Monthly Archives: April 2019

Ducati April 30, 2019 posted by

A New York Minute: 1997 Ducati 916 Monoposto

If there is a bike that needs no introduction, it must certainly be the Ducati 916. Raising the performance game to a level not seen by manufacturers before, Ducati created a powerhouse that punched like Mike Tyson, had the speed of Usain Bolt, and the looks of Kate Moss. As gorgeous as it was functional, the 916 knocked the world on its collective ear, and World SuperBike trophies followed in droves.

1997 Ducati 916 Monoposto for sale on eBay

Engine wise, the 916 was an evolution of the 851/888 SP series of bikes. That means a liquid-cooled v-twin with 4-valve heads activated by desmodromic gymnastics for better high-RPM power – 114 horses at 9,000 revs, to be exact. Anything over 100 HP was considered pretty stout in the day, and the 916 had the kind of power that repli-racers could only dream about. It wasn’t just the power either, but the stunning torque of the v-twin that won fans with riders. All of this performance did not result in a fragile power plant; with significant testing and actual use in the 888 SP0 series, the 916 motor has shown itself to be well neigh bulletproof.

From the seller:
1997 Ducati 916 monoposto with 5224 original miles in unmolested condition that came out of a collection. All OEM takeoff parts are included in the sale which will be boxed up and included in the sale should the purchaser desire to return this to bone stock. Recent $2300 full recommission and 6,000 mile service by Ducati master tech which includes a detailed invoice, plus a dyno sheet. This is an appreciating classic which is difficult to find in this condition and one of the most important motorcycles of the 90’s. All original stickers in place. No cracks on bodywork tabs. Paint on wheels is intact. Vent screens on rear tail are intact. All electrics are 100% functional. Mechanically perfect. Clean transferrable New York State title.

More from the seller:
Currently fitted with period correct aftermarket Corbin seat, Ferracci carbon fiber slip-ons, Ducati Performance chip, braided steel lines, carbon hugger and front fender, (2) carbon tank guards (in boxes), and Helibar risers. The seat and bars make this extremely comfortable in comparison to the stock setup. This includes OEM front fender, clip-on’s, seat, mid-pipes, slip-on exhaust, brake lines, chainguard and body panel below the radiator. This bike wants for absolutely nothing and is ready to go. The only flaws are two scratches. One is on the rear tail section and one is on the tank which are visible in photos. It is not a museum piece, but it’s a very clean example with very low mileage. A bike is only original once, so I decided not to respray these pieces. I am selling it because I am shuffling my collection around focusing on 2 older air cooled Ducati’s. All service questions can be answered by the invoices from ECS which I have supplied photos of. My motorcycles are well-maintained and only serviced by the best in the business.

Values on the 916 are certainly on the rise, but they are also all over the place. Condition and mileage play a part here, just the same as with any collector bike. But more importantly is the actual model. In the case of the 916, it was introduced in 1994, and ran through 1998 before being replaced by the 996. The earliest of the 916s are the most coveted, with certain specific 1995 models assembled in Varese being the rarest and most valuable of the early set. As the years passed, factory capacity grew, and latter model year 916s grew more populous. Still, even these later models are growing in collector value. This particular example, showing just over 5,000 miles, looks to be in pretty good shape. There are some tasty aftermarket bolt-on pieces included (including that gorgeous carbon fender and FBF pipes), but for the purist the sale will also come with key OEM bits to revert the bike back to stock. All in all, there is a lot of very cool motorcycle here for $8,500 OBO. It’s not perfect, but with the parts and the services performed it should be in the running.

Sure, the Varese bikes will be nearly double the cost, but passing eyes would be unable to distinguish the difference between the two 916s. This 1997 model has all the same great looks and great performance with a price tag that is only half-sized; this Ducati 916 offers RSBFS readers some great bargain riding and collecting! Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

A New York Minute: 1997 Ducati 916 Monoposto
Yamaha April 29, 2019 posted by

Fiat Currency – 2008 Yamaha YZF-R1

Having presented an all-new R1 in 2007, Yamaha changed very little for 2008.  Hopeful for Rossi, they presented a Moto GP liveried body kit.  This owner has barely ridden the bike, kept it perfectly, and even improved a few of the minor decals.

2008 Yamaha YZF-R1 for sale on eBay

After many years with the 5-valve Genesis, Yamaha’s ’07 re-design used just four valves per cylinder, but still managed 180 hp from the liter.  Intake runner length is computer controlled, optimizing the low and high rpm running.  The throttle is electronic rather than mechanical, and there’s a factory slipper clutch.  The rider is warmed by air evacuating the fairing and the underseat exhaust.  Kayaba suspension is multi-adjustable and triple-puck calipers over 310mm rotors are outstanding.

The original owner has protected this R1 from a sportbike’s usual reality, installed the Fiat fairing kit, and made a few minor improvements.  For a fan, it’s a collectible combination, plus there’s a Rossi-signed tailpiece.  Pre-owned but not really used.  Comments from the eBay auction:

What’s unique about this particular scooter is the Limited Edition MotoGP Yamaha/Fiat Livery Kit which was presented by the Yamaha Factory Race Team back in 2007. Only 380 were made and distributed worldwide and my number is 144.  Every piece was meticulously installed and the results were and remain flawless.
The sponsorship decals that came with the kit were used at the time of installation but were of inferior quality so I had a professional printer make die cut decals copying what was on the factory race bikes at the time and the result is night and day difference. The decals you see on the swing arm and rear tire hugger show the better application. The original kit decals were smaller in dimension and were not proportionate to the areas of their intended placement. I did not keep the originals, some of them were damaged when removing them but in all seriousness, no big loss in that department. 

There have been no engine or exhaust modifications. Electronics have not been tampered with whatsoever. The bike is primarily stock with only a few aftermarket accessories. The stock brake and clutch levers were removed (for you purists, I still have them) and replaced with a machined set in anodized black. They’re not a brand name, I purchased them from a Chinese vendor on a whim but was pleasantly surprised by the exceptional quality and I thought they met my aesthetic and quality standard so that’s why they’re on the bike. 

The other decals you see on the bike which were not part of the Livery Kit are the number 46 on the windscreen and other assorted decals on the white bodywork towards the rear of the bike, the rear seat cowl and under the seat area. (No, that’s not a genuine OHLINS shock. Only the decal is genuine) All are high quality die-cut and replicate with accuracy of what was plastered all over Valentino Rossi’s bikes during the 2007/2008 MotoGP seasons. 
When Indianapolis Motor Speedway hosted the MotoGP races, I had the good fortune of first meeting Valentino Rossi in 2010 (and three times after) and he personally signed the seat cowl. I don’t have it installed on the bike. I’ve always kept it off. Safely protected of course.

Ten years on from the original R1, the oughties update had a host of improvements, and the bike got good reviews for it’s roadability.  The compact cockpit pleases smaller riders and the suspension isn’t too brutal.  Power delivery is slow starting but comes on strong above 8,000 rpm.  Number 46 went on to dominate the 2008 season, clinching the championship three races before the end of the season.  Collectible as it is, a ride would be hard to resist.

-donn

Fiat Currency – 2008 Yamaha YZF-R1
KTM April 28, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 2015 KTM 1190 RC8R

Perennial upstart KTM came to the superbike only in 2008, but has helped the RC8R evolve into one of the lighter weight and enjoyable liters.  RSBFS regular Seattle Used Bikes has a barely broken-in customer bike available.

The RC8R is built around KTM-developed Rotax 75-degree Vee, with 175hp derived from four valve per cylinder, two ( different ) plugs per cylinder ignition, and electronic fuel injection.  Chassis tube are big but thin, using the engine as a stressed member, with fully adjustable WP suspension front and rear.  Retro-forces supplied by Brembo, with 4-piston calipers over 320mm discs.  All-stainless exhaust is underneath and for mass centralization barely goes past the swingarm pivot.  The cockpit was made to accommodate various riders, with adjustable seat, bars, levers, and footpegs.

Despite having turned under 1,100 miles, this KTM has been serviced with all fluids twice.  Barely used and looks it.  SUB’s comments from their – web site –

This particular KTM RC8R Superbike has seen so little use it is almost a crime ! One owner bike, purchased from Skagit Powersports in 2016, had its first service performed at dealer late 2016, then again late last year all fluids were changed. Since then it has only been ridden another 40 miles.. Life changes and a move out of US dictates this one also needs to be re-homed. Absolutely no damage or scratches, runs properly and is just in to SUB in time for Spring fun!

Asking $11,999

Reviewed as possibly having been assembled by retired Swiss matchmakers, the RC8R got high marks for performance and design, never diluting the sporty formula.  2015 was to be the last year for the FIM Supersport-homologated machine, as the company shifted their focus to more streetable Moto3 400’s.  The new owner of this example will have not only a basically new RC8R, but only of the last out there.  Contact Seattle Used Bikes on (206) 535-6812 or by email – here –.

-donn

Featured Listing – 2015 KTM 1190 RC8R
Suzuki April 28, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1997 Suzuki GSXR1100

Update 5.14.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

I have always had a soft spot for Suzuki GSXR1100s for a couple reasons. First, when they bowed in the mid-1980s, they were absolutely one of the baddest machines you could buy, two wheels or four. They weighed nothing and had an absolutely insane engine. Over their run, they evolved into the thinking man’s sport tourer. They didn’t handle like their smaller badge mates, but they sure as hell went fast. And, compared to a lot of liter-plus mile-eaters, they went around turns with a fair amount of poise and grace. But by the mid-90s, they were an also-ran in the arms race, so they didn’t fly out of dealers the way CBR900RRs did.

1997 Suzuki GSXR1100 for sale on eBay

Which brings us to this 1997 Suzuki GSXR1100. It’s a bone stock, close to perfect example from the second to last year of the model. When the seller says it has zero flaws, he ain’t kidding. It’s exceedingly low mileage, to boot. That means it’s a modern sport tourer with classic pedigree, fabulous, blocky mid-90s Gixxer styling, and the running gear to take you from coast to coast in comfort and beyond 100 mph.

From the seller:

If you’ve always wanted a mint 1997 GSXR here’s your chance. This is a true time capsule that’s
in museum collecting condition. It’s totally bone stock including air box, cans and manufacturer
idiot stickers. It has 4300 original miles on it and looks like the day in left the dealership. No
chips, dings, anything. It seems like the previous owner detailed it after every ride. I was not
looking to buy this but when I saw the condition it was in; I could not help myself. It’s a disease.
As I am more of a track guy I do very little street riding anymore, no this has not been tracked.
As such it’s been sitting in my climate-controlled garage so time for a new home. I’m a picky 50
plus year old that collects bikes. Hence, I am very particular and tend to understate condition. I
can honestly rate this a 10 out of 10 as it has zero faults. The pictures speak for themselves. As I
like selling things with no stories the bike has just had all fluids changed, a new battery
installed, and the carburetors cleaned. It’s ready to be collected or ridden, your choice. You will
not be disappointed; I have many more pictures and happy to answer any questions. It’s
registered in New Hampshire which does not title anything over fifteen years old, but I do have
the previous owner’s title. I do not need to sell this bike so please don’t waste either of our
times. Thanks for looking.

As a now-classic example of one of motorcycling’s most famous marques, this thing has very few flies on it. It might not have been the fastest or nimblest in its day, but there’s no denying its pedigree, quality and power.

Featured Listing: 1997 Suzuki GSXR1100
Ducati April 27, 2019 posted by

Good Things In Small Packages: 2004 Ducati 749R for Sale

With the general level of competence from modern sportbikes, along with rules that don’t seem to favor limited-production homologation bikes, it’s easy to forget just how special some of them are. Bikes like the Yamaha OW01 might have looked nearly identical to the regular production machines from ten feet, but were often hand-built to a much higher quality, with high-performance engine internals, hand-welded frames, and other small changes that were intended to help the bikes perform in production-based racing clases. Ducati’s 749R is one such machine, and its superficial similarity to the regular production 749 and 749S belies just how much of a hot rod it was.

Not to say that the 749S wasn’t a good motorcycle. It was, and carried on Ducati’s less is more trend that started with their sweet-handling 748 that had just the right amount of power and superior agility, compared to the bigger 916/996/998. Much of that was down to the narrower 180-section rear tire, but it was a bit lighter as well, and the 916’s midrange torque made the bike faster than it looked on paper and race versions like the SPS could be a bit overwhelming.

Why was the 749R so trick? Well it was out of necessity: the 999 competed in various Superbike championships that generally allowed a degree of latitude in modifying the road platform for racing. The smaller 749 was destined for World Supersport against 600cc inline fours. Intended as a much more entry-level class, the rules were very strict to keep costs carefully controlled and allowed very limited modifications: even OEM wheels were required!

Basically, in WSS, if you wanted it on your racebike, you pretty much needed it on your roadbike. And to compete in terms of power output with a grid full of screaming fours, Ducati had to throw the whole catalog of performance updates at the 749R. Built between 2003 and 2006, the 749R had bigger valves made of titanium, high-compression pistons, a lightweight crank, and magnesium cam covers. Bore was up from 90 to 94mm and stroke was down to 56 from 71mm for a total of 749.5cc, with power climbing from 108hp to an eye-opening 121hp, although it’s obviously going to cost a bit more to service.

As you’d expect, suspension was top of the line Öhlins at both ends, and radial Brembo brakes offered the best available stopping power and feel. A slipper clutch was included for rapid downshifts free of drama and the bike uses a double-sided swingarm patterned after the World Superbike 999’s stiff, lightweight unit. Other details included a set of lightweight Marchesini wheels, an adjustable steering head, and carbon-fiber bodywork on the early bikes. All were solo-seat models, and so had adjustable ergonomics. But the R had a smaller range of adjustments, as the larger-diameter race exhaust took up some of the available space and, as previously mentioned, rules specified very minimal changes to the roadbikes, so the roadbike subframe needed to match the racebike’s.

From the original eBay listing: 2004 Ducati 749R for Sale

This is your chance to have one of the ultra limited collectible Ducati Superbikes for a fraction of what it cost new.
The bike is a 2004 Ducati 749R. Only 2348 miles
Almost all original including the stock tires. If you want to ride the bike you will need to replace the tires.
I just had the belts and fluids changed from a Ducati Master Tech. Bike has a new battery. Bike hasn’t been used at all since service was done. I only changed everything to make sure nothing would be needed other than tires if someone wanted to ride bike.
One small blemish on left lower fairing that has been touched up so really hard to see in photos but is there. Could easily be repaired and bike would show nearly perfect. Rear swing arm has small flaws from rear stand rubbing on black paint. The seat is doing the normal thing where the cover sticks to the base and looks a little weird. Normal on this generation of Superbikes.
Bike has no owners manual.
Has red key and one black key

There’s an $8,500 starting bid with no takers yet and plenty of time left on the auction. The 749/999 may be the least desirable Ducati superbikes, but they’re still Ducati superbikes, with all the performance, heritage, and style you would expect, and the 749R is one of the most collectible versions. This example looks bone-stock and very clean, with less than 2,400 miles on it. These were pretty trick bikes, straight from the factory, and would probably cost a small fortune to duplicate if you planned to build your own, so why not just pick this up, and save yourself the trouble?

-tad

Good Things In Small Packages: 2004 Ducati 749R for Sale
Ducati April 25, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada

Update 4.27.2019: Sold in just two days to an RSBFS reader. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The Ducati 851 is the father of modern Ducatis, from the world-changing 916 to the astonishing Panigale V4R. Without this boxy, lithe very red machine, those bikes would not be. The 851 arrived in 1987, with a very hopped up version of Ducati’s venerated Pantah engine. The air-cooled 90-degree, two-valve twin in the Pantah was updated with liquid cooling, four-valve heads and fuel injection for the 851, and Ducati shot back to the top of racing leaderboards.

Spitting out 93 horsepower and gobs of torque in a 430-pound chassis, the 851 was a statement that Ducati could use its agricultural engine tech to devastating effect. In 1990, the bike took home the World Superbike title, among a raft of other accolades over its five-year run.

This 1992 Ducati 851 Strada is from the last year before the 888 broke cover, and it has been kept largely unridden in a climate-controlled storage facility. Though it hasn’t crossed 3,000 miles since it was purchased as a leftover in 1995, all the major services have been done on a strict interval. Aside from the Fast by Feracci carbon cans, it is a stock machine.

From the seller:

This is a rare find, super low miles, Ducati 851 Superbike. This bike was purchased used from Bellevue Suzuki Ducati in 1995, at the time it was under 1000 miles on the clock. It has not seen much more use by its current owner as it was purchased to round out the collection of Ducati Superbikes, the 851/888/916. All three bikes have remained in owners collection until recently when he let the 888 go up for sale. Now we have been asked to find proper homes for the 851 and 916 still in his possession. Both the 851 and 916 have been kept serviced and stored in a heated shop/garage space. Run from time to time, oil changed and belts replaced at regular intervals. Other than the ever popular Fast by Ferracci carbon exhaust and a tank protector this beauty is all original. Ducati 851’s rarely come up for sale as it is, let alone one as clean as this one. Hurry, it will not last long. We have it scheduled for complete safety inspection and a 2-year service which will include oil, filter, hydraulics, coolant along with new timing belts. The owner has kindly provided some service records as well. It does have a clear WA title, all original keys and manuals included.

Here is some of the early press about these;

Ducati came of age in the late 80s, using ideas that the Far East thought as antiquated and as such not worth pursuing, the Italians enjoyed staggering race successes, and with it many sales to the public, motorcycling hasn’t been quite the same since. Chris Pearson samples the bike at the beginning of it all

Based upon the 1978 Pantah bottom end, the design was the first real modern day Ducati Superbike and successfully bridged the gap until the arrival of the 916 some seven years later. The first sight of the all-new Ducati road bike was caught at the Milan show in the autumn of 1987 although the prototype race bikes had provided more than their fair share of clues and insights into what was waiting just around the corner. Developed as a direct descendant of the Daytona winning twin from 1987, the production version of the 851 differed little from that prototype race machine. Ducati’s intentions for the new model were clear from the outset being offered in both Strada (road going) and Kit (race track) specification, for those wishing to put their 851’s directly on to the track. 200 examples of the latter were hurriedly assembled to satisfy the homologation required for the inaugural 1988 World Superbike championship, a roadster based race series that Ducati were more than keen to be a part of.

The basis of the 1987 spec Ducati 851 lived on until the end of 1993, gradually growing in capacity up to the 888cc model of 1992, proving so dominant on the rack that the planned update, the iconic 916 series, was held over for more than a year finally making its debut towards the end of 93 ready for its full onslaught in 1994.

Credits cards accepted, up to $150.00 documentation charge may be added.

You’d be hard pressed to find another 1992 Ducati 851 in this kind of shape anywhere for any price. At $9,200, we have a low-mileage perfectly-preserved example of the superbike that put Ducati back in the conversation.

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada
Ducati April 25, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1995 Ducati 916

Update 4.27.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Some of the most collectible bikes at the moment have only recently come into their own. You see there is a direct link to a bike’s age and how hot it might be for collectors. Only the rarest of the rare bikes appreciate in value on the showroom floor; elements such as original public reaction, total number of units produced, in-country availability when originally released, current condition, age and mileage all complicate the formula. Nostalgia is a pretty reliable condition, and if all other criteria are met then you can bet somewhere between 20 and 25 years on a motorcycle that was hot when introduced and still in good condition will pique the interest of fans and collectors again. Such is the case with the Ducati 916 – a bombshell of a motorcycle if there ever was one. As potent and fast as it was beautiful and unapologetic, the 916 was more of an assault than a revolution. Accolades from the press followed – as did the WSBK trophies.

Featured Listing: 1995 Ducati 916

Introduced in 1994, the bikes imported into the US were officially 1995 model year units. And if launching a groundbreaking new model is not stressful enough for a small company, imagine if your Bologna-based manufacturing line caught fire and burned to the ground just as you were getting up and running. That is exactly what happened to Ducati – right as demand for their gorgeous new powerhouse was at its peak. Ducati was forced to set up a new temporary production line for the 916, basing it on the grounds of MV Agusta’s plant in Varese, Italy. Bikes from this production line – while technically identical to those of later production back at home in the Bologna factory – are interesting and rare artifacts and known as “Varese” bikes. How can you tell? The year is the first clue. The second is in the VIN number. If you look at the VIN, the character 11th from left (or 7th from right) is the manufacturing plant code. Most Ducatis have a “B” in this space, for Bologna. The early models built in the MV Agusta factory have a “V” for Varese.

From the seller:
1995 Ducati 916
VIN Number: ZDM1SB8S2SV000849

This iconic Ducati 916 was purchased new in October 1994 from the Brother’s Powersports in Bremerton, WA and has only had one owner. The 916 in original condition, paint is in fantastic condition, no fading, no corrosion or oxidation to be found anywhere. Some popular upgrades include Fast By Ferracci carbon exhaust with upgraded fuel chip, Cycle Cat adjustable rear sets and handlebars The original clip on’s and foot pegs were provided. This 916 is in excellent cosmetic condition it has absolutely shows no signs of ever been dropped or tipped over. It has been loved since it came out if it’s crate Always stored in temperature controlled garage when not in use and often serviced with new fluids and belts for good measure and joy of ownership. We have it scheduled for complete safety inspection and a 2-year service which will include oil, filter, hydraulics, coolant along with new timing belts. The owner has kindly provided some service records as well. It does have a clear WA title, all original keys and manuals included.

Only 2,266 original miles!

Price: $17,999.00
Contact: dave@seattleusedbikes.com

It is estimated that approximately 2,663 Ducati 916s were assembled at the Varese factory, before full-scale production was renewed in Bologna. And while there is no technical difference in Varese bikes, there is a lot of anecdotal evidence that these bikes received greater attention in that they were assembled more by hand as the production line in Varese was temporary. Regardless, Varese bikes are the most rare of the base model 916, and provides a further interesting story into this exotic and hyper twin.

This particular 916 Varese is a one owner machine, having traveled fewer than 2,300 miles in its 24 years of existence. It is being offered by well-known friend of RSBFS, Dave of Seattle’s Used Bikes. This example is not totally stock, yet many of the stock bits come with the sale, allowing collectors to return it back to original glory if desired. The Fast by Ferracci pipes are nearly a requisite change over stock, and with a fuel chip, rear sets and handlebar upgrade, this is a bike that is made for riding. The bike has been serviced throughout its life, and the seller is offering up a 2-year service to ensure that this bike is up to snuff for whatever lies ahead; be it straightaway, decreasing radius left hander, or just a parking place on a pedestal somewhere indoors with an audience. Check out the pics, and then drop Dave a line. This is one good looking and authentic bike – and early 916s are riding the wave of interest and appreciation. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1995 Ducati 916
Moto Guzzi April 23, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Mk III

Spring is certainly in full swing given the number of fantastic bikes we are seeing enter the market. The RSBFS Featured Listing schedule has been chock-a-block full of the best of the best – and today’s offering is no exception. This 1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans model Mark III looks incredible – and despite this model’s penchant for eating up the miles today’s example has but 7,700 miles on the clocks. For those unfamiliar with the oldest European motorcycle manufacturer in continuous production (some minor stops and starts notwithstanding), the longevity of these large v-twins is legendary, meaning that this one barely has break-in miles under its belt.

Featured Listing: 1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Mk III

While the original LeMans was an 850cc derivative of the V7 Sport model, the design evolved quickly into its own personality. the evolution of the model was not exactly linear, however. From the original prototype created way back in 1975, the Mark I models established the bikini fairing, the monstrous cylinder heads sticking out from under the tank, the long flat seat and the distinctive tail. The elements meshed together in a unique design that has become the hallmark of the brand. In many ways the Mark II machine was both a technological leap forward, as well as a leap in the wrong direction. Hours in the wind tunnel created a larger fairing with streamlining around the engine lowers – and far more of a sport touring look than the Mk I. Thankfully the Mark III took up where the original LeMans left off, offering a return to the sporting side of riding. Dominated by the new, smaller and angular fairing, square headlight, the huge Veglia rev counter off-center in the dash and the trademark flat seat and tail, the Mark III version is arguably the best looking of the LeMans models.

From the seller:
1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Mk III

Original toolkit and manual
Second owner – 7,792 original miles
LaFranconi Competizione exhaust system
EnDuraLast 450 Watt charging system
EnDuraLast electronic ignition
Rebuilt front calipers, stainless steel brake lines
Powdercoated valve covers
Tommaselli clip ons
Repainted and new decals 5 years ago
Denali LED Auxiliary Lights
YSS Shocks
Located in Staten Island NY

Price: $10,000

Contact: dansciannameo@gmail.com

You are looking at a two owner bike here. Think about that. This bike has been out in the wild for 35 years, yet has been ridden fewer than 250 miles for each year it has been around. It has not been sold on through multiple owners, but rather cherished and cared for throughout its life. This particular bike does offer some interesting upgrades including a revamped electrical system and additional lighting. Is it me, or does this amazing machine look ready for a run at an Iron Butt event? The seller has included a walk around video of the bike here. Turn up the sound!

Modern riders accustomed to Japanese liquid-cooled hardware might be taken back by the valve train noise in the video, but that is part of the allure of these great air cooled machines. Valve clearance is important; “Better to hear some clatter than burn a valve” is one of the key lessons I was fortunate enough to be taught (rather than learn by experience). The video simply underscores the visceral nature of the LeMans – this is not merely a bike you ride, this is a bike that you experience. If you are serious about truly classic machinery, give Daniel a shout out. This Mark II Guzzi is a wonderful offering in a steam punk sort of existence. What’s not to love? Check out the pics and videos and Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Mk III

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