Posts by tag: Two Stroke

Suzuki February 18, 2017 posted by

Game-Changer: 1977 Suzuki RG500 Grand Prix Race Bike for Sale

Update 2.17.2017: Last posted in August of last year, this bike reached $34,101 reserve not met. Back on eBay and closes on Sunday. Links updated. -dc

1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike R Side

Prior to the RG500, two-strokes were found only in the smaller racing classes, and Suzuki was breaking new ground with this bike: no one had ever really built a two-stroke to challenge bikes in the premier class. Launched in 1974, Suzuki’s RG500 racing machine was impressively successful: with a Manufacturer's Title in 1976, the bike dominated Grand Prix racing for the next decade. That success drove the move to two-strokes for any manufacturer who wanted to remain relevant in Grand Prix racing, and two-strokes were the only game in town until rules changes for the 2002 season made four-strokes competitive again.

1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike L Side Tank

Power was no problem for the new, liquid-cooled engine, and the same lessons learned racing smaller bikes were scaled up for the square-four. But while four-strokes generally deliver their power in a smooth, progressive manner, two-strokes are notoriously on/off devices: a stumbling mess when “off the pipe” with an abrupt powerband like a jagged, lethal spike, characteristics only exacerbated by the dramatic displacement increase: early bikes ate chains, tires, and other consumables at an alarming rate, although development eventually cured these problems.

1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike R Side Engine

Early motors produced 110hp and used front and rear banks of cylinders that were the same height, but the later bikes saw the front bank a bit lower than the rear for the “stepped” motor that gave 124 hp for the 238lb machine. This 1977 machine is probably of the earlier type, although it's hard to tell for sure with the fairings in place. Either way, this is a very light, very fast motorcycle. And that's really always been the appeal of the two-stroke: simplicity, extreme light weight, and massive power for a given displacement.

1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike Dash

With the introduction of the new Suter MMX500, two-strokes have been heavily featured in the motorcycle press recently, and it's been interesting to read how many mechanics and riders loved preferred them to four-stroke machines: riders loved them for their light weight and challenging nature, mechanics for their simplicity and tunability.

From the original eBay listing: 1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike for Sale

Suzuki RG500 GP MK2 ex-Newbold, model year 1977, VIN 110077

An ICONIC RG500 version 1977 in the best paintwork scheme ever. It is an ex-John Newbold bike with all the correct standard original bits plus some works parts (tank etc). The bike was campaigned by Newbold in the Shell Sport 500 TT races beetween 1979/1981 and North West 200. It was completely restored by John Mossey who bought it in 1995 from a gentleman in Cardiff and sold then in 1997. It was just kept as showbike in collection since.

1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike Throttle

Bidding on the last couple of RG500 race bikes got up to between $26,000 and $44,000 although those were later bikes, and an individual bike's race history can make a huge difference in terms of value. Bidding for this one is up north of $22,000 with plenty of interest, but very little time left on the listing. Sitting in a collection means it's in amazing physical condition, although it will probably need extensive work if you plan to use it in anger...

-tad

1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike L Side

Game-Changer: 1977 Suzuki RG500 Grand Prix Race Bike for Sale
Aprilia February 17, 2017 posted by

Tiny Titled Two-Stroke: 2009 Aprilia RS125 for Sale

Back when two-strokes ruled the entry-level sportbike class in Europe, Aprilia’s RS125 was designed to appeal to new riders who wanted something sporty, but were limited in terms of displacement and outright power by strict licensing laws that prevented the purchase of bikes that in the USA would be considered "learner bikes." Sponsor logos and race-replica paint jobs were the order of the day and, made between 1992 and 2012, the RS125 had a pretty long and successful run. Details and styling varied throughout production, according to tastes of the period, but spec was similar: a 124.8cc two-stroke, single cylinder and six-speed gearbox, aluminum beam frame, racy big-bike looks, and a sub-300lb dry weight.

This version of the RS125 is clearly meant to resemble Aprilia's range-topping RSV1000, with those angular, cat's-eye headlights and stealth-fighter angles, although it shares those traits with the RSV4 that followed as well. Ultimately, the RS125 was superseded by the RS4 that more closely matched the look of the bigger RSV4 and was powered by a four-stroke single to meet today’s more stringent emissions requirements. It’s a perfectly competent machine and looks very sharp, but it lacks the pop and fizz of a manic two-stroke, and is far less tunable to boot.

The RS125 were never officially imported to the USA for road use, but some made it here "for offroad use only" and they do come up for sale from time to time. Unfortunately, the sleek little RS125 has two problems: one, you can’t just call it an “RS125” or people might not be clear what bike you’re talking about. Did you mean the Aprilia or the Honda’s entry-level race bike? Two, and obviously more significantly, the same titling and registration issues that affect all grey-market two-strokes apply here. If you live in a state with a liberal DMV, you may be able to find a way to make one road-legal without too much trouble: titled examples like this one have shown up on this site before. If not, you’re stuck with a handsome display piece or a very slow track day bike. If I was looking for a display bike, I’d probably want a bit of genuine racing machinery or something truly historic...

Fortunately, this example is ready for road use, at least in Pennsylvania...

From the original eBay listing: 2009 Aprilia RS125 for Sale

For Sale-York, PA. 2009 Aprilia RS 125 2 stroke. Clean and clear title. 798 miles. 34mm DeLorto carb, V-Force 3 reeds, pinned TPS, pipercross OEM style air filter, Arrow exhaust, Tyga carbon fiber rear hugger, chain guard and engine cover, Rhinomoto front and rear axle sliders, Driven Racing swingarm spools, R&G tail tidy, Evotech exhaust hanger, Woodcraft rearsets w/ GP shift, Aprilia OEM European ECU and harness to allow lighting, factory signals, mirrors and TS relay, Ohlins front fork springs, many replaced OEM parts included, Dyno tuned by Eraldo Ferracci of Fast By Ferracci. It comes with the factory Aprilia parts book and service manual. This was $5499 new in 2009 when only 150 were imported for racing only. It came derestricted with no lighting. Considering the amount of kit put on this bike and the rarity of this bike I think it is a more than fair price. I reserve the right to end this auction as the bike is also for sale locally. Serious bidders can contact me for more pictures or information. I will not ship this motorcycle so it will have to be picked up. Bike will have to be picked up within two weeks of auction end or deposit will be forfeited. You must have at least a 95% positive feedback rating to bid and at least 20 positive feedbacks. Deposit can be made through PayPal but the balance must be paid in cash.***It is currently tagged, titled, inspected and insured in York County, PA. It is titled as a regular motorcycle.

So what’s it worth? Well this seller has set the starting bid at $6,000 and there are no takers yet so he may be aiming a bit high. Certainly this one has that road-legal status, very low miles, and has been thoughtfully modified using quality parts and tuned by the famous owner of Fast by Ferracci. Eraldo had his hands on my Ducati Monster when I had it in to be rejetted and I was pretty happy with the results, so that'd certainly be a selling point for me. If you're in the market for a little two-stroke sportbike you can thrash the living daylights out of without tripling the national speed limit and live somewhere it can be titled, this one might be worth a look.

-tad

Tiny Titled Two-Stroke: 2009 Aprilia RS125 for Sale
Honda February 9, 2017 posted by

Frosh – 1987 Honda NSR-250R MC16

Honda had tested the market with the NS250F/R in 1984, and sampled in the MotoGP waters.  On the heels of Freddie Spencer's 1985 championship in the 500 and 250cc classes ( ! ), the factory introduced the NSR-250R in late 1986 as a 1987 model.  This early example of the winning two-stroke twin is almost a blank canvas - ready for a quick once over for the road or a big restoration.

1987 Honda NSR-250R for sale on eBay

Just square with 54 mm bore and 54.5 mm stroke, the 249cc MC16 engine used hard coating on the cylinder walls to help the 45 hp last, and computer controlled exhaust port to extend the torque band.  The alloy frame was lifted from the GP bikes, as was the cassette transmission and Pro-Link rear.  Just over 300 lbs. fueled, the NSR-250R came with dual front disks and three spoke alloy wheels.  Tires are 17" front and 18" rear which will require some attention when buying new rubber.

This  NYC-based example has more miles than most but doesn't look to have been abused.  The current registration is a help at the very least.  Cosmetics and mechanicals might be freshened up, or you could explore the edge of the slippery slope.  The owner doesn't divulge much history but says this in the eBay auction:

1987 HONDA NSR 250 (MC16) WITH 25118 KM (15607 MILES).  THE BIKE IS ALL ORIGINAL AND COMPLETE.  STARTS ON THE FIRST KICK AND RUNS AND DRIVES EXCELLENT.  THE ORIGINAL PLASTICS ARE PERFECT.  NO CRACKS EXCEPT FOR THE WINDSHIELD.  THE ORIGINAL PAINT IS GOOD, BUT NOT PERFECT.  THE BIKE IS TITLED IN THE UNITED STATES AND IS CURRENTLY REGISTERED AND INSURED IN MY NAME.

This was a brutally competitive market segment and time, and Honda won the 250cc championship 11 times from 1985-2009.  As the MotoGP 250cc class fed improvements into the showroom, the later bikes have more and higher tech, but the first year machine has its appeal.  This one has a rather realistic cost of admission, and the early year might ease the pain once renovations get under way.  From a time when championship-winning innovations quickly found their way into the street machines, the NSR-250R is purely speedy and lightweight, no room for anything artificial...

-donn

Frosh – 1987 Honda NSR-250R MC16
Yamaha February 6, 2017 posted by

Restored Replica: 1984 Yamaha RZ350 for Sale

If you live here in the US and have a hankering for a two-stroke sportbike the choices, assuming you don't want to monkey about with a grey-market import, are few and far between. 70's two-strokes were relatively light and nimble, but still limited by the suspension and frame technology of the time, and by the mid-1980s, they'd been legislated out of existence, leaving this Yamaha RZ350 to make a final stand against the inexorable tide of four-stroke motorcycles. With blacked-out engine and frame, that striking black and yellow "bumblebee" paint, bikini fairing, and the "Kenny Roberts" signature, the RZ350 represents the very last of the old guard before "sportbikes" were codified into the narrow, very focused form we see in today's motorcycles.

Produced for a very short period between 1984 and 1985, the RZ350 was a follow up to Yamaha's RD bikes. It was powered by a 347cc two-stroke parallel-twin that added liquid-cooling to the successful formula, along with the "Yamaha Power Valve System" or "YPVS." Powerband is typically two-stroke-y, even with the benefit of the YPVS power-valve, but the additional displacement helps some, compared to the all-or-nothing 250s. Weighing in at just 370 pounds or so with gas in the tank, it will still shake a leg on spirited backroad rides and can surprise modern machines, although tire choices for the skinny 18" wheels will limit ultimate grip...

The seller claims that the bike has been restored from top to bottom, including a full engine rebuild, and it also includes a full-fairing that appears to have been a popular period accessory, considering the number of RZ350s fitted with them that come up for sale.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Yamaha RZ350 Kenny Roberts Replica for Sale

Here is a beautiful restored 1984 RZ350 Kenny Roberts. The numbers are matching with a clear title in my name. This bike has a low production number of 223.  I have owned this bike for 6 years and have hardly rode it. It sat getting looks more than riding so its time to turn it loose. This bike has been completely restored. The engine has been professionally rebuilt from top to bottom. It runs and rides beautiful. There is less than 500 miles on this bike since it has been redone. As you can see it has a full fairing kit. The engine is stock with DG pipes and mild carb jetting. This bike is a real head turner where ever I have taken it. Probably the nicest RZ350 you will come across. Take a look at the pictures.

Bidding is very active on this one, and up to just over $7,000 with about 24 hours left on the auction. It's certainly possible to find an RZ350 for less but, unless you stumble across some pristine, low-mileage museum-piece that will probably need a full restoration if you plan to ride it regularly, you're unlikely to find one nicer. Well-reviewed when new and very popular now, the RZ350 neatly straddles the modern and classic eras, with clearly vintage sportbike style, light weight, and a liquid-cooled two-stroke punch. If you're looking for US-legal two-stroke performance, this is just about the only game in town, and this example looks to be one of the nicest around.

-tad

Restored Replica: 1984 Yamaha RZ350 for Sale
Honda January 27, 2017 posted by

Odd Import: 1983 Honda MVX250F

In the world of import two strokes, you may be intimately familiar with RGs, NSRs, RZs and the like. What you don't hear much about is the MVX. One of the oddities of the popcorn set, the MVX represents Honda's engineering might coupled with a healthy dose of experimentalism. Unlike the RD/RZ/RG set with parallel twins (or later, the RG V-twins), Honda pulled a page from their GP racing manual and created a V-3 triple cylinder machine. With a configuration similar to the Ducati L-twin layout - but with two front cylinders - the MVX was no wider than a parallel twin while showcasing an extra cylinder. Balancing the odd number of reciprocating parts was accomplished via a slightly heavier connecting rod on the 3rd, upright cylinder. The result was 49 horsepower at 9,000 RPM, with redline starting at 10,500 RPM.

1983 Honda MVX250F for sale on eBay

You would be forgiven to pass this off as a glorified moped - with flashy graphics but no street creds. After all, is that a drum brake up front?? In reality, what appears to be a drum brake is actually a clever inboard single disk. The centralized location eliminates the torque created by traditionally-situated single disk implementations, although heat buildup during extreme use would continue to plague the setup. Honda eventually adopted a conventional twin disk arrangement for the NS-series of bikes that were to follow.

From the seller:
The bike is imported from Japan.
Not registered yet in the U.S.
This bike is sold without title.
Low miles (2884km)
Engine number MC09E-1014852

The engine running to half a year ago, I stayed for a while. So, Cleaning of cab & spark plug. The color of the tank is slightly peeling off. Coating inside the tank

Part of the engine & frame that has been simple painted . A little cracked of single seat. The end of the stand is broken. Battery replacement required.

The seller has done a good job providing photos and video of the bike in question. Like the last bike from this seller, this MVX lacks any title. Given that the MVX never came near US shores (Japan and Pacific Rim countries were the sole recipients), getting this one licensed for road use might be a bit dicey. For its age and origination, this bike looks to be in great shape (which is not always the case with overseas imports). As always, RSBFS recommends that you do your homework and plan ahead if you have a hankering to act.

If you decide to act, better bring your wallet - the opening ask for this one is $5,800. We have not had enough history with these bikes to really derive a value, so it will be interesting to watch this one and see where it goes. The MVX is very rare in the US, but how much value does that add? What do you think? Does this 1983 Honda MVX250F tickle your fancy? Would you prefer this over a similar year two stroke from Suzuki or Yamaha? Check it out, then share you thoughts in the comments. Good Luck to the seller and all potential buyers!

MI

Odd Import: 1983 Honda MVX250F
Yamaha January 20, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: Zero-Mile 1987 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

Update 1.30.2017: The seller has notified me that this sale is now final on this bike after receiving serious interest just a day after listing. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Are you looking for an '80s two-stroke to tear up the back roads in a cloud of blue smoke? Just move along: nothing to see here. Are you searching for a museum-quality Yamaha TZR250 2MA/1KT? Well we may just have what you're looking for with today's Featured Listing, a zero-mile example that may never have seen a tank of fuel in its life.

The very first TZR was a development of Yamaha's RD series of motorcycles, and it helped to define the rapidly-evolving class: lightweight aluminum beam frame, fully-faired bodywork, and a liquid-cooled two-stroke parallel-twin backed by a six-speed gearbox and a set of 17" wheels. Every bike in the quarter-liter class featured some sort of proprietary powervalve technology, and the TZR naturally used the Yamaha Power Valve System or "YPVS." Triple discs quickly became the class standard, although early TZRs like this one made do with just a single disc and caliper at the front. With a good set of pads, this should still pull you up quickly, considering the sub-300 lb dry weight.

First-generation TZRs and NSRs generally seem to command less money than their later counterparts and I'm not really sure exactly why. I'm assuming it's because early 250 two-strokes are nice, fun little sportbikes, while bikes like Honda's NSR250 MC28 from the end of the line pack cutting-edge tech and some trick parts... But as far as historical significance and style go, these early bikes have both in spades.

From the Seller: Zero-Mile 1987 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

0 miles

Two stroke, not available in the United States, purchased in Canada. Extremely clean, near perfect condition. As far as I can tell, it's never had gas through the gas tank. New battery, original keys. Metric and US speedometer. A great addition to someone's collection.

The bike is located in Michigan to view and pick up. Not willing to ship but willing to assist with your shipper.

Price is $11,500.

As you can see from the photos, the seller even has the original service manual and a tool kit that obviously has seen minimal use. With zero miles on the odometer, it'd be a shame to put it on the road and wreck the pristine status, but if you're looking for an early TZR to complete your Yamaha sportbike collection, you're obviously very unlikely to find one in better cosmetic condition.

-tad

 

Featured Listing: Zero-Mile 1987 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale