Posts by tag: VFR

Honda April 12, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Honda VFR400R

Update 4.12.2017: Sale confirmed with seller. 3 hours from published to sold! Congratulations to buyer and seller!

If you have a rare sportbike for sale, model years 1980ish to 2004ish, consider our Featured Listing service for $59. Email me to see to get started: dan@motoringblogs.com

People often tend to think great visual design is the exclusive domain of the Italians. But that is not so, as witnessed by this beautiful VFR400R. This NC30 - along with its big brother, the RC30 - have flowing lines and a purposeful stance. Visually, these models are as striking as a 916 or F4. This is no accident, as the NC30 was patterned with endurance racing elements; what is there needs to be there, and little more. Not merely a design exercise, the NC30 stands out as a fantastic working machine; form follows function, and these bikes function as good as they look.

The NC30 follows all the right rules in motorcycle design. It is incredibly compact, despite an aluminum perimeter frame wrapped around the V-4 powerplant. The motor is a real gem, making noises that only Honda fours and gear-driven cams can make. If the soundtrack doesn't put a smile on your face, the power delivery and rev range on this 400cc turbine certainly will. The single sided swingarm is there to facilitate tire changes on the endurance racing model, but the aesthetics on the street version really make it stand out. So too, the twin headlamps really define the front of the bike and give another nod to it's racing heritage.

From the seller:
1989 VFR400R $6,500

I purchased this bike a few years ago and have enjoyed having it in my garage both as a project and as something unique to look at.

The list below details what I have done to recommission the bike. Oddly, I have never ridden it (the pleasure for me was spending time in my garage).

Included with the sale is the OEM body work, rear foot pegs, mirrors, front turn signals, and some other bits along with a shop manual.

Bike was brought to the US by a serviceman who was able to title it in NM. I bought it with that NM title and was able to transfer to AZ though I wouldn’t assume that your state will be as accommodating as mine.

What's been done:
New bodywork with new fasteners
Seats re-covered
Rims powder coated
New Shinko Podium tires front and rear
New fork seals and oil
New Galfer brake pads front and rear
New brake lines front and rear
Caliper seals replaced front and rear
Master cylinder rebuilt front and rear
New throttle, choke, clutch cables, (forgot to order a speedometer cable)
New stator, regulator / rectifier
Carburetors rebuilt with new o-rings, bowl gaskets, and intake boots
New radiators and hoses
Rebuilt water pump
New exhaust gaskets
Suspension linkage greased
New chain (never found a chain guard)

This appears to be a well-loved and oft drooled over VFR. The seller clearly took care of the machine and the list of new parts is impressive (check out the pile of receipts). Although I'd rather ride than wrench, I have a lot of respect for those that like to immerse themselves in a project such as this one. The win-win is a uber-clean, refurbed VFR without a whole lot of additional miles. This one shows approximately 18k (about 11,000 miles) on the KM clocks. As the VFR400R was never officially imported into the US, there was no need for Honda to federalize it (i.e. 17 digit VIN, speedo in MPH, US-specific emissions, etc). This may create issues for you when it comes time to register the bike, although this one has a history of US titles in both New Mexico (previous owner) and Arizona (current). If you live in a more restrictive state (i.e. CA), you may need to do more homework unless you "know a guy."

This Featured Listing 1989 Honda VFR400R is available directly from the seller. Contact Jason if you are serious about this striking grey market import. At $6,500 the price is very competitive - and given that these NC30 Hondas are pretty rare in the US, you might want to act quickly. Rare collector bikes in this condition do not hang around long. Give Jason a call and add one of Honda's finest models to your collection!

MI

Honda September 2, 2016 posted by

Featured Listing -1993 Honda VFR400R

Update 9.7.2016: All three bikes are now sold. Congratulations to buyers and seller! -dc

This Featured Listing is part of a set from the sellers for a VFR400, TZR250, and an NSR250. They are available for purchase as a group or individually. The sellers are available this labor day weekend for personal inspections in Southern California. -dc

unnamed

20160825 1993 honda vfr400r right

Stuff of legend here in the states, the VFR400R was built 1986-93, partly to satisfy progressive licensing requirements in Japan and a few other countries.  While speed and power were mechanically limited, the restriction were easily defeated, leaving a superb handling 60 hp machine which could be enjoyed by beginners and expert riders.

20160825 1993 honda vfr400r left

20160825 1993 honda vfr400r right front

The third and final revision to the bike had the factory designation NC30, and was the most refined.  The 14,500 rpm redline and "big bang" crank provided the ultimate performance from the 399 cc V-4.  Echoing the looks of its showroom-mate VFR750R, the 400 was also equipped like a larger bike, with twin-spar aluminum frame, adjustable suspension ( 41mm forks and single-sided swingarm rear ) and triple disk brakes.  The NC30 also used a handling trick from bigger bikes - a smaller front wheel aids turn-in, controlled by a steering damper.

20160825 1993 honda vfr400r right peg

 

20160825 1993 honda vfr400r left front wheel

This example began life in south Asia and was imported to the U.S. and restored.  Here are the owner's comments:

Purchased from prior owner in Nevada, imported from Thailand, prior history unknown, selling on bill of sale only, it was given a recent restoration using OEM parts when possible, quality repaint & wheels powdercoated, , minor upgrades (ie; braided brake lines), has full tread Bridgestone Battlax BT014, is missing passenger footrests. Has not been started in a while, but just needs fresh fuel.
Spares & Extras: Rear subframe (current one has slight twist, replacement is straight, can swap if desired), extra braided brake lines, steering damper & more.

Also includes Pit Bull rear stand, fresh Yuasa battery and trickle charger, parts catalog, service manual, and more documentation.

20160825 1993 honda vfr400r left tank

20160825 1993 honda vfr400r binnacle

Looking at least very good, with just over 11,000 miles.  The VFR400R reviewed as the best-made and easiest to ride of the small sports.  Almost any rider could hum along to the gear-driven cams on this down-to-earth exotic, though some work awaits if the road is your goal.  The ask is a sensible $5,700.

Donn

20160825 1993 honda vfr400r front

20160825 1993 honda vfr400r left rear

 

Featured Listing -1993 Honda VFR400R
Honda June 10, 2016 posted by

VFR=Very F’n Reliable: 1993 Honda VFR750 in white

The first generation VFR 750F was only offered with the uber-cool white bodywork in 1993 and it still looks quite good, especially in comparison to the other sportbike designs of the 1990's (cough-cough-I'm-looking-at-you-1993 Suzuki GSX-750R).  Fairly cheap just a few years ago, trying to find a 1993 VFR with the OEM white bodywork in good condition is now getting to be quite hard. Values have been increasing recently, as shown by this under 10,000 mile edition we listed last year went that for about $5,500 USD, well above its book value.

This one has a significantly higher number of miles than the one from last year but condition looks to be excellent and more importantly, mostly OEM.

nr7501

1993 Honda VFR 750 on ebay

Back in the early 1990's the 600cc class really started to upset the previously dominant 750cc class both in terms of performance and in sales. New 600cc bikes like the Honda 600 F2 and Kawasaki ZX6R were suddenly close performance rivals to the previously dominant 750cc class and while some companies such as Kawasaki and Yamaha responded by making their 750cc offerings even more track tech oriented, Honda decided to go a different route.

Instead of a single pure track oriented 750cc offering like the Yamaha OW01 or Kawasaki ZX7RR, Honda instead took a two-pronged approach.  Honda put their considerable technological efforts towards what would become the mind bending oval piston equipped NR750 while at the same time allowing their 750 street effort to take a more balanced approach.  The result were two epic bikes; a technological tour de force in the NR750 and possibly the best all around sportbike of the 1990's, the VFR750.

nr7502

When the VFR750 debuted Honda had just come through a debacle with the bikes predecessor, the VF700.  Flaws in the camshaft casting process had produced a reputation for "chocolate camshafts...they melt when they get hot!" and Honda was determined to restore their engineering reputation.  Rumor is that the focus on reliability was so intense that Honda lost money on the VFR750 for several years just to restore its reputation.

While reliability was a focus, the performance side of the VFR750 was nothing to sneeze at.  The VFR’s handling was on a par with the best superbikes of the day. A stock VFR finished eighth at the Suzuka 8-Hour race and another nearly stock version finished in 3rd place at the Donnington park Trophy race against competition that included the legenday Kevin Schwantz.    The Honda VFR 750 offerred bulletproof reliability and performance that measured up to all but the most performance-oriented bikes of the time.   It should come as no surprise that the VFR would in later years become a big sales success, win bike of year numerous times in the mid to late 1990's and was even crowned sportbike of the decade by numerous motorcycling publications.

nr7503

This particular VFR has a good chunk of miles on it; the seller indicates over 45,000.  Even so condition of the bike looks to be truly excellent, with no blemishes on the triple tree or gauges.   The only items that seem of note are the tailpiece and exhaust which appear to be non stock, there seem to be extra/non-stock reflectors on the front forks and perhaps a bit of paint bubbling or road rash on the lower mid fairing.

Here is what the seller has to say:

  • New brakes, grips, oil & filter
  • Good tires
  • Good chain and sprockets
  • Perfect seat
  • No leaks or other issues, Everything works, starts on first push
  • Yoshimura Pipe - subtle but noticeable
  • Needs 1 fork seal, plastics not perfect.

nr7504

So now the question - what is this lovely VFR in the cool white worth?  Well let me put it this way...when I saw that the Buy-It-Now price was only $2,350 USD I almost bought it myself.  The condition of this one looks to be very good, its the rare white bodywork scheme, maintenance history looks reasonable and while the mileage is kind of high, given the VFR's build quality reputation I don't think there will be major issues once any initial issues are resolved.

This may be one of those rare occasions when a seller has underestimated the value of his bike.    I expect this one to sell pretty quickly so if you missed out on the one from last year you might want to act fast.

Marty/Dallaslavowner

VFR=Very F’n Reliable:  1993 Honda VFR750 in white
Honda September 7, 2015 posted by

Gentlemen, start you collections: 1990 Honda RC30

rc301

Always a favorite here on RSBFS, the RC30 is a bike that every serious collector wants.  Officially designated as the Honda VFR750R with different trim based on destination country, the RC30 was a true homologation bike and came with what was at the time unheard of specs for a street bike; titanium and magnesium parts,  gear-driven cams, track based "slipper" clutch, a first gear that could take you up to 80 mph, a single-sided swingarm, etc.  How special were they?  Let me put it this way - the RC30 was so epic even James May of Top Gear UK owns one.

The RC30's 100 hp 749cc engine may seem tame today but what made the RC30 so special was the way it put everything together;  huge amounts of feedback, a massively broad powerband, lightest weight in its class, the Honda blew the 750cc competition away.  Of course all this race tech didn't come cheap;  the RC30 was priced at an eye popping  $21,000 in 1990, which equals about $39,000 USD in today's dollars.

A review of the RC30 can be read here.

rc302

1990 Honda RC30 for sale on ebay

For this particular RC30, there seems to be both an upside and some potential downsides.  On the upside, the seller states the bike is 100% stock original except for some stainless steel braided front and rear brake lines.  Fluids look fresh and the engine area looks immaculate which shouldn't be surprising since the seller appears to be a serious collector.  On the downside, the seller indicates they are the 3rd owner so true history of the bike will be something of an assumption.  Also the mileage is a bit higher than alot of RC30's we see here on RSBFS but this is reflected in the price.

rc303

 

Is this 1990 Honda RC30 worth its 23,500 starting bid?  Well we have seen recent posts range from $22,000  to over $28,000 USD so the asking price seems right in line with the current market.  Also these are true Rare Sportbikes with only 300 reported as coming into the USA so values will probably continue to rise over time.

Here at RSBFS we have some regular readers who will be able to offer better insight on the current fair price for this RC30 so if its time for you to add one to your collection, I suggest you check out the the comments on this post or the recent posts linked above but be quick if you are seriously interested as ebay auctions of these bikes often end early.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Gentlemen, start you collections:  1990 Honda RC30
Triumph July 8, 2015 posted by

Silver Surfer: 2001 Triumph 955i in Silver

NOTE: This one sold while I was writing this post which isn't really surprising because among fans of the Triumph Daytona series, this is one of the most desired.   Even though it has already moved to a new owner I think its still worthy of a post.

955i

I am a big fan of the early edition Triumph Daytona, I love the 1st gen bodywork style, the big 3-cylinder/triple engine and the trick single sided rear swingarm.   The Big Daytona was the first serious sport bike from the reborn Triumph motor company, but was oddly named the T595 in its first year.  The designation was meant to identify the engine series (T5) and then the displacement (955) but a lot of people though the Daytona was a 600cc bike.   In the 2nd year the bike was renamed as the 955i and offered with several limited edition boywork styles, including a luscious blue and the lovely solid silver seen on this bike.

Even though the 955i was their first serious sportbike, it wasn't ever intended to be directly competitive against hyperbikes like the Yamaha R1.  The 955i is more of the British version of the excellent Honda VFR; able to handle daily street duty, excell at weekend canyon corner carving and comfortable enough for medium level touring.  While not a hyperbike the 955 was no slacker in the grunt department; the Daytona moves along incredibly briskly due to a  955cc displacement three-cylinder engine designed in part by Lotus.

955i4

2001 Triumph 955i in rare silver on ebay

Seriously, I love the look of this edition of the bike, it looks much more organic, more shapely that the later versions.   The next generation also ditched the single sided rear swingarm for a standard setup and were more sharply focused, with less weight and sharper rake.

The only issue I see with this one is the aftermarket exhaust which looks odd and shows some evidence of being down.  The seller indicates the exhaust was an ebay aftermarket purchase so perhaps it came like this

955i5

Mileage is a lower 10,xxx miles and condition looks to excellent.   The seller indicates that they are an older rider which probably accoutns for the excellent condition of the bike.

Here is what the seller has to say:

  • Bought this bike in the most "stock" condition I could find at the time
  • Bike has never been dropped, shifts smoothly
  • Only slight mods like bar-risers for comfort and a smoked screen for looks.
  • Carbon Pipe is Ebay Buy with a grind, not related to handling of the bike, just sounds too good to switch out.
  • Took Mirrors off for storage, but they are in excellent shape, and available.
  • Bike has been stored indoors for it's life and it shows that way.
  • Comes with LSL rear sets which look trick.
  • Going on 51 years old, I don't trash my bikes.  I also never go near the red line, no need to for my enjoyment.
  • Still breaks my heart to sell her, she has so much soul and character.  I remember very vividly when these came out, and I was in Love at first Sight!

955i2

Normally at this point I would be asking whether this lovely 955i was worth the $4,000 USD asking price but since it sold in less than 24 hours I guess we know the answer to that question.   I know KBB prices show a value below the asking price but this 1st edition/955i badged version seems to be the hot/collectible style.  

To be honest, I was seriously considering making an offer myself but it sold before I could get my act together.  I would suggest that any collector act fast if they see one of these become available near them, especially the 955i version in silver or the even rarer, all blue.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

Silver Surfer:  2001 Triumph 955i in Silver
Honda January 21, 2015 posted by

Big-Bang Theory: 1996 Honda RVF400 for Sale

1996 Honda RVF400 R Front

Introduced in 1994 to replace the VFR400R, the RVF400 used a smaller, 399cc version of Honda’s gear-driven V4 powerplant with a 360° firing order. The updated model featured a revised fairing with cat-eye headlamps replacing the earlier bike’s round units, distinctive air tubes leading from the fairing to the front of the tank to feed the carburetors, although the airbox was not pressurized by any sort of ram-air system. Running gear saw a change to more modern upside-down forks and a 17” wheel replaced the earlier bike’s 18” item.

1996 Honda RVF400 Rear Suspension

Honda's homologation V4 engines featured a “big-bang” firing order that has all of the combustion events taking place relatively close together, instead of spaced evenly. This naturally increases engine vibration, but creates distinctive pulses in the power delivery that allows the rear tire to momentarily regain traction in between during on-track moments at the edge of adhesion, aiding handling and increasing tire life.

There’s also the undeniably subjective benefit in terms of sound: the “big-bang” engines often have the rawer, more charismatic sound generally associated with V4 engines compared to more conventional “screamer” motors with evenly-spaced firing intervals.

1996 Honda RVF400 L Side

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Honda RVF400 for Sale

1996 Honda RVF400 NC35. This bike is in very good condition. Bike has 9589 km = 5753 miles. Engine runs fine, no problems. There is a crack in the seat "see pictures". The passenger seat covers the crack so you don't see it. You don't see many RVF400 in this condition anymore. Bike is original, not restored. I have a clear California title for the bike.

1996 Honda RVF400 Dash

Sold officially only in Japan, all RFV400’s are grey-market imports. The seller is based in Japan, although this bike is supposedly in the US and has a clear California title. There is plenty of time left on the auction, with no takers yet at the $9,000 starting bid.

While these are obviously not as desirable as their bigger RC45 siblings, the RVF400 is prized by collectors for its motorsports heritage. And while the stock bike’s claimed 53hp is underwhelming on paper, the little RVF is reportedly a brilliant-handling bike, a “brains-over-brawn” bike for riders who like gear-whine that drowns out the stock exhaust.

-tad

1996 Honda RVF400 R Side

Big-Bang Theory: 1996 Honda RVF400 for Sale