Posts by tag: Two Stroke

Yamaha August 31, 2016 posted by

Starting Small: 1985 Yamaha TZR250 1KT for Sale

1985 Yamaha TZR250 R Side Front

Designed as a natural evolution of Yamaha’s RD two-stroke sportbikes, the TZR250 helped set the tone for the entire class, and the bike featured a lightweight aluminum beam frame, full bodywork, and liquid-cooling for the twin-cylinder powerplant that produced a claimed 50hp with the help of Yamahas YPVS power-valve. Until the introduction of the 3XV version of the bike in 1991, Yamaha used a parallel-twin configuration although rivals from Honda and Suzuki quickly moved to v-twin engines. The TZR was cutting-edge when introduced but was quickly eclipsed by the sportier offerings from Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Honda until the 3MA reverse-cyclinder version was introduced, although that bike was never officially available outside Japan.

1985 Yamaha TZR250 L Side

Unlike some other small sportbikes of the 80s and 90s, including Yamaha’s own 3MA, the TZR250 came with 17” wheels front and rear. This could, in theory, could help with tire selection: there are lots of smaller “sportbike lite” Ninja 300s and CBR300s running around and certainly bikes like KTM’s RC390 cry out for sporty rubber in skinnier sizes. The single front disc and caliper probably won’t offer cutting-edge stopping power but, with good pads fitted, should pull the sub-300lb machine up well enough.

1985 Yamaha TZR250 Clocks

This example is fresh off the boat from one of the regular eBay importers, and looks very striking in this unfamiliar color scheme. If you’re comfortable with DMV shenanigans in your home state, keep an eye on this one. It's a little rough around the edges, with some scuffs and surface corrosion, but is complete and appears to run well.

1985 Yamaha TZR250 R Side

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Yamaha TZR250 1KT for Sale

The bike is just imported from Japan. Not registered yet in the U.S. Very good running condition sharp response of 2-stroke engine is still well. Can shift all gears very smooth. Brakes are work fine. Electricals are all working. Has YAMAHA genuine fairings, but has hairline cracks and chips and scratches on fairings. Fuel tank has some scratches. Will needs new tires and fork seals too. Speedometer looks YAMAHA genuine parts and shows 11,900 km = about 7,400 mi, but actual mileage is unknown. Has an original key.

This is an over 30 years old used bike. Sold as is with NO warranty NO refunds NO return.

1985 Yamaha TZR250 Engine

The seller also includes a video of the bike starting and running. The last TZR250 1KT we featured sold for $6,000 on the nose, so this one should probably fall somewhat lower given the recently imported status: the aforementioned bike actually had a NJ title. I happen to like the graphics on this one, although traditionalists may prefer the period’s seemingly more common red/white speedblock pattern, so I’m not sure how the color will affect interest in the bike.

Keep in mind that this is a no-reserve auction, so keep an eye on this little TZR as it might go for cheap.

-tad

1985 Yamaha TZR250 L Side Rear

Starting Small: 1985 Yamaha TZR250 1KT for Sale
Suzuki August 30, 2016 posted by

Game-Changer: 1977 Suzuki RG500 Grand Prix Race Bike for Sale

1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike R Side

Prior to the RG500, two-strokes were found only in the smaller racing classes, and Suzuki was breaking new ground with this bike: no one had ever really built a two-stroke to challenge bikes in the premier class. Launched in 1974, Suzuki’s RG500 racing machine was impressively successful: with a Manufacturer's Title in 1976, the bike dominated Grand Prix racing for the next decade. That success drove the move to two-strokes for any manufacturer who wanted to remain relevant in Grand Prix racing, and two-strokes were the only game in town until rules changes for the 2002 season made four-strokes competitive again.

1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike L Side Tank

Power was no problem for the new, liquid-cooled engine, and the same lessons learned racing smaller bikes were scaled up for the square-four. But while four-strokes generally deliver their power in a smooth, progressive manner, two-strokes are notoriously on/off devices: a stumbling mess when “off the pipe” with an abrupt powerband like a jagged, lethal spike, characteristics only exacerbated by the dramatic displacement increase: early bikes ate chains, tires, and other consumables at an alarming rate, although development eventually cured these problems.

1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike R Side Engine

Early motors produced 110hp and used front and rear banks of cylinders that were the same height, but the later bikes saw the front bank a bit lower than the rear for the “stepped” motor that gave 124 hp for the 238lb machine. This 1977 machine is probably of the earlier type, although it's hard to tell for sure with the fairings in place. Either way, this is a very light, very fast motorcycle. And that's really always been the appeal of the two-stroke: simplicity, extreme light weight, and massive power for a given displacement.

1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike Dash

With the introduction of the new Suter MMX500, two-strokes have been heavily featured in the motorcycle press recently, and it's been interesting to read how many mechanics and riders loved preferred them to four-stroke machines: riders loved them for their light weight and challenging nature, mechanics for their simplicity and tunability.

From the original eBay listing: 1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike for Sale

Suzuki RG500 GP MK2 ex-Newbold, model year 1977, VIN 110077

An ICONIC RG500 version 1977 in the best paintwork scheme ever. It is an ex-John Newbold bike with all the correct standard original bits plus some works parts (tank etc). The bike was campaigned by Newbold in the Shell Sport 500 TT races beetween 1979/1981 and North West 200. It was completely restored by John Mossey who bought it in 1995 from a gentleman in Cardiff and sold then in 1997. It was just kept as showbike in collection since.

1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike Throttle

Bidding on the last couple of RG500 race bikes got up to between $26,000 and $44,000 although those were later bikes, and an individual bike's race history can make a huge difference in terms of value. Bidding for this one is up north of $22,000 with plenty of interest, but very little time left on the listing. Sitting in a collection means it's in amazing physical condition, although it will probably need extensive work if you plan to use it in anger...

-tad

1977 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike L Side

Game-Changer: 1977 Suzuki RG500 Grand Prix Race Bike for Sale
Yamaha August 22, 2016 posted by

1985 Yamaha RZV500 available in Wisconsin

s-l1600

Here's a great looking, unrestored, Japanese market RZV500. The biggest difference between the RZ500 and RZV500 is the aluminum frame and even smaller production numbers compared to the ROW models. Mileage is a mere 7,400 and with 5 days remaining on the auction, the current bid is a little over $10k, reserve not met.

dc

1985 Yamaha RZV500 for sale on eBay

s-l1600 (2)

from the seller:

If your looking at this ad then you already know what you want so I'm not going to list all the technical stuff for this bike you can look that up online. I have had this RZV500 for 12 years. I ride it about a 100 miles a year and put it away. It runs and rides great. Starts easy I have done nothing with the motor since I bought it just changed oil and tires that's about it. I did add the Lomas pipes and changed jetting the pipes are mild steel.The stock pipes will be included.

I am not an RZ Geek just someone who likes to ride 2 stroke on the road so I might not be able to answer all technical questions but I will try. As far as the condition it does have some cracking in the body work some mild oxidation in areas. About everything you could expect for an unrestored 31 year old bike. The one thing I did notice on my last ride is the directional will go on but not flash that is something I have not looked in too. Other than that everything functions as it should.If you need more photos of something specific I will be happy to provide them.


From the Q&A at the bottom of the listing:

Q: What's the difference between a RZ500 & a RZV 500 ? Thank you.

A: Hello, There are several differences some subtle and some not so subtle. here is a list of some differences. RZV500R (51X) Made exclusively in Japan Tachometer mounted red warning light that activates at the equivalent of 55mph. Hand-produced lightweight aluminium frame, fuel tank contents gauge activated by a rhs mounted function switch (uses water temp gauge to show fuel tank contents available), front suspension pre-load adjustable from dial on top of forks legs. Self cancelling indicators deleted. Production run limited to 1600 units only (all sold in the first week of release allegedly) The claimed dry weight of the RZ is 438 lbs. The claimed dry weight of the RZV is 418 lbs. I hope this answer's your question. Thanks for asking. Todd

s-l1600 (1)

s-l1600 (3)

1985 Yamaha RZV500 available in Wisconsin
Yamaha August 17, 2016 posted by

I Come In Pieces: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

1989 Yamaha TZR250 R Side

If you’re looking to import a rare and unusual vehicle that was never intended for the US market into the country like today’s Yamaha TZR250, there are a few ways to go about it. Some of these desirable machines can be found in Canada, and others can be found already here in the US, imported at some point in the last 25 years by one means or another. These days, there are a number of people bringing in little smokers by the container-load, buying up bikes that are relatively ordinary in Japan and shipping them across the Pacific to two-stroke-starved US buyers. If all else fails, you can simply browse the internet and buy all the parts you’d need to build one in your own garage, one bit at a time. Which is what the seller of today’s bike appears to have done.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 L Side Rear

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Japanese Big Four were competing for sales in the hotly-contested 250 two-stroke class. Specifications were very similar on paper and performance advantages could be razor-thin, with the RGV, NSR, TZR, and the occasional KR all fighting for a slice of the pie. Early on, parallel-twins were the most common configuration, although later bikes shifted towards v-twins. Yamaha eventually followed suit with their TZR250 3XV but, for a couple of years, they experimented with an unconventional reverse-head layout in their 3MA.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 R Side Front

Reverse-head engines claim a number of performance advantages, although the reality is that actual gains are very minimal. The main goal in the 3MA appears to have been packaging: two-stroke exhausts require bulging expansion chambers for optimal performance, and wrapping them around engines and behind fairings and underneath swingarms can be a packaging nightmare. In the TZR 3MA’s case, the expansion chambers are tucked up neatly under the rider to exit through the tail section, avoiding cornering clearance and swingarm fouling problems, in addition to saving some weight and any ram-air benefits the bike might have seen from mounting the carbs at the front of the engine.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 L Side

The 3MA TZR's handling was supposedly excellent, and the little twin made good power compared to its rivals. Unfortunately, the bike quickly developed a reputation for being very unreliable compared to the RGV and NSR, although I’ve read comments in various two-stroke forum threads claiming that they’re no worse than any other bike in the class. There’s really nothing here an experienced two-stroke rider wouldn’t expect, so the main concern with the 3MA is limited parts availability, although eBay and Google can likely provide most of what you need if you have a little patience.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

I have for sale a 1989 Yamaha TZR250 with a 3MA20 engine, wiring harness and ECU but a 00 clutch and top end. We did NOT import this bike whole but spent about 5 yrs getting parts and pieces for from all over the world to make this a complete running/racing bike. This bike was not sold in the US but can be titled here for street use or raced in Vintage Roadracing classes through a number of organizations.

She is a two stroke streetbike that was issued in Japan for street use or roadracing. She is about 95% complete, starts and runs (have even tested it around the streets of Indy). Doghouse shown in pictures is the only new piece of freshly painted bodywork on the bike ~ I have everything else to install still but have not yet since she wasn't completely built but could be tested this way and if anything happened, the new bodywork would still be pristine. I have a Japanese title and registration for her. I have the paperwork for Indiana BMV to assign a new VIN # to her and issue a Indiana title for her. Things still needing done ~ Rear brake caliper is leaking and needs replacing (I put in a rebuild kit and it still leaks ~  it needs replacing). Windscreen is not the proper one and too small for the bike ~ got tired of dealing with the supplier I was working with. Custom painted bodywork needs to be fitted to bike but have all pieces ~ front fender and doghouse already installed ~ seat, side panels and rears need to be installed. You can keep the old bodywork on her too. Wheels freshly powder coated white. New tires just put on last year.

Currently oil tank is not connected due to trying to keep the gas tank from rusting any further by using oil/fuel mixed in the fuel tank. A dust seal on LH Fork needed. Like I said, some minor things need finishing that I just can't do or afford right now. Just one hell of a bike. I will try to post a video of her starting and running. Contact us with any questions. This is also listed locally on Craigslist. Whenever it sells, the ads will be removed from both Ebay and Craigslist.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 L Side Front
The seller also includes a video of the bike starting and running. It’s great that this TZR is here and I’ve developed a real fascination with this particular model. These reverse-head bikes were a bit of a failure in practice, but they’re very cool and, for some insane reason I've put the 3MA on my wish list. But importing a bike in pieces seems to absolutely be the most difficult way to go about purchasing a TZR250. The question is: since these are being regularly imported these days from Japan and elsewhere, why go through the trouble to bring one in in pieces? A noble endeavor, but that’s a pretty big hassle. Did the seller begin the project before that was commonly done? Was he avoiding import taxes on a complete machine, or planning to title it as a "kit bike"? The seller does mention that he has Japanese paperwork for the bike, so I’d imagine it be just as easy, or just as difficult to get the bike registered, depending on where you live.

-tad

1989 Yamaha TZR250 Fairing Panels

I Come In Pieces: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale
Yamaha August 15, 2016 posted by

East Coast Smoker: 1986 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

1986 Yamaha TZR250 R Side Front

Introduced in 1986, the Yamaha TZR250 was the follow up to their RD family of sportbikes. Yamaha's first go at a quarter-liter TZR had middling success: it wasn’t especially competitive next to more focused rivals from Kawasaki and Suzuki on track, but it was a far better roadbike. The TZR followed the standard two-fiddy two-stroke formula of the period, with a lightweight aluminum frame and fully-faired bodywork surrounding a 249cc liquid-cooled parallel twin, and midrange courtesy of Yamaha’s YPVS power valve. They claimed 50hp from the motor, which made the 282lb dry machine capable of a top speed north of 120mph.

1986 Yamaha TZR250 L Fairing

17” wheels could be found at both ends, although tire sizes fall somewhere near bicycle width in the front and front tire at the rear… The single disc brake up front was adequate and pretty standard for lightweight sportbikes of the period, although twin front discs quickly became the norm for the 250cc class. Apparently a "blue spot" caliper from an R1 or R6 will bolt directly onto the stock front forks if you feel you need a bit more stopping power, a little restomod touch, or a splash of color.

1986 Yamaha TZR250 R Side

The first TZRs were known as the 2MA or 1KT bikes, depending on the market in which they were sold. Later, the parallel twin saw its head reversed in an effort to improve cornering clearance in the 3MA, before Yamaha switched to a v-twin for the final, 3XV version.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

86 TZR250, 9362 Kilometers.
Imported from Japan one year ago.
Super rare. Runs well.
Will ship at your expense.

Well that's not exactly a ton of information, almost an eBay haiku, but at least the seller includes a number of nice pictures. Even with the recent influx of grey-market two-strokes, the Yamaha TZR is pretty rare, although at that $6,000 Buy It Now price seems on the high side. They’re claimed to be relatively easy to maintain which is appealing, considering parts will have to ship from overseas most likely.

Interestingly, this particular little smoker is hiding in New Jersey. See: some good things do come from Jersey! Besides me of course: I grew up there. Actually, I’ve never really understood all the hate heaped on Jersey. It’s like people fly into Newark International Airport and decide that the whole place must just be more of the same. Or they get their information from uppity New York residents… Anyway, the state may be best known for its Jersey Shore bro-culture and really good tomatoes, but it is most definitely not known for having a permissive DMV, so I’m wondering about the status of this TZR. Is it registered and titled? The listing doesn’t say. Maybe that's why it's being sold after only a year? Considering that these early 2MA bikes are supposed to be most at home on the road, it’d be a shame if this was for collectors and track-riders only.

-tad

1986 Yamaha TZR250 L Side

East Coast Smoker: 1986 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale
Yamaha August 12, 2016 posted by

Pint-Sized Racer: 2006 Yamaha TZ125 for Sale

2006 Yamaha TZ125 R Side

Unlike the roadgoing, but still-sporty TZR series, Yamaha’s TZ bikes were track-only motorcycles with performance far exceeding what road riders might expect from their diminutive displacements and dimensions: technically, the Yamaha TZ125 isn't even pint-sized as this post title implies, since Google reliably informs me that a pint is actually 473cc, and even a cup is 236cc, which is an interesting coincidence for bikes like the Aprilia RS250 Cup... The TZ125 featured a liquid-cooled two stroke with slightly undersquare 54mm x 54.5mm bore and stroke that produced an impressive 44hp from those 124cc, helped by Yamaha’s YPVS power-valve. Pushing just 160lbs “semi-dry,” the featherweight sportbike could see speeds north of 125mph, depending on tuning, gearing, and what the rider had for breakfast.

2006 Yamaha TZ125 L Side Bare

A cassette-style six-speed gearbox allows for quick trackside repairs and changes, and there’s no starter of any kind, so rollers or bump-starting are the order of the day. Keep in mind that this is a true MotoGP machine in miniature, so you should be prepared to spend plenty of time between race or track weekends tweaking and maintaining this highly-strung little beast. But even just sitting still, this is such a cool machine: the details and welds on the frame, that huge intake snorkel, the dry clutch jutting from the side of the bike, and the airbox nestled between the frame spars.

2006 Yamaha TZ125 Dash

These probably work better for younger or smaller riders, owing to the fact that even last night's heavy meal could make a difference in top-speed and acceleration. Those 20 pounds of ballast you've put on since college? Yeah, that's more than 10% of the bike's total weight. But several commenters in the past have claimed that taller folks can actually ride them, something I hope to put to the test at one point or another.

2006 Yamaha TZ125 R Side Bare

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Yamaha TZ125 for Sale

Yamaha TZ125 Roadracer 2006 year model, all must go! Same owner since bought new in Nov 2005, original crankcases as new, KLS shifter, Ohlins rear shock, Marchesini wheels, Galfer brakes, PVL programmable ignition, MCE Racing/airtech airbox and fairing, thumb Choke, Storz steering damper, MCE Racing ported and flowed Cylinder, MCE Racing crankshaft, MCE Racing tuned engine. Additional spare parts, new crank cases, 2 new cylinders, 3 new cylinder heads, new front forks, 2 new windscreens, front and rear stands, tools with toolbox, crankshaft fixtures, foldable steel worktable, misc new gaskets, leathers, gloves, helmet, Accumix jug. Dent in top of fuel tank from something falling while in storage, can be removed by dent specialist.

The listing is pretty simple, but includes plenty of information about performance modification and spares included. The bike has a starting bid of $6,995 with no takers yet, which seems fair for a pure racing machine that includes some trick updates and a bunch of parts to keep the bike running for a long time to come.

-tad

2006 Yamaha TZ125 L Side

Pint-Sized Racer: 2006 Yamaha TZ125 for Sale