Monthly Archives: November 2019

Bimota November 30, 2019 posted by

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

This Bimota YB11 Superleggera isn’t just a sportbike, or even an exotic sportbike. It’s a high-performance boutique motorcycle, one of just 650 ever built. Of course, that’s pretty much mass production by Bimota standards. It doesn’t have quite the cachet of Honda’s limited-production homologation superbikes, but consider that Honda made almost 5,000 Honda RC30s, compared to just 650 YB11s. It’s still incredibly rare and plenty fast and, as a bonus, you can take your significant other with you on your high-performance boutique motorcycle: this was one of very few Bimotas ever built with passenger accommodations, although they’re about as comfortable as you’d expect. Still, it’s great to have that spare seat, in case of emergencies…

The “Superleggera” part of Bimota YB11 Superleggera refers to the focus on lightweight construction that allowed huge performance from an existing engine, along with the agile handling you’d expect. At the time, the bike weighed 403lbs dry, a full 80lbs less than the Yamaha YZF1000R that donated its 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed transmission. Power was rated at 145hp, with an impressive 80lb-ft of torque that allowed the five-speed box to be fitted to the open-class superbike in the first place, a characteristic it shared with Suzuki’s rival GSX-R1100. The light weight and power were enough to push the bike to nearly 170mph. All the way back in 1997.

Somehow, because of their hand-built nature and flaws, it doesn’t seem all that criminal to modify or improve Bimota’s 1990s motorcycles if it helps sort some of their more annoying quirks: a YZF750R six-speed can replace the original five-speed found in the YB11, and I’m sure somebody can figure out how to fit a stand-alone fuel-injection system to replace the carburetors. This example luckily has the earlier gauges that should hopefully prove more reliable than the later style, while looking better to boot.

It can be tricky to tell if we’ve posted a particular YB11 on the site previously: they all came in the same colors, have low miles, and are generally well cared-for. It’s even trickier when the seller refers to the bike as both a 1997 and a 1998 and appears to have “borrowed” some content from RSBFS in their description… Other than the occasional Termignoni system, aftermarket exhausts and accessories are virtually unheard of, and bolt-on farkles are generally considered undesirable. There appear to have been a few different exhaust hangers used, with and without passenger pegs, although it’s also possible those were fabbed up by the owners when new.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

One of only 650 produced

1998 Bimota 1,002cc YB11 Superleggera 

Frame no. ZESYB1100TR00047

A Rimini-based manufacturer of ducting for heating and ventilation, Bimota soon turned to their first love of motorcycles. Founders Guiseppe Morri and Massimo Tamburrini began manufacturing in the early 1970s and have since built a reputation of exclusive and limited with inimitable Italian styling machines of performance. Using the best cycle parts and an array of the best outside manufacturers’ powerplants, the Bimota was always an uncompromised and expensive foray in to exclusive motorcycling. 

Powered by Yamaha’s superb Thunderace engine, the Superleggera YB11 was Bimota’s last word in Italian exotica of the 1990s. The 131bhp ‘four’ in stock form breathed through a Bimota-designed exhaust system, which could squeeze out a little more power. It was shrouded by the firm’s trademark aluminum beam frame and complemented by some of the finest cycle parts available, including fully adjustable Paioli 51mm forks, fully adjustable Paioli shock, Brembo brakes, 17” Antera wheels and carbon fiber-abound. At 403lbs, the YB11 Superleggera weighed some 80lbs less than the donor bike and its handling and performance were in a different league altogether; as was the price, which at about $20,000, was a staggering 50% more than the Yamaha.

In the late 1990s Bimota went through one of its periodic financial convulsions and production of the YB11 ended in 1999, although a second batch of bikes was completed later using stocks of existing parts. 

The bike offered, an early 1997 example, the 46th built, is presented in excellent condition throughout. With an indicated 8,700 miles, racked up in the first decade of use, the bike has been on static display since 2007, though regularly maintained. A fresh service was performed to ready the bike for sale and no back-fees are due to a California buyer, as the last registration was due over ten years ago.

With only 650 machines produced, this represents a perfect combination of Italian exotica, Japanese reliability, ease of maintenance and power and with such qualifications, is bound to be a future classic.

For additional information, photos, etc. please visit ClassicAvenue.com

Look, the Bimota YB11 is a flawed motorcycle. And maybe the flaws would be unacceptable in a bike that originally sold for the equivalent of $47,000 in today’s money, but they don’t cost that much currently: this one is being offered at $9,900. That seems to be a little bit on the high-side for a 90s Bimota currently, although I doubt that will still be the case in the future. For that kind of money, you’re getting a hell of a lot of exclusivity and performance that will still peel your face back, even today.

-tad

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale
Honda November 28, 2019 posted by

Gym Buddy – 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30

Sport riders tend to head toward the lighter side when working on their skills or the racetrack beckons.  Now closer to thirty years of age than twenty, the NC30 is a perfect choice for a workout partner.  This grey import is even more unusual in the black / red livery.

1992 Honda VFR400R NC30 for sale on eBay

From across the four-lane it would be easy to confuse the NC30 with its 750cc sibling, but the general scale ( and 400R decals ) give it away.  The 59 hp are responsible for motivating only 364 lbs. dry, and it stays under 400 lbs. with full fuel.  Right wrist and gearbox will get exercise, since peak power is at just under 13,000 rpm.  Don’t miss shoulder day too often, since the compact package and 16-front / 18-rear wheel stagger will keep weight on the bars.  The last-gen NC30 had the 360-degree “big bang” crank, shows off the rear wheel courtesy of the left-hand muffler, and sports a 14,500 rpm redline.

A little light on pictures and description, this example calls for more information.  In the meantime we can enjoy the striking livery, new Battlaxes , and carbon muffler, and no evident damage.  From the eBay auction:

I have for sale a very rare color combination 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30, new tires , brakes, forks rebuilt, bike is in a good condition , has aftermarket exhaust , 18,000 kilometers (11,300 miles).

Comes with Vermont registration in my name which can be registered in any state.

Won’t need your headphones at this gym, just earplugs, as the gear driven cams will be music to your ears.  Reviewers advised that the NC30 had fallen off the sharp edge of the 399cc class, but the smooth power delivery, soft spring rates, and high build quality resulted in high overall ratings.  Even with its high ask, this one deserves further investigation.

-donn

Gym Buddy – 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30
Yamaha November 27, 2019 posted by

Wild Wolf: 1986 Suzuki RG500 Walter Wolf

If you’re not into oil drilling and late-1970s Formula 1, you might be nonplussed at the handsome red and purple livery that graces this otherwise-standard 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma. But, under the alliterative name and the cool-if-dated graphics lies a story of early business success followed by a longshot investment in a passion project that just so happened to pay off.

1986 Suzuki RG500 Walter Wolf for sale on eBay

After making his money selling oil drilling parts, Austrian-via-Canada businessman Walter Wolf  in 1975 bought most of the Williams Racing Team and all of Hesketh Racing and made a go at Formula 1 ownership. Soon after, he rebranded the team with his name, hired Jody Scheckter and won the first race his team entered with the new branding. Not bad. After another couple seasons, Wolf got bored and sold the team, but the cool graphics and handsome livery needed somewhere to land.

Enter, the 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma. With Wolf’s colors painted on, Suzuki had a defacto special edition of the already potent twin-crank parallel four two-stroke GP hero. This one is a Japanese market model that landed in South Africa in 2013, where it received a mechanical refresh less than 120 miles ago. Throw some new tires at it, and the 95-horsepower knife’s edge animal will be ready to be a backroads thrill seeker or garage display artifact.

From the eBay listing:

Thanks for taking the time to view my listing on this extremely rare Suzuki RG500 Walter Wolf.
She was imported from Japan in 2013 and formed part of a private collection until recently.
Cosmetically and mechanical the vehicle is an superb condition. She starts on the first kick every time, even from cold with the help of the choke.
The RG has been serviced less than 200 Km ago which included steering neck and wheel bearing replacement as well as complete carburettor refurbishments.
The period correct tyres that’s currently fitted are fine for display purpose however I would recommend that they be replaced if the Gamma is going to be ridden with some proper enthusiasm as Suzuki intended.
Here’s a link to the 360 degree view and engine sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSlSKVJnTEQ&feature=youtu.be

Worldwide shipping cost to:
Europe: $850
U.S.A, Canada :$950
Asia and Australia: $970
Shipping cost includes crating, insurance and handling.
The shipping will be taken care of by a trustworthy reliable agency that specialize in transporting motorcycles across the globe.

Please contact me should you require any additional info.

As you can hear and see, this thing idles like a champ and is in truly immaculate cosmetic condition. At $18,500, this special edition of a rare bike is priced as what it is, but there’s no doubting that some lucky collector will roll home with an absolute gem.

Wild Wolf: 1986 Suzuki RG500 Walter Wolf
BMW November 26, 2019 posted by

Tiger ( but not ) Beat – 1999 BMW R1100S

As often happens, the early years of option paint designs for BMW’s R1100S were some of the best.  This striped example has been somebody’s baby, low miles and dealer serviced.

1999 BMW R1100S for sale on eBay

Largely adapted from the earlier R1100RS sport tourer, the R1100S was introduced for the 1998 model year with the 1085cc engine, which used a single overhead cam driving four valves on each side, resulting in 98 hp.  The innovative front Telelever transferred braking force more horizontally than a typical fork, reducing front end dive.  The Paralever rear combines maintenance-free power delivery with a parallelogram-ish linkage which checked a shaft driver’s tendency to push the bike up under acceleration.  Brakes are factory standard 320mm disks, and the optional ABS is present.  The upper-only fairing flows  over the tank and all the way to the seat, which offers a covered pillion.

Not sure this is the original owner, but all service records are apparently available.  Whoever ordered this R1100S went for the nicer paint, ABS, and heated grips.  Not seeing the bag racks but they are still available if you insist.  Looks very stock and undamaged, though I’d keep it on the concrete and out of the rose garden.  From the eBay auction:

RARE Yellow and Silver Combo BMW R1100S in mint condition!  Regularly serviced at Bloodworth BMW all records available!  Heated Grips ! Extremely low miles and pampered it’s entire life!  Absolutely beautiful and runs excellent , no issues!  Not a finer one available this year!  Normal wear on Grips and Pegs !

BMW had a good run with the R1100S and had a few race paint replicas and race-prep limited editions.  The model jumped the 1150 motor and went right to the 1200S, which soon gave way to a more conventional sportbike in the S1000R.  With a stable ride and enough chops for a once-a-week rider to have a blast, but still not be a maintenance hog.  Kind a high starting bid, this one might be for a rider who has to have this livery, or wants a perfect example.

-donn

 

Tiger ( but not ) Beat – 1999 BMW R1100S
Honda November 24, 2019 posted by

Ride like the wind: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo

In the early 1980s Honda was flexing some serious technological muscles. Sure, they nearly single-handedly created the big bore standard with the CB750 in the 1970s, but the avenues they pursued in the 1980s were a fantastic mix of avant-guarde ideas seeking performance. Imagine the breadth and scope of Honda’s R&D department during this time: From the simple, air cooled single FT500, the wild six cylinder CBX, the sublime V45 Interceptor, the more conventional Hurricane, two strokes like the NSR250 or 400, the narrow angle v-twins, and even the mighty GoldWing touring rig. Every engine configuration was different. And on top of that blows in the amazing CX500 Turbo – the world’s first fully-backed factory Turbo effort. Heady stuff indeed.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo for sale on eBay

With everything that was going on, Honda leveraged an existing platform for the Turbo. In this case, it was the CX500 series, better known as a cruiser in US parlance, but available in a number of different forms (including sport tourers and sporty models) in world markets. This is the same platform that spawned the GL500 SilverWing, the smaller displacement touring bike. So obviously the bones of the Turbo were mighty flexible. But simply bolting a turbine wheel to the exhaust pipe does not a functional motorcycle make. Honda went all out in the quest to tame the bugaboos lurking in the mythological sphere of boost. Tricks included a tiny IHI turbocharger, liquid cooling (already present in the CX series), computerized fuel injection with knock detection that could retard timing, an improved 4-valve cylinder head, forged pistons, different connecting rods and a beefed up bottom end including a stronger crank. With a reported 82 horsepower, the 80 degree, pushrod V-twin had come of age.

From the seller:
1982 Honda CX 500 Turbo. This is a clean titled original condition vehicle as pictures show. It runs very well with no issues. All lighting and accessories operate as designed. Motorcycle was used for land speed record attempts. 3 official records were set with documentation included. Steering damper, boost gauge, AFR meter are installed. Final drive gearing has been changed for top MPH. Original gearing included. Motorcycle is fully legal and can be ridden normally on the street.Tires were new and motorcycle was running when stored. Fuel has been treated and battery has been maintained. Vehicle is sold as is.

Also included is a spare parts bike, engine and many extra parts.

Did you read the seller’s text? Maybe you want to go back and read it again. Yes, this bike was used for land speed record attempts. In some ways, this is a very strange choice. With a top speed of 125 mph, the stock CX500 Turbo is not going to set the salt alight. There is no indication of what the records might have been, but I would love to see them. No notes on what has changed on the bike other than gearing, a steering damper, and an air/fuel ratio meter. Beyond the text, I spy an extra boost gauge and fuel pressure monitor. None of that is a deal killer in my book, although Honda Turbos are pretty heavy on the handlebars at slower speeds – I’m not certain the damper is necessary if you are riding in a legal manner. This one even comes with a spare parts bike!

We have seen a spate of Turbos on RSBFS as of late, and I’m amazed at how dirt cheap they are for the technology Honda invested in their production. These are rare motorcycles that stand out and really do perform, yet they remain unloved and underappreciated. Prices have come up slightly over the years, but we are still near the bottom if you are in the market for something worth holding on to. Check it out here – and contemplate if you need to pick up yet another hobby, such as land speed record collecting. Good Luck!!

MI

Ride like the wind: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo
Laverda November 23, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

Update 2.4.2020: This bike has SOLD at Bonhams Las Vegas for $18,400! Congratulations to all parties! -dc

Update 12.23.2019: Joe’s bikes have been newly photographed by Bonhams in preparation for their upcoming auction at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction, and the photos are now in this listing and gallery. 

The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

When it rains, it pours, and the past couple weeks have seen us feature several different Laverdas. Bikes this old are usually a bit too “classic” to feature regularly on the site, but certain models are just too important not to include at RSBFS, and the hairy-chested Lavereda Jota like today’s featured listing is one of them. As a followup to their successful parallel-twin models, Laverda introduced a three-cylinder in 1973 after teasing prototypes for several years. It wasn’t just a twin with an extra cylinder grafted on, it was an almost entirely new design, with a twin overhead-cam head.

The earliest three-cylinder bikes used a large drum brake at the front, but that was soon updated to a twin-disc setup, although a drum was retained at the rear for a bit longer. Although it wasn’t tuned as aggressively as it could have been, the new, unimaginatively-named “3C” was one of the best-performing bikes available, with a 133mph tested top speed. But stock performance, however impressive, is never enough for some people, and UK Laverda importers Slater Laverda saw plenty of untapped potential and decided to build a bit of a hot rod.

Slater fitted factory racing cams and high-compression pistons, an updated exhaust, and SFC yokes for different front-end geometry. The resulting bike impressed Laverda’s management, and limited production began in 1976. Power for the 981cc engine was up to 90hp and the bike could clear 140mph, making it the fastest production motorcycle at the time. After success racing the bike in the UK, Laverda expanded distribution, and eventually the bike found its way to the US, although bikes originally intended for us were of lower-spec than the UK machines.

The Jota, named for a Spanish dance, is often characterized as a “man’s bike” but could more accurately be described as “a bike for tall people with strong hands.” The triples weigh in at nearly 500lbs dry, with a very tall seat 32″ high, no side stand fitted as standard, and a brutally stiff clutch-pull. Like all Laverdas of the period, they’re solid and overbuilt with power and handling to spare, but a Jota takes work to ride quickly. Or slowly.

Slight clarification of the seller’s information below: all of the early Laverda three-cylinder models, including the 3C and the original Jota used a 180° crank that basically fired “like a four with a miss.” The Jota was basically a hotted-up version of the regular production triple and used the same crank as the 3C. The “two up, one down” crank was great for power and made a pretty distinctive noise, but vibrated a bit more than than was considered acceptable. Later triples switched to a 120° crank after 1981 for increased smoothness, but purists feel like only the 180° bikes are the only “real” Jotas. Personally, I think the 120° bikes sound pretty cool too, but the 180° bikes are definitely more desirable to collectors.

From the Seller: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased. 

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari. 

When you decide, as I did, that the rare, large Italian Sports bikes of the 1970s are a great place to be for collecting. You will for sure want to have a Laverda Jota in your collection. 

Make sure that your Jota is a real Jota with 180 degree firing order, which distinguishes the Jota from other Laverda models. Again, the 180 degree firing order means that the 3-cyclindar engine fires off when two of the cylinders are up and then 180 degrees later when one cylinder is up, it again fires. In other words, the Jota fires two times per 360 degrees and not three times per 360 degree rotation, like the lesser Laverda models. This is what gives the motor its unique power and especially its unbelievable thundering exhaust note. These are big, heavy, and handsome bikes. This one was restored by a Laverda guru a little over 10 years ago and was put in our collection shortly thereafter. If you are talking about these Italian bikes that are designed to look like they have big muscles the Jota certainly exemplifies that. Of course, any of the rare Italian 1970s and 1980s iconic bikes are always great garage art and most often wonderful bikes to ride. The Jota is a man’s bike and not meant for the faint of heart unless you are going to just put it in your living room to look at it.  

There is plenty of information on the Internet about the Jota. There is a very large international club for them. This Jota was restored to perfection and is still in wonderful cosmetic condition and riding form. 

This is certainly a bike for serious collectors and for those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as the Ferrari automobile. I spent a decade looking for the best one and this is the best one I have ever seen.

The real Jotas seldom become available and you should always get the best. When they are available, they are almost never in highly restored condition.  All my bikes are kept on trickle chargers ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice. The Jota is one of those.  

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.  

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

The seller clearly knows bikes, and the collectability of the Jota is undeniable. The only Laverda model more valuable is the earlier SFC, and the Jota is a bit more civilized, although that probably isn’t saying much. Many Jotas came with a half-fairing, but I much prefer my big, burly bruisers to be naked! Wait, that came out wrong… Anyway, the additional wind-blast will be perfect for bulking up your neck muscles to match your newly-muscled hands: I’ve got a couple friends with Laverda triples and the effort required to pull that clutch still blows my mind.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale
Moto Guzzi November 22, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport

Update 2.4.2020: This bike has SOLD at Bonhams for $14,950. Congratulations to all parties! -dc

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

If ever there was a bike to show up to a cruise night on, surely the 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport is at or near the top of the list. The pundits all say it is the defining cafe racer shape, leaving the factory in the era before two-foot long license plate holders and 10,000 candlepower turn signals crept in to defile more modern machines’ lines. We tend to agree.

 

The V7 sport is adorned with absolutely nothing extraneous, its thin-tube frame, shapely tank and minimalist bodywork seem to embrace the prominent heads on the unmistakable Guzzi v-twin. Low bars, spoked wheels and twin chrome megaphone pipes complete the purposeful package.

 

Though it was made to celebrate and recall Guzzi’s mid-century racing successes, the V7 provides antiquated performance, with just 70 horsepower running through a very tall gearset. The mill revs quickly, but the eagerness is deceptive. Couple that with slightly scary drum brakes and a right-side-shift transmission and you’ve got a bike more suited to cruise nights than track days.

This 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport is in immaculate condition. All the paint and brightwork have a brilliant shine and appear to be blemish free. The seller says he stores her bikes in a climate-controlled facility on trickle chargers, so there should be no worries about the mechanical condition of the bike.

From the seller:

1973 Moto Guzzi V7

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

If Italian collector sports bikes could be rated for handling, the Motor Guzzi V7 Sport would certainly score a 98 out of 100 points. They can just read your mind in terms of negotiating the curvy roads. If motorcycles were rated for sex appeal the 1973 Motor Guzzi V7 would score 101 out of 100 points. I don’t know of anything that is quite so simply designed yet pleases the visual senses so much. And, yes, this bike has the rare original exhaust pipes with the fins, and the sand cast brake drums (not the ‘not so pretty’ disc brakes) which is just a little frosting on the cake.

This bike is in top flight condition and runs like a Swiss clock, it is kept on a trickle charger at all times. There are no known issues. Just try and find a nicer one!

This is certainly a bike for serious collectors and for those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as the Ferrari automobile. I spent a decade looking for the best one and this is the best one I have ever seen.

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.

Check out the pictures and be a little amazed – you are seeing the best!

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

 

Even though it doesn’t fit our traditional fare, we’re in love with this classic Goose, thanks mostly to those magnificent lines. Though it may not be an adept canyon carver, there is a place in any collection for a classic, sexy cruise night machine like this one.

Featured Listing: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport
Suzuki November 22, 2019 posted by

Real / Rough – 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750R Limited Edition

Not often seen but always appreciated, the GSX-R homologation special for 1986 had a single seat, alloy fuel tank, and dry clutch.  This SoCal example might have some questions better left unasked, but has great potential as a riding or racing restoration.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750R Limited Edition for sale on eBay

Suzuki had only just introduced the GSX-R750 in 1985 when its light weight and rugged reliability made it a natural for the race course.  To homologate for Superbike racing, the -R was built, not changing the alloy chassis or oil-cooled engine, but adding a few special parts.  To help cope with a 106 hp race machine, brakes and anti-dive were borrowed from the 1100cc model, along with 18-inch wheels front and rear.  The oil-cooled four was coated in a dark gray, and the steering damper is needed more on a 1985 short swingarm model.

The first owner must’ve been hard on a bike, since this auction pictures a past salvage title and damage to lowers on both sides.  It’s a study in contrasts, with the good-looking frame and swingarm but a massive gash in the tank.  Luckily the VIN can be researched and the dry clutch is undeniable.  Many comments in the eBay auction, here are just a few:

When I bought it the fairing was scraped up. the lowers were missing as well as the turn signals along with a few other small bits.
Fluids have been regularly checked and replaced
The carbs have been removed and cleaned
Brake fluid change
Clean fuel added
New battery
Tires have plenty of tread and no cracking
Electrical works as it should
The exhaust is a first gen Yoshimura from R &D America, USA.
It’s loud even with fresh packing
The drive-chain is near new but marks show in the middle of the adjustment of the swing-arm

The scratches on the gas tank and wind screen are compliments of the original owner. I was having the upper fairing repainted by guy that didn’t know what the heck he was doing, the color was wrong and the paint was super thin so I stopped and just left it as you see it.

I have an extra set of the NLA OEM stickers for the gas tank and for the upper fairing.
The lowers and middle side covers are livable.
The ask seems out of line for such a project until you look at some recent listings, these very rare -R’s arrived in just the hundreds, and are likely down to only dozens.  This R750R might return to trackday duty while the restoration is planned, perhaps never to begin.
-donn
Real / Rough – 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750R Limited Edition

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