Monthly Archives: May 2017

Ducati May 30, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing – 1997 Ducati 900SS/CR

6.26.2017: The seller has notified us that this bike has sold to one of our readers. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Subject of – this – RSBFS feature back in January, the new owner of this very mint CR has misgivings about putting miles on such a showpiece, and would like to make it available to a collector. A very special 900SS, this Cafe Racer has only 730 miles, and was a display item for most of its youth.  A powerful argument for back to basics motoring, the 900SS/CR has the brilliant desmodue engine, fully accessible under the half-fairing.

 

Engineered to be at the bargain end of the 900cc spectrum, the CR came to the showroom without carbon fiber bits or adjustable suspension, but had the chassis and lightness of the 900 desmodue, and nothing you didn’t need.  Ducati hallmarks like trellis frame, dry clutch, and big Brembo brakes are on board, and the riding position is purposeful.  Most often seen in red, this CR scooped the yellow used on next year’s SuperLight.

 

This 900 is in pretty special condition, the dusty gold frame matching the tempered stainless exhaust nicely.  Painted parts are unmarked, and I’m not seeing any aftermarket parts, most owners would have found a need to change something. The owner notes that even the original seat is included.  Even the stickers and decals haven’t aged a bit.  The Florida owner had this to say in his discussions with RSBFS

“I bought it because I fell in love with it at first sight. But it is so rare and unique, because of the ultra low mileage, that I hesitated to put any miles on it. I have had it for nearly 4 months and I have put 5.6 miles on it. I will give the opportunity for a serious Ducati collector to own it…

Price: $9900. Jacksonville, Florida”

 

One of the final years of the Tamburini style, the SuperSports would be rounded by Pierre Terblanche for 1999.  The angular and aggressive stance of the 90’s SS matched the booming exhaust note and no-nonsense presentation.  Often said to be a future classic, at twenty years of age, the 900SS/CR might be about to arrive. 

-donn

 

 

Featured Listing – 1997 Ducati 900SS/CR
Laverda May 30, 2017 posted by

WAUW: Cor Dees Laverda collection for sale (Netherlands)

I know this listing has already been posted on the RSBFS Facebook page and on other sites such as laverdaforum.com but this opportunity is too unique to not deserve a post here on the RSBFS mothership site – Marty

Late spring is usually the busiest time for RSBFS as people bring their bikes out of storage and decide they need to “thin the herd” a bit. A good example is the recent listings from seller Whiteknuckle in Springville, Utah who has been offering quite a wide variety of makes, models and conditions.   But over in the Netherlands another collection is up for sale that is truly amazing, the Laverda collection assembled by Mr. Coor Dees.  Apparently after 30+ years of collection Dees has decided to hang it up and the entire collection/museum is now up for sale with over 80 Laverda’s as well as a huge amount of memorabilia such as cutaways of engines.  Also includes is a massive photo archive that tells the story of the Laverda marque decade by decade.

Laverda Motorcycle Collection/Museum in the Netherlands

Dees dedication to the Laverda marque has produced possibly the finest long term collection of the north-Italian Laverda marque.  He collected everything related, even artifacts and old machinery showing the agricultural roots of Laverda and his close friendship with the Laverda family allowed him to purchase many of the bikes and associated memorabilia directly from the Laverda factory.  Now, after thirty years of collecting, he feels that it’s finally time to hand over the keys to his amazing collection.

The full list of the bikes that will be included in the sale is available via the link above but below are some some highlights of the offered machines.

*Laverda Racing models*
1973 Laverda 750 Side sidecar racer – factory SFC engine
1975 Laverda 750 SFC 1976 Belgium Champion
1975 Laverda 1000 spaceframe works endurance racer
1975 Laverda 1200 Franz Laimböck Monocoque racer
1978 Laverda 500 Formula Mk2 – one of 75 – Laverda Cup

*Laverda Prototypes*
1971 Laverda 1000 Milano EICMA motorshow – prototype
1986 Laverda OR 600 Atlas prototype
1986 Laverda 668 Cruiser prototype
1989 Laverda 668 Hidalgo prototype
1989 Laverda 700 El Cid prototype

*Laverda 650 & 750*
1968 Laverda 650 production number 17 – May 1968
1971 Laverda 750 SF
1972 Laverda 750 SF
1973 Laverda 750 GTF
1973 Laverda 750 SF1
1974 Laverda 750 Polizia Allessandria police
1974 Laverda 750 SF2

*Laverda 1000 & 1200*
1974 Laverda 1000 3C
1977 Laverda 1000 3CL
1980 Laverda 1000 Jota 180
1981 Laverda 1000 RGS Executive panniers & fairing
1982 Laverda 1000 Jota 120
1982 Laverda 1200 TS
1983 Laverda 1000 RGA
1989 Laverda 1000 SFC wire wheels – 2000 km

*Laverda Zanè production*
1995 Laverda 650 I.E.
1997 Laverda 668 Diamante
1999 Laverda 750 Formula

I have to admit I am personally happy to see some Zanè-era models also included as well as some prototypes I have never even heard of.  Amazingly even the original Laverda entrance sign of the old Breganze factory will be included in the sale (200 kg and 4m long, it was in the Laverda factory between 1952 and 2000).

Now before you begin looking through your checkbook, there are a few caveats with this offering.  Though the complete collection is for sale, Mr. Dees will (for now) keep the most significant specimen of Laverda engineering: the legendary Laverda V6.  After eight years of determination Dees has indicated he has almost completed the restoration of the 1991 V6 racer back to its 24-hour endurance race trim.  Dees has also indicated he wishes to continue working on the original 90-degree 1000cc Vee-Six prototype which caused a sensation during its presentation at the 1977 Milano Motorcycle Exhibition.

While not having these bikes in the sales of collection might disuuad some prospective owners, Dees has stated that once these two (of three!) existing Laverda 1000 V-Six machines come up for sale, the new owner of the collection will be given the Right of First Offer to purchase both machines as well as the remaining factory V6 spares and technical drawings.

Another caveat of the sales is that the collection has to be maintained.  This could be by being included in a museum or exposed as part of a larger collection of motorcycles but Dees also wants the collection to be based somewhere where there is a strong Laverda community, ideally near the companies home of Breganze, Italy.  Lastly he wants the collection open to the public so it can be admired on a regular basis by visitors from across the world.

It seems safe to assume the sale price for this amazing collection will likely depend on how closely the new owner is able to satisfy Dees requirements.  While Dees has stated he is ready to sell his collection at a very reasonable price if the next owner is a real enthusiast who is willing to exhibit the collection for the next decades, it has been my experience that when a lifetime-effort collection like this is sold what typically happens is the collection is parsed with the highest-end/most notable pieces being added to a major collection (possibly being rotated) while other categories are eventually sold off to collectors more oriented towards those aspects.

Given the size of this collection and the caveats on the sale, I don’t think this one will be going to a private collector.  Perhaps it can be acquired by one of the big museums in Italy such as the Museo Nazionale del Motociclo.  If by some chance it does end up in private hands all I can say is hopefully whomever acquires this amazing collection will at least meet the final caveat of keeping the collection open to the public so fans of the marque can continue to enjoy these Northern-Italian lovelies.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

WAUW:  Cor Dees Laverda collection for sale (Netherlands)
Suzuki May 30, 2017 posted by

Very Cooley: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S

Wes Cooley was a Los Angeles phenom on the club scene, and was cultivated by Pops Yoshimura to ride in the newly formed AMA Superbike Championship. Yoshimura initially fielded Kawasakis, but moved to Suzuki for the 1978 season. Wes Cooley used that dialed-in GS1000S to win the 1979 Championship, and he backed it up by doing the double in 1980 (amid stiff competition from younger guns such as Freddie Spencer and Eddie Lawson). The GS1000S streetbike was a commemorative nod to the AMA Superbike, and was produced by Suzuki in very limited numbers between 1979 and 1980. As the story goes, the GS1000S was never even supposed to come to America – but when US dealers saw it they pressured Suzuki into importing the model. Reports indicate that dealers in the US were allotted a single bike, with 500 units imported for 1979 and 700 units for 1980.

1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley for sale on eBay

While never signatured as the “Wes Cooley” model (nor ever officially marketed as such), the GS1000S is known as the Wes model in most circles. Replicating the style and color scheme of the Yoshimura racebike was a master stroke on the part of the design department, which resulted in a wonderfully proportioned bike that spoke to race enthusiasts. The limited edition “S” model came a year after the rest of the GS1000 lineup (which included the standard GS1000 and the semi-sporty “E” model). It did not have any material differences to the other GS1000 models in terms of engine, but it did share what was widely regarded as the best chassis to emerge from Japan during the era. Ultimately, that was the secret to the success of the bike on the track. For its first entry into the 1000cc market, Suzuki created a winner – both on the race track as well as the showroom.

From the seller:
Rare limited edition 1980 Suzuki GS 1000S Wes Cooley only 700 produced.

The bike was displayed in a humidity controlled private collection for the past 22 years. It has been recently gone though, new tires mounted less than 100 miles ago and is in excellent running condition. The engine is completely stock and unmodified, everything works on the bike including the clock. It comes with a Factory and Clymers service manual. As you can see from the photos the bike is in excellent condition and has been well taken care of.

Well-loved and unmodified Wes Cooley models are rare affairs. They are becoming harder to find, and more expensive to procure. Such is the nature of collectable bikes; the good ones will always be perceived as good, whether the market is up or down. Chances are strong that if a bike evoked some emotion on the day it was new, it will still be able to do so nearly 40 years later – for a price. And this bike really does look to be in excellent shape.

This bike has approximately 5,000 miles on the odometer, and is located in Tennessee. There are only a few days left on the auction, and interest has been moderate. I expect this one to climb a bit more before the final bell, so if you are interested I suggest you jump in quickly. Check it out here, and celebrate all the wonder that is the Wes Cooley Suzuki (that isn’t officially a Wes Cooley commemorative model). Good Luck!!

MI

Very Cooley: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S
Yamaha May 28, 2017 posted by

CA Fun: 1984 Yamaha RZV 500R

Today we have a bit of two stroke fun located in California. The Yamaha RZV model was built for the Japanese home market only. Notable changes came with the “Z” descriptor, including an all-aluminum frame and a “made to comply with Japanese regulations” restricted output engine. From a chassis and weight department, the RZV is the model you want. From a power perspective, you wanted the export-market RZ500. In stock configuration, the RZV is the more rare of the two bikes, given that it was not exported widely outside of Japan, but any of the big RZs could be considered reasonably rare in the United States (where we sadly received none).

1984 Yamaha RZV500R for sale on eBay

From the seller:
1984 RZV 500R All Original!
For being 33 years old, this bike is in great condition!
All fluids have just been changed (Motor, Forks, Brake Lines, Radiator) at 5000 km. Brand New Tires!
Bike runs and drives perfect!
5192 kilometers on the dash = 3226 US Miles.
Bike was imported from Japan and sent to California in a shipping container years ago. I have no paperwork. Vin number is available upon request to verify status.

The seller notes fluid changes, but no mention of engine seals. These are the items that are both critical to proper engine function (and longevity) and the more costly items to replace due to the invasive nature of where they are placed. I would much rather ride an old smoker that has old fluids but new seals than the other way around. Thus, it would appear that while this bike has low miles and looks to be in great condition, some maintenance work will be necessary to avoid seizing due to an air leak condition.

This CA located bike is also missing something else that is critical; a title and plates. This may not be a big deal in some states (where a bill of sale will open the door to riding nirvana), but is a potentially huge issue in California where licensing regs are not so lax. CA plated bikes have a gold plating for a reason, and the lack of registration on this one does have some impact to value.

The good side, this bike looks to be in decent condition for the age. There exists the requisite corrosion that one would expect from a Japanese import; this is common to any bike that lives near the seaboard. The plastics look great (with a possible crack on the upper right side panel and a missing fastener which could spell a broken tab), as does the paint and seat. The stock pipes look a bit peppered (or possibly just dirty), but nothing extreme to my eye. Even the wheels look decent, and the bike comes shod with new tires.

The big RZs are the mainstay of the grey-market world here in the US. Values have been solid for the past several years, with truly excellent examples commanding the highest prices. Being all stock is a real plus for this bike; it can only be all-original once. The location might be a positive for some, but the lack of registration and title is definitely a minus. A CA plate could have added another $1-2k to the price tag. All in all, this appears to be a solid example of the RZV breed. The internet does not wholly agree at this time, however: Bidding is just over $6k with a few days to go, and the bike has not met reserve. The BIN is set for $14k – pretty high dollar for the model – so it is possible this seller will be holding out for a while. Check it out here, and then let us know which you would prefer: RZ or RZV? Good Luck!!

MI

CA Fun: 1984 Yamaha RZV 500R
Honda May 26, 2017 posted by

Battle of the 400s! Honda CBR400RR or Kawasaki ZXR400R

The collection from Utah keeps on giving! Up for grabs this week is your choice of either a CBR400RR or a ZXR400R; both are 1995 models, but winning the auction only allows you to choose one. So which of these two ultra-rare grey bikes do you choose? Read on before you decide!

From the seller:
These two 400’s will be the last of the bikes I will be listing for sale. I’ve sold a lot of bikes and the honey hole is running dry.

This is a YOUR CHOICE auction. Up for your consideration is a 1995 Honda CBR400RR Fireblade with 22,014 kilometers (13,678 miles) or a 1995 Kawasaki Ninja ZXR400R with 25,254 kilometers (15,692 miles). High bidder will have their choice of bikes. You don’t get both bikes, you only get to choose ONE for your high bid. Both bikes have scratches and scrapes throughout. The Fireblade has a Fat Daddy aftermarket muffler installed but also comes with its original stock OEM muffler included. Both bikes are in great condition and would make great candidates for restoration. Both bikes run perfectly like the day they were new. Both bikes will have new batteries, new fluids and filters serviced. Both bikes come with Utah state titles and are titled as motorcycles for street use. Fairings and components on both bikes are 100% OEM factory original. Both look very nice and have good curb appeal.


1995 Honda CBR400RR Fireblade



1995 Kawasaki ZXR400R Ninja



There has been some good feedback about this seller in the RSBFS comments section (see this post here) and we have definitely seen some amazing motorcycles. But how would you choose between one of these little rocket ships? Neither is exactly in concours condition, but that might just be the appeal. Both are riders, meaning that you could pick one, thrash on it until your face hurts from smiling so much, and then park it knowing that you did not just ruin some zero mile investment. You can check the auction out here. Activity has been moderate thus far, and the current bid for one of these beauties sits at $6k with a reserve still in place.

If you are looking to add a grey-market 400 to your collection, this is a great opportunity. This seller has liquidated a serious number of bikes, and this is the end of that line. It is rare to see a collection such as this thinned out in one fell swoop, but it is certainly exciting to watch! Act now for one of these housebroken machines; it may be some time before we see the likes of them again. Good Luck!!

MI

Battle of the 400s!  Honda CBR400RR or Kawasaki ZXR400R
Bimota May 26, 2017 posted by

Gone Too Soon: 1997 Bimota SB6R for Sale

The SB6R could have been Bimota’s biggest seller of all time. Certainly the earlier SB6 sold in quantities that nearly qualify as mass production, with nearly 1,200 built. Unfortunately, the utter failure of the overreaching two-stroke V-Due low-sided the company into a crash barrier and the GSX-R1100-powered SB6R was not part of the brand’s renewal, killing it after just 600 were made. Sharp styling aside, the SB6’s party piece is that absolutely massive-looking aluminum frame that uses Bimota’s “Straight Connection Technology” concept to link the steering head stock and the swingarm pivot as directly as possible for optimized handling.

Great idea, but those big slabs of aluminum limit access to a number of important components, including the front sprocket and the alternator drive. This is a problem because the front sprocket will likely need regular replacement, considering the power and torque available, and the alternator drive needs cooling air to keep it from failing. So just what do I mean when I say that the frame “limits access”? Well both components require the engine to be at the very least unbolted from the frame and lowered, something that might deter owners just a bit…

Built during the same era as Ducati’s original 916, the Bimota SB6R goes about being a fast motorcycle in almost the opposite way as its Bolognese rival: bulging and stout-looking where the 916 is impossibly slim at the waist, beam frame versus a trellis, and powered by an inline four versus a v-twin. But both featured stump-pulling torque over high horsepower: the GSX-R mill in the SB6R is backed by a five-speed gearbox and I’ve yet to hear anyone complain that it needs a sixth…

That engine is a bit like the small-block Chevy of the motorcycling world, and plenty of folks out there have tuned them to make fairly outrageous horsepower. Today’s SB6R looks like it’s gone that route: it isn’t exactly stock, although the modifications are all under the skin and committed to the pursuit of absolute speed. A wise move, as the bike’s aesthetics represent one of the bike’s strong points. But is the seller’s asking price just one toke over the line?

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Bimota SB6R for Sale

Exotic Italian red handmade superbike.

Bimota SpA (www.bimota.it) was started in 1973 in Rimini, Italy, by Valerio Bianchi, Giuseppe Morri, and Massimo Tamburini (Bi-Mo-Ta). They design and build their own line of exotics, and the company and its people have also been involved with designing/developing Ducati, MV Agusta, and Lamborghini motorcycles. Bimota would study the market to see which drive trains they believed to be best of breed, purchase their components directly from those manufacturers, remanufacture and enhance them to Bimota standards, and then design and build an exotic motorcycle based on the new drive train. Bimota model numbers indicate which drive trains they were based on – SB (Suzuki), DB (Ducati), YB (Yamaha), KB (Kawasaki). Bimota also collaborated with other major brands on special models, and both SB and YB models have won world superbike and other class championships. True to the exotic business model, the company would only build a limited number each year, with very few making it to the U.S. market.

This SB6R was originally purchased new from Bimota by owners of a professional U.S.-based race team in the late 1990’s, intending it as one of their anchor bikes.

Prior to race homologation, the principal team owner suffered major injury and the team was closed. Approximately $70,000 had been invested in this SB6R up to that time, but it hadn’t yet raced and still remains in street legal configuration. If memory serves correctly, the original owner’s dynomometer certificate listed 182 horsepower. This SB6R still has its original Bimota uprated (150+ HP) GSXR 1100 drive train, which was further blueprinted/uprated (to 1200 CC)/race-configured by a professional Suzuki team in the US. This Bimota can essentially be serviced and tuned by a competent professional Suzuki technician.

The second owner of the SB6R was a friend of the original owners and purchased it when the team was closed. He was also a colleague in my area of business (telecom), and I purchased it from him as he was retiring and moving away. The SB6R has always remained in climate controlled indoor storage and is only ridden briefly at the beginning and end of each season to keep it in good operating condition. Both the second owner and I bought the SB6R as collectors, not racers.

The purchaser should appreciate that it is essentially a race vehicle that remains street legal. Response can be startlingly quick and strong across even low RPM ranges due to Bimota’s proprietary pressurized air box system. No tricks or gadgets, just simple, beautiful Italian race design on top of bulletproof horsepower.

Though not fully race homologated as intended, it will not ride and handle like a milder/more-comfortable/easier-to-ride street bike. It is designed for one rider of average racer size/weight and has no pillion or pegs for a second passenger. Riding posture and controls are designed for racing. Steering is designed to be more stable at high speeds, rather than more flexible at low speeds, and so is dampened and has less range of motion than normal street bikes. It is jetted for ~5000 feet altitude, and when cold will need to be warmed up patiently with graduated choke adjustments before being initially ridden (~15 minutes). Throttle control should be gentle and moderate, as response is fast and strong. Experienced riders (including me) have been caught by surprise when rolling in too much throttle in ordinary street riding conditions (especially from stops). The transmission is race configured (1-up, 4-down), which is the reverse of what is normal for street bikes (1-down, 4-up), and has a harsher sound and feel because it is heavier duty.

The buyer will arrange and pay for pickup. We’ve used a few different bike haulers over the years and they’ve always worked out fine. If the buyer happens to be in the Inland NW United States, I occasionally drive to Spokane or Bozeman for business and may be willing to deliver there or points between if serendipitous.

10% of sale proceeds go to the MARSOC Foundation.

Like many Bimotas of the era, the SB6R handles with aplomb, goes like stink, and looks the business, but the details let the side down: maintenance issues, including a gauge cluster prone to failure, and generally indifferent construction. It is one of my very favorite 1990s exotics, but that doesn’t change the fact that the seller’s asking price of $25,000 is extremely optimistic. It’s very nice, but most SB6Rs are pretty well-preserved, and previous examples haven’t gotten higher than around $15,000 before either selling outside eBay or going to the highest bidder. Is the extra attention lavished on the engine worth $10,000, or is it just gilding the lily? If you’re a wealthy collector looking for a very nicely prepared, but decidedly non-stock SB6R, this might be just what you’re looking for.

-tad

Gone Too Soon: 1997 Bimota SB6R for Sale
Honda May 25, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing – BOGO 1987 Honda NSR50’s

Our Utah collector obviously has a soft spot for the NSR50 as this his his second two-bike offering. This two-for-one pairs a stock NSR50 with a 80cc four stroke conversion. Both have some miles, and are complete, ready for an easy restoration.

Almost always available in lookalike paint schemes of the more senior machines, the NSR50 is diminutive but flies the Honda colors on pit lane.  Rugged build indicates Honda knew they would live a hard life with young riders and/or be irresistable to full-size adults.  Mini but wicked cool with perimeter chassis, alloy wheels and disk brakes.

The black machine has been upgraded to a Honda 80cc four stroke, note the large(er) diameter exhaust.

Not often an owner will boast scratches, scrapes, cracks, dents and dings throughout, but props for the honest assessment.

From the eBay auction:

Two NSR’s for the price of one. Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE are TWO Honda NSR’s. You get both bikes for one bid. Highest bidder wins both bikes. The RED NSR50 is completely stock with 6299 kilometers (3914 miles).

The BLACK NSR has a Honda APE 80cc four stroke engine professionally installed and odometer reads 8889 kilometers (5523 miles). Actual mileage on engine is less than 500 miles since it was installed. The black NSR also has upgraded front brakes and the upper has been painted.

Showroom novelty, pitbike or maybe for the kids, the NSR50 packs more than 49cc of fun into a tiny package.  The 80cc upgrade might tempt you to take it out on the road, but stick with minibike fun races in support of the privateers at your local track.  After restoration, they could be kept in the kitchen, hell maybe right up on the table !

-donn

Featured Listing – BOGO 1987 Honda NSR50’s
Suzuki May 25, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22A for Sale

 

Today’s Featured Listing Suzuki RGV250 is part of the rare and weird collection that the seller has been liquidating over the past few weeks. It may not be museum-quality, but it has obviously been well cared-for and would make a great weekend rider, assuming you live somewhere it can be titled. Rare and desirable here in the USA, Suzuki’s RGV250Γ was basically the GSX-R of two-stroke sportbikes: it was fast, a bit wild, and ubiquitous in markets where it was sold new.

But here in the USA, these little Gammas are extremely difficult to find. Go looking for a Honda NSR250 at any given time, and you’ll likely come up with at least something. But RGVs are pretty few and far between, in any condition. In fact, here in the US, the closest many of us may have come to the RGV is the Aprilia RS250 that is much more common and uses the same engine, with some minor tuning and cosmetic differences. 

The 250cc two-stroke sportbikes of the period seemed cut from the same cloth, although each managed to have its own character: light and stiff aluminum beam frame, liquid-cooled two-stroke parallel or v-twin engine, some form of power valve technology, a six-speed gearbox, sub-300lb dry weight, and lots of proprietary acronyms plastered across the fairings. In this VJ22’s case you’ll note “SAPC” or “Suzuki Advanced Power Control,” an electronic power valve and ignition timing system to boost the 55-ish horsepower 90° twin’s meager midrange. Earlier VJ21s had 17″ front and 18″ wheels, updated here in the VJ22 to a pair of 17″ hoops that should give a wider choice of modern rubber. Weight for the VJ22 was up a bit over previous models, largely owing to that beautiful but complex and heavy asymmetrical “banana” swingarm that left space on the right-hand side of the bike for the bulging expansion chambers that fed those sexy shotgun exhausts.

From the seller: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22A for Sale

Saved the best for last! This will be the last Suzuki RGV250 up for auction. The honey hole is drying up quickly.

Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE is a 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22A with only 8,780 kilometers (5,455 miles) on the odometer. This RGV runs like the day it was new. I don’t know the service history but it sure pulls like its been de restricted. Speedometer has been changed to a 300KPH clock so actual mileage is unknown. We see lots of these 250’s with speedo’s changed from the stock 180kph clocks to 300kph. This RGV has scratches throughout the bike. Tank looks like new. Mirrors and front fender show sun fade. The lower center V-fairing behind the front wheel has a broken tab and has a crack that needs to be fixed. Bike has great curb appeal and looks very nice. Bike comes tastefully upgraded with after market pipes and stingers, aftermarket levers and grips and steel braided brake lines. All fairings are 100% OEM Suzuki factory.

Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a Bstreet motorcycle for road use.

Scratches and scrapes throughout. Now there’s an honest assessment from the seller, and should give potential buyers a good idea of what to expect here: it’s clean, but definitely a used motorcycle. Those Brembo front brakes don’t look original but should be a worthwhile upgrade. The levers and grips maybe not so much, but those are easily changed to suit your taste. It isn’t perfect but, as stated earlier, might make a great weekend rider or a rolling restoration. You’ll have to source parts from overseas, but the internet is a wonderful thing and most of what you need should be available to keep an RGV running.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22A for Sale

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