Monthly Archives: December 2016

Honda December 26, 2016 posted by

Boxing Day Dream: 1989 Honda RC30 with 1,550 miles in the UK

1989 Honda RC30 for sale on ebay uk

Any RSBFS readers not familiar with the Honda RC30/VFR750R can read our previous RC30/VFR750R posts to learn about this legendary bike but to quickly summarize, Honda decided to show the world what it was capable of when all the limits (financial, manpower, etc) were ignored.  The result was the Honda RC30, a machine built to win and boy did it.  In just the 1st year after its introduction the result was pure domination with 15 of the 25 finishers in the top F1 class being on the new Honda.  As this was the homologation era, street versions also had to be available, an a total of 1,500 were produced each year over a 2 year production run.

A large block of the RC30's that were produced were dedicated to the Japanese market and this particular RC30 is apparently one of these Japanese editions but interestingly, is currently located in the UK.  Despite its travels, it is probably the most pristine/intact one we have had on RSBFS, with mileage at only 1,550 miles.

The pics* seems to match the mileage with the bike looking like it just came out of the factory.  The seller does mention some slight staining around the frame plate but this is not apparent in the pics and everything looks completely OEM/stock.   Given the low miles and the statement that this is a formerly japan market bike I would assume the Japan market CDI/top speed limiter is still installed but info on how to remove/replace it is available on the web so it would be fairly straightforward to enjoy the full RC30 experience.

*NOTE:  The listing includes both standard pics and additional classified ad pics which are located at the bottom of the ebay.co.uk listing.

The Honda RC30/VFR750R is one of those bikes that every serious collector wants to have in their collection.  It is probably the homologation bike that had the most top level track success, although the Ducati Desmosedici and Kawasaki ZX7-RR are both close runners up.  But even given its legendary success on the track and the pristine condition of this example the question remains; is this example worth the asking price of 28,000 GBP/$35,000 USD?  That price seemed a bit high at first but then again it is very unlikely you will see one for sale in this condition anytime soon and prices do seem to be steadily increasing.

I guess the question is what is this bikes destiny?  Is it already fated to exist only as a halo bike in a collection?  Or will its next owner give it some fresh fluids/rubber and do a bit of riding to see what all the fuss was about?  All I know is that if I was able to acquire this one, I would be in that second camp for at least a bit.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Boxing Day Dream:  1989 Honda RC30 with 1,550 miles in the UK
Ducati December 23, 2016 posted by

Perfetto! 1993 Ducati 888 SP4

For some international flair, how about an Italian gem - in Italy? Bellissimo! Featuring the 851 race bike's frame and ancillary bits but motivated by a 888cc mill, the SP4 was an evolution of the Ducati Superbike race-machine-turned-street-bike that added exclusivity to the promise of enhanced performance. For those shopping for the ultimate 888, however, the SPS edition would be the top run of both the rarity and performance ladder. Still, a SP4 is nothing to sneeze at, and a fine pedigree for collection or riding enjoyment.

1993 Ducati 888 SP4 for sale on eBay

All SP4 models are single-seaters, emulating the race bike (for a two-up version of the Ducati 4-valve series you will have to demote to the 851 Strada, the lowliest of the 851/888 lineup). The standard equipment list is to be expected: Ohlins, Brembos and Termis. While generally lauded for rock-solid handling, the 851/888 cockpit is somewhat tight and confined. Aside from that restriction, the booming twin is surprisingly tractable, making good power across the rev range. The upper register of the RPM spectrum is where the 4-valve heads really come into play, and to keep up with comparable four-cylinder machines the 888 will need revs. The payout is in a song unlike any other motorcycle on earth - and one you will want to hear often.

From the seller:
Selling my very rare 1993 888 SP4, #420 completely original, in perfect running order with 18139 miles (29193 Km) on. The bike comes with all the original sales paperwork and toolkit, the bike was ridden for about a year by the original owner.

Since buying the bike I have done the following:
1. Full service, belts, plugs, oil and air filters, fuel filter and tank gaskets.
2. Full brake service, stripped and cleaned the calipers, new pads and new fluid

I’d like it to go to someone who will care for it and keep this classic on the road. Not interested in low-ball offers, don’t need a quick sale. I’ve been watching these bikes for a long time and I have not seen a more original,SP4 anywhere in the world.

Take a look at the photo’s the bike is in perfectly original condition

This bike is located in Cecina, Italy. The opening bid is $19k USD, so if you are interested pack your passport and your checkbook. The 851/888 series continue to be strong collector machines, and the relative rarity of the SP4 model certainly helps with the whole supply/demand equation. No takers on this one as of the time of this writing, but between the holidays and the big opening ask, that is not too surprising. Check it out here, and let us know what you think!

MI

Perfetto!  1993 Ducati 888 SP4
Ducati December 22, 2016 posted by

Low-Mileage Future Classic: 1995 Ducati 900 SS/CR for Sale

If you want a machine with charisma, humane ergonomics, and a dash of tradition, the early 90s Ducati 900SS is a modern classic that offers a less frantic experience than similar bikes from Japan. Straight-line performance for the two-valve v-twin is modest, but these were all about midrange power and torque. Powered by a 904cc version of Ducati's air/oil-cooled Pantah-derived engine, the 900SS came in SS/SP and SS/CR flavors. The SP was equipped with some carbon bits and adjustable suspension components, so handling for the more entry-level CR is pretty basic.

I happen to love the half-faired version of the bike seen here, although I'd probably try to find a nice SP version and just fit the abbreviated fairing: the non-adjustable Showa forks found on some CRs aren't great, but even those are better than the much-maligned Marzocchi parts... I'm not sure which are fitted here, but it really shouldn't matter since you either won't use the bike for serious canyon-strafing and live with the stock parts, or will just bin them and get something better. But plenty of parts exist to sort that out: a set of forks from the SP, an adjustable Öhlins rear shock and some good rubber should see things improve significantly.

As always with a Ducati: condition is key and maintenance is critical: valve adjustments every 6,000 miles and timing belt changes every 12,000 miles or two years at the very least. The air/oil-cooled Ducati engine is fundamentally rugged, but needs more attention than many other machines and neglect is your enemy: the 900SS may be cheap to buy, but putting a bad one right can quickly exceed your purchase price, so this one looks like a pretty good deal.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Ducati 900SS/CR for Sale

Ducati's Supersport line has a pedigree that unmatched, its lineage traceable all the way back to the original 750cc racing Supersport of 1972. That bike won the famous Imola 200 race under rider Paul Smart, cementing respect for the Italian motorcycle manufacturer. The early 1990's were special years for Ducati's 900SS.  With the re-designed frame, improved Brembo brakes, the 900SS had the handling to accompany the booming 904cc desmodue. Powered by an air-cooled desmodromic 2-valve 90° V-twin is nicely carbureted by Mikuni, and has a wide power band.

This 900 SS/CR has had a pampered life, one owner, 5888 original miles, dealer serviced and always garaged. Basically stock with the exception of carbon fiber exhaust by D&D, bar end mirrors and rear fender eliminator. Recently serviced with belts replaced and carbs rebuilt. Includes all stock parts, both original keys and original manuals. This your opportunity to own a beautiful example of Italian engineering.

I happen to think the air/oil-cooled Ducati twins are some of the nicest-sounding engines of all time, but if you buy this one you'd better hope your neighbors agree, as those D&D cans are pretty loud... I'd keep them, but the seller indicates that he has "all stock parts" so you can always fit the original, much quieter pipes if you prefer. The Pantah-engined 900SS has been at or nearly at the bottom of the Ducati food chain for a while now, but prices are starting to creep up for good examples. The Buy-It-Now for this very clean example is a reasonable $5,200 but as always, a few folks are really jumping the gun on values: there's an SS/SP that's been sitting on eBay for a while now, with an asking price of almost $9,000... But nice, reasonably-priced examples like this one are still out there if you look.

-tad

Low-Mileage Future Classic: 1995 Ducati 900 SS/CR for Sale
Yamaha December 21, 2016 posted by

Feelin Fizzy: 1989 Yamaha FZR400

A perennial fan favorite, the 400cc edition of the Yamaha FZR has often been lauded for its razor-sharp handling and overall balance. While generally best suited for riders of smaller stature, the smaller Fizzer filled the gap currently occupied by the modern crop of 300cc machines; small enough to be entry level, but with the DNA to carve some serious corners in the right hands.

1989 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay

Powered by an in-line four cylinder that is happy to rev to a stratospheric 14k, the FZR400 is encased in an aluminum Deltabox perimeter frame with triple disks all around. Wrapped in full bodywork that evoked images of the bigger FZRs - including dual headlights - there was nothing small or cheap about the 400. And while the model run started in 1986 and ran through the mid 1990s, Yamaha only imported them into the US for a few years, and even fewer into California.

From the seller:
You are looking at my 1989 Yamaha FZR400 California EXUP model. I am the original owner and the bike is in amazing condition both cosmetically and mechanically. I have a complete file on the bike that includes the original receipt from when I bought the bike from Golden Gate Cycles in SF in July 1989. I spent over $4,000 this summer to have the bike mechanically reconditioned by Speed Motorcycles in Bronx, NY and it runs well. The only problem is a sticky front master brake cylinder. I had it rebuilt by Speed but it might need replacing. I'm selling the bike because I've lost interest - when I had it reconditioned this summer I thought I was going to get back into riding but it turns out that I'm just not that into it anymore. I never tracked this bike - I did put an aftermarket Kerker slip-on muffler on it and had it dyno tuned but I have the original exhaust.

This bike is very rare and I'd be very surprised if there are any out there in this condition and still owned by the original owner.

Today the FZR400 is hard to find in unmolested condition. So many of these bikes ended up on the racetrack (refer above to "razor-sharp handling"), that most of the available Fizzers have been thrashed. And rebuilding a FZR400 is not an exercise for the weak or impatient; parts are not exactly plentiful, and stock fairings are all but impossible to find. My recommendation: Find the cleanest, best example you can, and jump on it. Could this original owner bike be the one? Check it out here and see!

MI

Feelin Fizzy: 1989 Yamaha FZR400
Honda December 21, 2016 posted by

High-Tech Two-Stroke: 1996 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale

From the “jeez, if you’re going to post your bike for sale, couldn’t you at least wash it” files comes this Honda NSR250R MC28. Early NSRs have become relatively common on this site recently, with containers full of them coming over from Japan, now that they’ve become relatively easy to register in some parts of the US. But the MC28 version is still pretty rare here, as it isn’t yet 25 years old and is pretty much the ultimate development of the successful NSR formula. The MC28 features many trick parts, like the single-sided swingarm and Honda's PGM-IV electronic ignition that interpreted throttle position, gear-selection, and rpm to create three-dimensional ignition maps for each cylinder and to adjust their RC "Revolutionary Controlled" Valve for improved power and midrange response.

All that technology served a 90° liquid-cooled 249cc v-twin backed up with a six-speed cassette gearbox. As has been discussed at length, these were restricted to 45hp in their home market and, depending on the model, it can be a real pain to release their full potential. Especially in the case of the MC28: that very cool PGM-IV ignition system uses swappable ignition maps stored on "smart cards" and, unless you can track down a nearly unobtainable HRC card with "race" maps, you're kind of stuck. Supposedly, work-arounds do exist for this issue, but be sure to consult with an expert and proceed at your own risk...

It may be hard to see under that layer of dust, but this is a pretty nice bike, a few superficial scratches aside. The seller indicates that quite a bit of work has gone into it.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale

I won’t start by saying that is a GP replica and is a fast bike for a 250cc. If you are interested in the bike you know about it....

  • The bike has a complete engine rebuilt
  • all Honda parts
  • rebuilt complete crank (all the bearings)
  • all seals
  • all gaskets
  • clutch
  • tires
  • chain & sprockets
  • the rims are powder coated
  • all electrical working
  • PGM4 on the bike with one card

Fairings are OEM Honda not after market and they are in great shape no cracks at all

I have the bike for 3 years and I have done only 1500km on the engine. The bike is stored indoors all year and I start the bike every 5-6 weeks. I am just changing the fork seals this week (the one tube has a very small leak). The bike needs nothing just a rider to enjoy the ride. I have rebuilt the bike myself I have register and plate it here in Canada ON. The bike come complete from japan in boxes and I assembled it here. With the bike I have some parts that they come with it. 1 set of complete exhaust (you have the option Dog Fight or Ethos) The bike comes with stock.

1 set of front forks USD from a VFR400 NC35. You need to get the upper and lower fork clams and you install them on the bike. The bike comes with stock forks. As you see on some of the pics the forks and the exhaust I had them on the bike but the bike is complete stock now. The bike is located in Toronto Canada.

Bidding is up north of $6,000 with the Reserve Not Met, which is no surprise, considering what earlier NSRs go for these days. Even more so than usual, be sure you know what you're doing before you buy this if you plan to register it for road use. It's still a few years away from that magical 25-year mark, but maybe now's the time to scoop one up for your collection, with an eye to registering it down the road.

-tad

High-Tech Two-Stroke: 1996 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale
Honda December 20, 2016 posted by

Grey Market Rarity: 1988 Honda VFR400 NC24 for Sale

 

Built for 1987 and 1988, the NC24 version of Honda's VFR400 was powered by a 399cc V4 with a lofty 14k redline, although it used a more conventional 180° crank instead of the later bike’s 360° “big bang” unit, which should give the bike more of an inline-four sound but with the added bonus of a distinctive whine from the gear-driven cams. The engine was surprisingly flexible, and handling was considered excellent. It was the very first VFR400 to use Honda’s Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm, although the rear wheel on the NC24 was secured by four bolts, instead of the later bike’s single large nut: the part you see in the photos is actually a plastic cover designed to mimic a trick racing part.

The VFR400 was originally intended for the Japanese market, although the later NC30 was officially imported to the UK and others found their way abroad through various grey market and "parallel import" channels so they do show up for sale pretty regularly, even here in the USA. This is actually the first NC24 I can remember seeing for sale. Most of the attention goes to the NC30, with its “baby RC30” looks. But this is still a very cool and unusual motorcycle, and perhaps the dowdy looks will keep costs down for folks more interested in performance and heritage than sexy style. With somewhere in the neighborhood of 60 hp and around 350 lbs dry to push around, performance is respectable and these have always been popular bikes among

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Honda VFR400 for Sale

Here we have a Honda NC24 VFR400. It has just been imported into the States from the UK. I test rode this bike when I collected it in Lancaster, England. It started with some difficulty but after warming up it idled well. I suspect that the carbs are restricted by washers. This is a common practice in the UK to satisfy licensing requirements for novice riders. If I were going to ride it regularly, I'd have the carbs cleaned and the washers removed. The bike comes with the V5 document (English equivalent of a title) , copies of import papers, and a bill of sale. I offer competitively priced delivery in the lower 48 States with a right of refusal guarantee. Upon delivery if you are unsatisfied with the motorcycle you will only be responsible for the delivery fee.

Bidding is very active, but just up to about $1,600 so I imagine it will go a good bit higher before the auction ends. The bike certainly isn't perfect, with some flaking paint on the clutch lever, slight discoloration of the plastic "nut" that covers the rear hub, and the surface corrosion you'd expect on a bike that made it to the USA via the UK, where bikes see far more time being ridden in harsh weather and exposed to the elements. I'm also guessing that those aren't the original fairings: looking online, that red stripe on the tank should continue onto the side panels. Maybe just repaint the whole thing as a Rothmans replica? As the seller mentions, these smaller-displacement bikes were often modified to limit power and allow them to be used by new riders on restricted licenses. Instead of buying a little 125, you could buy a bigger bike with restrictions in place to limit power. Once you'd graduated to a full license, you could convert the bike to full power. The seller obviously isn't 100% sure they've been installed, but I'd expect anyone planning to buy a nearly 30 year old motorcycle would be prepared to do a bit of carburetor work if they plan to regularly ride their funky new purchase.

-tad

Grey Market Rarity: 1988 Honda VFR400 NC24 for Sale

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