Posts by tag: Yamaha

Suzuki April 23, 2017 posted by

Rare Pair: 1990 Yamaha YZF750R OW01 and 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale

Just a quick Sunday post for you folks who can't get out riding this weekend. Or for those of you on the East Coast, reading this early in the morning before heading out for the day... So here we've got a pair of rare homologation specials from the Age of the Seven-Fifty, where this now-forgotten class was the cutting edge of competition. Sure, the Big Four all had liter-sized bikes available, but while they more powerful, they were also heavier and much more road-oriented, while the 750s were that perfect balance of light weight, agility, and power. Today's Yamaha YZF750R OW01 and Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited represent some of the very best-handling and most exclusive Japanese sportbikes of the era.

First up is the Yamaha YZF750R OW01, a bike that looks deceptively ordinary at first blush. It was designed to compete directly against the RC30 and in typical Honda fashion, they engineered a completely new solution for their homologation special, with a gear-driven V4, chassis, and single-sided swingarm shared with no other bike in their lineup. Yamaha's bike shares its silhouette with the more common YZF750, but is far more exotic than it might appear: titanium rods, twin-ring pistons, an aluminum fuel tank, detachable alloy subframe, quick-release axle clamps, and Öhlins suspension at the front and rear. The engine was almost radically oversquare, although it displaced the advertised 749cc, and used Yamaha's five-valve head.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Yamaha YZF750R OW01 for Sale

This amazing bike has been in storage in a large collection for the last 9 years, dry stored correctly it will need recommissioning by the new owner for road use, it only has 34,000 kilometers and is in great shape with the original exhaust, toolkit and manual with pouch.

It has a few blemishes from its road use as seen in the pics rather than take up a lot of space here with this models lengthy attributes please do your own research, only 500 of these were made, a lot less than the RC30 and were quite a bit more expensive than it these bikes are getting scarce and climbing in value.

Suzuki threw their hat into the ring with their GSX-R750 Limited Edition, the homologation version of the iconic "Slabbie" version of their sportbike. Like the OW01, it's superficially similar to the standard bike, but features exotic parts intended for racing, like the lightweight dry clutch and electronic anti-dive forks. Lightweight bodywork, an aluminum tank, and a fiberglass tailsection differed from the stock machine, but the engine was still oil and air-cooled to save weight.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited, GSX-R750, and GSX-R1100 for Sale

Selling off my collection of 1986 GSXR First Generation Slab Side bikes. This is the ultimate collection if you are looking for all (3) excellent condition original bikes. Bikes are to be sold as a package as I have had them a long time and would hate to break them up.

1986 GSXR 750 Limited, 4400 miles, Original bodywork, pipe, airbox, etc  in excellent condition. Never been down and has not been a previous race bike.

1986 GSXR 1100- 8000 miles, Original bodywork,  pipe, airbox, etc in excellent condition. This bike has aftermarket tinted screen.

1986 GSXR 750 Red/Blkw ith only 600 original miles. Yes that's right only 600 true miles 100% correct and still has the OEM tires on the bike. I also have original bill of sale from dealer. This may be one of the lowest original bikes in the world. Pic does not show grab rail or front markers  but I have those as well.

All bikes have lots of paperwork. Not looking to separate bikes at this time.

Both of these auctions end Monday, so move quickly if you're interested. This is the second OW01 we've posted up recently and obviously will need some work if you want to use it on the road, but a new owner may just choose to preserve it as-is. The Suzuki is part of a collection so you'll be picking up three bikes instead of just one, but they're all in very nice condition with low miles so if you're thinking of adding some classic Suzukis to your portfolio, you're in luck!

-tad

Rare Pair: 1990 Yamaha YZF750R OW01 and 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale
Bimota April 21, 2017 posted by

Screaming Deal: 1996 Bimota YB9SR for Sale

This is the first Bimota YB9SR I can remember seeing for sale and the seller unfortunately includes very little information, although the photos are of decent quality. The one detail you might want to keep in mind? The $5,500 asking price which, assuming the bike is mechanically sound, makes it an absolute steal. You probably won't find the YB9 on a short list of classic Bimotas, but bascially every Bimota is rare, fast, and collectible, although "fast" might be pushing things a bit here. The "9" has nothing to do with the bike's displacement and simply indicates that it's the ninth Bimota powered by a Yamaha engine. It's a bit down on power compared to its stablemates the SB6 and the YB11, which feature the GSX-R1100 and YZF1000R "Thunderace," respectively, since the YB9 actually uses the liquid-cooled inline four and transmission from the YZF600R "Thundercat" [Ho!] with around 100hp and it even uses that bike's stock gauge cluster, nestled in between the carbon air-intake tubes.

Bimota obviously made its reputation wrapping lightweight frames and sexy bodywork around reliable powerplants from Japan, sexy powerplants from Ducati, and even the occasional German powerplant from BMW... Their early offerings used tube-style frames like the Verlicchi part from yesterday's Ducati 750 F1, but by the 1990s they'd moved on to aluminum beam frames as seen here. Access on some beam-frame models for maintenance and repair can be a bit iffy: the massive-looking part used on the SB6 and SB6R is designed to connect the steering head and swingarm pivot directly, but makes access to some parts difficult, like the front sprocket that supposedly requires the engine to be dropped when it needs changing... I've heard no such complaints about the YB11 that uses a very similar frame to the one seen here, which makes a certain amount of sense considering the fact that both use Yamaha engines.

This appears to be the carbureted SR model, not the fuel-injected SRi introduced in 1996: the metal knob at the top of the triple clamp looks like it could be the choke. That's probably no bad thing, as the fuel injection system was exclusive to the Bimota and will probably make maintaining the bike more problematic: with just 651 YB9s built, anything exclusive to the model might be tricky to source. The system did add a few claimed ponies but, like all Bimotas of the period, reviews of the fueling "improvements" varied a bit and I've read both rants and raves. And as easy as it should be to maintain the YZF600 engine and transmission, be aware that bits and seals for those forks and the Paioli rear shock might not be so easy and the bodywork... Let's just say if it were mine, I'd be regularly trolling eBay for panels "just in case."

From the original Craigslist post: 1996 Bimota YB9SR for Sale

2,653 original miles. 2nd owner. All stock, 1 of 3 imported to the US. Email for more info. Available April 19-26 only.

So the listing contains very little information, but mileage is extremely low, and it looks to be in pristine condition from the few photos provided. And the price? A screaming deal at $5,500. I'm under the impression that the seller needs to sell quickly, which might explain a price more in line with a decent used 600cc supersport. Of course the YB9's 600cc engine means a modern 600cc supersport would probably destroy it in any straight-line competition, but handling should still be impressive. Maintenance should be affordable, but bodywork might be very difficult to obtain if you push a bit too hard... I'm not the biggest fan of the yellow color with blue graphics, but this is a great-looking bike and possibly the cheapest way to get into Bimota ownership outside the questionably-styled Mantra.

-tad

Screaming Deal: 1996 Bimota YB9SR for Sale
Bimota April 16, 2017 posted by

The Joy of SRX: 1987 Yamaha SRX250

Today we find a fun rare model that is - for once on RSBFS - totally affordable. The Yamaha SRX series included multiple displacements, although in the US we only received the XT-derived 250cc model and the XT-based 250cc machine. Home markets also included a 400cc variant. Based around a nimble, single cylinder air-cooled engine, the SRX models were extremely narrow and light, focusing on nimble handling and flick-ability rather than oodles of HP and straight line speed. The design was neo-British old school, and the overall package was unique and usable. Unfortunately for Yamaha, these were not great sellers, and the US models were limited to only a few editions over the 12-year global run. The 250 suffered the worst fate; a single year availability in the US over a 2-year model span. Then it was gone like it was never there at all....

1987 Yamaha SRX250 for sale on eBay

From the seller:
Up for sale is my 1987 Yamaha SRX250. This bike is super rare and only imported the the US for one year. The motorcycle is super clean for being 30 years old. The bike is all stock and runs, drives, stops and idles very well. It has 10,708 miles. The bike is missing the side mirrors. The engine is 249cc with a 6 speed transmission. The engine shares many parts with the Yamaha XT250 enduro which was produced for many years. The tires will need replacing at some point. Inside of the fuel tank is pristine. The bike has a brand new battery. All controls work as they should, turn signals, horn, kill switch, ect....

I have yet to see another one on the road. The bike gets comments everywhere it goes. The bike is a blast to ride and has plenty of power.

The antithesis of the Ninja 250R and as far away from the Honda 250 Rebel as it could get, the SRX250 looked to have carved out its own niche. But the 1980s were not about small displacement bikes, and although attractive and utterly practical, the smallest SRX lost out to lack of interest. It was a practical bike that held the promise of a lot of fun (as much fun as 17 HP will get you), but small displacement and wild introductions of Hurricanes, Ninjas, Turbos and GSX-Rs ultimately buried that fun in a sea of noisy performance.

Today the SRX is a loved model (the 600 version much more so, since we are all capacity bigots). Honda has come closest to recreating the magic with the CBR250, and with a different era upon us is actually moving a fair number of units. The little CBR will never reach the rarity or novelty of the SRX250, but then again a marketing failure is an expensive way to create a future rare model. Check it out here. Sure it's more of a toy than a true canyon tool for many - but it's very rare, very cool, and very, very affordable. What's not to like?

MI

The Joy of SRX:  1987 Yamaha SRX250
Yamaha April 1, 2017 posted by

No Fooling: 1988 Yamaha FZR400

April 1st has often been a day maligned by trickery. Even the hallowed pages of RSBFS have been besmirched by the occasional April Fools Day joke in past years. Not so this year. This year there are FAR too many excellent bikes available to waste time and web space on foolery. For example, 2017 seems to be the year of the FZR400 as evidenced by this fantastic find. This is a two-owner model that looks very clean and has obviously been well-loved. That is always good to see - especially with the Fizzers, as they are all too often raced, modded and generally abused.

1988 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay

With an aluminum Delta Box frame wrapping itself tightly around the rev-happy Genesis inline four, the FZR400 emerged as the sweetest handling machine of the 1980s. Able to carry higher cornering speeds than comparable middleweights (or even open class bikes), the relative lack of power is more than made up for by conservation of forward motion. This is a bike that loves to be ridden, and rewards a smooth, committed rider most of all. The fact that it is also a very forgiving platform makes it all that much more approachable; you will be hard pressed to find negative reviews on this gem from Yamaha.

From the seller:
1988 Yamaha FZR 400. Owned since 2012 (2nd owner). Penske rear shock, Race Tech front suspension upgrades. Very good overall condition, blemishes represented in pictures. Kerker exhaust, Lockhart tank cover, 2009 swingarm, Includes original exhaust, Corbin seat, OEM service manual and many receipts from the original owner.

This particular machine has had some interesting mods. The suspension upgrades are non-destructive and warranted; technology has come a long way in 30 years, and some refresh/upgrades are definitely in order for a bike that has seen some use. Pipes and jetting are common to extract the maximum from what small displacement is available, and the original exhaust is available with the bike (nice!). The Corbin seat is another common mod. The swingarm update is curious; this is normally a cure for the limited tire selections due to the wheel size - but no mention is made of any changes there. Interested buyers might want to find out more. There is nothing inherently negative about this change, but there may be more to the story.

The market remains curiously soft on these smaller machines. In the US, there seems to be a general lack of interest in anything below 750cc. Of course the production numbers don't help the supply/demand equation either, as this was a mass-produced Japanese machine. Still, these hold their value much better than a comparable middleweight (say, a FZR600), and with parts growing scarce we may see an elevation in status for these underrated canyon carvers. Check it out here, and enjoy the glut of FZR400s this year - it may not last!

MI

No Fooling: 1988 Yamaha FZR400
Yamaha March 10, 2017 posted by

Thawed: 1984 Yamaha RZ500

In many parts of the country, it would appear that a wet winter has relented to an early summer. Warmer temperatures seem to prevail, which leads to more riding, sooner in the year. This particular RZ500 - the model a shoe-in for top 10 bikes searched by RSBFS readers - was a Canadian import now a Florida resident. With importation already taken care of, an avid rider can simply take advantage and shred a knee puck or two. Dragging appendages shouldn't be an issue, given the RZ's reputation for outstanding handling; the frame is a basic-yet-stout mild steel box-section affair arranged in a perimeter layout. The rest of the bike is packaged around the fabulous V-4, two-stoke power plant, with the rear shock placed horizontally under the engine. Given the need for expansion chamber space (it is a smoker after all) the under-seat area is chock full of the upper cylinders' pipes. The end result is more mass down low, and a very transition-friendly machine.

1985 Yamaha RZ500 for sale on eBay

From the seller:
RECENT CANADIAN IMPORT. PREVIOUS OWNER BOUGHT FROM ESTATE SALE. OWNER DECIDED TO POWDER COAT FRAME AND WHEELS AS THESE LET DOWN THE CONDITION OF THE REST OF THE BIKE. THE FRAME AND WHEELS CAME OUT AMAZING.

HE HAD ANOTHER MECHANIC HELP HIM CHECK OUT THE ENGINE AS IT SHOWED 46K KILOMETERS ON THE SPEEDO. ENGINE HISTORY WAS UNKNOWN. COMPRESSION/LEAK DOWN CHK WAS GOOD AND THE ENGINE WAS IN PRISTINE CONDITION VISUALLY WITH NEWLY FINISHED COVERS ETC ALL GASKETS THAT WERE VISIBLE LOOKED NEW AND THEY TOOK CLUTCH COVERS OFF ALL LOOKED GREAT. THE CARBS WERE CAREFULLY TUNED AND SET UP AND THE BIKE RUNS LOVELY. STARTS HOT OR COLD AND REVS FREELY.

A VERY GOOD 9 I WOULD SAY FOR CONDITION PLS CHK PICS AND SEE FOR YOURSELF.

From a riding perspective, it is very hard to go wrong with an RZ500. These are performance machines, and provided you are willing to deal with the vibration, smoke and somewhat compromising riding position, you might think you had died and gone to heaven. Power is quite respectable (about 80 HP in stock trim), and weight is nicely managed with a claimed dry weight of 438 lbs. Prices have held strong over the last 5-7 years, making this a model that costs more to get into with each passing year. That is bad news for someone who wants one, but good news for anyone that either has one or has the cash to purchase one. This is a safe investment bet from a two wheeled perspective, although the appreciation may not be as great as with other machines (i.e. RC30).

This bike is available in Florida. It is not clear if the seller simply imported the bike, or imported and legally registered the bike for use in the USA. That would be a pretty big decider, as a licensed RZ500 in the US is worth more (considerably more) than a "sold with a bill of sale" example. The seller does claim a mechanic has made an inspection of this approximately 28,000 mile machine, but seal replacement can be critical to a two stroke to prevent air ingestion (and the resultant lean seizure). As always, we recommend that you investigate carefully, as lots of questions, and - if at all possible - see the bike in question in person. This is a popular auction with bidding above $9,000 USD and reserve not yet met. Check it out here, and be sure and share your thoughts on the model. Good Luck!!

MI

Yamaha March 7, 2017 posted by

On the bubble? 1988 Yamaha FZR400

In the feast-or-famine world of eBay, we seem to be experiencing a bit of a glut from the Fizzer 400 quarter. We don't always see a ready supply of these bikes, but in the first part of 2017 we have witnessed a steady stream. That is the good news. A RSBFS fan favorite, there is much to recommend when it comes to this little 400cc machine. While HP is not impressive, this in-line four will rev to the moon, and with an aluminum delta-box twin-spar frame, adjustable suspension and a tidy riding position, cornering speeds usually surpass those of the bigger (heavier) bikes. What's not to love? Well, therein lies the bad news: prices are rising on these underrated sport bikes. If you have one now, hang on to it. If you are in the market for one, tread carefully (and prepare to spend some cash). Or wait to see if the bubble bursts.

1988 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay

This FZR400 is claimed to be an original one-owner bike with fewer than 3,000 miles on it. The pics show a clean bike with no discernible rash. There seems to be a slight mark on the upper left corner of the fairin, but is easily forgiven on a bike of this age. Even the tops of the trees are free from the swinging key syndrome. The bodywork appears to be intact, and overall the bike is very clean and presents well. Given the difficulty of finding parts for these models, we recommend to purchase the best example you can find; the more complete the better. This looks like a complete bike, with some spares. Did I mention it is clean?

From the seller:
Up for your consideration is an original 1988 FZR400 Motorcycle with 2,609 original miles. Motorcycle has had one owner and stored in the garage since new. The auction includes owners and service manuals, spare keys and period performance parts that were never installed. The bike needs carb work to idle well.

I often wonder about additional performance parts included with the sale of a stock motorcycle. I wonder about exceptionally low miles in a cable-driven odometer world. The devil's advocate in me also wonders about the idle issues; is this simply a case of sitting unused too long, or is there something else lurking behind the scenes. Why are the tank cover mount grommets and screws missing/broken (or appear to be) - oversight or other? To be precise, this bike is not completely stock - the NRC case covers are clear aftermarket items. Again, the devil on my shoulder prods at me; is this preventative maintenance or evidence of a previous boo boo? There is nothing nefarious going on that I can tell from the advert, but if I had any Spidey sense it might be tingling, prompting me to either ask more questions or check the bike out in person.

Of course the devil that is poking at me sprang up from the asking price: $7,500. That would be a serious high-water mark for one of these models, and at that price I would expect perfection. We typically see FZR400s as $3,500 - $5,000 bikes, with exceptional examples fetching a bit more. You can't blame a seller for trying to get top dollar, and you can be sure I will be watching this one carefully, as it could be a price barometer for the type. If nothing else, we continue to see good examples of the FZR400 in the market - and that is something that should make all of us very happy. Check it out here and let us know what you think.

MI

On the bubble? 1988 Yamaha FZR400