Posts by tag: TZR

Kawasaki April 21, 2018 posted by

Rare Colors: Cali-Titled 1989 Kawasaki KR-1S in Zeus Blue for Sale

They're relatively rare here in the US, even in states with lax registration requirements, but late 80s and early 90s quarter-liter two-strokes were pretty widely available elsewhere in the sportbiking world, considering their narrowly-focused role and limited audience. Kawasaki was largely absent from the intense class rivalry during that period, though. Their earlier KR250 was out of date compared to something like the original TZR and they didn't have a real competitor ready until 1988 when the Kawasaki KR-1 and the sportier KR-1S were introduced.

The KR-1 was discontinued in 1992, without any significant updates and well before the others in the class. Just 10,000 were built, making it a pretty rare sight outside Japan these days: Honda constructed more than ten times as many NSR250Rs! But although Kawasaki as a company didn't seem like they'd gone all-in on the idea of going head-to-head against Honda, Suzuki, and Yamaha, it wasn't as if the KR-1S itself didn't measure up.

Like most of its rivals, the KR-1S was powered by a liquid-cooled two-stroke parallel twin and backed by a six-speed gearbox to exploit the razor-thin powerband although, also like its rivals, the Kawasaki did feature power-valve technology, here dubbed "KIPS," to boost the midrange. Modern bikes with their ever-larger engines and horsepower numbers are increasingly equipped with electronic up-and-down shifters and autoblippers, but they really don't particularly need them on the road, considering the available power. A quickshifter/autoblipper would get plenty of use on one of these, had they been available: there's only so much you can do with just 249cc and the bike's government-mandated 45hp, so dancing on the gear lever is a required, not optional activity when riding a little two-stroke.

The frame was the typical aluminum beam unit of the class and the suspension was good but, compared to other bikes in the class, the KR-1 was a bit... raw. Handling was "lively" and the bike managed a best-in-class tested top speed of 139mph. An engine balance shaft driven by the 180° crankshaft seems like it was the only concession to civility, and even that was probably justified as preventing vibration damage to the minimalist frame, rather than as a means to refine the experience of riding the wee beastie.

From the original eBay listing: Cali-Titled 1989 Kawasaki KR-1S in Zeus Blue for Sale

The KR1S model here in the USA is one of the most rare of the Japanese 250 racer replica two strokes. If one can be found, it will usually be the green, white, and yellow bike. Sometimes the black and green bike, but never a factory genuine JDM Zeus Blue bike. These bikes were very limited in production. The factory Zeus Blue bikes differed from the export models in a few ways: indicators, mirrors, calipers, rotor center color, wheel color, all ID by the frame number. California titled and plated to its original VIN# Rare. Call Tim @714-746-5087 for more details.

When I purchased the bike a few years ago, I went onto the forums and found only a handful of original Zeus Blue KR1S models all overseas: one in Australia, one in the Netherlands, and one in the UK. I would go so far as to say this is the only one in the USA, and I know it’s the only one with a California title. This is THE rocking horse unicorn bike. To whomever buys the bike, you would be INSANE to remove the California title from the bike. That makes this bike so desirable. These bikes were ONLY JDM models never for export which is what makes them so rare. I have owned many many 2Ts (TZR, SPR, MC21, Rothmans, MC28, VJ23, V Model, Lucky, etc). These parallel twins really are amazing bikes. Having owned the four big Japanese manufactured bikes, to me there is no question Kawasaki is the most fun to ride. They literally are mad scientists and I LOVE IT! The KR1S was the fastest of all the 2T racer replicas. And if you know Kawasaki, they just built it and let it rip. Yamaha, Honda have their rev limiters, credit card ignitions, etc. Not Kawi. This thing will go all the way if you were to wind it out all the way. The sound of the parallel twin motor is simply the best. The cackling of the pipes. This bike has only had Motul 710 in it, runs fantastic, starts first kick, and purrs at idle. 18k miles on the clocks, float, gaskets, float valves all done, carbs serviced and cleaned, has Uni foam filter, new plugs, steering damper, factory toolkit, original key, etc. Clear California title in hand and current registration ‘til Jan 2019. Bike is for sale locally so the auction can end at any time. Thanks. Enjoy the ride…

Personally, I prefer my wild-haired Kawasakis to be vibrant green, and not the more civilized, metallic green they've been using on their modern, more sophisticated offerings. No, I want that lurid, fluorescent green of old. But this color scheme is exceedingly rare here, and that does count for something. Not to mention that it does look pretty sharp! The 18,000 miles indicated may not be stored-in-your-livingroom low, but the bike does appear to be you-could-eat-off-it clean and is in immaculate condition, with the very desirable California registration. And yes, the seller is correct that re-titling it in another state is absolutely a bad move financially: legitimately-titled two-strokes of this era are difficult to come by here, and there are plenty of well-heeled enthusiasts willing to pay extra for something they can legally ride.

-tad

Rare Colors: Cali-Titled 1989 Kawasaki KR-1S in Zeus Blue for Sale
Yamaha February 8, 2018 posted by

Grubby but Great: 1992 Yamaha TZR250

From our buddies at Deftone Cycles comes this 1992 Yamaha TZR250 Racing Sport, the dry clutch version of Yamaha's entry into the early '90s quarter-liter two stroke wars. This TZR presents a unique conundrum, as it reportedly runs like a top, but has cosmetically had it. Do you restore it? It certainly is rare enough to warrant the work. Do you ride it? That route would definitely provide the most instant gratification.

1992 Yamaha TZR250 for sale on eBay

If you do decide to ride it, you'll be on a sweet-handling variant of the two-stroke sportbike class, but power could leave you wanting. TZRs were restricted to 44 horsepower in the home market, and it apparently can take some doing to bring them to full chat. That said, Cycleworld recently gave the TZR high praise for its power delivery.

From the eBay listing:

Yamaha TZR250RS 3XV Racing Sport. Dry Clutch Model. NO RESERVE 9,734 Miles (15,666 Kilometers) Completely original and unrestored. Mechanically Sorted. Cosmetically Challenged. All fluids are fresh. Shifts and revs to redline perfectly. Starts effortlessly every time. Very Honest Bike. Things to note: This vehicle is for one who wants a restoration project or just wants to ride without a care. Please see Images. Fuel tank is Rust Free. Factory red wheels are showing their age. Both lower fairings have broken by the lower V and have touchup paint. Bike has Vin Matching State of Ohio Title. 3XV0886** “Buyer is responsible for their own State Requirements.” Imported into the States through all legal channels. Sold as is. Buyer responsible for shipping. Thanks for looking. Please email any questions.

Broken fairings notwithstanding, this TZR is firmly in new supersport price territory, par for the course for two-stroke imports. For the right buyer this will make a great summertime mount.

 

Grubby but Great: 1992 Yamaha TZR250
Yamaha September 12, 2017 posted by

A Little Fizzy: 1993 Yamaha FZR250R for Sale

While most small-displacement bikes these days are relatively simple, economical singles and twins, the Yamaha FZR250R spec sheet reads like a much bigger machine: aluminum beam frame, four cylinders, four valves per cylinder, dual 0verhead cams, an EXUP exhaust valve, and a six-speed gearbox. That adds up to a claimed 45hp and 18 ft-lbs of torque that could push the 310lb dry machine to a top speed of 110mph.

Unlike modern sportbikes with their flexible powerbands, the littlest FZR absolutely required you to chase that screaming 18,500rpm redline to make any sort of progress at all: the technical specs meant Yamaha could eke out every bit of performance possible from the diminutive displacement, but there's only so much that four cylinders and four valves can do with 249cc. So while that redline may be fun for a while, the downside is that you're revving the nuts off of it everywhere, all the time, and 10,500rpm at 70mph in sixth gear makes for some frantic freeway miles.

The FZR250R is a good-looking machine for sure, pink and white graphics notwithstanding but, aside from the novelty and that previously-mentioned shrieking redline, the question here really is: what's the point? The little FZR is nearly unheard of here in the USA: it was officially sold only in its home market of Japan, although many countries have a thriving grey market so they did find their way elsewhere when new to places with heavy taxes on displacements or tiered licensing systems.

Mostly though, they didn't: small-displacement sportbike junkies typically gravitated towards two-strokes like Yamaha's own TZR that were cheaper to buy and run, with similar weight and claimed power but a less-frantic powerband. It was much easier to extract additional performance from two-strokes as well, since the FZR was already pushing the envelope in terms of four-stroke tuning. Ultimately, the FZR requires big-bike maintenance with almost none of the payoff.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Yamaha FZR250R for Sale

Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE is a 1993 Yamaha FZR250R with only 25,499 kilometers (15,844 miles). The BEST thing about these little inline four cylinders is the 18,500 redline. These bikes love to be revved to the moon! This baby Fizzer looks good and has great curb appeal. There are several scratches and tiny chips in the bodywork from it's ride thru life but overall very clean. No dents in the tank and only two tiny cracks in the upper fairing on the left side around the front blinker and the mirror...... Small tear in the passenger seat and some corrosion that will clean up easily. This bike would make at candidate for restoration. Comes with a aftermarket muffler and clear blinkers. Everything else stock. Fairings are 100% genuine Yamaha. Bike runs flawless. New battery and fluids. Fun little bike to ride in the tight turns. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use.

Bidding is up to just over $1,500 with very little time left on the auction. It's not in perfect condition, with some corrosion and scuffs and those non-standard grips and bar-ends, but is complete and the fairings are claimed to be original and it does have a US title. Obviously, pure performance junkies need not apply: power is very limited for wide-open American roads and, even though the handling is good, you're still looking at pretty basic, non-adjustable suspension bits on the FZR250R. But with light weight, you should be able to throw it around with abandon, and wringing that tiny inline-four's neck should provide hours of entertainment. Absolutely hammering a bike in all six gears with few legal consequences could make this a pretty fun toy for backroad riding, especially if you're not a fan of the noise and headache associated with two-strokes. Just make sure you live close to those backroads...

-tad

A Little Fizzy: 1993 Yamaha FZR250R for Sale
Yamaha August 25, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1994 Yamaha TZR250RS

When it comes to RSBFS, the most popular category for our readers seems to be the quarter-liter two stroke arena. The 250s make up the most often requested, clicked on, and likely purchased machines, and it's not hard to see why. For those who prefer a pure, unadulterated GP racer with handling that would embarrass a strip of velcro on a shag rug, enough power to be interesting (but not so much to be painful), braking that will give you 8 (or 9) cents of change back from your dime, and bodywork that screams purpose yet looks like art, not even the boys from Bologna or Rimini can touch a small-bore smoker. Popular world wide - from the home markets of Japan, throughout Europe and Canada - 250cc smokers made for great rides, affordable club racers, and a stepping stone to real GP bikes. In the US, they are coveted for all this PLUS the fact that none were ever officially imported into the US. That makes them rare with a capital "R." Put rare and drool-worthy together on the same ticket and you have today's 1994 Yamaha TZR250RS. The "RS" refers to Racing Sport - as if there would be any other sport worth considering....

1994 Yamaha TZR250RS for sale on eBay

The TZR250RS - also known as the 3XV model by Yamaha aficionados - consists of a 90 degree v-twin, fed with reed valve induction and twin Mikuni flatslide carbs. A close-ratio gearbox with a dry clutch and add triple disks all around showcases the intent of this machine. Featuring fully adjustable suspension front and rear, the RS model is a sub 280 lb (dry) smoking rocket that will corner with the best on the racetrack. Initially these RS models were home market bikes - which came with a restricted output of approximately 45 HP. Latter markets, including Australia, Western Europe and the UK enjoyed a higher-output machine. As with other smokers of the era, the TZR responds well to de-restriction (figure 30% gains) and traditional two-stroke performance mods. The TZR250 was available in many different configurations, which included a dizzying array of carburetors, ignition modules, exhaust power valves, transmissions and clutches. And as is the standard, each came with specific graphics and marketing nomenclature (250R, 250RS, 250RSP, 250SP and 250SPR).

From the seller:
Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE is a Beautifully rare Yamaha TZR250RS (3XVA) with only 2,581 kilometers (1,604 miles). This TZR is in very nice mechanical condition. New battery, new fluids and has newer tires on it. Bike runs like the day it was new. This TZR has great curb appeal and looks great. Left rear cowling has two cracks in it and is missing a tiny piece where the two rear cowlings join together. Rims have paint peeling from sitting in time and need to be powder coated. Upper cowling, lower front cowlings have no cracks, fuel tank has no dents. Bike had sat for a while when I found it. I bought it to restore as it would make a excellent candidate for restoration since its got super low miles on it, but never got around to it. It needs to be cleaned up, corrosion removed, new rear left cowling installed and it will look like a million bucks again. Bike is completely stock and all original. Fairings are 100% genuine Yamaha. Original windscreen comes with purchase.

This TZR comes with a Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use. Bike will sell to highest bidder regardless of cost, loss or investment. This is an excellent chance to buy a Yamaha TZR250 RS on the cheap!

By the end of the 250cc two-stroke era, all the manufacturers had moved to a v-twin power; packaging and aerodynamics were the primary reasons, although longevity due to perfect primary balance was another positive factor for the vee motors (farewell, parallel twin). Yamaha definitely followed suit here, yet the result is far from another cookie-cutter "me too" 250 GP bike for the streets. The TZR lineup has a rabid following and stands out as some of the more rare variants of this popular class. You will look high and low for another TZR250RS, and - at least in the US - you will be looking for quite a while.

Today's example can be best summed up as very clean and a great starting point for either a rider or a sano-resto-neo-original build. This bike looks like an honest piece of kit, but is far from some of the museum pieces normally seen by this Utah collector (such as his awesome KR-1R). As the rooms of his man cave empty out to make room for new acquisitions, there appear to be plenty of fun items left; you should definitely check out some of his other auctions on eBay, including a cool Ninja 150RR. This TZR250RS is a meaty morsel - and RSBFS readers are serious two-stroke carnivores. Bidding has started slowly, and is only nearing the $3k mark with a few days remaining. Check it out here and start scheming on your plan to score this no reserve auction bike. Good luck!!

MI

Yamaha August 19, 2017 posted by

Barenaked Two Stroke: 1991 Yamaha R1Z

Looking like a modern take on the wildly popular RZ350 two stroke, the 1991 Yamaha R1-Z somehow never made it out of Japan. That's a shame, too, because the R1-Z sports a too-sexy-for-my-fairing steel trellis frame and the powerplant from the TZR250 race replica.

1991 Yamaha R1-Z for sale on eBay

Sneaking in under 300 pounds dry, the little smoker makes fantastic use of the 45 horsepower that was de rigeur among JDM quarter liters of the time. With as much time as TZRs spent on race tracks, waking an R1-Z up likely wouldn't be a challenge.

This R1-Z shows quite nicely, and comes with a clear Washington State title, so putting it on the road in your home state shouldn't be too much of a challenge. It does have marks in keeping with its age, and some pitting on the fuel filler cap, but the paint looks very nice. We are particularly fond of the "INDIVIDUAL SPORTS" graphic on the tank. Note the pillion seat.

From the listing:

INTRODUCTION:::

You are looking at a 1991 Yamaha R1Z. The Yamaha R1Z was legally imported from japan and now has a legal Washington State clear title. Yamaha r1z is a very rare unique blend of race inspired two stroke motor put into a open café inspired trellis frame. The R1Z was a bold move for Yamaha at the time and way ahead of the styling trend; the motor used in the R1Z is identical to the tzr250 parallel twin motors of the same time period so the R1Z is a very quick 250cc naked sport bike. This particular R1Z has very low 9300 miles (14,900 kilometers), and the bike is mostly all original and in good shape. But please feel free to read more about the specifics of this bike and see the pictures for detail. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. U.S. and International bidders are welcome to bid on this motorcycle but must arrange shipping themselves...

BODY:::

The body work is in great condition, all of the painted body work is near perfect with the exception of some very small rock chips on the front of the gas tank as can be seen in the pictures. The frame is in great shape with no major scratches or nicks and the motor is nice and clean. Overall the body is in very good condition for its age.

MECHANICAL:::

The bike runs and rides perfect, and it shifts smoothly through all 6 gears. The carburetor was recently cleaned and adjusted, and a full service tune-up was performed which included new, spark plugs, chain, air filter, brake pads, oil change, and brake fluid flush. All of the lighting and electrical components work as they should.

CONCLUSION:::

This is a great opportunity to buy a very rare nice and clean 1989 Yamaha R1Z. These bikes were never imported into the USA and very few were exported outside of Japan to any other countries so it is a very rare Yamaha model. If you need any additional pictures or have any additional questions please feel free to email us. Domestic & International buyers are welcome to bid but must arrange the shipping themselves. However we will be glad to assist with any loading of the motorcycle. We have helped with the shipping of motorcycles across the country and overseas for other customers in the past. Please feel free to bid as long as you make the shipping arrangements.

Bidding on this beast is just south of $2,200 with nine days left in the eBay auction. Does this stir your inner oil burner? Let us know in the comments below.

Barenaked Two Stroke: 1991 Yamaha R1Z
Yamaha May 1, 2017 posted by

Grey Day: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA

It's a "when it rains it pours" type of situation with TZRs here on RSBFS. Given last week's 3MA model posting from a California location, here comes one from the other side of the US - Florida. Ironically, the seller claims that this one came from California a few years previous. In what small circles do rare bikes run!

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for sale on eBay

As staff writer Tad has captured in a previous post of this generation TZR: "The 3MA version of the TZR250 saw the head spun around 180° from what you might expect, with the carburetors at the front where they could gulp fresh air and the exhaust exiting out the rear. This helped solve some of the packaging issues involving the bulbous expansion chambers needed for two-stroke performance, keeping them tucked up inside the bodywork instead of having to route them under or around the engine." The net effect is not more power - that is unchanged from a conventional head setup - but rather the ability to keep all the bits tidy from front to back. Do not underestimate the difficulty in fitting expansion chambers neatly inside the bodywork. The 3MA was Yamaha's novel solution.

From the seller:
1989 Yamaha TZR250 Bought a few years ago from California. The bike dose not have a Title and is sold as is. It runs and rides. That said I have not ridden it in a few months. Its in good condition over all. Any questions or pictures just ask.

A no title two stroke is a roll of the dice in today's world. If you are a US resident, you may or may not have a shot at registering something like this. Being that this bike is based in Florida, I would have thought that was about the best chance you had to obtain a license plate. As always, do your homework with your local DMV constabulary *before* plunking down big dollars. Otherwise, this looks like it would make a pretty sweet track day bike. You do engage in track days, don't you??

That said, the opening ask for this one is $4,000 USD. The seller notes it has not been ridden in a few months, which means it likely has racked up few miles in the last year. That is a warning for engine seals and other goodies; smokers need to run in order to survive, and old engine seals are a quick trip to a seize and a high-side. Figure a mild refresh in your estimates to be on the safe side - until you know for sure. Only a few days left with no takers. Check it out here, and good luck!

MI