusta dealership, and the company still sells high-performance Ducati parts on their site, although the brick-and-mortar dealership itself is closed.

The SPS or “Sport Production Special” was basically a way for Ducati to begin racing their stronger, larger-displacement 996cc v-twin before the 996 was introduced. As with all the bikes in the 916/996/998 series, it might look like a regular 916, but featured extensive, evolutionary upgrades to the Tamburini superbike that was introduced way back in 1994. It used the close-ratio box from the smaller 748, along with updated suspension that included an Öhlins shock and a lighter frame.

But of course, the heart of the matter was the updated 996cc engine that included titanium connecting rods for 1998. Ducati found that the functional limit for their original Desmoquattro was 955cc: any bigger, and the cases tended to crack under racing stress. The new engine was a comprehensive redesign that saw the inclusion of new heads, barrels, pistons, injectors, and a lighter crank.

Combined with the usual tuning tricks that didn’t make it over to the regular 996, the changes all added up to an engine that was more than the sum of its parts, with a savage and aggressive character. It was very expensive, but made testers at the time struggle to find enough superlatives to adequately describe the lust it inspired. The seller borrows a good chunk of his description from a very nice history of the SP/SPS Ducatis over at OddBike, and it’s worth a read if you’ve never checked that site out.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

About This Motorcycle:

“The primary reason of building the 916 SPS was to homologate the new 996cc engine for Superbike competition but fortunately for bike fans, the installation of the 996 engine into the 916 setup produced a bike that was described as legendary, astonishingly good looking and a true Superbike. Only 404 examples were built with less than 50 of those imported into the States.

The SPS was released to homologate the new 996cc engine for Superbike competition. The previous 916 crankcases had been maxed out at 955cc, and had problems with cracking and stress fractures under racing conditions. So in 1997 Ducati tried again by taking their new 996 engine and putting it into the 916 frame. The result was the 916 Sport Production Special (SPS).

New reinforced crankcases were needed, and to accommodate a displacement closer to the 1000cc limit for twins in Superbike the case mouths needed wider openings and wider stud spacing to match. Thus the barrels and heads were new, made wider to match the new cylinder stud spacing. Bore was now up to 98mm, with the same 66mm stroke as before. The heads had larger combustion chambers and bigger valves. Compression ratio was now 11.5:1 inside a lighter crankshaft with tungsten plug balancing. The high pressure double injector fuel setup with P8 ECU was carried over from the SP.

Press reviews of the 996 powered SPS declared it to be something quite special, with some testers being able to crack 170 miles per hour with the Termignoni exhaust and ECU kit fitted, a pretty stunning speed for a twin with ‘only’ 120-odd horsepower. The new engine gave a much wider power delivery band but this together with neck-snapping torque was enough to push the limits of the chassis. The 916 models in general did not respond well to ham-fisted riders, so it is not surprising that the SPS and its significantly wider power band resulted in a bike that could be dangerous for even skilled riders.

Despite its somewhat dangerous reputation the SPS was still sexy as hell with a sound like the apocalypse, especially if the Termi pipes were installed. Price tag new was almost $25,000 USD, a significant amount above the $16,500 Biposto and nearly double the price of a 748 model. Most reviewers declared that despite its dangerous nature it was worth the extra investment and there was a lot of demand for the SPS but since these bikes were built for homolgation, just 404 examples were built and only a small number of those brought into the USA.”

Among these rare breed of motorcycles there is something even more special and quite possibly one of the most spectacular, modern era homologated Ducatis. Now that would be tough to believe except this is a FBF bike, but for those who know about Eraldo Ferracci and his relationship with Ducati will easily justify the aforementioned statement.

Speedart Motorsports acquired this motorbike few years back and it has been a highlight of our Ducati collection ever since.

The first owner of this stunning example took delivery in November 1998 from Mr. Ferracci and he commissioned FBF on November, 11 to transform the SPS in to one of their 1,026 cc stroker fire-breathing monsters at an exorbitant cost.

The following is a partial list of the work performed by Eraldo Ferracci with an FBF serial number stamped on the case, further attesting to the pedigree of this extravagant Production Special.

  • Renthal quick change rear sprockets carrier
  • Ferracci billet lightweight flywheel
  • High pressure fuel regulator
  • Ported and polished heads
  • Stage-3 Eprom chip
  • Corse rearsets
  • 37mm Intake valves
  • 31mm Exhaust valves
  • 54mm Ferracci Forza full stainless system
  • Ohlins shock revalved
  • Hyperpro spring
  • Ferracci billet clip-on handlebars
  • 98mm 12:1 Compression piston Kit
  • FBF power crank 68mm stroke
  • Ducati Performance carbon fiber under-seat oil vent tank
  • MS Production carbon air intake runners
  • Stage-3 cams
  • Pankl Racing titanium rods
  • Carbon fiber MS Production swingarm cover

During our custodianship at Speedart Motorsports, further enhancements were performed including Dymag carbon fiber wheels, ultra-rare Ducati Corse RS slipper clutch with DP carbon cover, NCR sprocket carriers, Poggipolini titanium fasteners, Samco hoses, Spiegler cables with fittings and much more.

The sale of this legendary Ducati is accompanied by extensive documentation, owner’s manuals, all Ferracci build records including Dyno sheets, fastidious maintenance receipts, stands, cover, etc.

Speedart Motorsports invites all serious inquiries of what is believed to be the most extraordinary 916 Sport Production Special in captivity, freshly serviced, in spectacular form both cosmetically and mechanically.

The high-compression pistons match the original 98mm bore, but the new crank’s 68mm stroke is up 2mm from the original for a total of 1026cc, compared to the original 996. That might bother some collectors, but it looks like only the very best parts have been used to upgrade and tune this very special SPS. Other than the gold plugs that don’t match the frame paint, this is a very nice, very trick bike, and one of just 1058 built in 1998. A nice SPS will generally sell for much less than the $34,500 asking price seen here, but they usually haven’t had as much attention lavished on them.

-tad

More Than Skin Deep: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale
Ducati January 26, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 2002 Ducati MH900e

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

A viral internet sensation, the Ducati MH900e (Mike Hailwood evoluzione) was launched online and sold online – and was an instant hit. Designed by oft-derided South African visionary Pierre Terblanche (also known for the Supermono and 888, as well as the 999 series), the MHe was intended to be a conceptual update to the original Mike Hailwood replica. By all counts Terblance knocked this one out of the park; from all angles – in photos as well as in person – the MHe is an impressive motorcycle. One can get lost all day in the details; from the tank to the abbreviated tail, the waspish waist, the huge shotgun exhausts, the intricacy of the single-sided swing arm to the simplicity of the center-dominated tach – some of the details are clever and downright devilish.

Featured Listing: 2002 Ducati MH900e

The MHe was built around a standard Pantah-based Supersport engine and transmission. The venerable air-cooled, two valve motor is well known for producing gobs of torque and the sort of wonderful noises you would expect from a Ducati. But with unique touches such as a remodeled oil sump that was designed as a nod to the older style of bevel drive Ducatis and a model-specific oil cooler, the MHe engine stands out as a unique entity and a critical design element of the motorcycle. Throw in some retro touches such as the round, chrome-ringed headlight and you have something very interesting that seems to exist both in the past as well as the present at the same time.

From the seller:
2002 Ducati MH900e
This rare collectable Ducati is 1807 of 2000 and is loaded with goodies. I purchased the bike in 2010. This bike comes with:
The owners’ plaque showing that the bike is number 1807 of 2000, pit bull stand, manual, and 2 keys.

Additionally this bike has a full Ohlins suspension including FG 845 titanium nitride forks specifically calibrated by Kyle Racing. Ohlins shock and Ohlins steering dampener. The upgraded suspension has transformed the bike and it tracks beautifully. ($4,000 + upgrade)

Full Staintune header/exhaust system. This bike was used to spearhead the header development by getting enough MH owners together with a group buy to put deposits on headers, and then a generous MH owner in Australia donated his bike for the R&D. Great improvement in throttle response, sound and looks. ($1,600 upgrade)

Ducati Performance clutch pressure plate (Red) $199
Ducati Performance clutch cover $175
Ducati Performance turn signals $175
Ducati Performance timing belt covers $350
Ducati Performance chrome valve covers $250
Ducati Performance bar end mirrors $250
Cycle Cat adjustable bar risers (way more comfortable)
California Cycleworks 5.1 gallon endurance fuel tank (not the battery tank) $899
Ducati performance bike cover $75

I also have all the original stock parts (except for the rear fender)

Asking Price: $20,000

Contact: David Edinger (Edinger.david@gmail.com) +1-317-908-2573

History clearly shows that the MHe was a success. Offered for sale just after midnight New Year’s day of the year 2000, the entire planned production line sold out before the day was even half out. Over the next couple of years, despite some ramp up and production issues, Ducati eventually built 2000 examples of the model (which was more than expected). Ducati initially planned to farm out production of this hand-built motorcycle to fellow Italian constructor Bimota, but when the Rimini firm fell into bankruptcy Ducati created a new assembly area and started to build the bike themselves. It took a couple of years for all of the MHe models to be produced, but even by late 2002 the fanfare generated by this enthralling machine had not abated.

Today’s Featured Listing is a 2002 MH900e serial number 1807. The year and number place it towards the end of production, but as there were virtually no changes throughout the model run it can be considered the same as an early bike. This particular bike has seen some very tasty upgrades, including a shift to full Ohlins suspension (original bikes had either Paioli or Sachs units in the rear). It also has a very expensive and rare Staintune exhaust, and a litany of Ducati Performance goodies. Nearly all of the stock pieces are available with the bike, so those fearing mods need not fret. Unlike some garage queens this one has been ridden, and shows 7,462 on the clock. The asking price is very much inline with current market values, and given the scarcity of these models interested parties should reach out and connect with David quickly. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 2002 Ducati MH900e
Ducati January 24, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada

1.31.2020: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

The Ducati 851 is one of the all time greats; a watershed bike that defined a company, dominated a racing class, and lives on as a lust-worthy dance partner in the canyons. Everything about it screams “Ducati” from the miles of blood-red paint to the big, booming exhaust note that only a 90 degree v-twin can produce. The design silhouette is distinctive – and sexy. This is an Italian exotic at its finest, and at its most collectible. And yet this is a bike that you can buy without mortgaging your house, and you can live with day to day.

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada

What makes the 851 such a big deal is the manner in which it burst onto the scene. Ducati leapfrogged the evolutionary process by simultaneously moving the Pantah-based platform from air cooling to liquid cooling, from a two-valve desmo head to a four-valve arrangement, and switching from carbs to fuel injection. That is a lot to pull off in one fell swoop, but given the performance, reliability and longevity of these motors it is obvious that Ducati cut no corners. As a result the 851 is a great choice if you are looking for a collector that you can ride. It makes usable power (but not outrageous amounts), offers strong brakes and willing suspension, and a decently upright riding position.

From the seller:
1992 Ducati 851 Strada
This model 851 was only made for two years and only 1200 were produced. This is a two owner bike with the rare Euro tail section added. The original BiPosto seat is included with the sale of the bike.

The Ducati 851 was the successor to the air-cooled two-valve Ducati 750 F1. After buying Ducati, Cagiva invested in the development of anotherV-Twin, but with liquid cooling, and four-valve Desmdromic heads. Based on the Pantah motor, but with liquid cooling, fuel injection, and desmodromic four valve heads (with an included valve angle of 40°), the 851 made Ducati once again competitive in motorcycle racing.

Bordi collaborated with Cosworth to develop the heads, but in the time they had, they were only able to reduce the included valve angle of the desmodromic engine to 40°, while less than 30° was possible with valve springs. Ducati stuck with the desmodromics. The subsequent 851 road bike had stronger crankcases, while the heads and valves remained the same; designed to fit above the 88 mm bore of a 748 cc version.

1.31.2020: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

This particular 851 is a Strada (street) model, but has been uprated with a carbon front fender, carbon mud guard, a sweet Fast by Ferracci high-sweep carbon exhaust (sounds so good!), and a solo section tail. In other words, this particular model is well-suited as a rider. The asking price is right in the ball park for a clean and cared-for example. That is the interesting thing about these models; while the SP4 and LTD models have higher resale value, clean base model Stradas continues to trade strongly. This is a testament to how great these bikes are to ride and own (author confession: my wife rides one as her commuter). Check out the pics of this extremely clean example and then drop David a line – he would love to see this beloved ride from his collection find a good home.

MI

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada
Laverda January 23, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC for Sale

Update 6.18.2020: This bike is SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

We don’t post a ton of “classic” sportbikes here, but some motorcycles transcend the era in which they were built: the bevel-drive Ducati 900SS, the Moto Guzzi V7 Sport, Norton Manx, Vincent Black Shadow, Kawasaki ELR, Honda CBX, and this bright orange Laverda SFC are iconic enough that they fit in just fine among machines decades newer. Quite literally a race bike with lights, the SFC or “Super Freni Competizione” was a high water mark for the marque, and always makes me sad they’re not currently in business. I think the world has room for a stylish, overbuilt motorcycle with great handling and Italian charisma. I picture something like a Triumph Thruxton R with Ducati SportClassic style…

At the heart of the machine was an air-cooled, 744cc two-valve, overhead-cam parallel twin supposedly patterned after Honda’s CB77 Superhawk and built to last, with five main bearings. The SFC shared the same engine with the more street-oriented SF1, although the SFC included the usual period upgrades to improve performance: larger valves, head work, different cams, balanced and polished internals, bigger carbs… The result was somewhere between 71hp and 81hp, depending on the year. They were all hand-built and dyno-tested and rolled out pretty much ready to compete in endurance racing events. Just remove the lights and add a numberplate.

Unlike other Italian manufacturers of the period, Laverda’s goal was to use the very best parts in their motorcycles, regardless of origin. So while the suspension and frame were by Verlicchi and Ceriani or Marzocchi, respectively, they used Nippon-Denso electrics, and Bosch ignition components. It’s significant that Laverda named their bike after its braking ability: Super Freni Competizione basically means “super competition brakes” and the early machines featured a massive magnesium brake drum out front with a similar unit out back.

Later machines moved to twin discs out front, with a matching disc in the rear, but the result was the same and Laverdas stopped as well as they went. In 1974, the frame was updated to lower the center of gravity and reduce weight, and to improve handling with revised suspension geometry. Fewer than 600 SFCs were ever made, making this one of the rarest examples of an already exclusive marque.

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Laverda SFC for Sale

At only approx 541 units produced, the Laverda SFC is one of the best bikes for the buck you can collect and ride! this is a street legal factory race bike that pumps out approx. 70HP, it’s fun, fast and vicious– to me the SFC is the pinnacle of 70’s Italian sport bikes, it hits all the marks and its built like a tank. This is the closest bike in feel to a Lamborghini Miura.

At this point I can say with some authority, that I have owned, bought and sold more SFC Laverda’s then just about anyone in the US, if you look in previous sales, this bike is just 12 bikes later than the last SFC that came through the shop.

Every SFC is slightly unique, every bike has a story. This particular example has been in private ownership for the last 10 years, the current owner had the noted Laverda craftsman Scott Potter do a complete frame up rebuild with the intention to ride her on the beautiful California coastal roads. At this point a new Steel tank was acquired and paint matched to the rest of the bodywork, new parts were used as needed and the rear shocks were upgraded.

As the bike had been sitting, I decided to give her a once over and clean and replace the jets, set the points. After putting in some fresh fuel, this BEAST roared back to life. The time and money spent on the rebuild was obvious as the quick pull of the throttle felt the parallel twin whip the bike back and forth, the feel of the SFC is unmistakable. BUY, RIDE, COLLECT.

WORLDWIDE SHIPPING IS AVAILABLE

Feel free to call me 929-264-7212 or email via my website – motoborgotaro.com

1974 LAVERDA SFC DETAILS –

  • Frame #17160
  • Engine #17160
  • Dell’Orto PHB 36mm carburetors
  • Borrani aluminum wheel rims
  • Steel tank
  • Ceriani suspension * rear is Marzocchi
  • Electron rear hub and sprocket carrier
  • High quality aluminum replica gas tank
  • Nippon Denso instruments
  • Smaller European taillight

Original parts included * Original fiberglass tank and original pipes

If you’re not familiar with Moto Borgotaro, they’re a restoration shop over in Brooklyn, New York and have had a number of very nice Laverdas pass through their hands. This example looks basically perfect, with just 4,304 miles on it, and the seller is asking $58,000.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC for Sale
Ducati January 23, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1988 Ducati Paso 750

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

That Ducati Paso 750s don’t get the pure adulation that they deserve from anyone outside dyed-in-the-wool Ducatisti is baffling. Sure, they’re looks might aptly be described as controversial and they never had world-beating power, but their place in motorcycling is as important as any mid-80’s Japanese rocket.

Most importantly, the bike saved Ducati from the scrapyard of history, pulling together the earliest versions of the brand’s modern hallmarks under new corporate ownership. Second, however controversial it might have been, their styling is uniquely Italian, uniquely 1980s and at the time was from outer space. The man who penned it, Massimo Tamburini, went on to give the world the Ducati 916 and the Ducati Monster.

So, it’s safe to say without the oddly charming Paso, with its belt-driven cam engine and fiberglass fetish, the Ducatis we drool over now might never have appeared. If we’ve piqued your interest, this 1988 Ducati Paso 750 is the pick of the litter.

With fewer than 1,500 miles on the dial since new, and wearing the rare-as-frog-hair blue bodywork, this Paso rightfully should end up in a museum. According to the seller, it’s one of just 55 sold in this color scheme worldwide.

From the seller:

This blue model Paso is very limited in numbers with only 55 sold worldwide and only has 1,486 miles which allows you to have a brand new antique. The Ducati Paso 750 was the first road going product to come out of the Cagiva-Ducati relationship, launched in 1985 when Cagiva purchased Ducati from the Italian government. Cagiva rushed to get it ready for the 1985 Milan motorcycle show. The bike has a set of Conti slip ons however the stock exhausts come with the sale of the motorcycle. This is a very comfortable bike for both the rider and the passenger.

Between 1986 and 1988, Ducati only sold 4,863 Paso 750s. It’s important because it was the first Ducati product designed by Massimo Tamburini, co-founder of Bimota, and the man who would go on to design the Ducati 916, and the MV Agusta F4, both considered to be two of the world’s most beautiful modern motorcycles.

For the Paso 750, Tamburini cloaked the entire motorcycle behind fiberglass and plastic panels, hiding all the mechanical parts. For the time, the Paso was packed with state-of-the-art features: square chromoly steel tube perimeter chassis, an aluminum rear swing arm, and aluminum Marvic 16-inch wheels wrapped in radial tires.

The Paso 750’s calling card was in the parts department. The 42mm anti-dive front forks were pretty huge for the era, and there was a stout fork brace built right into the front fender. At the rear, the rising-rate “Pro-Link”-style Ohlins monoshock was adjustable for preload, compression and rebound damping.

It is equipped with the belt-drive Pantah motor which was a strong and capable engine, and known to deliver in the Ducati 750 F1.

The bike’s instruments were nestled in a binnacle that on normal machines would be covered by a tinted plexiglass windscreen, but on the Paso was an extension of the bodywork. They were made up of equal-sized speedometer and tachometer, along with a fuel gauge.

The Paso was lauded as “the best-equipped Eurobike ever to take on the Japanese in the hotly contested 750 sports market.” Owning a Paso today is something of a labor of love. They’re also mechanically reliable. The carburetor–an automotive Weber two-barrel pressed into duty running both cylinders.

The Paso is a fun, unique, and totally ’80s ride for not a lot of cash. Riding one never fails to elicit a thumbs up, and an appreciative glance from the crowd at your local European bike night.

Top Speed is 131 MPH with 72 HP@7,000 RPM and with a dry weight of 429 pounds with a 5 speed transmission, 5.8 gallon fuel capacity and a 30.6 inch height seat

Contact: David Edinger
Edinger.david@gmail.com
+1-317-908-2573

For all that beauty and rarity, our buddy David is asking for just $5,500. That’s half what you’d pay for a grey market Japanese two stroke, and this one is twice as clean as most smokers you’ll come across.

Featured Listing: 1988 Ducati Paso 750
Kawasaki January 23, 2020 posted by

Ride and cherish: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR

The 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR is the ultimate expression of streetbike muscle from the era when racebikes actually were just tricked out street bikes with hot engine kits, big brakes and slicks. Without someone like Pops Yoshimura in your rolodex, you still weren’t gonna get close to Eddie Lawson’s horsepower numbers, but with a couple number plates and a decent imagination you wouldn’t be far off.

1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR for sale on eBay

The 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR was the company’s marketing play on Eddie’s 1981 and 1982 AMA Superbike championships aboard a very green KZ1000. With bodywork from the previous year’s GPz, a warmed up engine and the hallmark bright green and blue bodywork over gold wheels, the look was perfect. The bikes were always meant to be a little extra special, so they sold few of them and the ones that remain are blue-chip collector bikes.

This one is a Canada-spec machine, with no smog equipment and a kilometers per hour speedo. It shows some wear and tear from its 37 years, but it feels nitpicky to mention them. With just under 11,000 kilometers on the dial, this thing has a lot of cruise nights left in it.

From the eBay listing:

1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR (Canada / Europe spec) This model does not have engine head cover US emission valve as can be seen in photo. Speedometer in Kilometers. Very rare and hard to find period FOX race shocks. Bike is in very good condition with 6822 miles or 10979 Kilometers on the bike. 150PSI plus on all cylinder compression and valves adjusted. Repacked steering head bearings, new petcock seals, rebuilt front forks with seals and 20W fork oil. Good condition and painted side covers with decals and emblems as hard side cover grommets damaged the tabs on the side covers. Bike has new side cover grommets now. Owners manual and partial tool kit as can be seen in photo. Bike runs and have video of bike running . Shifts through all gears and no clutch issues. Brakes work as they should. All lights work. New Metzeler Sportec Klassik tires front and rear. New Yuasa battery.
Clear title in hand.

This  bike is very clean and original, but not so gleaming that you’d feel bad about riding it, which we love. For someone out there, this bike is the perfect addition.

 

Ride and cherish: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR
Triumph January 22, 2020 posted by

Brutal Hooligan: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

After a long, slow fall from grace into obscurity, Triumph had some soul-searching to do. Once, a premier manufacturer of sporting motorcycles, the storied brand needed a brand new strategy when businessman John Bloor chose to resurrect the company, instead of turning their facility into upscale condos… Instantly creating a line of motorcycles to topple the Japanese brands from a pure performance standpoint was out of the question, so Triumph chose instead to play to their strengths: heritage and old-world build quality. Why build engines to racing specifications when racing is so expensive, and you’re likely to lose more prestige than you gain? The result was a line of bikes that included this very simple, brutish Triumph Speed Triple T309.

Originally, Triumph’s modular range included both three and four-cylinder engine variants that powered a range of sport, naked, and touring machines that were all built around a spine frame. The lighter, more characterful triples ended up being more popular and, although it may not look like much, the Speed Triple could be credited with keeping the newly reborn company afloat, since it’s a mainstay model even today. This first-generation model isn’t nearly as polished, but has plenty of old school charm.

Chief among those charms was the beefy, 885cc triple that gave the bike its name and was also a callback to the 1937 Speed Twin. Backed by a five-speed gearbox, the engine was a modern, liquid-cooled design with machined details that evoked the cooling fins on earlier, air-cooled Triumphs. Styling was very simple, basically a Daytona with the fairing removed and a simple, round headlight and simple, monochromatic paint. Available colors included “Fireball Orange” and basic black. Classic. Suspension was adjustable at both ends, for all the good it did.

The T309 version of the Speed Triple definitely not an ideal basis for a track-day machine: Triumph’s original modular concept had many virtues, but the spine frame carried weight relatively high and the Speed Triple was considered a bit of a pig, although things can probably be improved if that’s what you’re into: there was a Speed Triple Challenge single-make race series to promote the bike when it was introduced. Better to just enjoy this low-mileage example for what it is, and take it out for late night blasts around town in your black jacket with black helmet and dark-tinted visor, squirting from stoplight to stoplight and hoisting fat wheelies. Or sipping tea on sunny Sunday mornings at your local cafe, whichever you prefer.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

Triumph 3cylinder 900 cc Condition is Used. Please notice this is an extraordinary example of the Triumph Speed Triple with low milage @1700 miles a 2nd owner well maintained great running bike. Hi performance carburators re: flat slide Keihin smooth bore Venturis jetted and matched to the carbon fiber mufflers. Kept and garaged in a heated pest free environment. This bike does it all and sounds really good when gassing it twisting it open and bracing against the acceleration. Owner is downsizing his collection. We recently sold a Ducati Paul Smart classic from this same collection. No expense spared in the up keep of these bikes. Recent additions are a new battery and fuel petcock valve. The gas tank is clean inside without corrosion or swarf to contaminate the fuel system. Tires are excellent. Brake fluids and the oil and filter were changed before posting to sell.

With only 1,790 miles, this example is pretty much perfect for collectors. The Micron cans seen here are a great period touch and the flat-slide carbs should add some great induction noise, along with a few extra horses. Cosmetically, the biggest problem here is that set of oddly-shaped tank grip pads. Grip pads are great for fast riding, but this particular design doesn’t match the tank cutouts and cheapens the look. Obviously a very easy fix.

-tad

Brutal Hooligan: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

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