Monthly Archives: October 2017

Ducati October 16, 2017 posted by

Featured listing: 1998 Ducati 900SS Final Edition

Update 1.5.2018: Seller has notified us that this bike has sold! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

To say commemorate its wildly popular, fast and cantankerous carbureted 900SS as fuel injection approached in the late ’90s, Ducati put the old beast out to pasture with a worldwide run of 800 bikes with special paint and graphics and a few trick parts.

The 1998 Ducati 900SS Final Edition carried upswept dual exhausts for cornering clearance, lighter wheels, bigger floating disc brakes, and a solo seat tail section. Bologna didn’t exactly throw the racing parts catalogue at the bike, and its performance was just slightly better than the standard version, but the changes were enough to tip you off that this is not an ordinary SS.

Today’s featured 900SS has been tweaked even further by its current owner, with an Ohlins shock and a brand-new set of Keihin FCR 41 flatslide carbs. The big carbs won’t make the big Duc’s famous starting ritual any simpler, but will definitely sweeten the ride once everything gets up to temperature.

The bike is number 118 of 300, and reportedly has had $4,000 worth of work in the last 50 miles, which includes the aforementioned Keihins as well as a new chain, tires, stem bearings, timing belts and a valve adjustment.Though it has been very well looked after, its 10,894 miles show that neither of its previous owners have been afraid to ride the bike.

Early in seller Joe’s nine-year ownership, the bike was repainted to a very high standard by Ferrari of Houston, as it had been scratched in the original owner’s garage.

From the seller:

1998 Ducati 900 Supersport Finala Edition, VIN ZDM1LC4M5WB027187. Rare and immaculate 1998 Ducati 900 Supersport Final Edition. #118 of only 300 of the last of the carbureted series of classic Ducati Supersports, considered one of the most iconic and beautiful motorcycles ever made. I purchased this bike approximately 9 years ago, and it had a scratch on one of the fairing panels due to something falling against it in the prior owner’s garage. I elected to acquire the correct graphics from Ducati and have the entire bike professionally repainted at the Ferrari of Houston award-winning paint facility, and it is stunning.

The bike has had almost $4,000 in service and upgrades performed in the last 50 miles, including a Keihin 41mm flat-slide carb conversion, new tires, full service including valve adjustment and timing belts, chain, new steering head bearings, and much more. It has an Ohlins rear shock and Corbin custom seat. Brand new Vitaloni Baby Turbo mirrors included with sale. All original parts included. It is realistically priced at $9,900. I don’t believe you will find an example in better cosmetic/mechanical condition than this one. This is an appreciating classic that’s as great to ride as it is to look at.

As mentioned, it has been fitted with a Corbin seat and a set of Fast by Ferracci exhausts to round out the package. The bike is listed at $9,900 and is located in Houston, TX.

Featured listing: 1998 Ducati 900SS Final Edition
Buell October 16, 2017 posted by

Fashionably Late – 2007 Buell XB12 Super TT

One of Buell’s last Harley-powered models, the XB12 Super TT has a slightly longer and more stable XB2 chassis, powered by the 1203cc pushrod twin.  Styled as a super / hyper street machine, it’s a great performer and snappy dresser.

2007 Buell XB12 Super TT for sale on eBay

Part of the XB2 upgrade was more fuel in the frame, and the STT has 4.4 gallons available.  The familiar Sportster powerplant is shrouded in the alloy perimeter frame, with Buell’s Thunderstorm heads and downdraft fuel injection providing 103 hp and 84 ft.-lbs. torque. Showa suspension is fully adjustable and the signature 6-piston Zero Torque Load front brake provides a visual statement as well as great stopping power.  The binnacle fairing has a number plate look to it, as do the panels below the seat, adding to the short, spare, lightweight look.

The Illinois owner has put under 3,000 miles on this STT, and has kept it very clean, and apparently upgraded the suspension and seat, but doesn’t shout about it in the eBay auction:

SUPER NICE ORIGINAL CONDITION NOT MUCH TO SAY OTHER THAN THESE ARE RARE AND IN MY OPINION THE NICEST LIGHTNING THAT THEY MADE. THE BIKE NEEDS NOTHING OTHER THAN A NEW HOME. I HAVE A FEW EXTRAS THAT ARE INCLUDED WITH THE SALE AS ONE OF THE PHOTOS SHOW. I MIGHT HAVE A FEW MORE MILES ON BIKE AS I WILL TAKE A COUPLE SHORT RIDES BEFORE STORING IT FOR THE WINTER.

The black forks are at least a cosmetic improvement, and the owner shows a more road-oriented white front fender on the spares page, which would be going on first thing if it were mine.  While the overall design might be an acquired taste, the STT reviewed as a great fun bike, no more or less practical than any other hyper, but the big torque makes it a leave-it-in-drive kind of ride.  Fully sorted might be a good way to describe the XB2, a mature though innovative frame design and bombproof Evo motor, along with Buell’s funky solutions to some age-old motorcycle design issues…

-donn

 

Fashionably Late – 2007 Buell XB12 Super TT
Yamaha October 14, 2017 posted by

Extreme-ly LE – 1989 Yamaha FZR750R / OW01 with 1277 Miles !

An iconic product of the WSBK race series, the Yamaha FZR-750R or OW01 was an homologation special which sold for more than twice what a more streetable FZR-1000 fetched, and cost Yamaha zillions.  Rather than a tarted-up road machine, Yamaha built the race bike – poorly suited for the road actually – equipped it for DOT inspection, and sold it to race teams and collectors.  Pre-owned by the latter, this OW01 was imported but never registered, and has been ridden only 1277 miles.

1989 Yamaha FZR750R for sale on eBay

Yamaha was playing a little catch-up after the first WSBK season, and prepared the FZR750R for 1989 year.  Based on a proper race engine, the OW01 has Yamaha’s signature 5-valve heads, titanium connecting rods, and low-friction pistons with short skirts and only two rings.  Their EXUP exhaust valve adjusts exhaust flow and improves running outside of the 9,000-12,000 powerband.  The light alloy DeltaBox frame is thin but wide, capped by an aluminum fuel tank.  43mm conventional forks lead an Ohlins monoshock, and 4-piston Nissin brakes are up front.  Riding position in the full endurance fairing is uncompromising.

This Oregon owner has been a fine caretaker of #427, with no apparent wear or damage.  Even the footpegs are pictured, virtually unmarked.  It’s without a stateside title, but some preparation for registration has been done.  From the eBay auction:

Out of the crate this is part of what you got for your money.

1.       Titanium con rods with light weight, short-skirt, stepped-top pistons.
2.       Hand polished ports on a big 5 valve head.
3.       Handmade aluminum fuel tank and handmade aluminum Delta box frame, etc.
4.       Huge magnesium Nissin racing calipers and 320 mm discs provide race quality stopping power.
5.       More magnesium parts to reduce weight.
6.       Quick release axle clamps.
7.       Light weight fiber cowling/fairing.
8.       Close ratio 6 speed gears.
9.       Ohlins adjustable rear shock.
10.     43 mm forks with full range of adjustment.

The OWO1 has the perfect balance of light weight, agility and power. The OWO1 represents one of the best handling and most exclusive Japanese sport bikes of the era and in my opinion, is one of the sexiest looking motorcycle design ever to come out of Japan.

Now about my 1989 OWO1 #000427

This a Japanese domestic model OWO1 with 1277 miles/2044 kilometers. Mileage and initial registration is documented on the Japanese vehicle registration form (shaken-sho). The Japanese shaken-sho is up-dated every two years through a physical vehicle inspection by the Japanese DMV.

This OWO1 is guaranteed to have never been raced. It is a beautiful motorcycle that is 100% stock except for two things. The original owner changed the single horn to a dual horn set-up for safety reasons. He also added a little more heat shielding to protect the light weight fiber cowling/fairing.

This bike has never been registered here in the U.S. You will receive the following from me after purchase so that you can register the bike.

  1.   (CBP form 7501(04/05). This form tells the DMV that customs has been cleared and the bike is ready to be registered.
  2.   A bill of sale
  3.   Because this bike is over 25 years old no EPA or DOT documents are necessary for registration.

This bike has been in storage for a while, so I have done the following before the sale. I have put in a new battery, changed the oil, filter, coolant, brake fluid, and spark plugs.

This OWO1 is extremely rare and beautiful. It is very hard to find one in this kind of condition. But, please keep in mind that it is not a new motorcycle so there are some minor blemishes.

Most OW01’s went racing, with a dealer’s team or privateers, and a factory race kit which added a few thousand to the already astronomical price.  Finding an almost un-used FZR750R has become a odyssey for some, since only a few hundred were made each year.  Though it never resulted in a championship, the OW01 made a healthy mark on WSBK, and under Carl Forgarty held the absolute lap record at the Isle of Man TT for many years.  From an era when factories’ engineering chops could be seen and felt, fans speak reverently of discovering the little-known secrets of the OW01…

-donn

Extreme-ly LE – 1989 Yamaha FZR750R / OW01 with 1277 Miles !
Suzuki October 13, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ Gamma for Sale

Update 10.27.2017: SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Like Ducati’s MotoGP inspired Desmosedici, the square four in the Suzuki RG500Γ “Gamma” in today’s Featured Listing wasn’t actually a detuned version of the race bike’s engine. Race bikes engines are built for power, not longevity, and simply “de-tuning” is probably not going be enough to make one work in a road bike. So in both cases, the engines shared the configuration and general specifications with their MotoGP racebike counterparts, but few or no actual parts. Which almost makes them cooler in my mind: in both cases, the one-off engines were built to be installed in a very limited run of exotic motorcycles, with no intention that they be mass-produced or turn much of a profit. These engines and bikes exist seemingly only for a very small group of enthusiasts, and there’s something inherently cool about that. Also, I love using the Greek alphabet typing up these posts.

The “configuration and general specifications” we’re talking about in this case refers to the two-stroke, twin-crank, disc-valve square four that displaced 498cc. Four very compact Mikuni flat-slides fed fuel and air into the engine, and the gearbox was a quick-change cassette six-speed. Of course it featured a power valve system, in this case Suzuki’s AEC or Automatic Exhaust Control that helped smooth out the two-stroke’s abrupt powerband. The result? The Gamma put just a bit less than 100hp worth of stinky, heavy exhaust smoke out of its four tiny stinger exhaust pipes.

The rest of the bike was more familiar, with an aluminum frame not all that different from the GSX-R, with hydraulic anti-dive forks in the front and Suzuki’s “Full-Floater” system out back. Skinny period 16″ front and 17″ rear wheels mean terrifyingly skinny tires that look like they’d be more at home on a beach-cruiser bicycle today, but were par for the course in 1986. With 340lbs worth of dry weight to push around and less than 100 horses to do it with, performance seems like it would be unimpressive. But it’s the very nature of that spiky power delivery, the all-or-nothing acceleration that requires constant use of the gearbox to make fast progress, the challenge that seems to get two-stroke fans excited.

Unless you’re “of a certain age” or younger and a bit of a bike nerd, the appeal of the whole two-stroke thing may fly over your head. They’re smoky, buzzy, and generally pretty high-maintenance. They also have famously narrow and fairly abrupt powerbands, making them challenging to ride quickly. But even though they do require more regular maintenance than a four-stroke motorcycle, the upside is that they’re relatively simple to work on, lacking traditional intake valves, and therefore cams, cam chains, cam belts, pushrods, or any of the other bits typically associated with “normal” motorcycles.

This particular bike is claimed to have seen the attention of the famous Rick Lance during its refresh and appears to be in extremely nice condition, ready to become the showcase of the next owner’s collection and hopefully be the talk of every motorcycle gathering when the new owner takes it out for a spin and stretches its legs.

 

From the Seller: 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma for Sale

Located in Greater Chicagoland Area 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma

This 1986 RG500 Gamma with 17,769 km (approximately 11,041 miles) is in near mint original condition.  It comes out of the famous BAC car and motorcycle collection. It was extremely well cared for by the previous owner and the current owner.  BAC has owned this bike for almost ten years.  The current owner searched for almost two years to find the best one that could be found.  After purchasing the bike, he had Mike the Chicagoland expert on Gammas along with Rick Lance, a Gamma guru, to supply necessary technical information to bring this bike back to its original factory condition and near mint condition.  The bike runs just as you would expect an original factory bike to run.  And looks exactly like an original factory bike would look after only a few thousand miles were put on it.

Over the years many of these bikes have either been raced into the ground or had the engines pulled out to put in a smaller bike leaving the close to mint original bikes very few and far between.  The current elderly owner has collected cars and motorcycles and says that these Gammas have a long way to go in terms of appreciation and wants to be sure that the next owner is going to preserve the intrinsic and cosmetic value as he has invested so much time, energy and money to bring this bike to its highest level.

Mike the master Gamma mechanic and Rick spent two long years getting this bike and all its necessary parts together to make this bike one of the finest original Gamma’s that exists.

Great bike for those who want only the finest and priced accordingly.

Asking price is $18,500 negotiable.

Other two-stroke GP replicas of the period compromised: the RD500LC famously added a balance shaft to make the bike more civilized, while Honda’s NS400R went with a smaller displacement to help home-market sales. Both offered a much more refined experience, and both have a far less rabid cult following than the RG500 as a result. Prices have been steadily rising, although the RD and NS have increased in value as well, perhaps simply because RGs have been nearly unobtainable for a while now. If you’ve been looking for an RG and have the cash to spend, this one is worth a look.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ Gamma for Sale
Honda October 13, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1979 Honda CBX with Matching Helmet!

Update 10.27.2017: SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

In 1978 Honda stunned the motorcycling world with a technological tour de force. The six cylinder, 24 valve CBX was the most ambitious – and the most visceral – Honda project to date. Dominated by an air-cooled inline format mounted transversely, this Honda made a statement like no other. And while Benelli introduced the world’s first production six cylinder motorcycle, Honda completely owned it and made it their own. Seemingly an engineering exercise that got out of hand, the Honda CBX remains a remarkable piece of machinery. It is coveted by collectors as well, with prices following suit.

A bit portly at 600+ pounds wet, the CBX was considered a superbike at it’s 1978 introduction. Part of that reason is that the world had never seen anything like it. With more than 105 HP on tap, the big bike was as strong in performance as it was stunning to look at. While you might not know it by looking, the big six was actually an evolution of the 50cc and 125cc GP race bikes of the 1960s and early 1970s. Honda claimed this lineage not only aided in meeting the performance targets of the 1047cc, 24-valve DOHC inline six cylinder, but also dramatically shortened the gestation period since this was a route already well traveled by Honda engineers. As a promotional stunt Honda provided bikes to the Isle of Man TT, which were utilized by course marshals and made a statement as to the sporting intent of the flagship Honda. Capable at the dragstrip, decent on the road course (especially endurance events), and at home at any boulevard in the nation, the CBX delivered on Honda’s promise of engineering excellence.

From the seller:
1979 Honda CBX

This CBX bike comes from BAC, the famous automotive and motorcycle collection. In the early 2000s the owner of a famous automobile collection decided that post war 1970s and 1980s motorcycles were some of the most unappreciated classic bikes and set out to buy the best of the best of all the iconic bikes. The owner is nearing 80 years old and has decided to sell off his collection of Italian and Japanese classic bikes of the 1970s and 1980s.

More from the seller:

The CBX in this ad took him three years of traveling across the country to find the best CBX he could find. While the bike has just under 10,000 miles on it, the current owner is the second owner. The previous owner who purchased the bike new only drove it on sunny days and it has never seen a drop of rain or any major dust or dirt. Everything is original bike except for the bearings in the rear swing axle. The bike even has a matching color Honda period correct helmet. The owner says without a question; this has to be one of the finest CBXs in the nation. It runs perfectly and has never been taken apart and nothing sounds like a Honda CBX when it is winding up through the gears.

More from the seller:
The owner said in his opinion the most important part of any collector bike is the mufflers as they are almost in all cases impossible to reproduce. The mufflers on this CBX are immaculate.

This bike also comes with a matching helmet!

This 1979 Honda CBX is located in Chicago land: $14,500

From the pictures of the enormous engine, you might think you need to be a bow-legged cowboy to ride one. But thanks to intelligent design, that is not the case. Not only did Honda cant the cylinder bank forward some 30 degrees, the intake setup is arranged in a vee format to further narrow the bike’s midsection; despite engine dimensions, there is plenty of room for the rider. And with a jack-shaft arrangement that moves ancillary components from the ends of the crank to behind the motor, the CBX is not nearly as wide as you might otherwise imagine.

Built from 1978 through 1982, the CBX was but one of the incredible models that Honda created during this wild time; other examples include CX500 Turbo, CX650 Turbo and later the V45 Interceptor. Yet the more conventional CB900F was the real showroom performer, outselling the engineering oddities by a large margin. As a result, the CBX remains a relatively rare model. Yet it still presents an amazing sight, and continues to stun today. The 1979 Honda CBX shown here is a low mile example. More importantly, this is a a completely original example that was recently liberated from a larger collection. If you are in the market for a 1970s collectable Honda, you want to source the cleanest, best example you can find. This particular machine meets those specs easily. The asking price is $14,500.

MI

Featured Listing: 1979 Honda CBX with Matching Helmet!
Honda October 13, 2017 posted by

Stored indoors: 1985 Honda VF1000R

The 1985 Honda VF1000R answered a lot of prayers when it finally came to the States, after the press and public here had for years praised everything Honda threw a V4 at, but clamored for the serious sportbike Europe got. The VF1000R was the first Honda V4 outside of a full-on racebike to have gear-driven camshafts, and differentiated itself from the slightly less sporty 1000F with full fairings.

1985 Honda VF1000R for sale on eBay

The big motor made well over 100 horsepower, and the bike could nearly hit 150 mph in street trim, even though it weighed north of 600 pounds with a tank of gas on board. A truck by today’s standards, the VF1000R at the time was a hard-nosed weapon, at least until the GSXRs debuted the following year.

The seller of this 1985 Honda VF1000R has kept the bike inside, in what looks like the living room, not the garage. The condition looks great from the small pictures, though the bike is not a low-mileage garage queen. The upholstery and bodywork look to be in top condition, and the bike appears to be mostly, if not all, original. Per the seller, the tires are new.

From the eBay listing:

1985 Honda VF1000R. Excellent condition. Runs amazing, everything works, newer tires. This bike is so nice I have it in currently inside my home. Really don’t want to sell it. But am thinning my collection to make a move to FL. This is a serious collectors bike. Call with any questions. If you have a 0 rating you must call me before bidding or I will cancel the bid. Serious bidders only please. Shipping is the responsibility of the buyer. Todd 913-927-8806
I will not disclose reserve. So please don’t ask.

With a couple days left in the auction, the bidding has been slow, and the bike has not reached its reserve.

Stored indoors: 1985 Honda VF1000R
Ducati October 13, 2017 posted by

Spawn of Sausage Creature: 2014 Ducati 1199 Superleggera

This 2014 Ducati 1199 Superleggera has barely covered its break-in period, and comes complete with a boxful of accessories and two Akrapovic exhaust setups. And, if you’re so inclined, the option of a two-year warranty. On a 200-horsepower, 400-pound Scud missile. With a license plate. And turn signals.

2014 Ducati 1199 Superleggera

It is nigh on impossible to avoid cliches when describing the 1199 Superleggera, as writers have been trying to come up with ways to describe ever lighter, ever faster, ever more mind-bending bikes since Harley and Davidson strapped their first thumper to a Safety Bicycle. Weapons analogies seem appropriate, though, as a race bike handled carelessly will have the same effect on you as any of Beelzebub’s evilest creations.

Even with three years under its belt, the 1199 is an amazing machine, carrying all but the final, infinitesimally small and expensive tweaks that Ducati’s WSBK steeds do. Though it will pass emissions and safely indicate a turn, this bike has very little business on a public road, needing only its first two gears to land you squarely in jail, or turn you into Hunter Thompson’s aptly-named creature.

The bike seen here comes from a dealer in California and is, for all intents and purposes new. Judging by the size of the chicken strips on the tires, it has rarely, if ever been ridden in anger. It comes from smack in the middle of the Superleggera’s production run, wearing number 294 out of 500 examples.

From the eBay listing:

2014 Ducati 1199 Superleggera RARE SUPERLEGGERA – PERFECT

Extended warranty for 12, 24 or 36 months available at a discounted rate.

WOW! We are proud to have this rare piece of motorcycle history available for sale. The 1199 Superleggera is exactly what its name translates to in English – Super Light. Ducati’s performance recipe of lightweight and more power, and designed a machine that creates over 200 horsepower and has a dry weight of just 341.7 lbs., which is the same as Ducati’s WSB racer. Ducati created 200 new parts for this most exclusive slice of exotica, including a carbon fiber seat unit, titanium fasteners, a feather-light 700g lithium battery and revised electronics.

Ducati outfitted the 1199 Superleggera with a lighter, tungsten-balanced crankshaft, titanium con rods, and a lighter flywheel. Ducati also used aluminum cylinder liners instead of steel

With these enhancements, the 1199 Superleggera produces more than 200 horsepower. To tame this type of power, Ducati incorporated a host of electronics, including Ducati Wheelie Control (DWC), Ducati Traction Control (DTC) and Engine Brake Control (EBC). These systems are optimized “with new automatic calibration of rear-tire size and final transmission ratio.” Ducati also added a race-derived, handlebar mount to easily adjust the levels of these systems on the track.

Here is the chance to own the rarest motorcycle in the world and still save 1000’s.

Stock #: R1697

We offer very attractive long – term financing and leasing on all of our pristine vehicles.

Shipping nationwide and worldwide is available with our trusted transportation partners.

Please contact us if you have any questions about this vehicle. We are looking forward to hear from you.

RARE SUPERLEGGERA IN PERFECT CONDITION / Collectors item / 2nd exhaust included

Extended warranty for 12, 24, 36 or 48 months available at a discounted rate.

The $45,890 Buy-It-Now price for this brute is closing in on Desmosedici RR territory, though this bike is nearly as rare, just as powerful and arguably more usable than its hand-built and directly GP-derived sibling.

Spawn of Sausage Creature: 2014 Ducati 1199 Superleggera
Norton October 12, 2017 posted by

Throwback Thursday: 1974 Norton Commando Fastback

In the mid-20th Century, Norton occupied rarefied standing in motorcycling, making itself legendary among racers in Britain and Europe, taking home Manx TT trophies and trading wins with other big names on the continent and in the Isles. Its big-bore engines and revolutionary vibration-isolating frame designs made the brand wildly popular, cutting edge and fast.

1974 Norton Commando Fastback for sale on eBay

By the 1970s, Britain’s notorious knack for corporate mismanagement and reliability woes had hit the company hard, and as it tried to make its Commando – which had debuted in the late ’60s with yet another innovative suspension setup – all things to all people, it was being outgunned by Japanese rivals.

The Norton Commando Fastback had helped debut the badge, and by 1974 was essentially just a sportier-looking seat and fender setup for the popular-but-flawed platform.

The 1974 example seen here is in excellent condition, and carries a raft of modifications to the parallel twin, including a displacement bump, big carbs and a high-compression RH7 head from an earlier Commando 750. We dig the era-appropriate copper-bronze paint, the overstuffed seat and simple, purposeful stance.

From the eBay listing:

900 CC.. BALANCED WITH LIGHTER SOLID STEEL FLYWHEEL.. 80MM BORE.. 36 MM MK2 CARBS MATCHED TO A RH7 HEAD.. BIG BORE EXHAUST. CLOSE RATIO GEARBOX WITH QUAIFE SHELL.((( MOSTLY FOR DOWN SHIFTING TO LESSEN GEARBOX STRAIN))) BIKE HAS NO ISSUES.. LOOK INSIDE MUFFLERS TO SEE HOW CLEAN IT RUNS..STARTS WITHIN 2 OR 3 KICKS AND WILL IDLE AT 500 RPM. EVEN WITH BIG CARBS… E MAIL FOR MORE INFO. E MAIL FOR PHONE NUMBER AND WILL CALL BACK IF SERIOUS. OTHERWISE PLEASE DONT WASTE MY TIME

Rarer than Japanese bikes of the same era, albeit a lot more temperamental, the big Norton is a time capsule to the end of the era of British manufacturing might, rendered in the brutal simplicity that made the breed famous.

Throwback Thursday: 1974 Norton Commando Fastback

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