Monthly Archives: September 2016

MV Agusta September 16, 2016 posted by

Jet Fighter Replica: 2006 MV Agusta F4 1000 Veltro Strada for Sale

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To stimulate interest in their flagship F4 that saw only occasional updates, MV Agusta trotted out a seemingly endless series of special-edition bikes with the usual collectors-only price tags, wild horsepower claims, and extremely limited production numbers. Certainly, today’s F4 1000 Veltro Strada counts as rare: just 99 were built, along with 23 of the track-only Pista version. The Strada included carbon fairings, tail piece, airbox, fenders, air-ducts and so on. The frame side plates are magnesium instead of aluminum. The Pista version also included a lighter frame, oversized radiator, a carbon-fiber fuel tank, and a magnesium triple clamp and swingarm. It was powered by MV’s 998cc, radial-valved, inline-four that, in this version, produced a claimed 174hp, or 185 with the “race-only” titanium exhaust fitted. The Veltro Strada was, to my knowledge, never imported to the USA: this one is for sale in the UK.

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Interestingly, “Gruppo 23” isn’t a race team, as you might expect. It’s an Italian fighter jet squadron that was based in northern Italy. Their mascot was a greyhound, as can be seen in the graphic on the fairing. Unfortunately, at a glance the greyhound silhouette does look a bit like those awful tribal flame graphics that were popular during the early 2000s…

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Considering these went for around $72,000 new, the approximately $80,050 USD asking price might sound reasonable for such a rare, exotic machine at first, until you consider that even very limited-edition MVs are going for relative peanuts right now here in the USA. If you’re a collector, this kind of thing might make sense. For the rest of us? The “regular” F4 1000 offers up the same exotic looks for 1/7th the money, with the only penalty being a few more pounds and a couple less horses you probably weren’t using anyway.

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From the original eBay listing: 2006 MV Agusta F4 1000 Veltro Strada for Sale

This is an exciting and rare opportunity to acquire a mint condition MV Agusta F4 1000 Veltro Strada Sports Bike – 1 of only 99 ever produced worldwide!!

This super bike is in ‘As New’ condition with only 175km/ 100 miles approximately on the clock, and is being sold complete with MV Agusta unused titanium exhaust system, MV Agusta race fairing and MV Agusta race helmet.

This collectors superbike would not look out of place being displayed within your home or as part of a vehicle/bike collection.

The Veltro Strada motorbike is the road legal version of the Veltro Pista, and only 99 of this model were every manufactured making it an excellent collectors item. The Strada features carbon fibre bodywork and fixtures, machined aluminium steering head and foot rests, Brembo superlight wheels and unique matt black paintwork/graphics in the style of a WWII Italian fighter plane.

It’s top speed is listed as 190+ mph and features 185hp @ 12,000rpm.

Viewings are more than welcome on this rare motorcycle from serious purchasers. Vehicle location is within the London area, United Kingdom.

Asking price for sale is £54,995 GBP

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It’s a shame for all those speculators who purchased what they thought would be blue-chip collectibles, but great for the rest of us: these things really should be ridden, not hoarded anyway. If you like the F4 and can’t stretch to one of the various ultra-collectible versions, a “regular” F4 1000 offers up the same exotic looks for $10,000 or less and, in most parts of the country, you’ll still likely be the only person on one at your local bike-hangout. Obviously, that same money would buy an equally fast Japanese literbike that would be infinitely more practical, but if you want a bedroom-poster machine in your garage, and have a spare bike to ride while you’re waiting for parts to arrive from Italy during August when the MV factory is completely shut down for the entire month…

-tad

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Jet Fighter Replica: 2006 MV Agusta F4 1000 Veltro Strada for Sale
Honda September 15, 2016 posted by

Vee-Four: 1985 Honda VF1000R for Sale

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The popular conception of homologation specials is one of thinly-veiled racebikes, competition bodywork with a couple holes cut in it for headlights, close-ratio gearboxes, and racebike power just a remap/rejet away. The reality is sometimes far less exciting. Sure, the Honda VF1000R may look like an endurance-racing bike with lights, but at a portly 600lbs with fuel, plenty of other bikes of the period could show it a clean pair of heels. Ultimately, the bike was a bit of a misfire as a performance machine: it was just too heavy and offered no real advantage in terms of power or handling over the more common VF1000S. But that wasn’t really the point, since an homologation bike is mainly designed to include specific components so that those same bits can be utilized by production-based racing teams. And anyway, the same criticisms could be leveled at both the RC30 and RC45: out of the box, they were incredibly exotic, but some fast guy on a standard GSX-R750 could probably take your candy.

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The VF1000R’s 998cc V4 ditched the S-version’s cam chains and replaced them with a more precise gear arrangement, something that eventually became the V4’s distinguishing characteristic. It made a claimed 117hp and the slippery fairings allowed a near 150mph top speed, while Honda’s Torque-Reactive Anti-Dive Control meant cool acronyms and improved manners under heavy braking. Wheels are often overlooked and considered pretty unremarkable on a motorcycle: they’re round and covered with sticky, black rubber things. But as the point of contact between the bike and road, they’re critically important components.

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In the VF1000R’s case, they were Honda’s modular Comstar wheels and came with radial tires, something very new to motorcycles at that time. Axles were clamped in place with a quick-release system, the rear brake disc was vented, and the bike featured adjustable bars to help set the bike up for the rider’s individual preferences. Obviously, many of those parts serve no real purpose on a road bike, except to admire for their innovation and craftsmanship, or to brag about at your local bike meet.

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Today’s example has low miles, appears to be in excellent condition, and features the desirable dual-headlamp setup often missing from the 1985 bikes: worried that it wouldn’t pass federal regulations, Honda developed a simpler, single rectangular unit often seen on these bikes.

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Honda VF1000R for Sale

Not perfect, but a very, very good original survivor condition 1985 Honda VF1000R of sufficient quality that that it won its division at a large AMA sanctioned/ judged show (see below). It was originally purchased new in Indiana.  The 2nd owner purchased it in 1990 with about 5000 miles and eventually moved it to Kansas City.  I purchased this VF1000R from the 2nd owner in 2012 with 10,077 miles.

In 2012, I rode to one of the largest motorcyle events in Kansas City – The 20th Annual (and final) “Ralph Wayne Backyard Nationals”.  It is an insane confluence of two-wheeled wonder that includes thousands of bikes including Ariels, Aprilias, Vincents, Victories, Hodakas,  Ducatis, Gammas, RZs, BMWs, Harleys, R1s, CBRs – you get the picture.  There is a tent in Ralph’s back yard that only holds about 30 of the most unusual and/ or outstanding bikes at his event.  When I got there, one of the marshals waved me to the tent and this VF1000R was the only Honda under the tent that year.

In 2013, I entered this bike in the Clymer Manual Sponsored, Heart of America Motorcycle Enthusiasts (HOAME) Vintage Midwest AMA sanctioned and judged show.  This a huge regional show and this VF1000R won the “Best Modern Superbike “Division.  Several of the AMA judges asked me if I still rode it (by looking at the tire wear patterns).  I responded “yes” and they expressed mild amazement that a bike this nice would still be ridden regularly.   Clymer posted a video they took of this bike at the show on Youtube.  It can be viewed with key words “Clymer VF1000R”.

The bike is nearly 100% survivor excepting the following:

When I initially rode the bike home after the sale, the OEM fork springs were shot, causing the front end to dive and scratching the front fender and left/ clutch side fork tube with the left lower metal blinker mount.  The scatches were touched up with correct, color-matched Honda “Fighting Red” paint.  The worn OEM fork springs were upgraded with Race Tech 1.05 Kg/ mm single-rate springs with new seals and synthetic Motul fork oil.  This fork upgrade dramatically improved front end tracking and feel.

The OEM/ survivor carbon fiber backed bodywork was touched-up with correct, color-coded paint prior to above shows and apparently looked good enough to the judges to win. It has the optional (for 1985 models) endurance racing dual headlamp fixture that came standard on the 1986-later models. It was shown with the F1S aluminum mufflers as seen in the photos, but the bike also comes with very good condition original/ OEM mufflers that could easily be cleaned up and reused if you want to sport that “Big 80s Big Muffler” look.  The F1S pipes on it now sound great. The OEM chain was replaced with RK X-Ring chain on the original/ OEM sprockets.

Prior to my ownership, some brake fluid leaked onto the external clutch cover and damaged some of the paint on the lower edge.  The damaged clutch cover paint has been colored with black marker.  See photos. There are a few scratches on top of the original aluminum/ OEM/ survivor fuel tank.  Otherwise the original paint looks deep and glossy except for minor/ normal mars on this 31 year-old survivor sportbike.

CONDITION:

The original 998 cc, V-4, 16-valve motor runs as well as any VF1000R.  It starts without issue and idles smoothly, does not smoke, shifts smoothly and accelerates linear and hard all the way to redline. No oil or hydraulic leaks.  The gear drive sound is marvelous.  There is no undue mechanical noise.  It purrs. The pictures closely demonstrate the overall, excellent condition of this 1985 VF1000R. Comes with (most of) the original Honda VF1000R tool kit which is otherwise unobtainium

I’ve enjoyed absolutely gawking at this very low mileage amazing condition VF1000R in my garage for the past 4 years and putting a few miles on it, but now it’s time to pass it on to somebody who will hopefully enjoy it as much as I have.

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The seller includes a ton of information at the original listing and includes his personal history with the bike, a few minor cosmetic issues, and a listing of everything that was changed or updated, along with reasons why. It’s pretty clear that the owner is an enthusiast, although the price is on the high end for these: the starting bid is just south of $7,500 with no bids yet, but plenty of time left on the auction.

If you’re looking for a Honda homologation special and can’t spring for an RC30 or RC45, these are rare, feature exotic specification, and can still be had for relative peanuts. It’s not, and probably never was a cutting-edge sportbike, but that just makes it more practical as an affordable bit of HRC history: something you can ride and enjoy, not something that needs to be stored away for alternate, sunny Wednesdays in June.

-tad

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Vee-Four: 1985 Honda VF1000R for Sale
MV Agusta September 14, 2016 posted by

Et tu – 2008 MV Agusta Brutale 910S

After Cagiva’s purchase of MV Agusta’s storied name in 1999, the company decided to enter the boutique naked-sport market and developed the Brutale 750.  The model has been the subject of several limited production factory customs, and further evolution brought the Brutale 910S.  Though it will never have the utility or daily ridership of a Monster or SV, the Brutale is one of the very sportiest of naked sports.

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2008 MV Agusta Brutale 910S

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The 910S is powered by an inline four with MV Agusta’s excellent four-valve heads, pretty high compression at 13:1 and making 134 hp.  The rather sculptural trellis frame surrounds the engine and terminates in large cast swingarm connectors.  The front suspension is a pair of rather massive 50mm inverted Marzocchi forks, and a Sachs-damped single-sided swingarm is found under the seat.  Nissin supplies the 6-piston front calipers over 310mm rotors, with a single 210mm rear brake.  It’s unfaired except for the radiator shroud, though the double parabolic headlight looks aerodynamic enough.  Behind the teardrop instrument binnacle, a split level seat and low European handlebars complete the cockpit.

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This Colorado Brutale has less than 2,000 miles, and looks excellent.  Apparently the only mod, the HP Corsa exhaust is a lot shorter and likely quite a bit lighter than the factory dual mufflers.  From the eBay auction:

This bike only has 2,000 miles on it.  It runs and looks like it just rolled off the showroom floor. It only has one small crack in the paint in the tank, which is very difficult to see in the light.  I used a flashlight to take a picture and make it more visible for the ad.  You won’t find a nicer, lower mileage 2008 Brutale anywhere.  This bike has a custom exhaust that gives it an awesome look.

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The 910S reviewed as a nice handling standard with ergonomics favoring the smaller rider.  The low bars and nearly rear-set pegs make for an aggressive posture, the narrow seat helping the rider move around a bit.  The trademark star alloys identify it as an MV Agusta, and the fuel tank’s wings give you almost another gallon.  A distinctive and thoroughly modern take on the naked sport, the Brutale 910S uses Agusta’s potent transverse four, but otherwise makes its own road…

-donn

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Et tu – 2008 MV Agusta  Brutale 910S
Ducati September 14, 2016 posted by

Red Head, Tamburini Style: 1995 Ducati 916 with 3300 (ish) miles

We seem to be on a bit of a Ducati theme here at RSBFS of late but before we move off, here is one more…a lovely Ducati 916.  For those of a certain age, it was proably the first bike that ever caused feelings of motorcycle-based lust without any knowledge of performance or racing heritage. Today’s example is the standard/strada version with a mere 3310 miles as of this post and best of all, fresh maintenance.

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When the Massimo Tamburini designed 916 arrived in America in 1995 it was a sensation, with quite a few young fans drawn by the lithe proportions that made other bikes of the era look bloated (I’m looking at you, Honda CBR1000).  Best of all the 916 sinuous form was matched by function; it really did handle and go well.  It was smaller and more powerful than the preceding 888 model, and while power was less than some of the Japanese competition of the day, at 114 bhp it was no slouch (NOTE: And anyone who wanted a bit more power, there was the SP model which looked the same but a more powerful engine).

Downsides?  Well the riding position was kind of brutal, and required belt maintenance was very pricey…but the design was so iconic it continued on in the 996 and 998 and still appears in lists of important designs in motorcycle history by authorities like the Guggenheim Museum.

As Motorcyclist magazine wrote in their recap of the 1990’s – “1994: Ducati 916 debuts. Did anything else happen that year?”

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1995 Ducati 916 with 3300 miles on eBay

Condition of the this 916 strada looks to be very good and pretty much all OEM.  There is an odd crack in the upper fairing and some small paint chips and I am not sure if the exhaust is the Termignoni without stickers or something else but other than that it looks really really good.

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Here is what the seller has to say:

The bike was gone through top-to-bottom by MCC in Villa Park on 7/5/2016 and had the following done (see picture of receipt for all the specifics):

  • Oil Change
  • Brake Fluid Change
  • Coolant Change
  • Michelin Pilot Power Tires (F&R)
  • Chain Replaced
  • Belts Replaced
  • Rear Brake Pump
  • Voltage Regulator Replaced
  • Upper & Lower Chain Sliding Shoes

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So is this low mileage, Massimo Tamburini penned red head worth the current asking price of $7,499 USD?   If it was one of the top shelf/unobtainum SP versions maybe but given that this is the strada version, I would say probably not.  Even though Massimo Tamburini passed away back in April of 2014 and some of his creations are already climbing in value, I don’t think this 916 strada will appreciate much over time.

The last few of these on ebay seem to have gone for between around $5,700, + 500.  Given the condition of this one together with the low mileage and recent service and I would think a fair price would be between $6,000 and $6,400.  It might make a nice addition to anyone building a Tamburini inspired collection, perhaps parked between the Bimota SB2 and the MV Agusta 750 SP-01.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Red Head, Tamburini Style:  1995 Ducati 916 with 3300 (ish) miles
Ducati September 13, 2016 posted by

Never Been Kissed: Zero-Mileage 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale

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Ducati is a company with one foot in the past and another in the future, and that philosophy is clearly embodied by the MH900e. That may seem like the norm these days, with seemingly every manufacturer on the “modern classic” bandwagon, but Ducati’s been playing the game a lot longer than most of the other manufacturers. If you want to get people to shell out premium dollars for a product that performs no better than one from a competitor, you need to tug on those emotional heartstrings, and callbacks to past glories are certainly one way to do that.

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Styled by the controversial, but undeniably talented Pierre Terblanche, the MH900e used a modern incarnation of their air and oil-cooled, two-valve 904cc L-twin engine, a beautiful trellis frame, and a tubular single-sided swingarm, with quality forks and shock. The look is intended to evoke race-winning NCR Ducatis and the name is a reference to Mike Hailwood, the unlikely winner of the 1978 Isle of Mann TT riding a Ducati. That win spawned the original Mike Hailwood Replica bikes and this represents the spiritual Evolutzione of those machines.

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With just 75 rear-wheel horses pushing around 400lbs, straight-line performance is fairly tame, although cornering is excellent. Unfortunately, even though the bike is certainly entertaining to ride, it seems like it was always meant more as a functional collectible than a real-world motorcycle: the seat is very tall and unless you’re over six feet tall, you won’t be putting your feet flat at lights, performance is modest overall, and most of what looks like a fuel tank is really an airbox: the actual fuel cell is just 2.2 gallons, so it’s good the engine is pretty frugal.

In addition to the looks, collectability is increased by the fact that just 1,000 were built in 2001 and another 1,000 in 2002. Production was originally outsourced to Bimota, but they were unable to build the bikes as they filed for bankruptcy, so Ducati built them in-house.

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In this case, all the superlatives you can level at the engine and chassis are irrelevant since any buyer is likely to keep that odometer reading “0”: there are plenty of riders out there, and this one is meant for the collectors.

From the original eBay listing: Zero Mileage 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale

2002 Ducati MHe (Mike Hailwood Evoluzione) Museum quality with zero miles, never started, never had fuel in tank, never had battery installed. Here is the rare of the rare. One of 2000 sold directly from the factory to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Mike Hailwood winning the Isle of Man TT for Ducati. There might be another zero mile example but you would be hard pressed to find it this clean and at an opening bid, with NO RESERVE and well below market value.

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As far as living room objet d’art items go, you’d be hard-pressed to find a more striking modern motorcycle. Sure, a classic Vincent or Brough has more polished brass, steampunk detailing, and a retired racebike might have more historic value, but the bodywork on the MH900e really does look both forwards and backwards in the best way possible.

There are no takers yet at the $15,000 starting bid, but it’s early and there is still plenty of time left on the auction. It’s a shame that this example may never run considering that, aside from the ridiculously small standard fuel tank and committed riding position, the Evoluzione is a very good motorcycle, with a fun, flexible engine and sharp handling.

-tad

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Never Been Kissed: Zero-Mileage 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale
Honda September 11, 2016 posted by

Literally – 1993 Honda CBR900RR

While an occasionally a special bike is regarded as a game-changer, a reference standard, or in impeccable condition, a museum piece.  This first-gen CBR900RR is quite literally all these things.

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1993 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

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In development, Honda stroked their four-in-line 750cc engine to 893cc, pushing power up to a liter-bike 122 hp, but not appreciably increasing weight.  The package weighed just over their own 600 but moved like a superbike.  A redesigned aluminum spar frame handled the power, with 45mm right-side-up forks and monoshock rear.  Nissin supplied the 296mm front disks, with 240mm out back.  Round headlights identify the first generation 900RR, along with an array of vent/intake perforations that must’ve been some young grad student’s thesis.

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Presented by a shop that also houses a museum, this CBR looks to be every bit of the 300-mile display article.  The 900RR’s were made in too many paint schemes to to authenticate the red/white/blue/black, but more knowledgeable readers will likely weigh in.  From the eBay auction:

The Original Open Class Super Bike!

This bike is all business! The epitome of the retro superbike era! Plenty of true unaltered rear wheel horse power!

This engine has IMMEDIATE power surge from the bottom! It’s so strong it feels like you’re going into warp drive! The power is there whenever you want it!

Razor sharp handling! Tipping the scales at 450lbs this bike was in a different stratosphere than its competitors!

This is not a bike for the faint-hearted rider! This was one the first bikes that would raise the bar so far that the limit would fall at the rider rather than the machine!   

A must have for any true super bike collector!

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Elsewhere in the auction the seller states that the bike runs great, and though it probably won’t happen this way, the new owner could have a fantastic couple-three rides on this very original RR, and return it to display duties with clean pistons and less than 500 miles…

-donn

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Literally – 1993 Honda CBR900RR
Ducati September 9, 2016 posted by

Old School Class: 1980 Ducati 900SS for Sale

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This very classic black-and-gold Ducati 900SS represents the polar opposite of the little two-strokes that have been cropping up on our site lately. Both are motivated by v-twin engines, but that’s where the similarities end. One was a product of ruthless and very close competition between arch rivals and used cutting-edge technology to eke out the barest advantages over competing machines. The other is a slightly long-in-the-tooth thug that uses thumping big cylinders, past glories, and oodles of Latin charm to win friends and influence people. Guess which one is which?

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Powered by the restyled “square case” motor that was introduced in 1975, Ducati’s 900SS actually displaced 864cc. The evolutionary 900SS also came with improved or modified features to improve performance and make the bike more palatable to US buyers, including quieter stock mufflers and a shift mechanism meant to improve on the the version available on previous models that crudely relocated the lever to the left side of the bike.

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Ducati’s 900SS was far from cutting-edge technology by the time the 1980s rolled around: twins were pretty passe in the new era of inline-four superbikes from Japan. And Ducati’s famous desmodromic valve-actuation was probably no real advantage for a twin with a redline of 8,500rpm. But European bikes still represented the pinnacle of handling at this point, and although the bevel-drive, Desmo twin probably had just an insignificant performance advantage over comparable rivals, the Swiss watch-like arrangement of shafts and gears and cam lobes used to open and close the bike’s four valves seems like engineering overkill. Not practical, but inherently cool.
From the original eBay listing: 1980 Ducati 900SS for Sale
I bought this bike brand new in late 1979, and have owned and maintained it this entire time.   This bike is unrestored, so the decals show cracking (typical), and the bike has it’s share of minor scuffs (see pics).   This 900SS was delivered with 36mm carbs and Silentium pipes, which were exchanged for the Delloro 40s and authentic Contis you see in the pictures a few years into it’s life.   I also put on the factory solo seat at the same time.    Other modifications (all typical) are SS brakelines, WORKS suspension front and rear from BevelHeaven, longer clutch actuation arm (you really want this!), V-Two Gear Gazer, and Dyna Coils.  All original parts come with the bike, except for the Silentiums (they were typically tossed in the trash) and the wimpy 36mm Dellortos. 
Mechanically the bike is excellent.   It’s starts easily, idles at about 1,500rpm (good for a 900SS with 40s and Contis), and pulls strong.  The carbs and ignition are very well sorted.  Inside, it’s had new rings and clutch some years back, refreshed pickup wires (they all need this eventually), and MBR collets on the last valve adjustment (totally worth it).  Common for the period, the low dogs on the 1st gear slider were removed in it’s first year or so.  Since I’ve owned this bike it’s entire life, I have (nearly all) the maintenance records from new, which are available on request. 
Motorcycle Classics did a nice feature article on this bike about 8 years ago:   search “motorcycle classics moto-guzzi-le-mans-versus-ducati-900-ss”
Hit me with any questions.   I have mixed feelings about selling this bike, but over the last 8 years it’s only been out once or twice a year, so time for someone else to enjoy it.

His asking price is $39,000 for this very nice example, although bidding is up to just over $15,000, with the reserve not met. The 900SS was produced in much greater numbers than the preceding “round case” 750SS, but values are still going through the roof for all bevel-drive Ducatis, and even the much-maligned 860GT has been increasing in price steadily in recent years. While the blue-and-silver paint on other examples may have a stronger link to Ducati’s racing success, you can’t argue with the black with gold striping seen here and, for all the grief Giorgetto Giugiaro got for his styling on the 860GT, he also designed that classic Ducati logo.

-tad

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Old School Class: 1980 Ducati 900SS for Sale
Honda September 8, 2016 posted by

De-Restricted Import: 1989 Honda NSR250R MC18 R5K for Sale

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Many of the coveted bikes in the quarter-liter two-stroke race-replica class were never officially sold outside Japan. They were certainly seen in countries where “parallel-imports” or “grey-market” bikes were commonly sold, but 250cc sportbikes were intended primarily to meet the needs and requirements of that market. And that means buzzy little animals like this Honda NSR250R MC18 were restricted to a mere 45hp when sold new in Japan, and de-restricting them can require knowledge, specialized parts, or both. In the case of the later MC28 that used Honda’s trick Smartcard technology, de-restricting the bike was a major headache, since the digital card held the bike’s ignition map and can’t easily be updated without an official HRC race card, although apparently work-arounds do exist…

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Honda’s MC18 NSR250R was powered by a 90° liquid-cooled 249cc v-twin backed up with a six-speed cassette gearbox and featured a more basic, easily-hackable version of Honda’s PGM-II ignition system which, in this case, has already been modified to release somewhere in the neighborhood of 55-60hp, depending on who you ask. The MC18 unfortunately lacks the later model’s asymmetrical “gull-arm” swingarm that allowed the bulging expansion chambers on the right side to tuck up close for maximum cornering clearance, but it is still an iconic machine.

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This example looks to be in excellent condition, with plenty of new parts as described in the listing. If you check out the seller’s website, they do claim to do thorough inspections and even restorations of the bikes they sell, so it’s not like you’re showing up at the docks to pick up a bike that’s possibly been thrashed by a teenager then left outside to corrode for the past twenty years. Their prices are higher than some I’ve seen on eBay recently, but they seem to have quality bikes for sale, and it helps to know there’s someone in the continental US you can yell at if things go wrong…

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda NSR250R for Sale

MC18 R5K model from Moto2 Imports. Popular blue and white color scheme with just 8,900 miles. This bike has been fully mechanically restored with brand new tires, chain, spark plugs, re-built jets/needles, refurbished front forks & new fork seals. The fuel system has been flushed and cleaned and the whole bike has been treated for rust and corrosion removal. The engine has been professionally de-restricted and is now producing full power. All lights, indicators, and switches are in proper working order. Cosmetically, the bike is in excellent condition (see pics) and the plastics are all factory OEM. You will not be disappointed. Moto2 Imports is the country’s number one importer of foreign sportbikes, specializing in two-strokes. Check out our website for more information and inventory!

1989 Honda NSR250 L Side Front

The seller also claims that the bike has a valid Washington State title with a VIN matching the frame number, which should hopefully give some peace of mind to bidders. And the fact that it has been professionally de-restricted is a big plus, since those extra ponies will be helpful at moving the potential extra mass of its new American rider… Among the Big Four, Hondas seem to be the most desirable, with commensurately higher prices to match. Bidding is very active on this one and already up to $5,000 with the Reserve Not Met, with The Buy It Now set at $6,599 which seems to be right on the money currently for a US-titled NSR250 in good condition.

-tad

1989 Honda NSR250 R Side

De-Restricted Import: 1989 Honda NSR250R MC18 R5K for Sale

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