Monthly Archives: February 2019

Suzuki February 28, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1983 Suzuki GS1100E

Post modified to reflect updated description by seller. -MI

Today’s featured listing is something of a departure from our usual fare, but if you can’t figure out why we jumped at the chance to feature this beautiful beast, you’re in the wrong place. As the seller will detail later, it’s from the dawn of the Golden Age of sportbikes, before fairings, but after AMA Superbike had sparked rabid passion for roadracing. In the wake of bikes like the Kawasaki Z1-R, the GS1100E helped build the bridge between the big four-cylinder bikes of the 1970s and the fully-faired featherweights that popped up in the late ’80s. The factories had started to figure out adequate frames, suspension and brakes, but smaller, fatter tires and perimeter alloy frames were still a ways off.

I should at this juncture give something of a disclaimer. Bikes of this ilk were my introduction to motorcycling; my first-ever motorcycle was a 1982 Kawasaki GPz 750. I miss it. This beautiful Suzuki is a hell of a lot more bike than my GPz was, but it’s aimed at the same target. With stump-pulling, air-cooled power, a comfortable upright seating position and decent brakes and suspension, it was equal parts friendly street bike and fire-breathing animal.

This 1983 Suzuki GS1100E has done 28,000 miles, but has been incredibly well cared for, and as a result is in great cosmetic condition, especially for its age and mileage. The classic red-and-black paint scheme is a hallmark of the period, and it looks the absolute ticket here. Even the carbs got a thick coat of gloss black. Inspired. The engine, brakes, tires and driveline have either been updated or confirmed to be in good condition. The list of downsides is short, but includes a non-functioning anti-dive valve and no fuel gauge.

From the seller:

Mileage: 28,893 U.S. miles
VIN#: JS1GU73AGD2101189

The 1983 Suzuki GS1100E has often been referred to as the original Superbike, the start of era of massive power, good brakes, light weight and defining sport bike handling. It was the dawn of an era of what we take for granted today, Sport Bikes that have evolved from these humble, but significant beginnings.

Our 1983 model is in the rare black and red color scheme with 28,000 miles showing. It is cosmetically extremely stock and in very good order right down to the stock exhaust system, a rarity today. The engine is the 108hp, 1074cc “TSCC” (Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber) DOHC. It ran a four Valve per Cylinder Head with a Roller Crank that proved its self bullet proof while setting numerous huge high horse power drag racing records. The stock engine was known for its strong, wide bottom end horse power and torque, making it an easy bike to live with on the street.

Our bike has just had a major service done to it by a long time, local GS expert. The valves have been checked and adjusted as needed, new plugs installed and the carbs cleaned, adjusted and sync’d. The brakes have been flushed, pads inspected, chain and sprockets inspected and adjusted and the tires are in good order. Over all, the bike is a great vintage Japanese sport bike that can be ridden, rather than hauled in a trailer for shows and display.

The upside and downsides to this bike. The inside of the gas tank looks brand new. It is the 108hp 4 valve engine. The bikes are getting scarce these days and to find one in this stock, good condition is a rare moment. The plastic side covers do not have any of the mounting tabs broken off (where you can see them until you take them off). All of the lights and gauges work and it comes with the owner’s manual. The bike runs well and needs nothing today except good weather and fuel. The downsides. The forks are soft because the Anti-Dive Valve is not working. There is no center stand. There is no factory tool kit. The right Fork Cap has some cosmetic damage to it. There is no fuel gauge and last but not least, it was ridden and because of that, it now has 28,000 miles on it.

The VIN# JS1GU73A6D2101189. The miles are 28,883. The selling price is $4,495. For other interesting bikes and collectable vehicles, visit our web site http://www.automaniagp.com 541 479 8888 or come by and see us at 895 SE Gladiola Drive, Grants Pass, Oregon, 97526. Oregon Dealer DA1287.

Automania LLC is a Consignment Oregon Dealer selling quality, privately owned vehicles including Aprilia, Buell, BMW, Citroen, Ducati, Harley Davidson, Honda, Hummer, Kawasaki, Moto Guzzi, MV Agusta, Nissan, Ossa, Piaggio, Suzuki, Triumph, Vespa, Classic Hot Rods, Buick, Dodge, Ford, Chevrolet, Lamborghini, MG, Packard, Porsche, Rover, Shelby, Toyota, Triumph, Volkswagen and any other vehicle of interest.

For less than $4,500, you could do a whole lot worse than this beautiful Suzuki. If you’re in or near Oregon, Automania has your next riding season sorted for you.

Featured Listing: 1983 Suzuki GS1100E
Kawasaki February 28, 2019 posted by

Lean and Green: 1990 Kawasaki KR-1S for Sale

The entire class of 250cc two-stroke sportbikes has alwasy been forbidden fruit for US-based sportbike enthusiasts. The last real road-burning stroker was the RZ350, a bike that can certainly hang with much more modern machines and punch well above its weight, but the 18” wheels and bikini-fairing mark it out clearly as a bike from a much older era. In recent years, it’s become pretty common to see NSRs, RGVs, TZRs, as well as the much less common Kawasaki KR-1S up on eBay, as importation laws here allow bikes and cars older than 25 years to be brought in and used on the road, although state laws regarding actual registration vary wildly.

Overseas, and especially in their home market of Japan, the quarter-liter sportbike class was hotly contested and although, in principle, a two-stroke is mechanically relatively simple, these little machines ended up being at the cutting edge of motorcycle design, as each manufacturer tried to eke out any small advantage over the others. But despite Honda, Suzuki, and Yamaha’s serious interest in small two-stroke sportbikes, Kawasaki chose to mostly sit the whole thing out, producing just 10,000 KR-1s during the entire run from 88-92, and the bike saw no significant updates during four years of production, nearly an eternity by standards of the class.

Maybe that’s because they got it very right the first time, and the bike certainly wasn’t lacking performance, with a class-topping 139mph tested top speed from a KR-1S. It was fast, with excellent, if slightly twitchy, handling. Claimed weight was 270lbs dry, and the liquid-cooled, 249cc parallel-twin slung beneath the aluminum beam frame made the expected… 45hp, as required by Japanese regulations, although it was obviously capable of much more and was highly tuneable. A six-speed gearbox helped riders make use of the available power and a KIPS powervalve system helped make the available power a bit more accessible.

Three versions of the bike were produced, the KR-1, KR-1S seen here, and the extremely rare KR-1R. The S model had wider wheels at both ends, compared to the regular KR-1 and, unlike other bikes in the class, the R model didn’t feature magnesium wheels, a dry clutch, or much else in the way of fancy accessories, although it did have larger carburetors and a close-ratio gearbox. Just a few hundred were supposedly produced.

Note that the bike is currently located in La Chopera, Spain, so be prepared to deal with shipping if you’re not currently enjoying your vacation home in Madrid…

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Kawasaki KR-1S for Sale

Well preserved. Some minor scratches and fairing defects.

The seller also includes the usual copy/paste specifications, if you’re interested, although some history might be nice. Has it been serviced? Is it ready to run? Good information to have, since parts for these are pretty scarce, considering the age and low production numbers. There’s not much time left on the auction, and bidding is only up to $2,550, so maybe take a chance and see if he’ll take a lowball offer?

-tad

Lean and Green: 1990 Kawasaki KR-1S for Sale
Ducati February 27, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2005 Ducati 999R

I’m going to go on record here, and tell you that I was wrong. In fact, I think many people were wrong. We just didn’t notice. You see, when the Ducati 916 was released it blew the world away with what a motorcycle should look like, sound like, and how one should move. Massimo Tamburini penned an instant legend; a svelte scalpel with a booming, throbbing heart. We fell in love. The world fell in love. And copy cats followed with the ensuing years – the 996, and the 998 just to name two. More of the same was good when it looked this good. And ultimately, we fell into a rut. Everything had to have the same narrow slit twin headlights, single sided swing arm, and exhaust cans hanging way up high. It was a look, and we liked it that way. Enter 2003, and the Pierre Terblanche-designed 999. Gone was the familiar face, the coke bottle side view, and that rear wheel hanging out with no visible means of support. The Ducati 999 climbed out of the rut in such a fantastic manner that people had a hard time following. History will show that the 999 failed to capture loyal Ducati buyers due to the polarizing looks. It was a love it or hate it sort of thing. But everybody who rode it loved it.

Featured Listing: 2005 Ducati 999R

Today the 999 is starting to get recognized for the amazing machine that it is. In person the lines and details on the bike make the 916 look like a Jr High School crush. And while pictures do not do it justice, the real thing draws your eye in to see more. This is a motorcycle that has presence with a capital P in a way the 916/996/998 simply cannot compare. And speaking of comparisons, let’s talk performance. With a power plant based on the 998R unit (itself a major revision of the Testastretta engine), the 999R promised 150 HP pushing a sub-400 pound machine. That is both more powerful and lighter than the R bike that preceded it, and it shows on the road and on the racetrack. Stopping this missile is easy, thanks to the race-spec radial mount Brembos. And unlike the trio of bikes that came before, the triple nine has yet another crazy trick up its sleeve: comfort. With revised ergonomics that include a range of adjustments, the 999 is actually a platform you can ride without planning a trip to the chiropractor. The seller has good detail about this bike, so I will let him pick up the tale on this one:

From the seller:
The Ducati 999R was one of the most expensive to manufacture motorcycles Ducati created other then the Desmosedici. It had an invoice of $29,995 when new, $7000 higher then the S model which was the next lower upgrade over the standard 999 offered. The R had the same Ohlins Suspension, but the engine was treated to all sort of exotic changes including being a true 999cc in size from the 104mm bore, having Sand- Cast Crankcases, revised Ports with larger Valves, more aggressive Cams, higher Compression ratio, Titanium Connecting Rods, Knife Edged Crankshaft and 12-Hole Injectors feeding 54mm Throttle Bodies that added up to almost 15 HP more then the S model.

The end result was one of the most amazing refined motorcycles produced. It combined an incredibly smooth engine with insane amounts of torque along with an incredible chassis delivering unbelievable handling and astonishing brakes. It then wrapped all of this engineering and handling in Carbon Fiber Body Work finished in Ducati Red with fit and finish that has not been seen since.

More from the seller:
Living the Ducati dream, the owner (dealer) then installed all sorts of what have become “normal” Ducati ad on’s. The Leo Vince Titanium Exhaust System sitting in a box new was close to $4,000. The Speedy Moto vented Clutch Cover and Pressure Plate was a foregone conclusion. The AMS Triple Clamps create a beautiful sight from the rider’s seat along with the Pmoto Master Brake and Clutch Reservoir billet covers. After Market Front Brake Rotors were dramatically lighter and replaced the stock Ducati items. The infinitely adjustable Rear Seats may take an engineer to adjust there are so many variables allowed. Also installed was Ducati’s Factory Shift Assist which can be seen to the left of the instrument cluster. There so much more as you can see in the images. What is great about this bike is that all of the stock parts (except the front brake rotors) are included with the sale.

A full service has been completed including Belts, Tires and Fluid changes. The motorcycle was inspected, the gas replaced with clear treated fluid and test ridden by a Ducati trained Tech.

The selling price: $16,495
Mileage: 3,642
VIN# ZDM1UB5W85B013323

For more information please contact: ted@automaniagp.com
You can also visit the Automania website

This is one very beautiful 999R, and it is sporting a wealth of upgrades and very few miles. It has had a recent service. If you dream of a Ducati R bike, this should be your wake up call. The 999 series were superior in every way to the previous generation. These are also the bikes that are next up on the value-appreciation escalator. As people realize how capable these machines really are AND begin to understand how good these bikes really look you will see a run on them. They have come of age. There is subtlety in this beauty; the 999 just needed a few years for us to mature – and admit we were wrong. But I’m not wrong about this – there is a whole lot of bike for $10,000+ less than a heavier, slower 998R will fetch. That is a bargain in the making, and a future standout for collectors. Look closely. Then admit it. You were wrong too. Give Ted a ping when you are ready to ‘fess up. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 2005 Ducati 999R
Yamaha February 27, 2019 posted by

Deltabox Racer: 1992 Yamaha TZ250D for Sale

Racebikes are different than other bikes we feature on RSBFS. Where the goal for many collectible roadbikes is absolute originality, or at least limited, period-correct updates, the whole point of a racebike is that it’s a rough-and-tumble artifact, a bit of living history, and battle scars are okay. If the machine in question is historically significant, that goes double. But race bikes are more like living organisms than ones trapped in amber, and some have evolved over time, especially if they’re still being used in competition, like today’s Yamaha TZ250D.

Note the missing “R” in the name: this isn’t simply a TZR250 with the lights removed. While people did use the TZR250 road bike as the basis for competition machines, the TZ250 was Yamaha’s pure competition machine, available over-the-counter to racers. Both the original TZ and TZR were powered by parallel twin engines, but Yamaha eventually began experimenting with a v-twin engine to keep pace with competitors in Grand Prix raxing, and the YZR250 used what was essentially half of the YZR500’s two-stroke V4. For a number of years, Yamaha produced the two machines in parallel: the v-twin powered YZR250 seen in Grand Prix and the parallel-twin TZ250.

1991 saw the introduction of a completely new version of the popular TZ250 racing platform, incorporating the v-twin configuration from the YZR250, along with upside-down forks, a banana-swingarm to clear the expansion chamber on the right side, a wider 5.25″ rear wheel, and a set of 38mm Mikuni carburetors. The “D” model that came along in 1992 featured a significant reworking of the rear suspension that meant the rear subframe could be made extremely light, with just one job: provide a perch for the rider. The new package worked well, taking the fight to Honda, and was popular among privateers.

Of course, this being a racebike and not a warmed-over streetbike brings its own set of problems. Racebikes generally aren’t designed with durability as a top priority, and two-strokes, although mechanically simple, are pretty maintenance-intensive. It’s also the nature of racing two-strokes, especially 125s and 250s, that they need gearing or jetting changes need to be made to suit the track, temperature, and altitude, to perform at their best. The trade off is incredible light weight and handling from the spartan machine, as well as racebike engineering to drool over. Honestly, I think Yamaha’s Deltabox designs of the era are some of the most beautiful frames ever created, and I think I’d just want to ride it around with the bodywork off, although I’d prefer the original finish in place of the polished part seen here.

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Yamaha TZ250D for Sale

1992 YAMAHA TZ250D

One of a kind with a beautiful polished frame!!

  • All new bearings (swing arm, steering head, and wheels).
  • Suspension rebuilt will new oil, bushings, and seals, set up for 185 lb. rider.
  • .8 kg/mm fork springs 8.5 kg/mm shock spring
  • Rebuilt Shindy Daytona Steering Damper
  • 120 mile Rick Schell crankshaft (crank is a work of art, lightened and polished flywheels and rods)
  • 120 mile top end (pistons, rings, bearings)
  • Roland Cushway 8.0cc heads
  • 96′ cylinders and pipes with 2.5mm pipe spacers per Roland Cushway
  • New plugs and caps
  • New reeds
  • New gaskets throughout
  • Dual EGTs
  • Daytona digital water temp gauge
  • New clutch and pressure plate
  • Every bearing in cases replaced with new (trans, case, water pump, balance shaft)
  • New EBC HH brake pads
  • GP tech thumb brake
  • Custom rear sets and foot pegs
  • Vortex Clip-ons
  • New DID x-ring chain
  • EBC Prolite rotors
  • Professional Paint
  • Airtech Aerotail w/anti Draft Shield
  • New Center front stand by Battle Factory
  • Original Rear Stand
  • New Multi-Temp Chicken Hawk Tire Warmers

Shipping to arranged and paid for by the buyer. I will assist the shipping company as needed. 

This Yamaha TZ250 has no racing history of note, so interested buyers will likely focus on race preparation and spares, since I’d assume they’re planning to use it in anger, and sourcing some parts for these now obsolete two-strokes is only going to get harder. No mention is made of any spares package, so a quick email to the seller might be in order to see if there are any available. That aside, this looks like a killer track bike or race bike for someone with the skills or friends or money to keep it running, and the Buy It Now price is set at $12,500 which seems reasonable, considering the preparation that’s gone into it.

-tad

Deltabox Racer: 1992 Yamaha TZ250D for Sale
Ducati February 26, 2019 posted by

Doing the math: 2002 Ducati 998R

Sold before we could post it! This immaculate 998R is going to a new home after someone committed to the $26k BIN. -MI

In the game of “there’s no substitute for cubic inches” the Ducati 998 was a step above that which came before. The last of the 916 lineage, the 998R model was everything that a 916 enthusiast could hope for. More engine, with more torque and power. More suspension and more adjustment. More championships, and unfortunately, more price. Visually, the 998 (as well as the 996 that preceded it) resemble the fabled 916. But the 998 was everything that the 916 strove to be in the initial version. And the 998R? It was even more.

2002 Ducati 998R for sale on eBay

As is Ducati custom, the “R” bikes are something just a bit more special. Ignoring the limited edition numbered plaque on the headstock for a moment, the R bikes have always been equipped with the best of the best – from suspension to brakes. But even more so, the power plant of the R model has been one step ahead of current year Ducatis. The 996R model foreshadowed the 998 in displacement. And the 998R, with a revised bore/stroke combo, a model-specific oil pan, cams, and more, really displaced 999cc. That’s right folks – this is really a 999R in Tamburini clothing (for those that prefer it to the Terblance design that followed). From an engine perspective, it is mechanically closer to the 999 than the 996 (and not just numerically). Easily the most recognizable form in the motorcycling world, the 998 utilized the general bodywork, single sided swing arm and high exhaust of the 916 to create a beautiful – and terrifically potent – road missile.

From the seller:
For Sale is my 2002 Ducati 998R, #461 of 700. I have owned the bike since August, 2006. It currently has less than 6600 miles and is in excellent shape. It has always been titled and licensed in California, since new and the current registration (in my name) is good through Jan 2020. It has been stored in a climate controlled garage since I bought it 12 years ago. There is no evidence that it was ever abused or raced. I have many receipts from the previous owners dating back to early 2003.

This bike is in very original condition as a street legal model. The paint is beautiful with one noticeable scratch on the lower portion of the fairing. Everything works properly (gauges, lights, controls, horn, etc). It has Marchesini Magnesium wheels with older Pirelli tires. Ohlins suspension front and rear with an Ohlins steering damper. I have added the wiring mod to allow the bike to idle in neutral while on the side stand. Also, a new Yuasa battery (May 2018). It comes with all the additional goodies. I will include the front and rear stands, a factory 998R shop manual, a complete factory tool kit, the 998R owner’s manual, and the factory Plaque of Authenticity.

More from the seller:
The most current service to the bike (June/July, 2018) was performed by Scott Watters, owner of Motoservizio in Signal Hill, Ca. Prior to starting his business in 2002, Scott worked at Ducati dealerships as a factory trained mechanic. He also was a Fast by Ferracci mechanic for Doug Polen (AMA 1994), Vance and Hines mechanic for Thomas Stevens and Anthony Gobert (AMA 1997-98), Doug Polen (FUSA 2000), Dean Mizdal AMA 2001. All were racing Ducati MCs.

The recent servicing included:
4 valve service
New cam belts
All fluids fully changed (oil/filter, coolant, fork oil/seals/bushings, and brake fluid)
New air filters
R&R fuel pump, new filter, new hoses, and cleaned tank interior
Clean the headlight shells inside and out

Again, the bike is in excellent condition and is ready to be ridden hard or put on display.

The final model in the original 916-based line, the 998R stands out as the pinnacle example of that model. It shares all of its good looks and characteristics with the legend, yet boasts more power and better *erverything* across the line. If you are in it for the collection, this is a must-have bike. If you are in it to ride like Troy Bayliss (but undercover, without the polarizing graphics of the Bayliss Edition), this is still a must-have bike. This is a bike you can ride today and it will still be appreciated by the people you pass. Not bad for a design that reaches so far back; it is really that timeless. Check it out here, and don’t wait long. It is not cheap, but we do not see 998Rs of this caliber often. Two more than a 996, 82 more than a 916, and one less than a 999 – you do the math. Good Luck!!

MI

Doing the math: 2002 Ducati 998R
Yamaha February 26, 2019 posted by

Ferocious Fizzer: 1994 Yamaha FZR400RR SP in Utah

Update 2.25.2019: We last saw this bike listed by the same seller in November of 2017 for a buy-it-now of $10,500. It’s back on eBay and bidding is underway. Good luck to buyers and seller! Links updated. -dc

After a short quiet period, friend of the site Gary in Utah is back on eBay, somehow with yet more incredible grey-market machines on offer. Today’s offering is a lovely 1994 Yamaha FZR400RR SP, the gnarliest 400 Yamaha made in the ’90s, sharper, faster, lighter and angrier than the bog-standard FZR400R and FZR400RR.

1994 Yamaha FZR400RR SP for sale on eBay

These got license plates, but they were really best suited to track use, with carbon bits, solo saddles, fully adjustable suspension and a rack of flat slide carbs complemented by a better exhaust and a modified intake. There were faster 400s out there, but the Yamahas had a reputation for corner speed and handling accuracy that still draws wistful stares from Those Who Know.

Being from Gary’s collection, the bike you see here is surgically clean and in near-perfect condition, with all its legal rigamarole taken care of and a clean title. It has covered a handful over 6,000 miles, so it should be good to go for many more.

From the eBay listing:

Up for sale is a very rare, seldom seen 1994 Yamaha FZR400RR-SP with only 10,224 kilometers (6,353 miles). Bike is in gorgeous condition with only a few light scratches, scrapes and handling marks from its ride thru life. Bike comes tastefully upgraded with Akrapovic slip on exhaust, steel braided brake lines, Coerce rear sets and aftermarket grips. Everything else is stock. Fairings are 100% genuine Yamaha factory. Bike runs like the day it was new. Comes with new battery and new engine fluids. $200 deposit due immeadiatly after sale thru PayPal. Remaining balance due within 5 business days by check, bank wire or cash in person. Please text 801-358-6537 for more pictures or with any questions. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a streetbike for road use.

The Buy-It-Now for this 14,000-rpm mini beast is set at $10,500, which is big money for a little bike, but the SP’s rarity and reputation justify the outlay.

Ferocious Fizzer: 1994 Yamaha FZR400RR SP in Utah
MV Agusta February 25, 2019 posted by

Legendary: 2002 MV Agusta F4 Senna 750

An MV Agusta F4 Senna 750 is enough by itself to justify a modifier like “legendary,” but this one carries around a couple extra big names to back it up. Not only does it bear the name of The Man Himself, the bike wears 10-time GP World Champion Giacomo Agostini’s signature and was first owned by NHL legend Sergei Fedorov.

2002 MV Agusta F4 Senna for sale on eBay

If you’re not a fan of the Detroit Red Wings, or you don’t remember the early 1990s, Fedorov’s name likely doesn’t mean much to you. But the dude won three Stanley Cups with the ‘Wings, after a gutsy defection to the United States after an international game. Look him up.

Setting aside the signatures and ownership of famous men, the 2002 MV Agusta Senna 750 is a force to be reckoned with. The 750cc inline four was designed with the help of Ferrari, and in the Senna managed about 140 horsepower. They’re serious machines, but there are a raft of cheaper bikes that went faster. The Senna is one you buy, because, well, look at it.

This is number 192 of a worldwide production run of 300, and it looks to be in very good shape, commensurate with its scant 3,500 miles. The pictures don’t tell us much, and the description doesn’t go into huge detail either.

From the eBay listing:

Extremely rare and beautiful. Part of a small collection of bikes purchased new by NHL Hall of Famer Sergei Fedorov. Bike has been personally signed by legendary MV Agusta rider/ champion Giacomo Agostini! This bike is number 192 of 300 built for worldwide production. MV reported that only 50 of these bikes were imported to North America. Inline 4 cylinder engine designed with cooperation from Ferrari produces 136hp at 13900 rpms. 0 – 60mph in 2.9 seconds. Quarter mile in 10.7 at 136mph. Lightweight and extremely fast. These bikes are legendary not only for performance and handling but for design and collectability!

This bike is in excellent cosmetic, running and riding condition at 3500 miles. The sale includes original owner’s manual, spare key, spark plug tool, and factory red rear wheel bike stand.

This bike is currently for sale locally as well.

With a starting bid of ten grand, and no word on the reserve, we’ll be interested to see where this one will go. Will the whiff of fame and provenance drive the value above similar bikes? Let us know what you think in the comments!

Legendary: 2002 MV Agusta F4 Senna 750
Honda February 24, 2019 posted by

Nickel Defense – 1986 Honda VF500F

Mid-1980’s Honda covered the flanks of their bigger VF-series sportbikes with the sharp-handling VF-500F.  This example had low miles before an unplanned break in the action, but has had inside storage and is looking for a new home.

1986 Honda VF500F for sale on eBay

While Honda’s double cradle of square tubing might not be futuristic, it provides a stable platform for the DOHC V-4 which is pretty state of the art.  The very oversquare 498cc engine makes 70 hp and revs to almost 12,000 rpm.  Showa forks are air-adjustable and incorporate Honda’s TRAC anti-dive system.  Under the seat an adjustable Kayaba monoshock limits the aluminum swingarm.  Brakes are triple 255 mm disks, with four piston calipers up front.  Livery for 1986 involved a red seat and fork, but the blue and red were more HRC than earlier models.

This VF500F is garaged but it sounds like higher priorities have gotten in the way.  The left rear turn signal could use a new mount, and the right front fairing has a scrape, but otherwise it’s all there.  Low miles for the age and along with a little re-commissioning maintenance, it just needs a shining up here and there.  Notes from the eBay auction:

Clear title. Nice bike. Well maintained and owned by a certified Honda mechanic. 15,549 miles.  Unfortunately my hubby Mr. Hondaholic, is incapacitated at the moment so I (his wife) am selling this for us.  Been garaged and kept on trickle charger (Gets fired up routinely).  Only thing I can see wrong with it is the right rear blinker is taped up and there is an abrasion on the left side of fairing.

1986 was the last year for the V-4 500, replaced by the CBR600 in 1987.  Reviewed as a nice handling roadster, the compact riding position and finicky cold running were the only squawks.  While not perfect, the scrape on the fairing is limited to the blue area and as re-finishable as it could get.  Good chance to get into a great V-4 and help out a fellow rider.

-donn

Nickel Defense – 1986 Honda VF500F

Support Our Sponsors!



FB Like Box

Subscribe by Email

Get all our new posts delivered to your email automatically. Spam free! Enter your email address:

Featured Listings

Do You have a special sportbike that should be listed on our site? Sell your bike with a Featured Listing!

Archives