Monthly Archives: April 2019

Yamaha April 9, 2019 posted by

Small Bites: 1990 Yamaha FZR 400

Always a gem in original guise, the Yamaha FZR400 stands alone as the smaller-than-middleweight that was officially imported into the United States. Unlike the current crop of small-bore US bikes, these 400cc scoots were often reserved for European countries only; power-hungry America was not seen as a viable market by most manufacturers. This was partially borne out by the FZR400 – it was drastically out-sold by the FZR600 and FZR1000 here in the US. Because of that, the FZR400 is relatively rare. But more than just rare, the FZR400 is a fantastic performer…provided you bring reasonable expectations to the table. Today’s example is a 1990 model and looks great.

1990 Yamaha FZR 400 for sale on eBay

When compared to some of the other 400cc set (especially the Honda NC24/27/30 series), the FZR400 is often seen as less technologically advanced. The engine is somewhat conventional and resembles a slimmed down 600cc mill: a liquid cooled, inline four cylinder with four valves per cylinder and a brace of four CV carbs. But with a made-to-fit aluminum frame and (in the case of the later generation ’90 model) a larger aluminum box-section swing arm and larger brakes, the FZR400 is a made to order canyon carver right from the showroom floor.

From the seller:
1990 Yamaha FZR-400 ~ 100% original and unmolested, with only 5022 miles. This is straight out of Mr. Kitty’s personal collection. NEVER raced or modified. Only year in this color combination and Deltabox swingarm. New Pirellis front and rear, just did a head-to-toe service! Carbs, NGK plugs, air filter, anti-freeze flush, brake system flush, and oil change using Bel-Ray semi-synthetic. No rattle can or touch-up paint has ever touched this bike! This little Fizzer is not only rare but ready to ride! Clean Clear NY title ~ $6000

Shipping at buyers expense, NYS residents pay sales tax.

It looks like we have seen this bike before. Back in 2017 Aaron wrote this post on what looks to be this exact bike. It had about 10 fewer miles back then, and finds its way back on the open market with the same pictures. The seller’s eBay account has changed, so it is possible that the bike changed hands somewhere along the way. Either way, the bike looks fantastic in the pictures, and with the rare blue/black livery should really stand out in person. With a recent service and new tires, this is a low mileage Fizzer that is ready to shred. We KNOW that RSBFS readers love these machines – they are sweet handling, unique and tremendous fun! There appears to be some slight marks on the pipe, but nothing that looks like rash. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comment and share your thoughts on the “more common” of the 400cc sub-middleweights. Good Luck!!

MI

Small Bites:  1990 Yamaha FZR 400
BMW April 7, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2007 BMW R1200S

Somehow, weird isn’t exactly the adjective that leaps to my mind when someone says, “BMW.” I mostly picture skinny European men in their late 40s designing ergonomics with a supercomputer, getting every detail down to its most efficient and sensible form. But, then I look at the 2007 BMW R1200S and I have to wonder whether those buttoned-down engineers weren’t enjoying one hell of an acid flashback when they designed this thing.

It’s an incredible machine, and a shame that there are so few of them knocking around. The 1,200cc twin-cylinder boxer engine is both antiquated and a technological marvel, generating 122 horsepower and 83 torques out of architecture nobody but BMW would dare still use. Then there’s the fact that this sportbike, which tipped the scales at 482 pounds ready-to-ride, wears a single-sided swingarm that contains a shaft final drive. Up front, there is BMW’s excellent but odd telelever suspension set up. All this on a bike that ze Germans drew up as a track and canyon carver.

The R1200S bowed in 2006 to replace the long-serving R1100S, and came in substantially lighter and more powerful than the older bike. Power was up thanks to a compression bump and some fueling and timing tweaks, and weight was down thanks to an entirely new steel trellis frame. Despite all that, the R1200S was a tough sell, since it rode somewhere less comfortably than a true sport tourer, but lacked the all-out aggression of an R1 or similar. In ’08, Bimmer replaced it with the even more ludicrous HP2.

This R1200S has been ridden enough to show enthusiasm, but is in absolutely impeccable shape, as you would expect from something this rare and special. It is equipped with a quick-turn throttle, smoked windscreen and tank pads, but is otherwise as it left the dealership.

From the seller:

Grey 2007 BMW R1200S, 14900 mi, Clean Canadian title. Heated grips & ABS. All original except for Techspec tank pads, RRRapido Quickaction throttle pulley & light smoke windscreen. The bike is in extremely good shape. The Pirelli Angels have approx. 25% wear on them.

The bike will come with some specialized tooling; valve adjusment shims, spark plug removal tool, Carbtune Pro synchronizer.

If you are looking here I don’t have to explain how rare and how good this bike is.

Located in Montreal, Canada.

Asking price, 6900 USD.
Contact Steve: stevemongrain74@gmail.com

For $6,900, you’re paying Suzuki DRZ money for a very rare, very fast and very cool and entirely out there machine. If you’re looking for a long-term do-it-all bike, here’s your mount.

Featured Listing: 2007 BMW R1200S
Yamaha April 6, 2019 posted by

Sorted: 1986 Yamaha RZ500 for Sale

Compared to a modern superbike, the fire-breathing performance of vintage two-stroke race replicas maybe isn’t quite as wild as their reputation would suggest. At the time, they were light and very powerful, but weren’t exactly at Grand Prix extremes of either even then. Modern machines have levels of rigidity, suspension response, and electronic assistance an old smoker like this Yamaha RZ500 could only dream of, back in the hazy 1980s. But an RZ500 still has the goods to be hustled along a canyon road, and this example has had a couple of updates to the running gear to help it hang with newer bikes.

Also known as the RD500LC in Europe and the RZV500R in Japan, the RZ500 was powered by a a liquid-cooled 50° two-stroke V4 that featured twin cranks, a pair of YPVS power valves, a balance shaft to smooth things out, and magnesium components to reduce weight. Lubrication for the two-stroke was handled by Yamaha’s Autolube oil-injection and the transmission had six speeds. At the front was a 16″ wheel and a set of anti-dive forks matched to an underslung rear shock and an 18″ hoop out back, limiting a modern rider’s access to good performance rubber.

The Yamaha RZ500 made a claimed 88hp and weighed in at 436lbs wet, while a 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 of the same period made a claimed 106hp and weighed 465lbs wet, so performance was pretty similar on paper. However, the character of the two bikes couldn’t be more different. With heavy two-stroke smoke dripping out of the four exhaust tips and the crackle and zing of the engine, you have to work the RZ500 much harder, in spite of a pair of power valves designed to improve midrange response.

Interestingly, the Japanese market bikes received an aluminum frame to offset the reduction in power required by government restrictions. I always wonder why, since this was a premium sportbike to begin with, they didn’t just fit the aluminum frames to all of them. Certainly, if you wanted to build your dream RZ500 and throw originality to the wind, that’s what you’d probably do. This particular bike follows the path of “thoughtful evolution” and includes some components from later machines that should help the bike’s cornering prowess.

It’s maybe not a purist’s museum piece, with the later YZF750 front end and 17″ wheels. But, while the RZ500 was commendably light and agile by mid-80s standards, an update to the fork and brakes should help bring the bike closer to modern feel, while the ZX6 wheels will make tire choice much simpler, and give the new owner access to modern levels of grip.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Yamaha RZ500 for Sale

We are a Yamaha dealer selling this bike for a 2 stroke collector’s estate. This is a great example of a 1986 Yamaha RZ500. It has a clear Pennsylvania title (has been here since at least 2006) but was originally sold in Canada. VIN is JYA52X007GA007150. The odometer reads 73 miles but since the KM speedo was replaced the actual odometer is aprox. 7500 km with about 1000 km since rebuild.

Cosmetic condition as you can see in the pics is excellent. Bodywork is all OEM including solo cowl. We’ve included a owner’s manual and service manual – all in good shape. There is 1 original factory key and 1 copy. Frame up restoration done in 2006. At that time, all seals were replaced, cylinders honed (std bore)

We’ve had our resident two-stroke tech go through the bike after a short storage. Air cleaner was replaced, tank drained, carbs removed and thoroughly cleaned, etc. Plugs replaced, fresh trans oil. Bike started easily and runs well with no clutch slippage. Left fork seal has slight seep and as any two stroke, it could take more fussing to get carburation perfect. Trans shifts very well but clutch pull a bit heavy (upgraded springs?). Brakes solid and chatter free. This is a well sorted RZ.

Upgrades and mods include but are not limited to:

  • YZF750 complete USD front end and brakes.
  • JMC custom polished swingarm
  • Penske remote reservoir rear shock
  • Alex Mayes chambers – Rare!
  • Carbon Tech low tension reeds (porting is stock)
  • ZX6 wheels (both wheels powder coated red)
  • Magnesium left engine cover
  • Braided brake lines
  • Hindsight mirrors
  • MPH speedometer
  • Zero Gravity windscreen
  • Carbon fiber meter panel

There is NO reserve or buy-it-now price on this item

Other RZ brochures and some parts are available but are not included with this bike.

Pick up at our dealership in Pennsylvania (19512) has no charge of course, but delivery by truck or international shipping is the responsibility of the buyer. 

As the seller describes it, “this is a well sorted RZ,” a daily rider that captures the feel of an earlier era of performance, with a couple modern touches. Unfortunately, there are no takers yet at the $13,000 starting bid, with just a few hours left on the auction. Is it too early in the season? Were the modifications just a bridge too far? Has the interest in two-strokes plateaued?

-tad

Sorted: 1986 Yamaha RZ500 for Sale
Yamaha April 5, 2019 posted by

Punching above its weight: 1976 Yamaha RD400

The 1976 Yamaha RD400 came out screaming in 1976, a mag-wheeled exclamation point on Yamaha’s range of popular, fast-paced two strokes. To make sure the message landed, Yamaha re-tooled its factory to build the RD400’s parallel twin, which was more than just a rebored version of the RD350’s mill. A longer stroke necessitated new crankcases, which meant the factory needed new tooling. That was a gutsy move, as even then street two strokes had fully entered their sunset years.

1976 Yamaha RD400 for sale on eBay

The little beast knocked out 45-ish horsepower, and had a slightly flexy steel frame and a delicious tendency to pull the front wheel on acceleration. By most accounts, the single-disc front and rear brakes were terrifying, which made the 106 mph top end seem that much more astronomical.

This 1976 Yamaha RD400 has had a fairly recent restoration, which featured a rebuilt engine, new paint, new tires and tubes, new touch points and rebuilt carburetors. It’s ready to look and play the part this riding season. The reserve has not been met, but the seller says he is open to offers.

From the eBay listing:

This is a very clean matching #’s RD 400. Rebuilt engine , new tires & tubes. Fresh paint & decals.
Rebuilt carbs. New grips. Nice clear gauges. Good controls. Original mirrors. Aftermarket OEM style signals. Good chrome with slight patina. All stock with the exception of the seat & paint. Very clean rider for the summer.
Open to offers.

A $750.00 Non- Refundable Pay Pal deposit is due within 48 hours. Full payment via bank check or wire transfer due within 7 days and before you come to pick it up. Funds must clear before pick up. NO PAY PAL FOR THE BALANCE!!!! Pick up due with in 30 days. I have the necessary paperwork to transfer ownership. You must have 10 or more recent feedback. Bidders with less then 10 feed back will have to contact me before bidding or be canceled. If you are the winning bidder. Please plan on completing the transaction. Sold as is.

On first blush, the RD400 looks like just another soldier in the legion of UJMs that were spat out in the 1970s, but it carries some extra panache and a bunch of extra punch. Two strokes of its ilk are a slice of life from a time before strict emissions regulations, and a window into motorcycling’s truly wild years.

Punching above its weight: 1976 Yamaha RD400
Ducati April 4, 2019 posted by

Godfather: 1998 Ducati 916

In 1994 Ducati unleashed the equivalent of a nuclear weapon in the face of a sport bike field full of conventional weaponry. That year Ducati introduced the legendary 916 – and commenced an enviable run of WSBK world titles (four within a five-year span). Simultaneously offering a quantum leap in twin-cylinder performance (horsepower, rev limits, packaging), the 916 was also stunningly beautiful. Even today the lines on a 916 are distinctive and striking. From the twin narrow headlights, to the high mounted exhaust cans, to the single sided swing arm with endurance-styled quick-change rear wheel, to the straight-sectioned chrome-moly chassis, nearly everything on the 916 forced us to rethink what we knew about how motorcycles were designed and how they performed.

1998 Ducati 916 for sale on eBay

The original 916 spanned from 1994 through 1998 – eventually making way for the 996, and ultimately the 998. But even in the first generation of this model, Ducati spared little expense on components. The 916 was a fair sight more expensive than contemporary Japanese machines, making it more exclusive. But far from a glittering farkle with no real purpose, the glory of the 916 was that it worked. It worked for all of the moto magazine editors and testers. It worked at the racetrack. And thanks to its good looks, it worked on the showroom as well. Ducati created a massive following with the 916 as designer Massimo Tamburini played off speed and style like his own personal yin and yang. To say it was a winner is stating the obvious… after it already happened.

From the seller:
I have a nice 1998 ducati 916 that has been part of my collection for about 4 years
bike is nice and near mint shape has about 7732 miles .bike always starts and rides nice
valves have been adjusted in this machine. comes with a clear title. bike does have some add ons as you see in the pics
vin#zdm1sb8s6wb013367
asking 8500

Today the 916 is not quite the performance explosion it was 25 years ago; time, after all, will catch up with all of us. But there is no denying that it stands strong and proud despite the time that has passed. There is no embarrassment when showing up on a 916 – whether it is a local bike nite event, a weekend canyon ride, or even a track day with your buddies. The 916 looks great, pulls strong and handles well. You just need to remember that this WAS cutting edge during its time – but technology inexorably creeps forward. Take the brakes, for example. The 916 shipped with top-shelf Brembo calipers clamping down on huge disks. But modern riders won’t confuse them for monoblock calipers and radial master cylinders. Nor will the 114 horsepower astound a modern liter bike rider. Again, it was more than adequate in the day, but by today’s numbers is not truly remarkable. But even today few motorcycles have represented the total package of looks, performance and commercial success.

Today’s example is a clean 1998 model (last year of the original 916 run). It has but 7,700 miles on the clock, which equates to fewer than 400 miles a year. There are a few add ons that I can see – the Termis and ubiquitous open clutch cover are but two – but nothing appears to have been hacked or unconditionally changed. I could do without the stickers, but those can be non-destructively removed. The seller even refers to a recent maintenance (a four-valve desmo adjustment is not an insignificant task when replacing shims), although there is no mention of when the belts were last changed. Still, this is a good looking specimen of a fantastic motorcycle. The 916 is a collectible motorcycle, and prices are on the rise. The earliest, cleanest and rarest examples of the 916 have risen most quickly, but even the base model is growing in value. This one has an opening ask of $7,999, with reserve in place. The ad text states an $8,500 asking price, so it looks like the reserve might be set close to the opening ask. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Godfather: 1998 Ducati 916
MV Agusta April 3, 2019 posted by

Meccanica Verghera: 2009 MV Agusta F4 1078 312RR

Originally conceived as an aviation company, famed motorcycle marque MV Augusta turned to the two-wheeled world after World War II in a move to survive European post war economics. With transportation being a key element and need, the firm began at the small end of the spectrum and only grew from there. From transportation to bikes with more sporting intent to reaching the very pinnacle of the racing scene, MV Agusta has long been a powerhouse in the motorcycling community. And it is a community; many of the early employees of MV Agusta were from the family aviation business. And let’s not forget Claudio Castiglioni’s involvement in the firm, having been at the helm during more than one of the corporate turnarounds. It is the latter incarnations of the company that produced the F4 (the world’s most beautiful motorcycle according to some) and from that F4 spawned many special models. One such rarity was the hyper 312RR.

2009 MV Agusta F4 1078 312RR for sale on eBay

If speed is king, the MV Agusta F4 312RR set out to become the ruler of the land. The name of the bike – 312 – refers to the top speed in kilometers per hour. That equates to about 194 MPH in Americanese. The 312RR started life out as a F4 1000 R model, and MV-A engineers played with internals to pile on the horsepower. The original 312R (2007 – only a single R) offered a stout 9 HP increase over the already-over-the-top standard R bike. The second generation model (2009 – two Rs in the name) offered the 1078cc engine and 190 horses – another 7+ over the previous gen. By 2010 the top speed party was all over, the final version of the bike being mechanically the same Gen II machine, but with “312 RR Edizione Finale” graphics and exclusivity generated by only 30 units total.

From the seller:
Very Rare 2009 Mv Agusta F4 1078 312RR in perfect condition, Priced to sell fast as im moving, only 1799 miles, bike is from North Carolina Dealership and has a North Carolina title and the bill of sale, bike is hand made in Italy engine was made by Ferrari 190 hp fast is a understatement best handling bike ever. I didn’t like the original seat so a changed it to red black and silver suede and leather , looks great and feels better. Too much to say I’m selling my baby and a few others in my collection New tires on it and just serviced needs nothing and in Brand new condition never in rain.. Serious buyers please, questions please ask. bike will sell. The bike comes with the stand all keys books, alarm, gps, charger and cover. Can arrange shipping for a extra fee. Bike is located in Miami Florida. North Carolina Clear Title.

The 312RR is undoubtedly rare-ish out in the real world. Part of this is due to the low volume production of MV Agusta, and the limited number of units bestowed upon the various editions. The other part if it is that these were simply horrendously expensive motorcycles to begin with. Often branded as the Ferrari or Lamborghini of motorcycles, F4 Limited Edition models had sticker prices 4x or more when compared to the more readily available (and serviceable) Japanese cutting-edge sport bikes. That kept ownership numbers low, and exclusivity high. The downside is that several MV Agusta models have not really translated that exclusivity into resale dollars. While stronger than contemporary Japanese peers on the resale side, the ratio has certainly dropped. This is true for the base F4 models as well as some of the lesser special editions – although the Senna, CC, and Claudio continue to hold value (or appreciate).

This particular 312RR looks very, very good. Mileage is low, and at least from the pictures there are no major red flags. The opening bid is a very fair (low?) $8k, which means that you could be riding away on an iconic Italian machine for a song. Sure, the 312RR will be eclipsed by more modern machinery (time has a way of putting everything in its place), but this is still a damn fine motorcycle that will exceed the limits of most riders – and looks 200 MPH even when sitting still. We will ignore the controversy regarding the actual top speed of the bike given the majority of our readers are in the US where limits are much, much lower. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on the F4. Any 312R or RR owners out there? Share your stories. Good Luck!!

MI

Meccanica Verghera: 2009 MV Agusta F4 1078 312RR
Honda April 2, 2019 posted by

Tropical Depression: 1988 Honda CBR250R

Deep in the vaults of exotic hardware purposely kept from the shores of America include examples such as this magnificent 1988 Honda CBR250R. There were extremely rare in the US during the late 1980s and 1990s – which is amusing since the venerable 250 Ninja was imported during the same period of time. But the CBR250R was the far sharper of the two, and was destined for the small-cube crazy home market of Japan where quarter liter racers dominate. The US had to make due with a relatively tame parallel twin that practically shrieked “entry-level-economy.” But in the collector market today, the CBR250R has become easier to find, as evidenced by the number listed on these pages over the years. Still, they should be considered to be quite rare and finding one in good condition is the same thrill as with any other unique bike.

1988 Honda CBR250R for sale on eBay

The CBR250R does some shrieking of its own, but that is largely due to the sheer number of revs this bike requires in order to produce forward movement. A liquid cooled inline four cylinder with four valves per pot and a 11.5:1 compression ratio, the CBR250R relies on a 18,000(!) redline to achieve a respectable 40 – 45 horsepower. With full sport bodywork, twin headlamps and a single, beefy front disk (certainly enough to stop this 330 pounds dry machine), the CBR250R was marketed as part of the Hurricane lineup in some European markets. Given that the Hurricane model range scaled up to the mighty 1000F, you might think of this as more of a squall.

From the seller:
This very rare MC19 CBR250R is the 963rd bike produced for the 1988 production run. It was purchased about a year ago with 318km on the speedometer (about 190 original miles). It was imported by a dealer in UT and purchased in running condition. It still had the original 1987 date code tires on it, which were badly cracked, so a new set of Avon tires were installed. The carburetors were removed, re-jetted and installed on new OEM intake manifolds. The rear sprocket was changed from 54 to 52 and finally to 50 teeth, in order to reduce highway cruising rpms by about 1,000.

These bikes weigh 350lbs wet and are rated at 45 horsepower at 14,500rpms. The redline is at 18k rpms and the engine will run up to redline quite willingly. With stock gearing the bikes were rated at 110 mph top speeds.

This bike sat in Japan for 30 years, perhaps at a dealership or in a personal collection. It has a fair amount of patina on alloy parts and in little nooks and crannies in the engine bay area. If you love to polish aluminum, you can make this bike really shine again. The frame is aluminum.

These bikes were never imported/sold in the US and only after they are 25 years old can they be brought into the country and legally registered in CA and elsewhere. Yes, the bike IS registered with its 11 digit serial number!

I do have PDF files of the service manual in English and there are a few spare parts, including the rear sprockets. The oil filter is a common Honda part. The thermostat was replaced with a 180 degree unit, which keeps the little engine cooler than when they have the stock 190 degree unit installed.

A new choke cable was installed. These bikes have electric fuel pumps and inline filters.

A few paint scratches are evident here and there. The original OEM factory windscreen is checked but not cracked. One of the forward fairing tabs is broken, but held in place with the original modified nut-plate.

Riding these bikes is an unreal experience, especially when you rev it up past 14k rpms. You can easily imagine yourself as being Mike Hailwood at the IOM races, with the little four screaming out unimaginable rpms through the gears.

Due to recent ankle surgery, I am no longer able to ride the bike as before, so sadly must let it go to an appreciative new owner. Current miles are about 2,995 km, which is about 1,800 miles. This is one of my favorite bikes of all times… and I have owned hundreds of Hondas of all types and sizes. I will miss it dearly and will enjoy the memories that it gave me over the past year.

This particular CBR250R has an interesting history and shows how rare these bikes are… and how small our collecting community really is. This bike was sold on the pages of RSBFS a few years back, as highlighted in this post by Tad. And while the VIN number remains the same, the mileage has grown from 192 up to 1,800. What has not grown is the price – the Buy It Now figure is right at the $6k mark, just like the earlier sale. I’ve grabbed one of the photos from that post (above), as the current seller has not included very many. There are a few more sharp, high-res photos available via the older post – although please note they do not necessarily represent the bike as it sits today. Check out the current advert here, and then imagine what 18,000 RPM sounds like as you strafe the apexes of your favorite canyon. Good Luck!!

MI

Tropical Depression: 1988 Honda CBR250R
Moto Guzzi April 1, 2019 posted by

Italian Sweetheart: 1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza

Moto Guzzi has a long and storied history in the annals of motorcycling. Among the oldest motorcycle manufacturer – and THE oldest if you consider the “…in contiguous operation…” caveat (simultaneously turning a blind eye to the few lean years where they were between owners and technically not in production) – the Guzzi trademark is really the splayed out V-twin look. Turning the cylinders across the bike rather than inline (like an Aprilia, Honda or H-D) allows the power to flow through the crankshaft and provides direct input into the transmission and final shaft drive without having to make any 90 degree turns. Much like a BMW with folded-up cylinders, Moto Guzzi has resolutely clung to this configuration as if nostalgia were the sole meaning of existence. Modern examples of
the transversal V-twin* (* official Guzzi marketing nomenclature) have introduced updated technology, but to this day the twin cylinder arrangement remains as an anchor feature of the M-G brand.

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza for sale on eBay

The V50 Monza was the baby brother to the V7 and LeMans models. Displacing a modest 500cc and producing an even more modest 48 horsepower, the Monza configuration provided for bigger valves and different carbs over that of the standard V50. With a dry weight of 355 pounds, the Monza is no high performance scooter. But to compare quarter mile times (somewhat on par with a Toyota Prius) really misses the intent of the V50 platform. Intending to introduce an entirely new group of riders to the mystique and cachet of the Moto Guzzi brand, the V50 was an attempt to create a smaller, more approachable and more affordable slot in the Moto Guzzi lineup. Sadly the buying public did not line up to purchase the V50 (or its even smaller brother, the V35), making this an often overlooked motorcycle.

From the seller:
The Moto Guzzi V50 Monza’s were a real gem that is often overlooked. There are said to be only about 100 of them that were sold in the United States. They are essentially a baby LeMans, but their lower weight and smaller size make them a very nice bike for back roads or local cruising. They are smooth, dependable, reasonably fast, and the design is very attractive. You just have to love the alligator-patterned seat vinyl. No plastics (to speak of) and lots of beautifully cast aluminum.

I’ve had this 29,895 mile bike for 5 years and its one of my favorite drives. We have rebuilt the carbs and done all maintenance regularly. There are no mechanical or electrical or cosmetic issues. The tires are a few years old and have nearly all there tread. While the bike has a lot of miles, it is impeccable. There are no paint blemishes, wear, scratches, or fading of any sort. This is a pristine survivor. No excuses.

I’m not sure the silencers are OEM, but they came with the bike. It sounds great, The Guzzi sound is pretty unique. There is no other bike that sounds like these narrow sideways V’s. Sort of an Italian Harley sound. The bike made a fair amniunt of power for the day. The 45 hp motor was in part due to the fairly novel use of Heron heads. The other small bike of the era that used them was the iconic Moto Morini 3 1/2. Incredibly smooth ride due to the shaft drive (which is beautifully enclosed in the right rear swing arm).

My only additions to the bike was to install the beautiful Alberts bar-end mirrors, new tires, and a new OEM windscreen.

Time is said to heal all wounds, and eventually makes (nearly) everything valuable again (ever surf eBay for fun?). With 38 years and nearly 30,000 miles behind it, this 1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza looks pretty incredible. The colors are vibrant and the instrument cluster looks unblemished (and no rash on the top of the triple trees!). There is some discoloration and staining on the cases and cylinder heads which is simply an indication of normal use. From the pictures this looks like a time capsule, and with legendary Guzzi longevity this would be a bike to putt around on for decades to come. The current bid on this beauty is a paltry $3,200, with reserve still in place. Depending where that reserve is set, this baby Guzzi could be a bargain in the making. It’s hard to believe the seller would let it go for peanuts after lavishing such care on this Italian beauty, but as we see so few of these rare models come across our pages it is definitely worth a look. Into classic Moto Guzzi models? Check this one out here, and then be sure and jump back to the comments and share your thoughts and experience with this lesser known example. Good Luck!!

MI

Italian Sweetheart:  1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza

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