Posts by tag: Two Stroke

Honda June 25, 2017 posted by

Ride or Restore: 1993 Honda NSR250R SP MC21 for Sale

Some motorcycle enthusiasts are looking for a perfect, time-capsule example of their favorite bikes. Me? I'm glad perfect examples are out there for collectors, but I want something I can ride and enjoy without being worried that a tip-over or low-side or just a few extra miles on the odometer will destroy the value of some pristine collectible. Today's Honda NSR250R SP is a little rough around the edges, with some scratches and scuffs, but it seems like an honest bike, and very solid mechanically.

The NSR250 featured Honda's familiar 90° liquid-cooled 249cc v-twin with a six-speed "cassette" gearbox that allowed owners [or pit crews] to rapidly swap out gearsets to suit different race tracks. Obviously not all that useful on a road bike, but still pretty slick. The NSR may have sucked fuel through a set of carburetors, but it used a very sophisticated PGM-III system that controlled the bike's ignition based on throttle-position, revs, and gear selection.

This particular NSR250R is the desirable MC21 version of Honda's agile two-stroke, as indicated by the asymmetrical "gull-arm" aluminum swing arm that curves on the left-hand side to clear the exhaust's expansion chambers to maximize cornering clearance. The swingarm looks very trick, but helps make the MC21 a little bit heavier than the MC18 that preceded it. Dry weight is still under 300lbs, so even the bike's artificially-limited 45hp will move the bike out smartly, although I'd definitely check with the seller to see if the bike has been de-restricted, as anyone outside Japan will want the bike's full-power available.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Honda NSR250R SP MC21 for Sale

20,441 Miles (32,898 Kilometers) This is a Very Rare only 900 made Last Model MC21 SP. Mostly original and unrestored.  Perfect opportunity for a budget minded MC21 SP for restoration. All fluids are fresh.  Shifts and revs to redline perfectly.  Starts effortlessly every time. OEM Fairings have hairline scratches and cracks. upper fairing has a broken section near the mirrors and the lower fairing has a section cut out near the expansion chambers along with a couple dents on the fuel tank near the stay, included close up pictures featuring defects. The Red on the tail fairing doesn’t match each other exactly also. No respray or rattle can. Red Magtek wheels are in excellent condition. Otherwise straight from the factory.  Bike has Vin Matching State of Ohio Title as a 1992 model MC21-1070*** “Buyer is responsible for their own State Requirements.”  Imported into the States through all legal channels. EPA and Declaration papers provided.

Bidding is up to $6,500 with about 24 hours left on the auction. If it stays in that neighborhood, it's on the low side for an MC21, but that's in keeping with the less-than-perfect condition. This example is obviously not perfect as described by the seller, but is claimed to be mechanically in good working order. If you're buying one of these and worried about sourcing parts, that may be a weight lifted. Even if you end up on a quest for a perfect set of original bodywork, you can at least ride your machine in the meantime, and this looks like it'd be pretty nice from ten feet, certainly a good place to begin for a restoration. Personally, I'm okay with replacement bodywork, as long as the frame and everything else are clean and straight. Get a decent set of Rothmans replica bodywork from the internet, spend the weekend fitting it, and then ride your little smoker with no fear of destroying a priceless, pristine collectible.

-tad

Ride or Restore: 1993 Honda NSR250R SP MC21 for Sale
Aprilia June 22, 2017 posted by

Tiny Tiddler: 2009 Aprilia RS125

Go figure, but these Aprilia RS125s are extremely popular on RSBFS. Nowhere near liter bike territory, the little Rotax-powered chicken chaser is the grey-market equivalent of a Honda Grom - only much, much cooler. With a single cylinder two stroke motor, lights and turn signals to make it almost legal in most states and a reputation for handling, this Aprilia will let you take the fight to those pesky Ninja 250Rs and Honda CBR250s for top title in the small bike class. Got a local track that is tight and twisty? Here is your answer. Addicted to anything that requires premix? Here is your answer. Got a few bucks laying around and hankering for a new toy? Here is your answer.

2009 Aprilia RS125 for sale on eBay

The world is changing, and we are drawn along with it - willingly or not. Gasoline and diesel are the targets of EV automobiles. Our beloved two strokes are already in their graves; four strokers have taken over everything from GP machinery to scooters. What is left but the past? This RS125 is a perfect reminder of the past. Conjuring up the glory days before Moto3, the RS125 hearkens back to an era of 125cc, entry-level GP racing. This is where pimply-faced teens cut their teeth before becoming heroes: Rossi, Biaggi, Criville, Capirossi, Locatelli, Pedrosa, Dovizioso, Luthi, Bautista, Di Meglio, Marquez. I mean, what do these guys know?

From the seller:
2009 Aprilia RS125. Purchased new, all original except tidy tail, exhaust bracket and solo seat. Factory wiring harness with no cuts/splices. Street legal, licensed and titled in my name (17 digit factory vin number). The solo seat was a factory Aprilia part (fiberglass). Bike has clear title in my name, never down or dropped, needs nothing.

Aprilia made the brave move to bring the RS125 into the US for a scant few years. Those individuals that purchased them bought well, as these are wonderful (if not small) sporting motorcycles. Keeping one on the pipe can be a mental exercise, but isn't the mental aspect what we we really seek when riding or racing? Gone is the basement torque you may expect from your Ducati. Gone is the safety net of big horsepower when you blow your corner entry and get dogged on the following straight. Small bikes are all about focus, corner speed and planning. The RS125 plays this game well with a rev-happy motor, strong brakes and decent suspension. This is a viable trainer for the younger set, and a noteworthy toy for the, uh, more mature riders (and readers) among us. If, when you step on the scale, you double the displacement of this little scoot, you will be forgiven if you pass. But you're still missing out.

Located in Tennessee and with 3,433 on the clock, this US titled bike looks to be in great condition. The seller is asking for some pretty big dollars, and already has a few bids on the hook; This RS125 is up to $4k with more to come. Check it out here, and then jump back to our Comments section for the real test: would you be able to ride a RS125, or is something, er, a little "larger" more preferable? This is a great bike for some - check it out and Good Luck!!

MI

Tiny Tiddler: 2009 Aprilia RS125
Suzuki June 21, 2017 posted by

Clean, Low Mileage, All-Original Gamma: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ for Sale

For a very brief period in the mid-1980s the Grand Prix racing fans were able to sample two machines of singular purpose: Yamaha's V4 RD500LC/RZ500 and Suzuki's wild, square-four powered RG500Γ "Gamma." Each was intended to showcase the style, performance, and feel of a two-stroke GP motorcycle in a road-legal package, although they went about it in different ways. Of the pair, Suzuki's was closest to the true spirit of a "race bike for the road" and is generally considered more valuable than the Yamaha, although the RD/RZ has its fans as well, and prices for both are steadily climbing.

Part of the reason the Gamma is so desirable is that Suzuki never made that many of them in the first place, the other is that it might be one of the most authentic race replicas ever made, with a twin-crank, two-stroke, square-four engine that wasn't shared with any other motorcycle in their lineup. Although, like the similarly exotic Desmosedici that shared no parts with its MotoGP inspiration, Suzuki's powerplant merely aped the configuration of their 500cc Grand Prix machine, but was more much more road-oriented. So it may not have exactly been a detuned race bike, but it's as close as you're likely to get.

With around 100hp pushing almost 400lbs wet, the RG500 isn't the quickest thing around at this point, and it wasn't even the fastest thing going in 1986. But it was lightweight for the time, and the whole package was so exotic: two-stroke sports twins were the order of the day, so a twin-crankshaft, square four cylinder with the same eye-opening power delivery, only even more so, must have made the RG feel like it rolled right off a race track, with an experience of speed and agility that far outstripped the measurable performance.

If you're searching for a Gamma, today's example is about as good as it gets, unless you're looking for one that's been modified with more modern suspension, brakes, and wheels.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ for Sale

Up for auction is my 1986 Gamma. This bike is completely stock with only 3,711 original km or roughly 2,300 miles. This bike has never been rebuilt, is all original and is by far the nicest Gamma I have ever seen. The bike has lived inside my house for the last five years. Originally a Canadian bike stored in a climate controlled environment I imported the bike legally and it now has a Maryland state title.  I just trailered it to the shop for a new battery and fresh plugs and it starts right up on the first or second kick.

 In the time I have owned the bike I can't make myself ride it. Its just too nice. It really belongs in a museum or in someone's private collection or take it to shows which I have done. First place winner every time. Unless you find one still in a crate somewhere you'll not find a nicer Gamma anywhere.
I'm willing to work with the buyer as far as shipping but cost will be their responsibility. I can also take as many pictures as you need and am willing to talk with any serious buyers. I also have another RG 00 with 8000km and a California title in amazing condition as well that is going to be auctioned next.
Gammas are perennially popular, and only going up in price these days: the starting bid for this one is $30,000 although there are no takers yet. Many are in nice condition as a result of those increasing values, but these are thirty-year-old motorcycles and a large percentage have been restored or modified at this point. As they say, "it's only original once" and this one is claimed to be that. Certainly, most have far more than 2,300 miles on them. Gammas are very cool bikes, but this example is sadly very likely to end up in a collection, instead of being properly thrashed on a track or canyon road.
-tad
Clean, Low Mileage, All-Original Gamma: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ for Sale
Suzuki June 18, 2017 posted by

Full Power: 1996 Suzuki RGV250SP VJ23A Export Model for Sale

The history of the quarter-liter sportbike seems to be one of convergent evolution: twins obviously make sense given the size and capacity, or even triples, if we go back to the 1970s and consider a Kawasaki S1 a "sportbike." But early bikes could be powered by parallel or vee configurations, and by the time the early 1990s rolled around, Honda, Yamaha, and Suzuki were all using  90° v-twins backed by six-speed gearboxes. But when the 70° v-twin powered RGV250 VJ23 came along in 1996, it was packing a 70° unit with a dry clutch [and an electric start!], presumably because it's more compact and doesn't increase vibration significantly, compared to a 90° unit with theoretically better balance.

The VJ23 was pretty much the final word in two-stroke performance: the Suzuki-powered Aprilia RS250 continued in production alongside, but used their earlier 90° v-twin engine. Honda's NSR250 was still in production as well, but their MC28 was introduced in 1994 so the VJ23 really does represent the very last generation of two-stroke performance

I'm not a huge fan of the swoopy curves of the VJ23 model, although plenty of two-stroke fans love the very 90s styling. Maybe the graphics aren't helping: the VJ23 definitely looks much cooler in Lucky Strike colors. But you certainly can't argue with the performance available: today's example is claimed to be the full power "export" model, meaning it's not limited per Japanese market rules that restricted power to 45hp on models intended for sale domestically, and 60 claimed horsepower should make this little bantamweight a real rocket, with handling to match.

Experts may want to chime in here: these were supposedly extremely rare in any form, and I'm not clear if this has simply been de-restricted or if it came from the factory with all the horsepower present and accounted for.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Suzuki RGV250SP VJ23A for Sale

Rare 2 stroke bike from Japan!! Suzuki RGV250SP

VIN: VJ23A-1020**
Year: 1996
Mileage: 24,325 km
Condition: Running very well.
It is 60ps of export model!! It was overhauled an engine, brakes, front forks when 20,000km of mileage. It has some scratches, tiny cracks at body work, tiny dent at left under side of gas tank. But still GOOD condition. Belly pan is aftermarket product. Other cowlings are original.

Shipping : We'll put it into the wooden crate and ship by surface. We'll enclose Japanese original title, and also Sales Certificate and Bill of Sales issued by us in English. Shipping cost: The bid price includes shipping cost to overseas, and it's charged from our office in Japan to the nearest port to your address. We expect you'd pick it up at the port and arrange the land transport to your address by yourself. The other cost, such as the handling cost, duty fee, tax, etc. which will be charged in your country, they're not included there.

The Buy It Now price is listed at $9,400 which would seem very reasonable if the bike was here in the USA, considering what nice NSRs are going for these days. Obviously, the fact that this bike is currently in Japan means the buyer will have to deal with all the importation and titling hassles. If you're in a permissive state, that might not be too much of a headache, but for many of us, it remains out of reach, considering the year of manufacture means it's still a few years short of the 25-year mark. Depending on your local DMV, there might be some shenanigans you can pull to get it on the street, but I'd expect this makes the most sense as a collectible or occasional track day ride.

-tad

Full Power: 1996 Suzuki RGV250SP VJ23A Export Model for Sale
Kawasaki June 17, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Kawasaki KR-1R!

It may take you a little bit to pry yourself away from this first picture. It's OK, I'll wait a moment. Yes, that is an honest-to-God, freaking *original* Kawasaki KR-1R. The rarest of the rare of the quarter-liter smoking set has arrived, and this is your chance (and likely your only chance) to score one of these "what lies at the end of the rainbow" sort of machines. KR-1 examples are few and far between these days. The "R" spec - as it does with all other mega cool bikes with sporting intent - kicks things up a notch into crazy uber collectable mode. With KR-1 models coming across our pages so infrequently, it should be no surprise that the one and only KR-1R seen here on RSBFS was over 6 years ago (and based in England). Today, we are thrilled to bring you what must be one of only a handful of KR-1Rs that live here in the US - and this one is titled for street use.

You might wonder what's the big deal about the KR-1R. Visually, it differs little from the lesser KR bikes. They all share the same parallel twin, reed valve inducted 250cc two stroke power plant. This motor, while not the trendy v-twin variety, has the distinction of being the most powerful of the 250cc smoking set. When it comes to bragging rights, the Kawasaki hits hard. Fun fact: A KR-1R holds the speed record at Bonneville for 250cc production motorcycles. The KR-1S is slightly different from a base KR-1 by color scheme and wheels. There are also bits that you cannot easily see, such as improved suspension components and chassis modifications (all KR models have an aluminum chassis, naturally). Take the KR-1S, add larger carbs for even more power, bolt on a close ratio gearbox and stronger clutch springs and you have one of the approximately 180 KR-1R Kawasakis in the world. It goes without saying that the KR-1R has a unique paint job with its nomenclature very, very clearly stated. All "R" model bikes were domestic (Japan) only machines.

From the seller:
The bike came from a Kawasaki collector in Japan. Motor is all stock. Stock carbs,
stock airbox, stock heads, ect all confirmed OEM Kawasaki. Fairings 100% OEM.
Windshield appears to be OEM. Two Keys.

Previous collector has cosmetically customized this KR-1R with Kawasaki OEM green
front fender, Beet rear sets and Beet exhaust and mufflers. Some suspension
components have been polished.

The bike has been professionally resprayed. Being a Kawasaki dealer with ties to
Japan, I was able to source OEM decals and correct paint codes. The paint job was done correctly. You may notice, The lower air vent was not blacked in like you see other KR-1R's on the internet. The green and black paint lays over the air vent with a 50/50 split like it came from the factory.

All three brake calipers were sent to Powerhouse in England for complete
refurbishment. Powder coated, new seals, pistons, pads, ect. because they were old
looking. I have all the original brake parts that go with the bike.

More from the seller:
Bike has newish tires, Dunlop GPR's, new brake fluid, new coolant, new oil, new
battery. Bike runs flawless at sea level and a little rich at my 4500ft elevation.
Bikes runs perfectly.

Bike comes with Utah title and is titled as a street bike for road use. I am looking
for offers over $20K - highest offer wins the bike. Potential buyers can contact me via email with offers. Only 180 bikes were made and this one is a very low serial number. Complete Serial number won't be published.

Price: Accepting offers over $20,000

Deadline: July 1, 2017

Contact: rmurangemasters@aol.com

If some of the pictures look familiar, you will notice this is indeed the same Utah collector (and Kawasaki dealer) that recently thinned out a number of exotic machines (some purchased by RSBFS readers!). Gary states that this KR-1R was a crown jewel in his collection, but it is time to move on. There are A LOT of pictures, and I've included as many as possible. If you are serious buyer and there is something that you want to see, ping Gary for more details. Word from our readers is that Gary is great to work with and the purchased hardware shows up looking as advertised. That is good to know, especially when dealing with what may be the only US-based KR-1R with a street title.

Values are hard to come by when so few examples change hands, but I can assure you that $20k is a bottom dollar bargain number when it comes to a clean and sorted KR-1R (if you can even find one). This bike looks fantastic, and is one of the more rare models you might hope to see on RSBFS this year (or the next). So if you have a spare kidney laying around that you're not really using, NOW is the time to reach out to Gary (rmurangemasters@aol.com) and make a deal. Good Luck!!

Featured Listing: 1989 Kawasaki KR-1R!
Suzuki June 15, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1996 Suzuki RGV250V Lucky Strike!

In the glorious 1990s, big tobacco made motorsports run. Cigarette sponsorship was everywhere, and every major series and team was titled by a cancer stick hawker; The Winston Cup, The Camel GT series (as well as the Camel AMA Supercross and Camel Trophy events), Marlboro McLaren, Marlboro Ferrari, Marlboro Penske, Mild Seven Benetton, Rothmans Williams, Benson & Hedges Jordan, John Player Lotus, 555 Subaru Rally, Silk Cut Jaguar Group C just to name a few. On the bike front, you cannot ignore the Rothmans Hondas, Skoal Suzukis, Smokin' Joes Hondas, Gauloises Factory Yamahas, and many, many others. Of course in the world of RSBFS, the one that really matters is the partnership of Lucky Strike and Suzuki. Which brings us to our bike: An original 1996 Suzuki RGV250V VJ23 Lucky Strike.

The RGV series was a popular and successful one for Suzuki. Using a liquid cooled v-twin to replace the earlier, parallel twin RG models, the RGV provided more power in a slimmer package. The results were impressive on the racetrack (so much so that Aprilia licensed the VJ22 powerplant for use in their own bikes), and translated tolerably well to the street. Suzuki RGV models are some of the most popular of the import two-strokes we see on these pages. So while RGVs may not be uncommon, this specific variant - the factory Lucky Strike livery - is very rare indeed. Just over 100 of the VJ23 "V" series were released for export as Lucky Strike models. There were an additional ~240 LS "T" models created for the domestic home market. To find a clean example that is not a fake Lucky Strike (cheap body panels are available) is a tough chore. Buyers need to be very careful, scrutinizing chassis numbers, SAPC versions, and other details such as exhaust chamber part numbers to ensure that they have 1) a VJ23 to begin with, and 2) the holy grail of the RGV lineup, the Lucky Strike Edition.

From the seller:
1996 (97 model) Rgv250v
Factory Lucky Strike
One of 119 in this scheme, these were the last of the vj23 line.
This was originally exported to China and is one of three that I own.
The full power bikes were quoted at 55ps in the sales brochure not 70.
This is unrestored except for the fact I've renewed all chassis/wheel brgs and consumables like carb rubbers.
Brakes and forks have been overhauled.
Engine is fine and has perfect compressions
Only non or parts are the carbon cans/nitron shock/brake lines
All oe parts are included,;seat/rear pegs/original shock/hoses/OE cans
Recent chain/sprockets
This bike needs nothing.

Price: £16,000 (plus shipping)

Contact: tasswipe@icloud.com

Like most Japanese bikes, there are a couple different variants of each model depending upon the intended market. Japanese home market bikes will always be restricted to a lower output due to licensing regulations. Bikes destined for Western Europe (specifically Germany and Italy) had a mid-grade output specification. Bikes headed to Canada and Australia usually were full-power examples, and where the higher HP numbers were quoted.

This seller is extremely knowledgeable in this model. While doing some research in the past, I came across some of his wisdom on a RGVs site, and I refer to it now and again. This is a good thing when it comes to very rare machinery; with Lucky Strike fakes pretty common, nobody wants to plunk top dollar down for any less than genuine. Fortunately, this looks to be a verifiable article from the factory. It is the last gen of the RGVs and probably the most desirable of the models. As such, it can command market price. The seller is looking for 16,000 GBP, which equates to approximately $20,400 USD at the current exchange. Drool over the pictures a little bit; your computer won't mind. Then contact Alan at tasswipe@icloud.com if you are looking for a centerpiece for your collection. Good Luck!!

Featured Listing: 1996 Suzuki RGV250V Lucky Strike!