Monthly Archives: December 2018

Suzuki December 30, 2018 posted by

Last of Its Kind: 1996 Suzuki RGV250 SP VJ23 for Sale

For the most part, the RGV250 was a gradual evolution of the original beam-framed, two-stroke 90° v-twin machine introduced in 1987. But the VJ23 version introduced in 1995 was a significant leap forward, with an entirely new frame and engine to go with the swoopy bodywork. Unfortunately, with interest in the class waning, this final, and some feel best version of the RGV250 was never officially available outside Japan, making this little bit of forbidden fruit especially rare here in the USA.

That new engine featured a switch to a 70° v-twin that replaced the earlier 90° unit. Traditionally, sports v-twins have 90° v-angle because they’ve got perfect primary balance, but the advent of balance shafts and more precise engineering seems to have shifted things, and sport v-twins like the Aprilia RSV Mille used a very compact 60° engine.

Obviously, given the tiny pistons involved in a 250cc two-stroke and the relatively modest revs involved, I’d expect the additional vibrations of a 70° v-twin could easily be chalked up to “character,” and the more compact configuration should offer improved packaging and additional flexibility in placing the engine in the frame for better weight distribution.

In addition, the bore and stroke of the new engine measured 54 x 54.5mm, compared to the racier and more oversquare 56 x 50.6mm of the earlier bike so, although power was still limited to 40hp per Japanese laws and made similar power in de-restricted form, the package was much more flexible at lower revs and easier to ride. A functional ram-air duct added power at speed, and for the first time, an electric start made the bike easier to fire up, while the SP added a trick dry clutch to the mix.

The brakes on these little rippers would have been enough to stop a much bigger machine, weight was under 300lbs with fuel and oil, and there was real performance on tap, with 125mph top speed. But you still had to work for that speed, and that was pretty much the whole point of the quarter-liter class anyway.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Suzuki RGV250 SP VJ23 for Sale

1996 Suzuki RGV250 SP VJ23. 9900 miles (15,934 kilometers), very original and unrestored. Mechanically sorted. All fluids are fresh. Shifts and revs to redline perfectly. Starts effortlessly every time. Very honest bike. Small paint chip on fuel tank, left silencer has a dent, some touchup paint on lower nose fairing. Please see images. Fuel tank is rust free. Aftermarket lower controls (COECRE) and exhaust (SUGAYA). Has VIN matching State of Ohio title.  All bidders make NOTE: Vehicle is titled as a 1993. If this is of concern please don’t bid. “Buyer is responsible for their own State Requirements.” California and Hawaii sold with Bill of Sale only. Please email all questions. Thank you for looking.

Some of the images are relatively low-resolution here and leave a bit of detail to the imagination, but the seller does indicate some cosmetic imperfections that are visible in the detail shots. It’s rough around the edges, but it claimed to be mechanically solid, so maybe the perfect bike for someone who wants a rider or a bit of a project. For the right price, this could be a really cool bike, if lurid neon graphics, stinky smoke, and knee-down corner-carving are your thing.

-tad

 

Last of Its Kind: 1996 Suzuki RGV250 SP VJ23 for Sale
Benelli December 29, 2018 posted by

Green Flash – 2005 Benelli Tornado Tré

Great to see two Benelli’s in a month, but two have popped up this holiday week !  This is an earlier example of the rear-radiator sportbike, with just dealer miles despite its litigious past.

2005 Benelli Tornado Tré for sale on eBay

After difficulties in the late 1980’s, the revitalized Benelli showed the Tornado in 1999, and developed the 898cc triple with a reputed 140 hp.  In concert with a desire to have the engine as far forward as possible, the radiator was located amidships with underseat fans vacuuming hot air out the back.  The tube and casting chassis is Triumph-esque, with premium Brembo and Öhlins components.

The Tré has traveled but unfortunately not much under power, between storage units mostly.  It appears as new except for a couple of very light marks.  The owner has dealt with a couple of storage-related issues, and the ECU re-flash hopefully exorcised the lean-running midrange flat spot.  From the eBay auction:

This example has now 198 original miles. I think it had 135 miles when I first got it about 6 years ago.  I found it in North Carolina.  It was said to come out of a storage locker. I had to chase down the original owner and pay off the bank loan to acquire title. That took a while.

I found a former Benelli technical rep who has a small shop near Pittsburgh. He helped me bring it back to life, fixed a few things and put in the current ECU map, etc.  That was when  first got it and Its been part of my collection ever since. More recently, I had to replace the fuel pump which went south from sitting. Back to Pittsburgh it went.

Its now again a turn key  bike! You wont find a cleaner nicer example but it does have a couple small hairline scratches in the lower left green panel. See pix. That’s about it. The rest is as new.

The offbeat design led to an 1130cc superbike and naked, but after a 2005 merger with Qjian Jiang the company’s focus has shifted to smaller singles and scooters, though a 600cc four is still on their North American menu.  Good reviews for the Tré were tempered by ECU mapping and alternator drive difficulties, but once sorted it handles great and the 900 triple is a joy.  The asking price concentrates on all the good things about rarity, and maybe there is a buyer with the support network in place.  In the meantime, the rest of us can enjoy a very Italian sport from 2005 with just 200 miles…

donn

 

Green Flash – 2005 Benelli Tornado Tré
Laverda December 28, 2018 posted by

Bet on Black: 1998 Laverda Black Strike Cafe Racer for Sale

As Laverda rose from the ashes of the 1970s, they saw Ducati as a natural rival, inspiration, and target. Yes, I know that Laverda continued to produce new motorcycles into the 1980s, but those were just 1970s engines wrapped in new clothes, a pattern that would continue when the company was reborn in the 1990s… So as the 750S was intended to target the Ducati 748, the Boys from Breganze needed something to compete with, and hopefully sell as well as, Ducati’s parts-bin success story, the fabled Monster. Enter, the Laverda Ghost Strike.

The original Ghost used a trellis-style frame apparently intended to mirror the Ducati Monster, although the restyled Strike version seen here used a beam frame designed by the famed Nico Bakker, along with restyled bodywork and a twin-headlamp setup in a handlebar-mounted bikini fairing. Interestingly, the Ghost was available with both trellis and aluminum beam frames concurrently to suit different stylistic tastes. Fortunately, geometry and weight are identical, so the bike’s excellent handling was unaffected.

High-quality components like Paioli suspension and Brembo brakes spoke to Laverda’s serious intent, and the bike was one of the first production motorcycles with a centrally-located fuel cell. In this case, the aluminum cell is fitted behind the engine, leaving the “gas tank” to be an airbox, possibly to the confusion on new riders and onlookers since there is no gas cap, just a blank expanse of plastic. The actual filler cap is in the tail, under a plastic panel or a pillion pad, depending on what mood you’re in that day.

It was the engine, a development of the 500cc parallel twin first seen in the Alpino and introduced way back in 1977, was always the Zanè-era Laverda’s Achilles’ heel. It wasn’t a bad starting point, as it already had dual overhead-cams, four valves per cylinder, and a six-speed gearbox. For this more modern application, the air and oil-cooled parallel twin was punched out to 668cc and fitted with Weber-Marelli fuel injection for a claimed 70hp.

Viewed in isolation, the engine did a fine job: it was naturally compact, liked to rev, and made decent power. Unfortunately, it was up against the torquier, two-valve Pantah in the Monster and needed to be worked harder for the same result. The engine later gained a few cubes and liquid-cooling for the Sport models like the Formula, but that bike was pitched against the Ducati 748 and, while handling as as good or better, the Laverda’s 1970s roots were unfortunately showing by then.

Overall, the Ghost’s styling is… distinctive. It’s not a pretty bike, but looks aggressive and purposeful, a worthy competitor to the Monster. However, while both are designed to provide an Italian bike experience for the proles, the Monster looks like its own thing, but the Ghost hasn’t aged quite as gracefully and doesn’t hide it’s parts-bin origins as well.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Laverda Black Strike Cafe Racer

If you are looking at this auction, you probably know what this is. This is a Zane Laverda Black Strike Café Racer 650/668. This is an extremely rare motorcycle. Only 50 total were built and only a few made it to the United States. Of these, this one has only 1 true mile on the odometer.

The black strike edition was a kind of a one-off within the Zanè-era lineup and incorporated all the top shelf goodness of the Laverda marque at the time; a Nico Bakker designed frame, 3 sets of Brembo brake calipers, Marchesini wheels and a letterbox gas tank that reduces the center of gravity (which is still pretty advanced after 14 years). And the fact that you can still get a Zanè-era Laverda for reasonable money whereas a lot of Breganze-era bikes have begun to appreciate beyond the reach of us mere mortals is another plus.

The air-cooled 668 engine and Nico Bakker designed frame were from the 668 Sport model, while the seating and gauge clusters where from the the 668 Ghost.The 668 Black Strike was also the first model with the lighter plastic gas tank, straight exhausts without the restricted collector box and also offered a few bits of optional carbon fiber such as exhausts and optional front fender/mudguard.

The Black Strike model was produced in 1997/98 at the number of 50 units and since Laverda is now a mothballed marque within Aprilia Piaggio this is definitely a rare bike.

The story behind this bike supposedly is, that Laverda brought a handful of bikes to Laguna Seca in 1997 to have them tested and rideen by the press. After a couple bikes were crashed by journalists, Laverda pulled the remaining bikes, but instead of sending them back to Italy, they passed them on to selected dealers. This is one of these bikes. 

Original owner. Bike purchased from Space Coast Cycle in Coco Beach. It was started by the dealership when bought and never started  again.  

Other Zanè Laverdas for sale: 1999 Formula and 1998 Legend. Inquiries welcome.

Some specs: 

  • Air/Oil cooled parallel twin, four stroke, DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, Electronic Fuel Injection
  • 6-speed
  • 668cc Bore x Stroke 78.5x 68.8mm 
  • Compression 9.0:1 
  • 70HP @8,000 rpm  – 61Nm@ 7250 rpm

Buyer to make arrangements for shipping/pick-up

Bike is located south of Cleveland, Ohio.

I’d never actually heard of the Black Strike Café Racer before seeing this, which makes sense since they only made 50 of them, according to the seller. A good Monster offers Italian looks, sound, and performance potential with much better parts availability, but the big appeal of any Zanè-era Laverda is rarity: I ran into a nice, yellow Ghost Strike here in SoCal and my riding buddies had absolutely never heard of the damn thing. All “murdered out,” this Black Strike does have a very sinister 90s vibe that I like and, if being different is your thing, you sure as hell won’t see another one at your next bike night. If anyone knows a good Laverda mechanic, feel free to share in the comments…

-tad

Bet on Black: 1998 Laverda Black Strike Cafe Racer for Sale
Benelli December 27, 2018 posted by

Explosive – 2007 Benelli Tornado TNT1130 Sport

Following their 2002 Tornado Tré sportbike, Benelli’s successful TNT all-around bike was the re-vamped company’s foray into the liter-plus-class.  Testing the roiling naked-sport waters, Benelli put many advancements and quality components into the Tornado Naked Tré 1130.  RSBFS regular Iconic Motorbikes offers this 2007 TNT and though it’s not perfect, its ability to draw a crowd sets it apart.

2007 Benelli TNT1130 Sport for sale on eBay

 

The TNT Sport expanded on the company’s 4-valve triple, with a fairly extreme 130 hp and 87 ft.-lbs. torque.   The hybrid chassis combines steel trellis with cast head and connectors, with Marzocchi 50mm forks and dual-adjustable monoshock.  A “power control” button on the dash reduces rear-wheel hp for rain events or cold tires.  Side rads and integral turn signals are part of the red and black jagged-flow design.  Brakes are Brembo Serie Oro, and their black wheels complete the picture.

 

With just over 9,000 miles, this Sport has been in a low-speed mishap, but except for a few scrapes and a cracked fairing boss, it shows quite well.  Much too rare to be festooned with farkles.  From the eBay auction:

Horsepower is right around 135 HP and a torque curve that’s sure to loft the front wheel in the air.

Funky side mounted radiators, a single high center exhaust, futuristic “alien like” styling and nothing short of brilliant engineering will most certainly get you second looks wherever you go!  This was one of Benelli’s last true innovative bikes that they released.

When released the magazines and reviews all agreed that it had amazing handling, fantastic power and one of the best naked bikes on the market.

As far as this particular bike, pretty much stock with a carbon fiber front fender, CRG levers and just the OEM awesome styling such as the HUGE diameter front forks, the swept design hollow spoke wheels, the two tone seat and a taillight that wraps around the exhaust….SO COOL!

 

Reviews praised the TNT’s up-to-date handling, but a few electrical gremlins played havoc with Bennelli’s reputation.  Even Cycle World’s long-term test article was a bit of hangar queen, claiming only 1,300 miles over their second six months.  Though still based in Italy, Benelli now has an Asian partner and has been concentrating on that market.  But for a fan of the brand or just off-beat super nakeds, the TNT1130 has a lot to recommend it.

-donn

Explosive – 2007 Benelli Tornado TNT1130 Sport
Honda December 25, 2018 posted by

Christmas Bonus: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

Long before “mass centralization” became a popular marketing buzzword for sportbikes, Honda was investing its bubble economy-inflated budget in a bike that took advantage of that very concept, the exquisitely-engineered VFR750R, otherwise known as the legendary RC30. Honda was so invested in sportbikes at the time that it actually sold an I4 and a V4 range of bikes concurrently, with their CBR and VFR filling slightly different niches. But when it came to their homologation bikes, Honda took their hard-won knowledge from the street-oriented V4 bikes and used it to develop the bike seen here, the VFR750R.

If you’re passingly familiar with Honda’s roadbikes, “VFR” probably evokes images of practical and engaging sport-touring bikes that lean on the sport end of the spectrum. This is not one of those bikes. The RC30 was developed to win production-based racing classes, specifically the then-new World Superbike Championship, although the ELF-designed single-sided swingarm hints at the bike’s endurance racing capabilities as well.

At the heart of the bike is obviously a compact V4 engine with a relatively narrow frontal area for good aerodynamics and very centralized mass, gear-driven cams for extremely precise valve control, and a 360°crankshaft that improved traction at the rear wheel, compared to a more traditional 180° unit. The concept of the 360° crank is that the combustion events are clustered close together, instead of spaced evenly throughout each engine revolution to allow the rear tire to “recover,” increasing traction and improving tire life. It also gives the bike a flatter powerband and a distinctive soundtrack that can be appreciated, even if your skills don’t extend to tire-spinning corner exits. The downside of a V4 is generally increased weight compared to an inline-four and tight packaging, especially with a 90° v-angle, as used here. Stripped of its fairing, the RC30 looks very dense and packed with mechanical bits, and V4s can be a bit of a bear to work on.

Reviews then and now describe it as an easy bike to take full advantage of, a bike that rewarded finesse, a bike that just did as it was told and allowed the rider to get on with winning. Power was unremarkable, weight was average, and nothing about the bike screamed “race winner.” But win it did, even against stiff opposition from Ducati, Bimota, Suzuki, Yamaha, and Kawasaki, and Honda only abandoned the V4 formula when it decided that rules in WSBK favoring v-twins were onerous and biased. So they built a v-twin and showed everyone they could win with those as well, but it was clear their hearts would always belong to the V4…

The RC30 is a handsome bike, with nearly perfect proportions and a wealth of amazing details, although it doesn’t have the easy wow-factor of something from Italy. It’s not often you can accuse Ducati of cribbing styling elements, but the 916’s taillights and distinctive single-sided swingarm look awfully similar to what you can see here. And unlike those Italian machines, every single component is carefully thought out to work as part of a complete package, and engineered to near-perfection.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

  • Long term ownership and fewer than 5,000 miles
  • 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30
  • Frame Number: 2100129
  • Engine Number: 2100162
  • Legendary 16-valve gear-driven DOHC 90 degree V4 engine
  • Reportedly fewer than 3000 produced
  • Single owner since 1990
  • Fewer than 5,000 miles from new.

One of the modern era’s few immediately collectible classics, the Honda VFR750R – better known as the ‘RC30′ – was created for just one reason: to win the World Superbike Championship, a feat it achieved in the nascent series’ first two seasons of 1988 and 1989. And while American Fred Merkel was bringing Honda its first two WSB crowns, Britain’s Carl Fogarty used an RC30 to win the TT F1 World Championship in 1988 and 1989, and the equivalent FIM Cup in 1990. No mere short circuit scratcher, the RC30 and its derivatives proved durable enough to win a hat-full of Endurance Classics too. That this latter requirement was also part of the design brief may be determined from the fact that a quick-release front fork and single-sided swinging arm – essential for speedy wheel changes – were part of an unrivaled specification that included a twin-spar alloy beam frame, 16-valve V4 engine with gear-driven cams, close-ratio six-speed gearbox and four-pot front brake calipers.

All of which did not come cheap: at the time of its launch in 1988 an RC30 cost near double that of other super-sports 750s. Despite the passage of time and progress of motorcycle technology, the RC30 remains a match for the latest generation of sports bikes but possesses an exclusivity that none of them can approach. ‘No other bike from the late-Eighties is lusted after like the RC30’, reckoned Bike, and few would disagree. And then there’s the exhaust note – loud, of course, but soulful enough to bring a pit crew to tears.

This RC30 was only very recently liberated from its second and very long-term owner. Purchased in the UK in 1990, fewer than 5,000 miles have been put on the bike since it was new. Not long after acquisition, the superbike was taken to the Isle of Man where it was driven around the race track, but not actually raced. In 1991 the machine was brought stateside. Regularly maintained since new, the previous owner reports that the RC30 was taken to the local Honda dealer for a pre-sale service within the last couple of months.

Fresh from nearly three decades of single owner care, this legendary machine is offered in excellent condition throughout. The engine starts readily, idles smoothly and has an abundance of power. The clutch is silky-smooth and brakes and suspension are near perfect. I would opt for a new pair of tires before serious road use and am happy to negotiate your tire choice in to the price.

This is a rare opportunity to acquire a motorcycling icon of performance and provenance and a must-have for a discerning collection.

For additional information and photos go to ClassicAvenue.com

V4s are all the rage these days, but Honda really pioneered them for modern motorcycle applications. Because who the hell else would want to design around such a packaging headache? Obviously, Honda has a history of doing things just because they can, practicality be damned: their oval-pistoned racebikes grew out of a staunch refusal to adapt to the changing technology of the Grand Prix scene and simply build a competitive two-stroke. And although that particular experiment was a failure, it shows the lengths to which Honda will go when they believe in an engineering concept. Luckily, the V4 wasn’t quite so complex and was ultimately vindicated by both in-period success and by the legacy it left behind. This example has very low miles and appears to be in very nice, original condition with an asking price of $44,900 and just one more day on the listing, so if you didn’t get what you wanted for Christmas this year and happen to have a bit of your holiday bonus left lying around…

-tad

Christmas Bonus: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale
Moto Guzzi December 24, 2018 posted by

Some of its parts? 2003 Moto Guzzi V11 with mods

While we here on RSBFS tend to favor the original over the modified, sometimes there is a clean enough project bike that deserves some attention. I believe this V11 is one such bike, and I think you will by the time you get to the bottom of this post. Pull up a chair, grab some coffee (or something stronger) and read on!

2003 Moto Guzzi V11 build for sale on eBay

While we tend to see major dollars thrown at the odd Ducati or custom two stroke, it is not often we come across a Moto Guzzi bestowed with such a lavish wardrobe. Guzzis are relatively rare enough in the US and a V11 would find itself on these pages if in decent condition, but when somebody takes the time and money to bridge the stocker into something more while retaining nearly all the stock pieces, you see a potential collection in the making. After all, there are nearly enough parts here to build a second bike!

The V11 is as straightforward a Guzzi as you can imagine: The big V twin is situated across the chassis. Displacing 1064cc and with valves actuated with pushrods, the focus is more on torque than outright, high RPM power. Still, there are over 90 ponies at your disposal in stock form, which ensures respectable performance. Modern touches such as fuel injection and a six speed gearbox bring the Italian relic to the current century. Evolution is a good thing, and Guzzi took advantage of a solid foundation to provide minor improvements to the lineup: a lighter clutch made engagement easier (and reduced the torque roll), enhanced swing arm / driveshaft geometry reduces shaft jacking, and revised chassis rake/trail numbers enhance handling. If you ever drooled over a 1970s or early 80s LeMans, the V11 line offered the same great bones with far greater refinement and reliability. Better yet, the V11 was offered in several guises, including Naked, Sport and LeMans formats along with a few limited specials.

From the seller:
After 5 years of ownership and countless dollars and hours spent on restoring and modifying this Moto Guzzi V11 Sport (serial #1 for the 2003 model year), I have decided to part ways with this fantastic motorcycle. My BMW car hobby has overgrown the garage, and I haven’t rode any motorcycles in a few years now. I’ve sold off all my other bikes and this is the last one I was hanging on to. I’ve only ridden this one about 64 miles since I completed the resto-mod. There’s still a few things I’d like to do to be fully complete to my satisfaction, but I will have to leave those items to the new owner. I’d be happy to discuss all the details with potential buyers.

As a brief overview, I purchased the bike in 2013 from a local seller here in Tucson. Although it had fairly low miles, it had seen some sun exposure and needed some serious TLC. Being serial number 1 for the 2003 model year (the very first bike with all of the Piaggio group updates), I had to save this bike, and also put my flare into it. About 9 months later and thousands of dollars later, I had created a wanna-be Cafe Sport model, with actual Ohlins suspension from a Le Mans (sourced from The Netheralands), a brand new Quat-D exhaust, and custom SpeedHut digital gauges with GPS speedometer (to name a few mods). Lots of OEM and Italian carbon fiber bits too, along with a Power Commander III. Tons of brand new parts from Italy, including a new gas tank and hand controls just to name a few parts. Including the purchase price of the bike, I probably have close to $15K wrapped up in this restoration.

More from the seller:
I will consider getting the old Odyssey battery I have installed and try to get the bike started for interested parties, but I may not have the opportunity during this holiday season. The tank has been drained and not run for a few years now, as it’s just been on display in my garage (sad I know). It was running fantastically before putting it away, as I had adjusted the valves and balanced the throttle bodies with the special adapter cable and multi-meter, as well as a digital differential pressure gauge I borrowed from work. That said, I would highly recommend that the bike be gone over thoroughly by a Moto Guzzi expert before taking to the streets. The tires are old now and should be replaced, even though the tread is still within spec. Again please remember that this has been sitting un-ridden in a climate controlled garage for at least 3 years. The engine oil, trans oil, and final drive oils are 4 years old, but only have 64 miles on them.

More from the seller:
In the pictures below, please note that I am selling ALL of the spare parts with the bike, so if you are the lucky winner, please plan on arranging for transport of the motorcycle as well as the huge spread of parts as shown. There’s probably $3000 in spare parts alone. On that note, please do not ask me to part out the Quat-D exhaust, carbon fiber pieces, etc. At this time, the winning bidder will be rewarded with a large collection of rare OEM and aftermarket parts to which he or she can part out as they see fit. I truly think this resto-mod is a great ‘sum of its parts’ motorcycle, but I understand if it appeals to some people as a source for parts and profit; however I will not be tearing the bike down for that purpose.

Selling as shown in the photos, no warranties expressed or implied. Happy to work with your moto-shipping company for transport. The bike is located in Tucson Arizona. I will be keeping the personalized license plate!

Not only is this a gorgeous build full of some awesome parts, it has been chronicled in a few different formats. First off, there is an extensive thread in the Guzzi forums HERE. If you want to see a timeline, this is your chance. There is also a video of the bike in action, however it may not be in its final configuration:

As you can imagine, the seller has invested more into this V11 (with serial #1) than he is likely to get back out of it. Bespoke items for Italian hardware do not come cheap, and modified machines rarely recoup the purchase price (or labor) of the upgrades. And at the heart of it, the base V11 Sport is not exactly rocketing up the charts when it comes to valuation. That makes this auction extra interesting: with a $7,500 opening ask there is a lot of value here, even if that is on the high side for this make/model. Check it out here – there are many more pictures available. Enjoy the fruits of someone else’s labor and obsession, and if you play your cards right you might end up with an Italian steed with a boatload of spares for a decent sum. Viva Italia!

MI

Some of its parts?  2003 Moto Guzzi V11 with mods
Norton December 23, 2018 posted by

Mystery Ship: 2010 Norton Manx

According to Wikipedia: “The Norton Manx or Manx Norton is a British racing motorcycle that was made from 1947 to 1962 by Norton Motors Ltd.” And as any avid motorcycle enthusiast will know, this is a truly iconic brand and model – dominating the TT as well as other races in the day. Knowledgeable readers will also know that Norton has not been in the motorcycle business for a number of years, having changed hands several times over the last few decades. Rights to the Manx name was sold off in the late 1960s, and currently resides (since 1994) with UK Engineer, Andy Molnar. If the date of the bike is correct, this looks to be a Molnar Manx – a faithful reproduction of the original Manx but NOT a true Norton.

2010 Norton Manx for sale on eBay

From the seller:
(translated with Google – the original text is in French)
Bore diameter: 90 mm
Reinforced motor bearings
Gardner carburetor: 40 mm
Box Quaife 6 reports with barrel
Maxton rear shock absorbers
Magneto electronic ignition
Öhlins steering damper
18 “wheels with Avon racing tires
Integral fairing with integrated recovery tray
Carbon front and rear fenders
Front brake Fontana 4 cams 230 mm
Electronic rev counter

Maintenance documentation as well as new maintenance parts are also provided with the motorcycle.

Molnar Precision Ltd. offers a number of reproduction parts, including chassis, suspension, engine and transmission pieces. They also offer complete bikes, which I believe this to be. They are not cheap, and including currency conversion from GBP to USD would result in $40k+ for a build. There is very little info on this bike – and even fewer pictures – but one can make the reasonable assumption that it is the 90mm bore spec, based on the ad text, which works out to 500cc (see the Molnar spec sheet). With a starting bid of $28,000 and a Buy It Now of $35k this could be in the money when compared to a new Molnar build, but interested parties should do some serious research before jumping in. The good news is that the bike is already in the US, so that makes the transport that much easier. Check it out here. Definitely not a core RSBFS offering, but we thought it interesting. Jump over to the Comments and share your thoughts on this remade classic. Good Luck!!

MI

Mystery Ship: 2010 Norton Manx
Ducati December 22, 2018 posted by

Suit That’s Red – 1992 Ducati Paso 907 I.E.

– Sold on the buy-it-now while this post was being scheduled, hopefully to a sharp RSBFS reader !

Like a back-lit tinsel tree in its hometown Santa Monica, this rather red Paso is all dressed up for Xmas.  The last-generation desmodue was a fuel-injected 9th inning home run, which unfortunately couldn’t extend the Tamburini model into extra innings.

1992 Ducati Paso 907 I.E. for sale on eBay

The all-enclosed Paso was one of the first Ducatis under Castiglioni stewardship, intially as a 750cc and later a 904, both with a single Weber.  More linear electronic fuel injection and 90 hp came in 1991, transforming the ride.  Hiding under the soap-bar is a peculiar square-tube frame, and Marzocchi suspension peeks out.  Brembo made both the four-piston calipers and wide 17-inch wheels.  Intakes and vents are arrayed over the fairing with the aim of funneling cold air to the airbox and radiator, and warm air out and away from the rider.

With nearly 48,000 miles, a full rebuild and restoration is likely in this Paso’s past, and though there’s no mention of it in the auction, the buy-it-now is in the upper end of the range.  No evident damage and it’s spotless all around.  Nothing out of the ordinary except for a missing turn signal lense and a nicer seat cover.  From the eBay auction:

This final year example of the 907ie is offered in the classic Ducati red livery. Showing an astonishing 47,926 miles, the bike looks like it has a fraction of that. Regular servicing by a local independent shop has kept the bike in fine riding condition. A recent trip to the shop ensured that the bike was ready for sale.

The 907 I.E. got high marks for its torquey delivery, spot-on fuel injection, hydraulic clutch and 17-inch wheels.  The all-encompassing body was an acquired taste though, and production never really got much over 1,000 per year, ensuring its rarity.  This Paso would have some stories to tell, about some long sporty tours and that season getting a makeover.  And a super previous owner…

-donn

Suit That’s Red – 1992 Ducati Paso 907 I.E.

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