Monthly Archives: April 2019

MV Agusta April 20, 2019 posted by

Hypothesis: 1976 MV Agusta 350 Ipotesi

In the way cool archives of rare bikes there are undoubtedly some weird and wonderful ones. There are always surprises and bikes not many people have heard of, and there are always some real gems hiding behind the uber popular homologation crowd. Today’s find, a 1976 MV Agusta 350 is the perfect of example of the weird and wonderful. Looking a bit like a single (it’s a twin), a bit like a two stroke (it’s a 4-cycle) and a bit like a much larger bike, it is clear that this MV Agusta is all Italian by the “nothing extra is needed here” style.

1976 MV Agusta 350 Ipotesi for sale on eBay

The Ipotesi is a small scale parallel twin. It has an overhead cam (only one) to operate the two valves per cylinder. A pair of small Dellortos handle the intake side of things, while a pair of chrome pipes take care of the exhaust. At 350cc this is hardly a powerhouse. but with air cooling and appropriately sized components, it is hardly a heavyweight. With 30-ish HP on tap (comparing reasonably to the current crop of small-bore bikes), the little 350cc engine is pushing only 350 pounds of bike. Brakes look tiny (those are 220mm rotors all around), but with less weight and speed comes less need for larger, heavier hardware. Clip ons are low and tight; perfect to practice that aerodynamic tuck!

From the seller:
This 1976 MV Agusta 350 Ipotesi was purchased by me from the original owner in the U.K. in the late 1990’s. It has about 6,500 km on it but not long ago I had the speedometer repaired and it was reset to zero km. The current speedometer reading of 394 km is from my riding of the bike after the repaired speedometer was returned to me. This motorcycle has a California title and current California registration. The bike is an easy kick starter and I ride it frequently around San Francisco and the Bay Area. The bike is fully sorted and needs nothing: you can get on it and ride it and enjoy it! The motorcycle is entirely correct and original and unrestored. There are some minor paint touch up areas on the tail section behind the seat. The most noticeable paint flaw is the touched-up area on the rear edge of the front fender, shown in one of the photos. I wanted to keep all of the paint on this motorcycle original, so I did not repaint the entire front fender. Some of the paint on the instrument panel is worn, but I wanted to keep that paint original and have not touched it up. There is a photo attached of the instruments and the surrounding panel. Other than these paint issues, the bike is in extremely good original condition. The Heidenau tires are nearly new, but they are the correct size per original. You won’t find a better Ipotesi for sale in the US or another Ipotesi for sale in the US: MV Agusta 350 Ipotesi motorcycles were never officially imported to the U.S. so any here now would have been privately imported. Therefore, there are very few here. Of the few MV Agusta 350 Ipotesi motorcycles in the US, I doubt too many are fully sorted and have current registration and are being ridden such as this one is.

We don’t see many pre-F4 MV Agustas in the States, much less anything that displaces less than 500cc. This Ipotesi is a fantastic looking motorcycle. It seems impossibly narrow, yet retains the classic proportions of a much larger bike. The paintwork shines in the sun, and the odd elements of what make up this little 350 blend together to make something special. It’s far from museum perfect, but it still looks great anyway. Value? Too rare in the US to really put a number on it; we simply have no historical data on which to base an assumption. The seller is asking for $11k OBO – that might seem high for a 350 scoot, but not a lot of dosh for a very unique MV Agusta. Check it out here, and then jump to the Comments section and share your thoughts on this cool little bike. Good Luck!!

MI

Hypothesis:  1976 MV Agusta 350 Ipotesi
Moto Guzzi April 19, 2019 posted by

Idiosyncratic – 1987 Moto Guzzi Le Mans 1000SE

The Le Mans’ long history included a run of just 100 Special Editions for 1987, in classic red and white.  This NorCal example is in surprising condition for its age and miles.

1987 Moto Guzzi Le Mans 1000 SE for sale on eBay

The Le Mans was already venerable in 1987, having been introduced in 1976, and the 1000 SE was essentially a Mk. IV design with a few DeTomaso-era details.  Based on the square-head Le Mans III, the 948cc longitudinal twin pushes 81 hp at a modest 7,400 rpm.  The crankshaft sits low in the traditional downtube frame, the long chassis providing a stable platform, made a little snappier by the 16-inch front wheel.  Classic eighties livery is making a high speed pass when parked.

Having somehow survived 30-plus years and almost 28,000 miles, this SE has just a few scrapes to show for it.  K&N filters, head guards, and Corbin seat are signature updates.  Not much maintenance history in the comments but the compromise handlebars are admitted in the eBay auction:

This bike is all original except that the stock clip-on handle bars have been replaced by a standard handle bar. The handle bar now on the bike makes for a more comfortable riding position. Very good condition, fully sorted, runs well, needs absolutely nothing. I ride this bike frequently around the San Francisco Bay area. California title and current registration. The only obvious cosmetic flaw is a small scratch on the left rear seat bodywork, shown in one photo. The bike is entirely unrestored with all original paint, decals, and seat. A Corbin seat also comes with the bike and is shown in one photo.

The Le Mans 1000 reviewed as a European thoroughbred, not at the leading edge of technology but a torquey bullet.  Some may find it a bit of an ask for such a rider, but as they say, no more are being made.  Despite its rubs and chips, this one is complete, nearly correct, and operational.

-donn

Idiosyncratic – 1987 Moto Guzzi Le Mans 1000SE
Laverda April 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale

This is an unusual opportunity to buy a rough-and-tumble, forged-in-fire vintage racing Laverda. If you’re searching for a display piece to adorn your Manhattan loft, you should probably look elsewhere. This SFC-spec SF2 was made to run, and run hard. It’s all killer and no filler, built to race. Period. The original SFC is one of the most desirable and iconic sportbikes of the 1970s, with a stylish half-fairing, bright orange paint, and solo tail. The 744cc parallel twin was supposedly heavily influenced by Honda’s CB77 Superhawk engine, and Laverda built their bikes to last, with five main bearings in the engine, electrical components from Nippon-Denso, ignition components from Bosch, and a Verlicchi frame, and suspension from Marzocchi.

The result was the perfect basis for an endurance racer, and Laverda whipped up a hand-built factory special to capitalize on that potential. The SFC or “Super Freni Competizione,” which translates to “Super Competition Brakes.” The engine featured the usual race-oriented updates: a lighter crank, polished connecting rods, bigger valves, and high-comp pistons. 36mm carbs fed the high-performance engine and produced as much as 80hp, depending on the year, while a two-into-one exhaust made sure everyone within miles could count every one of them.

The original SFC was technically a road-legal bike, but it was stiffly-sprung, over-carbureted, and generally temperamental. Many that have come up for sale have their road-legal parts in a box that comes with the bike, since they really were a bit of an afterthought anyway. Even that solo tail is specifically shaped to include a round numberplate, as you can see. The bike was a literal “racebike for the road” in a way that you just don’t really see anymore. Or maybe it’s just that all serious sportbikes are racebikes for the road, but they’re just not really all that much of a compromise now, with 200hp, a gel touring seat, and heated grips…

This particular bike isn’t an authentic Laverda SFC, it’s a high quality replica built from the ground up using a regular production SF2 with many trick parts, and uses the powerful twin-disc front brake setup from the later bikes that should work much better on track than the earlier drum, although it doesn’t look quite as sexy. Speaking of the track: this started out as a regular road bike, but it’s been converted to race duty and campaigned for years by Larry at New York City Motorcycles [who is also selling his Harley Davidson XR750 here on our site], who is currently based, ironically, in Venice, CA.

His original eBay listing tells a great story about how the bike came to be: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale

Where to begin…

Gorizia, Italy (on the Northeast corner of Italy 1km from Slovenia). July 2012.

That is when this Laverda came into real life, from the pages of every conceivable magazine and poster since childhood.  In fact the first time I laid eyes on a Laverda 750SFC was at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City in 1998, at its renowned exhibition, Art of the Motorcycle. If I wasn’t already hooked, now I was obsessed.

In the years since that life changing show, I was always on the “lookout”.  Sorta like John Walsh chasing fugitives!  I can recall being wide awake at 3am looking in remote places, the mideast, japan and of course the US and Europe.

I couldn’t believe my eyes in the summer of 2012.  In fact, I couldn’t understand the Italian listing on eBay Italy, either.   When the sun rose the next morning I was at my neighbor’s door, an Italian.  Within hours we had the bike’s owner on a conference call.  I had a million questions.  My neighbor just wanted to go to work.

I learned that the motorcycle was built to race throughout Italy by an engineer who also owned a genuine SFC.  Too precious to race, he saw no obstacle to making an exact clone, particularly the specification of the motor:

  • 10.8:1  Compression
  • Carillo Rods
  • SFC Crank
  • SFC Cams
  • SFC Pistons, valves and porting
  • 36 mm Dell’Ortos

The rest is simply bodywork… on an SF2 frame. Other than the factory 750SFC’s VIN series and frame insignia depicting that its a factory SFC, this bike is exactly the same in specification and appearance of a 1974 (Disc brake front) 750SFC.

The last thing I thought about doing when I bought, imported and titled it in the US, was racing it. So it was cosmetically and exhaustively restored as a streetbike. Laverda’s are known to have indestructible motors. And this was no exception. When it cleared customs it set off car alarms a quarter mile away…

My good friend Kenny Cummings, the owner of NYC Norton had been taking care of another parallel twin of mine, a Norton Commando. And every few weeks Kenny would be “gone racing.” So it’s technically his fault. I caught the bug. And became just as obsessed about racing as Laverdas. 

I raced two years before I became obsessed with the Laverda for a different reason. Though it was exhilarating to ride as a streetbike (outside of New York City where I lived), I soon learned this was a motorcycle that was designed, built and wanted to race. Long story short(er), that’s what it became.

The Laverda’s trophies include AHRMA National Series 5th Place in Formula 750 in 2015, 3rd Place AHRMA Pacific Crown, and various podiums at some of the most storied racetracks in America.

Recent marriage and move to Japan has put new goals on the horizon. Its time for my beloved Laverda to go from my back burner into the hands of someone whose passion picks up where mine leaves off.

The fuel tank is a Wolfgang Haerter special edition alumnium tank. 

As mentioned, it has never crashed. It could benefit from some TLC ie, valves adjusted, carbs rebuilt. A simplified wiring harness – though what’s on the bike now is perfectly functional for its current set up as a racer.

So much to list, these are the key pluses and minuses:

*The windscreen is cracked – it was “stitched” together with zip ties and continued racing. I always thought it adds character 🙂

  • One Sidecover flew off the bike at Willow Springs during competition. It was recovered but in a mangled condition (see photo)
  • Starter and generator (included; sprag gear is worn and should be replaced) were removed for racing; running a “total loss” set up
  • Needs a new battery
  • Missing the ignition key: bypassed
  • Runs an EMC electronic ignition (excellent) from Wolfgang Haerter
  • Slight weep from gas tank rubbing the frame. New Owner should either have the seam rewelded or coat the tank with Caswell
  • YSS Shocks in rear and Works Performance Springs in Front – Original Marzochi shocks included
  • Powdercoated frame completed 2014
  • No rust anywhere
  • 2 into 1 Conti exhaust
  • New York Title in my name
  • Street faring, street seat, tachometer included
  • Set of rear sprockets included
  • Uses an SFC’s shop manual, not an SF2’s.  Reproduced copy included
  • New racing foot pegs
  • Original Laverda clubman bars
  • Other extras all included

The motorcycle is sold as is, where is, and there are no warranties expressed nor implied. Judge the photos and make your own assessment of the bike’s condition, rather than rely on my opinion and/or description. Questions and clarifications are encouraged. These are my personal opin Bidders must be certain of their commitment before bidding, as once its submitted. If you win it, you bought it. No time for nonsense please. Bidders with less than 10 or any negative feedback must contact me prior to bidding or else expect your bid to be cancelled and removed.

This motorcycle requires thorough inspection and recommissioning before running or riding. Know what you are buying before you bid. If you don’t have the expertise and/or the budget, with all due respect, this is not the bike for you. 

New York City Motorcycles (nycmc dot com) is reasonably well known in the vintage motorcycle community and this is not the only platform for offering the bike. Therefore please consider not waiting until the final seconds of the auction to bid. Because while you’re waiting to pull the trigger, if a fair offer arrives from elsewhere and there is not a comparable bid here, the auction will instantly disappear from your watched items.

Multiples of the start price has been invested in this motorcycle. It was a privilege to lose money on this fabulous machine. Boyhood dreams fulfilled and then some 🙂

Motorcycle is located in Venice, CA. I will work with your shipper but its your responsibility.

On a personal note, I’ve come across this bike and owner before: I bumped into him at a 2014 AHRMA event in South Jersey, where I took the picture above. He was wrenching on this bike under a popup tent and, when I came over to babble excitedly about the Laverda, he stopped what he was doing to fire it up for me, a gleeful grin on his face. To me, that says about all you need to know about his passion and enthusiasm. The bike obviously isn’t a “real” SFC, but it is a real Laverda, and the engine specifications are, as he describes, SFC-spec. With real SFC prices headed into six-figures, they’re less and less likely to be raced as intended. Real or not, this Laverda won’t be cheap to buy or run, but is your best bet if you want to actually ride one of these fire-breathing Italian twins in anger.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale
Kawasaki April 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R

This Featured Listing is for our friends at Iconic Motorbikes. Thanks as always for supporting the site guys! -dc

This is not the bright-green, dual headlight monster most people call to mind when you say, “750cc Kawasaki Ninja.” Instead of the truly featherweight lairiness of the Kawasaki ZX-7R, the 1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R delivers a still-potent punch with much better manners than its race replica stablemate.

The Ninja 750R originally was designed to compete with the likes of the Honda Interceptor and the Suzuki GSX-R 750, but from the get-go it had higher bars and a slightly less spine-eroding seating position. It was fast enough to keep yourself entertained, but cushy enough to go two-up. It also bears the distinction of being the last fully-faired Japanese sportbike to rock a steel frame.

This one, offered by our friends and site sponsor Iconic Motorbikes, is in close to immaculate condition, with just north of 9,000 miles on it. It has apparently been sitting for some time, but was put away and stored properly, so new tires and perhaps a new chain should be all it needs to fall right back into duty as a big mileage puller. The red-black-silver livery is much less noisy than the racebike’s, and is a nice nod to the GPz 900 that graced Top Gun.

From the seller:

1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R – Excellent Condition – Only 9032 Miles
Here we have one of the cleanest Ninja 750R’s we’re yet to come across.

This 1990 750R is a solid 9.5 out of 10 and 100% stock! Harder and harder to find in this condition and even more difficult to find unmolested!

Perfect for a collector or a rider however if you’re planning to ride, plan on tires and some recommissioning costs as she’s been sitting for quite some time. Thankfully the bike was put away dry and stored properly so costs will not be excessive and we’d be happy to help!

At $6,050, the bike is priced according to its condition and scarcity when compared to the faster ZX-7R. For that, you’re getting a great, classic sport tourer with tons of years left.

Featured Listing: 1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R
Harley Davidson April 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750

It’s hard to think of a racing bike more uniquely American than the Harley-Davidson XR750. The bike combines all of the qualities that make us who we are as a nation, and carries a long history of victories through grit, determination and dedication to the art of plying your trade better than anyone else. For riders and racers in the 1970s and 1980s, the XR is as hallowed as Richard Petty’s sacred 43 or McQueen’s trademark smirk.

1972 Harley-Davidson XR750 for sale on eBay

The XR750, which is variously quoted as having anywhere from 80 to 100 horsepower is the winningest motorcycle in AMA history, thanks in large part to the fact that, 50 years after it bowed, flat trackers are still finding success aboard updated versions. Evel Knievel made the bike famous outside the fairly narrow lane of flat track racing, jumping his 1972 XR to a string of then-world records.

This 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750 was raced by Mike Boyes in the 1970s and 1980s. It sits in unrestored, as-raced condition, and has not started since Boyes last rolled it into the pits. It is a time capsule in the purest sense of the word. It is the first year of the alloy-head XR750 engine, and carries nearly 50 years of race patina on its simple orange bodywork. The fiberglass tank is uncoated and unlined, and therefore is likely unfit for use. The seller says that, despite its long slumber, the bike shows every sign that it would fire and run with minimal work.

From the eBay listing:

1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750 flat track racing motorcycle
Engine no. 1C101XH0
Unrestored. As raced.
• First year of the alloy head XR
• Raced throughout California in the 1970’s and 1980’s
• Delivered in as-raced, unrestored condition
This 1972 alloy XR-750 was purchased by Mike Boyes from renowned Harley tuner Michigander Tex Peel. Boyes then raced it mainly in California in the mid-to-late 1970s and early 1980s. He lives near Seattle, Washington today. Boyes sold the bike to Yoshi Kosaka of the Garage Company, now of Inglewood, California, who kept the bike for many years before selling it to Mike Cheiky, a California-based inventor. Mike died last year and so his wife Charity enlisted a family friend to find it a new home. The XR-750 found its way to New York City Motorcycles. Its appearance – the patina, that is – has been ‘undisturbed’ since it was last raced at Ascot, San Jose, Sacramento, and others. The motor gives every indication of firing up with a minimum of proper servicing and safety checks although it is recommended that fuel not be poured inside of the XR750’s original, un-lined, uncoated tank. To run it, a substitute tank or external fuel feed should be used.
Ran when parked 🙂
This is my third vintage XR750 and the purest racer of them all. The motorcycle looks exactly as it did when it exited the racetrack the last time.
Recent marriage and move to Japan makes keeping, shipping and/or storing impractical. My move is your gain 🙂
See other motorcycles offered for sale along with the XR.
*missing left footpeg
*Sold with a BILL OF SALE ONLY. XR750’s do not have titles and are not legal for road use!*
***optional Harley Racing factory stand available to the winning bidder only. $500 value***

The motorcycle is sold as is, where is, and there are no warranties expressed nor implied. Judge the photos and make your own assessment of the bike’s condition, rather than rely on my opinion and/or description. Questions and clarifications are encouraged. These are my personal opin Bidders must be certain of their commitment before bidding, as once its submitted. If you win it, you bought it. No time for nonsense please. Bidders with less than 10 or any negative feedback must contact me prior to bidding or else expect your bid to be cancelled and removed.

This motorcycle requires thorough inspection and recommissioning before running or riding. Know what you are buying before you bid. If you don’t have the expertise and/or the budget, with all due respect, this is not the bike for you.

New York City Motorcycles ( nycmc dot com) is reasonably well known in the vintage motorcycle community and this is not the only platform for offering the bike. Therefore please consider not waiting until the final seconds of the auction to bid. Because while you’re waiting to pull the trigger, if a fair offer arrives from elsewhere and there is not a comparable bid here, the auction will instantly disappear from your watched items.

Motorcycle is located in Venice, CA. I will work with your shipper but its your responsibility.

I’ve had several questions regarding the engine number.  Firstly, thank you for pointing out the number being incorrect, incomplete or possibly the engine number of the prior series, 1970 Ironhead.  I’ve just added addtional photos of the engine case, which shows the full number: 1C1013(followed by 2 with a slash over the number) H8

The slash through the two is consistent with a 1975 model I owned previously – in that instance the number 6 followed by the number 5 slashed out.  The unanimous opinion from experienced XR owners and collectors was 6 referring to 1976, the bikes completion date; the 5 slashed out refers to the 1975 model.  In that case labor disruptions at Youngstown were responsible for some 1975 bikes being carried over and released the following year. 

The number first shown was indeed incorrect.  I used the text from the Bonhams auction catalog from the Barber Motorsports, sale in October of last year, where the XR was listed.  Bonhams conducted their own independent review of the bike’s provenance.  I should have proofread their reference then, as well as now before I put the bike up for auction now.  Apologies for my oversight and hope this clears up any confusion caused.  Feel free to ask additional questions if my hypothesis appears incorrect!

Thanks again.

Running original XRs command silly money, and this one is a true museum piece with race provenance to back it up. Hurry over to eBay if it tickles your fancy, the auction is about to wind down!

Featured Listing: 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750
Sport Bikes For Sale April 18, 2019 posted by

Restored and preserved: 1986 Suzuki GSXR750 LE

The seller of this 1986 Suzuki GSXR750 LE claims he’s got the nicest one around, and he might be right. According to the eBay auction, his dad, a former AMA mechanic, bought it in the mid-1990s from the original owner, bought a raft of NOS factory parts during a cosmetic restoration, and then mothballed it. It hasn’t been ridden since a brief trip in 1998, and still wears a set of 1996 Michelins that still have their whiskers.

1986 Suzuki GSXR750 LE for sale on eBay

The seller says his dad decided the bike was too valuable to ride after a quick trip down the block, which for him is a shame, but is to the modern collector’s benefit. With dry clutches, lighter wheels, stouter suspension and healthier engines, the 1986 Suzuki GSXR750 LE was meant to have the plate and signals removed and ridden in anger at the track. They were a race kit and some expertise away from an AMA grid.

Suzuki built a few hundred of the LEs and stopped, so they’re scarce as hen’s teeth in any condition, let alone near perfect, as this one is.

From the eBay listing:

Significance

The 1986 Suzuki GSXR750R was a unique, limited-production homologation sportbike which featured many race-oriented options. Among them were a Yoshimura dry clutch, GSXR1100 forks and wheels, proprietary magnesium parts, a solo-occupant seat, remote reservoir shock and quick-release DZUS fasteners. The colors and graphic scheme were unique to the model, and ~200 examples were said to be released. My example is the most accurate, stock representation of the ’86 Limited offered on the market today.

History
This motorcycle was acquired by my father in March of 1995. He purchased it locally from its first owner, who was recalled to Active Military status to participate in the Bosnia peacekeeping operations. The motorcycle had cosmetic damage associated with its first owner. This consisted of scratches in the tank and bodywork.

My father, an AMA Superbike mechanic from 1980-1988 was very familiar with this generation GSXR, and its significance. He wanted a showroom-perfect example. Through our connections with a local Suzuki dealership, he ordered every piece possible for the bike: Tank, tailsection, chin fairing, turn signals, headlights, warning stickers, fairing, windscreen, fuel lines (anything that would dry-rot), etc. Anything that has been replaced on the GSXR was done so in 1996 with factory Suzuki parts. The replacement bodywork is NOS Suzuki. The sidepanels came from Suzuki unpainted, but were painted to exact replica specifications. The front fairing, lower fairing, tank and tail-section were painted from the factory as-is. Windscreen is a period-correct Lockhart Philips brand. Everything on the bike is the real deal, and it is entirely discontinued now. We were unable to secure a NOS set of original tires. Brand new (from ’96) Michelins are fitted.

We have done nothing but protect it and care for it since. It was registered in 1998 for road use, but my father drove it down our street, turned around, and rode back in. It was too valuable to ride.

Overall Condition

My bike in the enclosed pictures is arguably the best example of a US domestic market ’86 GSXR750R Limited Edition. Most examples have an aftermarket pipe, no airbox, non-standard turn signals, stickers, etc. This does not. It is OEM down to its vent hoses and grips. You’ll find all mechanical properties to be impressive, as in very low/no corrosion, and completely functioning.

Why Sell?

It’s no secret that this Limited stands to appreciate. In a decade it could easily be worth $40k. Unfortunately, our children’s education costs are increasing.

Please inquire with any questions!

At $21,500 buy-it-now, the seller has some idea what he’s got, and isn’t letting it go for a bargain. That said, it’s a beautiful example of an insanely rare and important bike, and will be a must-have for the right collector.

Restored and preserved: 1986 Suzuki GSXR750 LE
Triumph April 17, 2019 posted by

Big British Bruiser: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale

After years of “close, but no banana” attempts to out-inline-four the Japanese with their 600cc TT600 and Daytona, Triumph finally hit one out of the park with their slim, agile, and characterful Daytona 675, a bike capable of holding its own against the world’s best, while offering a unique blend of flexible power, torque, and a soundtrack to differentiate it from the typical inline four and v-twin sportbikes. This Triumph Daytona 1200SE represents the path not taken: with no analogue in their current lineup, Triumph’s four-cylinder Daytona was ultimately a dead-end for the company, as the smaller three-cylinder proved more popular and led the way forward for the company. But if you’re in search of something cool, classy, affordable, and fast, this one might just tick the boxes for you.

When Triumph was reborn in the 1990s, modular design allowed them great flexibility to refine their offerings and minimize the risks associated with new or niche models. Individual bikes were slightly compromised by frames and engines designed with versatility and not maximum performance in mind, but this kept the company light on its feet and and able to quickly respond to industry trends. The Daytona 1200 slotted their biggest, most powerful engine into the spine frame, added the best suspension in their arsenal and fitted some very effective brakes. It was Triumph’s big stick of their lineup and, even though it was discontinued after just a few years, that doesn’t mean the four-cylinder Daytona 1200 isn’t a great motorcycle.

When new, it was considered a bit of an also-ran, since it was compared directly to Japanese rivals like the Suzuki GSX-R1100 and Kawasaki ZX-11 in that all-important top-speed metric while costing a good bit more. With 147hp from the 1180cc engine to haul 550lbs of wet weight around, power-to-weight compares favorably with the last generation of Suzuki’s GSX-R1100, while offering an extra cog to make even better use of the flexible engine. That may seem unimpressive by today’s ludicrous power levels, but the 85lb-ft of torque is paired with real-world gearing that emphasized performance street riders could actually use, instead of hypothetical top speeds they couldn’t. With stock gearing, a 1200 Daytona could easily embarrass a ZX-11 from 40-100mph, before running out of puff at a mere 160mph.

And like the ZX-11 and the later GSX-R1100, the Daytona wasn’t a sport-touring bike, it was a big GT, a sportbike with comfortable ergonomics suited to mature riders who wanted to occasionally do very immature things on their motorcycles. A GSX-R with wild graphics and neon colors would blast to triple-digit speeds, strafe canyons, but had very boy-racer pretensions, for better or worse. But if you’d aged out of that, but still wanted to scare the bejesus out of yourself without needing to pretend you were hitting LeMans the following weekend, the Daytona was available in elegant black, classic British Racing Green, or a rich yellow. The styling was simple and unadorned by crass graphics, and the bike exudes class from nose to tail.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Triumph Daytona 12oo for Sale

Helping a family friend clear out an estate. Two Owner bike, Was adult owned its whole life, most recently by an avid motorcycle enthusiast in his 60’s for the last 15 years. Clean and Clear title ready to go and two sets of keys.

Limited edition 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200 in very nice condition. This is a rare bike they do not come up for sale often. limited production Only 250 made, this is bike #175.

She has been sitting in storage for the last 2-3 years or so, fuel was drained before storage. Pulled it out, new battery, gave it a wash, put fresh gas in, fresh oil change, and she fired right up and sounds amazing. Tires have good tread left, the bike brakes and handles amazing, its very fast! This bike has been very well taken care of and well maintained by owners. No leaks of any kind.

Paint is nice, always garaged. there are a few blemishes that I noticed, some scratches on the right side fairing isolated to about 2″x2″, and a hairline crack and some nicks up by the left mirror(see pics)

Modifications that I noticed: 

Micron carbon fiber slip on exhaust

Hella headlights, very bright, turn signals

Nology profire coils

Windscreen?

Very clean for being 20 years old, a few things I have noticed that I want to mention for full disclosure: 

  • Bike hesitated a little  before it took off when I drove it, I would recommend a fuel additive to clean out the carbs and fuel system for the first few tanks of gas since it has been sitting
  • Temp gauge was working intermittently

Don’t let this rare opportunity pass you by!!

With a Buy It Now price of just $5,500 this is a ton of bike for the money, and it looks clean and relatively unmolested, with just 15,000 miles on the odometer and a set of Micron carbon cans to liberate a bit more growl, as you can hear in the included video. It’s unfortunate the seller doesn’t know more about the history, but is pretty thorough in presenting what is there. It’s not quite perfect, with some scratches, flush front signals, and the frankly awful rear turn signals, but looks complete and all Triumphs of the era still represent a seriously fast chunk of classic sportbike for a pretty minimal outlay of cash.

-tad

Big British Bruiser: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale
Honda April 16, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30

Update 4.22.2019: This RC30 has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Often considered the darling of the collector world, the RC30 reigns supreme as being one of the most approachable of the highly sought-after rare bikes of the 80s & 90s. Volumes of research are readily available for these fascinating machines, and values remain strong with steady and continued appreciation. In short, the RC30 contains everything that RSBFS readers crave: A fantastic sport bike with racing DNA; A gorgeous silhouette that is THE iconic shape of the era; A mythical soundtrack that matches the good looks; A limited numbers homologation bike… and a good investment. There may be haters out there, but they are vastly outnumbered by those who understand what the RC30 brings to the table.

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30

Officially known as the VFR750R, the RC30 differs from the more pedestrian and economical VFR750F in more ways than the similarities. Both bikes have VFR in the title and both utilize a V4 engine arrangement. Apart from the Honda badge on the tank, that is where it ends and where the RC30 takes off. Throwing off the chain-driven engine internals of the previous VF series, the RC30 makes use of a gear-driven DOHC architecture which provides for ultra-precise valve timing and control. This is the piece that contributes to the characteristic whine of these VFR motors. And while the newer VFR-F models also utilized gear driven cams, the motor internals of the RC30 were decidedly more racy. Connecting rods were made of titanium to reduce reciprocating weight and raise the redline. The crank timing was changed to a 360 degree “big bang” sequence instead of the F-bikes 180 degree crank (the latter being smoother for street riding). The transmission was configured for racing – meaning a close-ratio box – and a slipper clutch was fitted. The twin spar chassis was all aluminum, including the revolutionary single sided swing arm. Suspension was all top line offerings from Showa. Devised for endurance racing and facilitating quick wheel/tire changes, even the front of the RC30 has quick-change hardware to minimize pit lane delays. And that is what the RC30 was built to be: a race bike with lights made available to the public. A total of 3,000 units were built.

From the seller:
1990 Honda RC30 For Sale

This beautiful motorcycle is for sale after 18 years of ownership. Its owner is selling his collection of desirable motorcycles due to health issues. It is complete, runs like it should, and has never been down. The bike has been ridden approximately 400 miles under its current owner. In its time it was never raced or abused, and always stored indoors in a dry and temperate climate.

More from the seller:

Because the bike has seen very limited road use over the past few years it received a total carb cleaning and synching within the past few months. At the time, while the carbs were removed, the fuel petcock was also dismantled and thoroughly cleaned by a former Honda mechanic.

The RC30 comes with its original factory tool roll, and the rear swing arm stand.

If you’re reading this post you already know this bike’s legacy both in Honda’s history, and in racing history. The bike was purchased from a collection in Georgia, and imported it into Canada after taking delivery there. It has been licensed in Ontario since that time, and has a clear ownership (title) in the province of Ontario. There are no warranties expressed or implied.

More from the seller:

Price: $28,000 (USD) or $35,000 (CDN)

The bike is located east of Toronto, Ontario. For you U.S. readers, importing a bike from Canada to the U.S. shouldn’t be anymore trying than it was to bring it to Canada. Filling out the appropriate forms, and having a bit of patience is all you really need. The owner can assist in shipping, but all planning and costs are the responsibility of the buyer.

This RC30 is in amazing condition, having traveled only some 2,200 miles in it’s lifetime. This is helped by the limited ownership; RC30s tend to be coveted and kept in collections for longer periods of time than other machines. This one is no different, and has been fawned over for nearly two decades. These are the types of bikes you hang on to for as long as you can, and those fortunate enough to own one have realized significant gains in valuation. Year after year, this is about as reliable a sure thing that one can find when it comes to collecting motorcycles. And even if you are more into riding than collecting, the RC30 has much to offer. There are those who ride these bikes regularly, which is really how it should be. These bikes were built to go racing, and while they look fantastic as a static display they are much more beautiful at full song.

This particular bike is located in Canada, although it looks to have been a US bike originally. The clocks are in MPH and it has already been federalized. That should help with bringing it back over the border (that, and the fact it is more than 25 years old). This bike comes with some cool RC30 extras, and has been recommissioned to boot. Check out the pictures – feel free to drool a little. At $28k USD this RC30 is priced to sell in the real world. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30

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