Monthly Archives: October 2017

Honda October 26, 2017 posted by

Big Bird: 2002 Honda CBR1100XX

Before the Suzuki Hayabusa swept in at the turn of the century to claim world’s fastest production bike status, the Honda CBR1100XX Blackbird ruled the top speed roost. When it came out in 1997, the Blackbird, named for the Lockheed SR-71 spy plane, stopped the motorcycling press in its tracks.

2002 Honda CBR1100XX Blackbird

With 135 horses to the rear wheel from its 1,100 cc inline four, the biggest, heaviest CBR screamed all the way to 178 mph, giving it a 3 mph edge over the Kawasaki ZX-11. Two years later, both bikes were relegated to the back pages with the ‘Busa’s introduction, but the Blackbird soldiered on as a potent sport tourer until 2003 in the states and 2007 across the pond.

The looks have aged well, and the bike has smoother flanks and crisper lines than the Suzuki, and still strikes a handsome profile nearly 15 years since it left this market. This 2002 Blackbird has been kept in close to perfect shape, with a few choice upgrades and all of its original take-offs in a box.

As a later example, this bike carries Honda’s PGM-FI and ram air, which means no-choke starting and a power boost at high RPM. It has covered 20,000 miles and should be dead reliable for the next owner.

 

From the eBay listing:

2002 Honda Blackbird for Sale in Excellent to Immaculate condition. Bird has always been garaged covered and all maintenance is up to date within the last 500 miles. Bike has only been ridden 2x this past year alone and always hooked up to a battery tender in my shop. Bike has new DID chain, new sprockets, and comes with factory seat plus a Corbin seat with silver pin striping. Has HID low beam headlights, customized mirror extenders, shorty levers, and I customized 2 accessory outlets for a radar detector and GPS. Comes with Ram mounts for a Radar Detector (not included) and Garmin GPS and is included. I have installed a Throttlemeister cruise control, stainless steel covers for fluid levels, and I changed all gauges to Blue LED lights. The bike also has a multicolored light kit with different patterns of lights throughout the body. Cover is included. I have all original manuals and a factory service manual that I put in a huge binder with laminated pages when working on in the shop. Bike needs absolutely nothing and owner will not be disappointed if looking for a classic Bird. The bike is an eye catcher. I will be including all knick knacks that I have for the bike. I do have the factory windscreen and as well as a Zero gravity double bubble to go along with purchase. some extra oil, and an oil filter. I also have 2 travel bags to throw in. Basically, anything that I have street-bike related will go with the Bird. I am just cleaning out my Street Bike collection as I will NO longer be riding! Bike sold as is. Feel free to email with any questions.

Buy-It-Now is set at a very reasonable $4,500, which will net the buyer an immensely capable sport touring ride with a very special name.

Big Bird: 2002 Honda CBR1100XX
Ducati October 26, 2017 posted by

Smarty Pants: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart

When Paul Smart rode a green-framed 750 to victory at Imola in 1972, Ducati history was made. No longer a bit player with smaller bikes, Ducati proved that they could compete on the world’s stage. And since that 1972 victory, Ducati has hunted down championship after championship. They have also reached back into the land of nostalgia a few times and brought back neo-retro designs to evoke images of the older bikes, but wrought with newer technology. The early 2000s brought us the Sport Classic lineup, and few are as classic as the Paul Smart replica delivered in 2006.

2006 Ducati Paul Smart Replica for sale on eBay

At the heart of this machine is the same tried and true desmodue 2-valve, air-cooled motor found throughout the Sport Classic lineup (as well as the air-cooled monsters and the SuperSport series). A many-generation evolution of the venerable Pantah “rubber band” power plant, the belt driven valves and simple air cooling are offset by new tech such as twin spark computer controlled ignition and fuel injection. With loads of torque and wonderful character, the 1,000cc L-twin has plenty of grunt and makes all the right noises. The rest of the bike is a revised classic interpretation of the original green frame, with traditional Ducati frame and fairing artistry. There are numerous unique design elements (check out that asymmetrical swing arm with a single shock), and the whole package is wrapped nicely in green and silver.

From the seller:
2006 Ducati Paul Smart

2nd owner. Bike had 400 miles on it when I bought it about 8 years ago.
Termignoni Exhaust with race ECU
Rizoma Grips
Rizoma Reservoirs
CRG Mirrors
CRG RC Levers
Alpina Tubeless Aluminum Wheels
Fleda Brake/Turn signals
JCPB Fork Guards
Supersprox
Pit Bull stand
Battery tender/charger
Also have a full Zard Stainless 2-2 exhaust (louder than the Termis)

I have all the factory signals, exhaust, mirrors, sprocket, chain etc that came on the bike, as well as a Zard 2-2 Stainless full exhaust. There is a blemish on the engine case (pictured), and small crack on the rubber of the right hand grip, which are the only noticeable flaws on the bike. $800 service from Pro-Italia couple hundred miles ago.

Just don’t ride the bike enough, sold the MH900E a while back, for the same reason.

The Paul Smart replica machines (also known as the PS1000LE) were made in limited numbers – data seems to indicate 500 were sold in the US out of a global total of 2000 bikes. That not only makes this an exclusive piece of kit, it also means that the laws of supply and demand start coming into play. Green-framed 750s are so far out of reach of mere mortals that it is not even worthwhile to look. The PS1000LE commanded a premium over the standard Sport Classic when introduced, but speculation and collectors have driven these up considerably since then. This particular bike is not stock, but the seller claims to have most of the stock items. The recent service from a well-known Southern California Ducati shop is another bonus.

The seller is looking for big dollars here: potential buyers need to pony up $24,000 USD just to get this auction started. That is potentially in the range for a great example of this breed (we have seen asks as high as $30k), but may be a bit too stiff for an opening move. The market will tell us where this one goes, although as of yet there have been zero bids. Check it out here to see all of the details and watch the fun (if it starts). If you are in the market for a Smart, you could certainly do worse. Good Luck!!

MI

Smarty Pants: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart
Suzuki October 25, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: Unrestored 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 1100

Update 11.2.2017: SOLD to an RSBFS reader! Thank you to buyer and seller for supporting the site! -dc

We seem to have been awash with slab-sided early Gixxers of late, as the magnificent, watershed beasts enjoy a renaissance of interest and value. Prices for the limited edition bikes are nudging the stratosphere, especially for aging Japanese iron, and they’re pulling the “normal” GSX-Rs along with them.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R 1100 For Sale on eBay

This first-year 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 1100 is a great example of a gently-aged classic sportbike, and is a true time machine, having been kept immaculate rather than being restored, and wearing only aftermarket parts that were added in the bike’s heyday.

The early bikes were very light for the day, and handled on rails when compared to the bulk of big bikes available at the time. Their 18-inch wheels show their age, however, and the square-tube aluminum frame doesn’t stack up to modern bikes as well as some others.

With the exception of just a few tiny cracks, the bike here is immaculate, especially since it hasn’t been mildly restored.

From the eBay listing:

86 Suzuki GSXR 1100, a true survivor, all original body panels and tank in excellent condition. Has some small cracks as shown in photos for its age. Yoshimura period correct 4 into 1 jetted for factory airbox. Original stock OEM exhaust included. Wheels have been powder coated to factory black, brake system flushed, new fork seals, new chain and battery. 16,429 miles, clean title , Bike fires and runs great.

The $7,500 asking price is about right for a first-year GSX-R 1100 in condition this good, and the bike will be a choice addition to someone’s sportbike collection.

Featured Listing: Unrestored 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 1100
MV Agusta October 25, 2017 posted by

The One – 2000 MV Agusta 750 F4 Oro with 1606 miles!

Cagiva bought the rights to the shuttered MV Agusta in 1991, and in 1998 introduced their first new motorcycle in fifteen or so years.  Designed and built to set the world on its ear, the F4 750 had many race-derived components and a pricetag to match.  This Oro is number 227 of 300 and has lived out its adolescence in careful hands and still has the factory original Pirelli Dragon tires.

2000 MV Agusta F4 750 Oro for sale on eBay

 

Designed by Massimo Tamburini, the F4 is striking from every angle and the specs read like an exotic motorcycle laundry list.  Ferrari helped design the radial-array four valve heads for the inline-4, and Tamburini himself had a hand in the 4-2-1-2-4 exhaust.  On the Oro, bodywork and fuel tank are carbon fiber, and magnesium wheels, frame connectors, and swingarm are anodized gold.  49mm Showa forks have quick release axle clamps, and the monoshock linkage allows ride height changes without changing shock settings.

 

Evidently on display since just after its first oil change, this F4 750 Oro’s picture is next to “magnificent” in Webster’s.  The gold magnesium just glows in the right light.  Pictures with Mr. F from FBF are icing on the cake.  The owner’s comments from the eBay auction:

It is one of 60 imported into the USA by Eraldo Ferracci, the USA distributor for the MV Agusta, and number 227 of the 300 built  for worldwide distribution. Purchased in July 2000 from Fast By Ferracci, Willow Grove, Pa. and pictured on delivery with Eraldo at Budds Creek Motocross Track back when Elrado’s Team Husqvarna raced there. 
 
Eraldo is pictured setting up the bike to my specifications. Some of the history and specifications of the F4 750 ORO are below. 1600 miles on this bike since its purchase, and it has always been stored in a climate-controlled environment. The bike is in perfect condition and comes with all original manuals. I think this bike will be a very good long-term investment and a great bike to have in any collection.

 

The Castiglioni brothers saw their vision for MV Agusta through and the F4 brought a few regional superbike wins back to the marque, but a factory race team wasn’t in the cards.  The F4 engine proved to be the foundation of the revitalized MV, and though the model was more sensibly produced starting in 1999 with aluminum castings and plastic fairings, an Oro is worth pursuing.  This one appears to have the white-glove treatment and provenance to justify going wherever the bidding will take it…

-donn

The One – 2000 MV Agusta 750 F4 Oro with 1606 miles!
Suzuki October 24, 2017 posted by

Bad Reputation: 1997 Suzuki TL1000S for Sale

By the early 1990s, pretty much everyone making a hard-core sportbike was using an inline four engine for their regular production motorcycles. And why not? An inline four is a relatively compact engine, is capable of making excellent power for a given displacement, is smooth-running, and can achieve much higher revs than configurations using fewer, bigger pistons. But Ducati stuck with their sports v-twin, likely because of both budgetary and marketing reasons. With some pressure on various race series’ governing bodies, they were allowed a bit of additional displacement compared to inline fours to keep them competitive in terms of outright power, and the wider spacing between power pulses gave them an advantage in terms of traction. But for street riders, the big benefit of a twin was character so, by the mid-1990s, the Japanese manufacturers wanted in on all that sweet vee action. For Suzuki, that meant the introduction of their stylish, half-faired TL1000S.

As has been discussed before, a transversely-mounted v-twin motor is very narrow for good aerodynamics and the perfect primary balance means it’s a smooth performer, but packaging in a modern sportbike can be an issue. Ducati refers to their 90° engine as an “L-twin” to differentiate it from other v-twin sportbike engines, and it references the fact that the front cylinder is virtually horizontal, with the rear cylinder sticking almost straight up. Looking at the bike from the right hand side, the engine does indeed look like a capital L instead of a V. The problem is one of packaging: it’s a long engine and, with a conventional set up, it results in a long wheelbase or a short swingarm, neither of which is ideal. Notice that, on the Panigale, the rear shock and linkage sit alongside the engine. To get the wheelbase they wanted, Suzuki rotated their own  90° v-twin backwards in the frame to clear the front wheel and used unconventional but very compact rotary damper setup at the rear. The theory is sound but, as many original owners discovered, it didn’t work out all that well in practice for the TL.

The issue was that the damper worked fine up until the pace heated up, along with the oil inside, which caused it to quickly loose its ability to, um… dampen. This led to an unenviable reputation for scary tank-slappers and terrifying on-the-limit handling. A larger capacity unit would probably have solved the problem, but several companies have stepped in and developed a compact spring/shock that replaces the stock Suzuki unit and gives predictable performance, allowing the bike’s otherwise excellent design to shine.

The TL’s handling may have been suspect, but there is no doubting that engine: in various states of tune, it’s powered a variety of Suzuki sport and touring models, along with a gaggle of Bimotas and Cagivas. It’s powerful, reliable, and makes all those v-twin noises without the occasional frustrations that came with Ducati ownership at the time. Ducati service intervals are even longer than some Japanese makes these days, but when the TL was introduced, Ducati ownership required real commitment to deal with the recommended 6,000 mile valve adjustments. You might be lacking the famous dry-clutch rattle but, fitted with a good set of carbon fiber cans as seen here, the TL makes all the right noises.

Many TLs have led hard lives: they were billed as affordable Ducati-killers and people certainly treated them that way, so it’s nice to see one that’s been used, but well cared-for.  Some of the aesthetic upgrades may not be to your taste, but good carbon fiber is never a terrible idea, and you can probably find someone willing to swap for the stock parts if you’re interested in originality. Something I wouldn’t change is the rear shock conversion that’s been fitted to sort the handling, the steering damper that should cure any errant bar motions, and the carbon cans fitted to bring out the expected big-twin boom.

Reading the seller’s detailed description, there’s something strangely familiar about it though…

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Suzuki TL1000S for Sale

Up for sale is a fantastic condition fuel injected 1997 Suzuki TL1000S with just over 21k on it. This bike has great personality, tons of low-end power and mid range grunt. Super fast but easily controllable and has great handling. This bike would make a great weekend twisty runner, commuter bike, or fully at home on the track. It is extremely fun to ride. It rides very smooth and can keep up with most sport bikes thru the twistys. Its a fantastic mixture of lightweight body/frame (gotta love the trellis style frame) and the perfect amount of power for the street. You wont be disappointed with this bike. Thousands of dollars in aftermarket goodies and hundreds spent on recent maintence items. This bike is ready to hop on and ride.

The bike has thousands of dollars in aftermarket upgrades and accessories below is a list:

1. Devil Slip-on Carbon Fiber exhaust (This exhaust is exactly what a V-Twin sport bike should sound like)
2. Carbon Fiber look Rear Hugger
3. Carbon Fiber look Air Dam Surrounds
4. Shorty turn signals front
5. Smoked Windscreen
6. Pro-Grip Carbon Tank Protector
7. Integrated rear tail lamp assembly (brake lights, running lights, and turn signals)
8. Adjustable shorty levers (Silver levers with black adjusters)
9. Aftermarket rear wave rotor
10. Aftermarket front wave rotors (not currently installed)
11. R1 rear shock conversion installed (This fixes all the problems with the rotary damper totally removes it)
12. Renthal Grips
13. Aftermarket black Aluminum side mirrors
14. Weisco Fuel Management (dyno tuned for current setup, runs amazing)
15. Aluminum Pro-Tek front and rear brake reservoir covers
16. Carbon Fiber Exhaust boot shields
17. Stainless Steel brake lines front and rear
18. Fender Eliminator
19. Aftermarket Color Matched Undertail

Here is a list of recent maintence items done to the bike:

1. Brand new oil and filter (Synth oil)
2. Chain adjusted and oiled
3. Coolant Flush
4. Steering Dampener Replaced
5. Spark plugs replaced
6. TPS adjusted/recalibrated
7. Battery Tender Hook-up
9. DID chain
10. Front and rear sprocket

Bike comes with a tub of extras that include the passenger seat, all documents for maintence and tuner, some of the stock parts, as well as some additional parts for the bike. Look at picture to see all. Any questions please ask. Price is negotiable. Need gone ASAP.

Introduced in 1997 and made until 2001, the TL1000S was a shot across Ducati’s bow. Tired of the Bolognese firm getting all the press for their sexy, thunderous twins, Suzuki did them one better: a reliable, low-maintenance, liquid-cooled v-twin that made the power of Ducati’s 916 at the price of their air-cooled 900SS…

While 125hp may not sound particularly scary now, it was a pretty big number for a v-twin in 1997 and the grunty power delivery, combined with relatively light weight and a compact wheelbase, made for notoriously “entertaining” handling.

In contrast to Ducati’s “L” twin, Suzuki rotated their 90° motor backwards in the chassis, allowing better packaging at the front of the bike. This left less room at the back for a traditional shock, so Suzuki whipped up a “rotary” damper that was far more compact than a traditional “linear” shock. Unfortunately, one of the reasons traditional spring/shock combos are so widely used is that they’ve got 70 years of development behind them and just flat work. When ridden hard, the TL’s rotary unit gets hot and loses its damping ability, which may contribute to the bike’s reputation for “tank slappers”, unintended wheelies, and all-around beastliness.

On paper, the TL1000S should have stomped Ducati flat, but that really never happened. But while the first bike to house Suzuki’s new twin may not have set the world on fire, the potential in the engine was obvious. It became the Engine That Powered a Thousand Bikes, finding homes in Bimota’s SB8 and the Cagiva Gran Canyon and Raptor models, and it still thumps on in the Suzuki VStrom.

Later reviews toned down the emphasis on the TL’s “widowmaker” tendencies, suggesting that things had been exaggerated just a bit at the time. And, if you do plan to really ride this bike hard, a modern steering damper will help keep things under control, and kits are available to change out the rotary damper for a more traditional unit.

The 996cc engine does sound amazing with a set of aftermarket cans fitted, and the bassy thump that pumps out of the twin exhausts is pretty distinctive, like a very good computer simulation of a Ducati, with added bass.

The TL1000S is aging better than most. The motors are pretty bulletproof, parts should be readily available, and would make a great day-in, day-out bike for someone who wants big twin noise and feel, but doesn’t feel like paying for Ducati maintenance.

Or someone that really, really likes wheelies.

Look, Suzuki’s TL1000S is a pretty cool bike, and historically significant as described above, but I’ll be frank: the reason I posted this example is because the seller’s description is basically a cut-and-paste of another post I wrote a while back! This isn’t the first time that’s happened and honestly, I’m flattered. Hey, if someone thinks my description of a particular model will help them sell it, I’m doing something right. Reading through it, I do wish I’d been a little less liberal with the quotation marks though… In any event, the TL1000S still offers up a whole bunch of bang for the buck. Nice ones are already pretty hard to find, but still don’t command much money. The looks may not be to everyone’s taste, but I think it’s better-looking than the bulbous, more conventionally-styled TL1000R and, with the replacement of the rotary damper, should be a solid handler. The epitome of 90s styling, with analog big-twin power and tasteful upgrades at a bargain price? What’s not to like?

-tad

Bad Reputation: 1997 Suzuki TL1000S for Sale
Yamaha October 21, 2017 posted by

Buy the Pair: 1988 and 1990 Yamaha FZR400

The Yamaha FZR 400 is the kind of bike that manages to get ignored by wide swathes of the motorcycling population, but instill deep devotion in those who have discovered its fantastic chassis, sprightly engine and general friendliness.

1988 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay   1990 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay

That appears to have been the case here, as the seller has not one, but two FZR 400s, and from two different eras of the 14,000 RPM featherweight. The 1988 model has covered a few more miles,  but wears Yamaha’s iconic red and white livery and fantastic “pure sports” graphics. The 1990 is slightly lower mileage, but wears the still cool but not as pretty later livery.

FZR cognoscenti will also know that the ’90 should make the better rider’s bike and track day machine, as it has bigger, four-pot front discs and an aluminum Deltabox swingarm, as opposed to the older model’s square steel unit. Either bike will be a more engaging ride than the heavier, flexier, less-special FZR600 that was available at the same time.

With about 60 horses pushing about 400 pounds, the FZR400 is no slouch, especially for its size and its lovely inline four responds beautifully to revs.

From the eBay listings:

1988 Yamaha FZR400:

1988 Yamaha FZR-400

5470 miles. This is straight out of my personal collection.
New Bridgestones front and rear, complete head to toe service done.
Turn key and ready to play.
See all the pictures for better details. All stock, never raced,
Clean Clear NJ street title!
Really nice example of rare classic!

Call/text me at 845-807-8181 if you have any questions or would like to see the bike in person…check our other auctions for a 90 FZR-400 that I’m also selling.

Shipping is the responsibility of the buyer; New York residents add sales tax.

1990 Yamaha FZR400:

1990 Yamaha FZR-400

100% original and unmolested, with only 5022 miles.
This is straight out of My personal collection. NEVER raced or modified.
Only year in this color combination and Deltabox swingarm.
New Pirellis front and rear, just did a head-to-toe service!
Carbs, NGK plugs, air filter, anti-freeze flush, brake system flush, and oil change using Bel-Ray semi-synthetic.
No rattle can or touch-up paint has ever touched this bike! This little Fizzer is not only rare but ready to ride! Clean Clear NY title.

Call/text me at 845-807-8181 if you have any questions or would like to see the bike in person…check our other auctions for an 88 FZR-400 that I’m also selling.

Shipping is the responsibility of the buyer; New York residents add sales tax.

The ask for each bike is in the upper echelon of what one should reasonably expect for these bikes. They are each in beautiful condition and apparently need nothing, but are not likely to gain much more value. That said, they likely won’t take a plunge any time soon, either.

Buy the Pair: 1988 and 1990 Yamaha FZR400
Kawasaki October 21, 2017 posted by

Little Kwaker: 1989 Kawasaki ZXR250A for Sale

A small-displacement motorcycle with a four-cylinder powerplant like this Kawasaki ZXR250 really makes no practical sense: singles and parallel-twins are simple to manufacture, inexpensive to maintain, easier to package, torquey, and fun to ride. Up to a certain size, where the weight of a single piston and connecting rod create unacceptable vibrations that irritate the rider and tear the engine apart from within, they really just make sense, which helps to explain the popularity of single cylinder powerplants for smaller, or entry-level machines.

But the ZXR250, introduced in 1988, wasn’t really an entry-level machine. It was intended for markets where experienced riders were limited by laws and heavy taxes on larger displacement machines. Riders that might want a more sophisticated machine, and were willing to pay additional costs in terms of purchase price, maintenance, and reduced fuel economy. What they got in return was a big bike experience, just without all that pesky horsepower…

The tiny, Swiss-watch marvel of an engine in the ZXR250 displaced just 249cc, but still had four cylinders, dual overhead-cams, and sixteen tiny valves. The bike produced a claimed 45hp, with a paltry 18 ft-lbs of torque from just 15 cubic inches, enough to push the 311lb machine to 124mph. Notably, the bike could scream along happily up to 19,000rpm, a big selling-point for fans of rev-happy engines. The rest of the spec was up to big-bike standards as well: a aluminum beam frame and a set of upside-down forks, something that was pretty uncommon for sportbikes, especially smaller machines, prior to the 1990s.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Kawasaki ZXR250A for Sale

1989 Kawasaki ZXR250A Japanese Import Rare
42hp Inline 4 250cc 4 Stroke 19000rpm Red line
53000kms Runs and Drives great.
Forks have been rebuilt, brakes have been serviced, carbs have been cleaned and serviced with bigger jets, spark plugs and wires have been replaced, speedometer cable is new, has clear turn signal covers, has a rare rear seat cover but still has rear seat underneath, has a smoked windscreen, adjustable brake and clutch levers, and a Vega Sports muffler, comes with a Daishin Racing full aluminum pipe very light. Left side has some scrapes on fairing but doesnt affect anything. Registered and clean titled in Florida.
Motorcycle is pickup only. Sold as is.

Photos show the bike fitted with Japanese plates, which I’m assuming is in lieu of blocking the Florida plates with tape or a thumb or something. It’s a bit dirty [see wheels] and there is damage to the left side of the bike as described by the seller, but looks complete and is otherwise very sharp for a nearly 30 year old machine. Obviously, a 250cc four cylinder sportbike is more a novelty than anything else, especially here in the USA where cheap speed is the order of the day. But as long as the price is right, I can completely see the appeal: being able to just pin the throttle everywhere, all the time, without tripling the national speed limit or riding with suicidal abandon is pretty cool. I’m a big fan of the “slow bike fast” thing and with a $5,000 Buy It Now price, I think this will likely find a buyer.

-tad

Little Kwaker: 1989 Kawasaki ZXR250A for Sale
Sport Bikes For Sale October 20, 2017 posted by

Slightly scruffy but ready to go: 1985 Suzuki RG500 Gamma

Yet another two-stroke from the land of Craigslist, this 1985 Suzuki RG500 Gamma wears the brand’s iconic blue and white superbike livery and looks very nice, despite its fair share of scratches and scuffs. Further signs of the bike’s age and use are cracked bolt holes at the mirror mounts on the cowl.

With the ugly stuff out of the way, this looks like the perfect Gamma to enjoy on your local backroads, with a set of aftermarket pipes and pod filters and a set of 17-inch rims from a Katana, which will improve handling and tire choices. The front brakes are Katana fare, too, and are a good bit bigger and more powerful than the stock units. The improved handling and stopping will be a welcome change on the Gamma, which has a reputation for being something of a demanding ride.

Save the pod filters and pipes, the 500cc square-four mill is stock, and was good for a stout 93 horses at the output shaft when new. That’s more than enough to make the front end lively when the power hits, especially given the bike’s 400-ish pound wet weight.

From the Craigslist ad:

Canadian model. Clean California title in hand. 19,640 kilometers so about 12,200 miles.

The good stuff: Bike runs awesome. Motor, tranny and carbs are stock. Has LG style pod air filters. Battery is new and has been relocated to original airbox location. Stock oil tank and pump in place. Upgraded with Katana front 3″ and rear 3.5 X 17″ rims. Larger Katana front rotors and calipers for better braking. Braided brake lines front and rear. Nikon pipes. New spark plugs. New transmission oil. Jetted for pods and pipes, but you will want to verify jetting for your area.

The bad stuff: Minor scratches on tank, solo seat cowl and mid fairing. No dents in tank or broken tabs or cracks on bodywork except upper cowl. Upper cowl has the typical cracks at the mirror area, but cosmetically it is very nice. Lower cowl is a fiberglass Lance Gamma replacement. See pictures for details.

Overall this bike is a great example of the RG500 that has the proper upgrades. Minor cosmetic work and the bike will be perfect. $14,500.00 OBO

With the rideability modifications the bike should be a peach of a canyon carver. The ask is healthy for a 32-year-old bike, to be sure, but the values of these old GP-style two-strokes have spiked recently, so it is not outside the range of reason.

Slightly scruffy but ready to go: 1985 Suzuki RG500 Gamma

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