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Posts by tag: TT2

Ducati July 10, 2018 posted by

Racer Replica: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale

The original listing for this 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica includes some good general information, but I'd love more specific details about the components. The seller mentions the frame was supplied by Roy Thersby, but did he build the frame, modify the frame, or just paint it? At a glance, it appears to be from a 90s SuperSport, which makes sense, considering the rest of the running gear. So it appears that what we're dealing with here is a fully-built 90s 750SS with brilliant retro-bodywork and paint. And headlamps. Those massive, retina-burning headlamps.

The original TT2 that inspired this build was a lightweight, Pantah-powered racebike displacing 597cc with a Verlicchi frame and Marzocchi suspension. Built between 1980 and 1984 the bike was very successful in competition and ultimately spawned the Ducati F1 road bike.

The engine in this replica is a 750, but it's looks to be the 90s version, since both carburetors live in the engine's vee: the 80s Pantah-engined bikes had both facing rearward, with the vertical cylinder's jutting out awkwardly towards the rider's knee. And the wheels are clearly 17" parts, in keeping with the 90s theme. Great for finding modern, sticky rubber, but not the most authentic-looking, if that's the goal, since the original used 18" hoops. And why choose non-adjustable front forks on this bike? Even set up properly, I'm surprised the builder didn't at least use the adjustable units available on certain 900SS models, since the upside-down forks give the game away anyway that this isn't really an 80s race bike.

Not doubting the craftsmanship, but there are some other choices I'm not big on, starting with the Koso instruments. I'm sure they're reliable and legible, but I don't really like them on recent Bimotas and I really don't like them on a retro-looking special. Something classic from MotoGadget would have given similar function with a much more appropriate look. The bar-end signals are a cool touch, but a bit too shiny for my taste and the grips and Union Jack tank pad are way too modern. And the M4 exhaust is perfectly fine on a GSX-R750 but a "classic" Ducati? But all that is relatively easy to change to suit the new owner's preferences anyway.

If it sounds like I don't like this bike, you'd be wrong: I'm really just picking nits and all of these minor issues are easily forgotten, looking at the red-and-yellow bodywork and those awesome endurance-racing headlamps. And although the listing doesn't go into too much detail regarding the engine, the Pantah engine can be tuned to make good power and, in a lightweight package, should make for a very entertaining bike.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale

For the Ducati connoisseur, this beauty will enhance any collection. Frame came from British Ducati legend Roy Thersby. The bike was built by vintage Ducati guru Scot Wilson as his personal ride. Scot is the owner of Italian Iron Classics in Tucson, AZ. I've had the pleasure of owning a couple of Scot Wilson's builds and they are very carefully planned and meticulously executed.

The 750 engine was built by Tom Hull of Phoenix to "Pro-Thunder" standards with Carrillo rods, dual spark, lightened internals and all the special bits you'd expect. The engine was moth-balled after a rule change, acquired for this build and has about 1,000 miles on it. 40mm Del Ortos, fork set by Computrack. GP shift but could be changed. The bike was just serviced, all fluids changed, fuel tank cleaned, carbs cleaned and carefully checked over. It's ready to go.

The bike is street legal, has a clear Massachusetts title and goes like crazy. Headlights are Hella style as used for endurance racing. Bar-end turn signals are installed so the bike will pass my state registration inspection. The paint is as good as it gets and looks as fresh as the day it came from the painter's shop. If you are looking at this bike I don't have to tell you about Ducati F1-R's or TT2's. I've had the opportunity to do a (very careful) track day at a Ducati event and the bikes gets lots of attention. If the track's not your thing you could proudly show it at any event and it would draw a crowd.

While undeniably cool, bikes like this are always tricky when it comes to determining value. They're not collectible in the conventional sense, in that they're not real race bikes or limited-production factory machines: they've been built using high-quality components, but they're basically really nice lash-ups, "bitsas" made from the very best bits. Of course, a real TT2 would likely sell for far more than the $22,500 the seller is asking, and considering the quality and names attached, I'm thinking this is a pretty damn good deal as long as the lack of originality doesn't bother you, and you're ready for the snobs to give you static when they ask you "is it real?" But honestly, if anyone gives you a problem, you should just blind them with those massive Hella lamps.

-tad

Racer Replica: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale
Ducati February 28, 2017 posted by

Pantah-stic: 1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale

Ducati's first motorcycle was the Cucciolo [or "puppy" in Italian], which was basically a simple engine strapped to a bicycle, an affordable tool to get the Italian population mobile and back to work after the end of World War II. Certainly a far cry from the frameless, race-inspired exotica they're famous for today. This NCR 600TT hails from the middle period of Ducati's history, and is powered by the grandfather of all their modern v-twin engines, the single overhead cam, two-valve Pantah.

They're famous for the format today, but Ducati didn't start out making v-twin sportbikes. Instead, once they graduated from producing simple, efficient people-movers, they built and raced single-cylinder motorcycles of various displacements, before eventually building their first v-twin. The hottest versions of those earliest v-twins featured Ducati's trademark Desmodromic valve-actuation that has become their engineering trademark. But they also used a complex and expensive-to-manufacture system of tower shafts and bevel gears to operate the overhead cams, and Ducati needed to increase profitability to stay afloat, so introduced a parallel twin that was much more compact and affordable to produce and assemble, much to the horror of famous engineer Fabio Taglioni.

That parallel-twin engine proved to be a massive flop, but Taglioni continued to develop the v-twin on his own, and the Pantah was the result. The revised v-twin swapped the tower-shaft and bevel-drive cam-drive of the earlier engine for a much simpler rubber belt arrangement. This meant the engine was less expensive to manufacture, but also meant owners needed to religiously maintain their bikes, as failure of the toothed rubber belt led to catastrophic engine damage. Today's Ducati engines are direct descendants of that original two-valve v-twin.

This particular Pantah-powered machine is literally a racebike with lights, and includes frame, bodywork, and preparation by NCR. If you're not familiar, NCR are best known today for their high-performance and obsessively lightweight Ducati parts, as well as for converting already expensive exotica into completely un-affordable, even more exotic exotica. But before that, they were originally a race team. The race team, in fact, responsible for Ducati's many racing successes until the creation of their in-house racing division, including Mike Hailwood's famous TT-winning bike, so they've been around the track a few times. Although the bike does include a headlight, a tail light, and turn signals, it appears that wasn't enough to get past rigorous TÜV certification and the bike couldn't be registered for road use in Germany where it was stored for many years. Maybe a new American owner will have more luck?

From the original eBay listing: 1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale

The 1981 Ducati Scuderia N.C.R was one of the preeminent motorcycle racing teams of all time. They were the de-facto Ducati factory race team from the early 1970s until Ducati took it in-house with Ducati Corsa in 2000. They continued as privateers and had success with rider Ben Bostrom. The company was then sold and continues as a specialist builder of very high end motorcycles.

NCRs wins on the world stage are almost too numerous to mention. But Imola 200 winners Paul Smart, Isle of Man TT winners Mike Hailwood were all on the bevel drive NCRs. The string of wins by Tony Rutter on the belt drive TT2 were all Nepoti and Caracchi machines that made NCR a household name with their distinctive logo of a speeding helmet clad dog.

Nepoti and Caracchi Racing designed their own frame for the belt drive Pantah based series. This was the 600TT. It differs from the more common TT2, which was more of a Ducati design. A total of nine frames were made by Verlicchi and a further two by DM. All but two were racing frames. Of these two street bikes produced, this is the only one built with an alloy gas tank. Imagine a genuine NCR with a steering lock.

This bike has spent most of its life unused in Germany. The owner tried to convert his Pantah to a NCR framed machine, but the TUV would not allow it, due to their ultra-strict type certification. Throughout 1980s, 90s and 2000s it was in hiding. It re-surfaced in 2006 and was recommissioned. However the German owner was still not able to use it.

It came to America several years ago and has been in a private collection museum ever since. It has a US tile as the original donor Ducati Pantah.

Gas has been drained and battery removed for storage and display. We are selling this incredible machine for a client of ours and all technical questions will be answered as quickly as possible but may take time to get as he has limited access. Sold on a clean, mileage exempt US title.

VIN#DM500SL661261

Bidding is up to just north of $9,100 with plenty of interest and plenty of time left on the auction. In general, the earlier bevel-drive bikes are considered the most desirable and collectible Ducatis, but this is an exceptionally rare and cool motorcycle, considering the direct links to NCR and the fact that it's theoretically a roadgoing racebike. Obviously you should be careful to consult with your local DMV if you plan to register this machine for road use, but this one might be best used as the crown jewel in a collection anyway, considering it's status as just one of two ever built.

-tad

Pantah-stic: 1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale
Ducati July 2, 2016 posted by

#becauseracebike: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale

1984 Ducati TT1 L Front

What looks good doesn’t always work well: some of the most beautiful cars ever built were created by eye, without the aid of modern aerodynamics. Sleek machines like the Jaguar E-Type and the Corvette Stingray may look impossibly fast, but often try to leave the road at elevated speeds… Racing machines on the other hand are often strange and awkward-looking, designed to perform ahead of all other considerations. The Ducati TT1 may not be the prettiest bike ever built by the company, but you can’t argue with its performance.

1984 Ducati TT1 L Engine
Although the earlier TT2 machine was more successful in terms of race results, the bigger-engine TT1 seen here still has some serious competition credentials and was successful in endurance racing as well. The bike was powered by a bigger 748cc version of the Desmo Pantah engine that used toothed belts to drive the overhead cams instead of the bevel-drive engine’s tower-shaft arrangement. A front-mounted oil-cooler behind the fairing kept temperatures under control, with holes drilled in front to allow sufficient airflow.

1984 Ducati TT1 Dash
This package eventually evolved into the air/oil-cooled L-twin Ducatisti still know and love today, although in this case it was still carbureted, with the rear head rotated 180° from more modern configurations: later bikes had intake for both in the center of the “V,” allowing Cagiva to fit the engine with an automotive-style carburetor in the Paso. The frame was an extremely lightweight, stiff, sculptural masterpiece by Verlicchi and a 16” and 18” wheel combo meant riders could exploit the bike’s extreme lightweight and agility.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale

Unimpeachable provenance and beautiful patina

One of three ex-works 1984-season European endurance race bikes, then bought from the factory direct by American enthusiast Dale Newton for AMA BoTT racing in the USA

Frame no. 6 (on steering head), engine no. DM600L*702481*

Sold on a Bill of Sale. Five miles approx. since restoration.

This well documented TT1 is the rarest of the rare. Three chassis were taken from the production run of 50 600 TT2s and built as endurance racers for the 1984 European championship. Essentially two of the three - this is one of the two - were replicas of Tony Rutter’s factory team TT1. Based on the belt-drive, desmo Pantah, the TT1 had a 88mm bore and a 61.5mm stroke for a capacity of 748cc, with a factory quoted 80 horsepower. At under 300 pounds dry, they were built with Italy’s finest contemporary components such as Marzocchi magnesium forks, wider aluminum (extrusion) cantilever swing arm (with strengthening rub running along the bottom) – one of only two bikes known to have this feature - and Brembo brakes all round. The compact TT1 was both ground breaking fast and exquisitely handsome. It features a unique lower mounting point for the engine vapor catch tank on the right side. As a new bike it attended the Imola test day. The engine has the “Ascension” kit installed that upgraded the TT2 motor to full race 750. The bike retains its endurance racing quick-release rear wheel kit.

American Ducatisti patron Dale Newton (he owned the Phil Schilling/Cook Neilson “California HotRod” Daytona superbike, too) bought the bike from the factory at the ’84 season’s end (still with its headlamp sockets etc. intact; Dale removed the lights as the AMA rules did not require them) and proceeded to run the bike in the USA and was the last bike he restored before his untimely death. Dale’s goal was to beat east coaster Jimmy Adamo in BoTT.

Brian Dietz purchased the bike from the Newton estate in September 1999 selling it on to Ralf Stechow in November 2008. It was acquired by the (private) seller shortly thereafter.

The Newton Ducatis were raced by legendary riders such as Tony Rutter, Kevin Schwantz and John Williams and were featured in Cycle magazine on several occasions. Next is a listing of the articles; January 1984 “Messenger in Red: Ducati TT2 600”; October 1984 “Ducati Pantah TT1”; April 1985 “Aboard Sunday’s Child: Ducati 750 TT1”; April 1985 “Desmo-Ships on a Time Belt: Ducati 750SS and TT1 750 F1”. "Dale Newton's ex-factory TT-F1 (this bike) is representative of Ducati 750 potential, and on the Axtell dyno it generated 83-86 horsepower." Kevin Cameron, February 1990.

This bike has also been featured in two of Ian Falloon’s books. “… the diminutive TT2 and TT1 were among the finest of all catalog Ducatis…they epitomized Taglioni’s philosophy of maximum performance through light weight and simplicity.”- Standard Catalog of Ducati Motorcycles, and Ducati Racers. And in Alan Cathcart’s Ducati, the Untold Story.

1984 Ducati TT1 R Engine

This TT1 is from a very limited run of competition-only Ducatis and has a well-documented owner history, the bike is in beautiful cosmetic condition for a race bike and is certainly very rare and valuable, although there’s been no real bidding activity so far and the auction is almost over. The more desirable TT2 might be worth six figures, but it’s pretty clear from the limited interest that the seller is aiming a bit high here.

-tad

1984 Ducati TT1 R Side

#becauseracebike: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale
Ducati June 10, 2016 posted by

Piece of History: 1984 Ducati TT2/TT1 Race Bike for Sale

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike L Front2

Although the mid-1980s 750 F1 may not have represented the very best from Ducati, the TT2 and later TT1 race bikes that inspired them certainly did. Lightweight, perfectly formed, and highly effective, they epitomize Ducati’s racing ethos of the period. The original TT2 displaced 587cc and used the belt-drive Pantah motor, with the later TT1 punched out to something closer to 750cc. Both bikes did well in competition, although the earlier 600 was far more successful.

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike R Side

The beautiful and very lightweight [at a claimed 16lbs] frame by Verlicchi and the bodywork with perforations to allow airflow to a front-mounted oil-cooler are distinctive characteristics of the TT, and those huge headlights speak to the bike’s obvious endurance-racing intent. The front three-quarter view also highlights the 16” front and 18” rear wheel/tire combo that contributed to the bike’s agility.

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike R Side Engine
Although this one may have racing provenance and should probably be on display somewhere in a collection or museum, but it’s battle-ready and scuffed appearance almost demand that it be put into track-ready condition and campaigned in vintage events.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Ducati TT2/TT1 Race Bike for Sale

Ducati TT2/TT1 750, model year 1984, VIN 22

This is a GENUINE TT2 factory bike, VIN 22 upgraded to TT1 750cc specs to compete in that class in the Endurance series. Jean Moto Team was a small but very “aggressive” team competing in endurance racing and TT’s during the 1980's

A real piece of mid 80's Ducati history this bike finished 6th overall at the 1984 Bol d’Or, first of all Ducatis so in front of works Ducati machines! It's totally preserved as it finished the last race but the engine was completely overhauled by factory ex-mechanic Giorgio Grimandi.

Forget stocks and shares invest in a true piece of motorcycling history! It comes with documentation (original period magazine etc). Race, parade and collect! Bulletproof investment.

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike L Side

Bidding is up to around $6,500 with the reserve not met and several days left on the auction. That’s no surprise, considering that real TT race bike should be at least a $30,000 machine. I’m not sure why there hasn’t been more interest. Perhaps the bike’s mongrel TT1/TT2 history? That seems very much in keeping with a racebike’s mission, and only bikes that have spent their lives on display would be lacking period upgrades to keep them competitive…

-tad

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike L Front

Piece of History: 1984 Ducati TT2/TT1 Race Bike for Sale
Ducati May 28, 2015 posted by

Pre-Poggipolini – 1982 Scuderia NCR 600 TT

Around the corner from the Ducati factory in Borgo Panigale, NCR founders Nepoti, Caracchi, and Rizzi began to modify and race Ducatis in 1967.  Their lightweight chassis and race team became a presence in endurance racing, winning the Isle of Man TT in 1978 with Mike Hailwood aboard.  Early in the trellis-frame's development, Pantah-based 600cc bikes were built to Tourist Trophy specifications ( by more than one tuner ), and this NCR 600 ready for the road may be more rare than a factory TT2.

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right

1982 Scuderia NCR 600 TT for sale on eBay

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt left front

Most of the Ducati V-twin 600cc engines have 80mm bore and 58mm stroke, displacing 583cc, though there was an 81mm bore update, displacing 597cc and using 40mm rather than 36mm Dell-Orto carburetors.  In the neighborhood of 60 hp is available mostly north of 6000 rpm, with two-into one exhaust, dry clutch and 5-speed transmission.  Three 260mm Brembo disk brakes provide the stoppage, very light looking 18-inch wheels suspended by 35mm forks and monoshock rear.  At a weight which should be just over 300 lbs, handling this bike will be a joy.

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt left grip  20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt left tank

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt left engine detail  20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right rear wheel

Though one might want to fit air filters for the road, the discretely lighted 600 TT displayed appears ready for a ride.  The owner's comments mention a 2005 restoration, and the bike looks at least excellent, though there is no odometer, it's nearly 35 years old.  The alloy tank, half-fairing and monoposto seat fairing look unblemished, as does the frame.

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right front wheel  20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt frame

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right engine  20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right rear wheel

From the eBay auction:

Believed to be one of only two 600cc street bikes made by the legendary Ducati race team. The 600 TT is purely a NCR design, where the better known TT2 is more a Ducati product. Approximately seven NCR 600 TT race bikes and two street bikes were built. This bike was most likely built in Germany from a kit.

Unable to pass the ultra strict type certification the bike was placed into storage. It resurfaced in 2005 and was restored and rebuilt and serviced. Still unable to be used in Germany it was advertised for sale in 2012. I purchased it, and imported it into the United States. The bike has barely been used since being built.I have ridden it a few times, where it performed flawlessly.

It has a clean correct Tennessee title. The condition is excellent. The only non standard parts are the turn signals. The only fault is a small dent in the exhaust system.

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right front  20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt left tank

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right peg  20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt binnacle

Pedigree would seem critical for a bike with this kind of buy-it-now, and perhaps the previous owner, restorer, or NCR can provide a paper trail.  Unrecognizable on the road, a vintage Italian track day would be a good day out for this machine, hopefully it will not be relegated solely to display.

- donn

p.s. - After being purchased in 2001 by Poggipolini, an aerospace and motorsports titanium concern,  NCR continues to thrive hand-crafting exotic parts and Ducati-based bikes.

Pre-Poggipolini – 1982 Scuderia NCR 600 TT
Ducati April 11, 2015 posted by

Fresh Tricolore: Recently restored 1987 Ducati F1

f1 restored1

When considering buying an older sportbike, maintenance history is always a bit of a black box.  Sure pictures, videos and ebay seller feedback rating all help mitigate the risk yet you never actually know what could be lurking behind the bodywork.

However there is one way to help reduce the risk; looking for a bike that has been restored by a dedicated owner.   Depending on the owner's level of obsession and willingness to purchase OEM parts, you can end up with a bike that is incredibly close to what it was when it left the factory.

This lovely 1987 Ducati F1B has undergone a major restoration from the frame up with OEM parts which means there shouldnt be any major maintenance related issues.

f1 restored3

1987 Ducati 750 F1B Tricolore for sale on ebay

For anyone not familiar with the Ducati F1B,  the bikes predecessor was the F1A which was released in 1985 and was essentially a street going version of the Ducati four time world champion TT2.   The F1B (this model) followed in 1986 after the purchase of the company by Cagiva and the major difference were cosmetic, with the F1B’s red wheels replacing the F1A’s gold and different script graphics along with some minor mechanical changes.

f1 restored4

This particular Ducati F1B tricolre looks incredibly clean.  The only thing that jumps out is the rear end fairing/bodywork but from what I have been able to learn this bodywork was the standard bodywork for the US-edition F1B  Tricolre.

Here is what the seller has to say.

  • Just completed frame up restoration. Almost impossible to find an example of this model with all original equipment still in place.
  • Stock motor new valve job, cylinders and side covers remove looks like new inside.
  • New belts.
  • New tires and battery.
  • Rebuilt kits replaced in brake hydraulics.
  • Parts usually not available are with this bike mirrors, turn signals,Brembo brakes, air box, 36 mm carbs,.dual seat, passenger foot pegs come with it.
  • All systems in working order. Available for inspection in Ft Lauderdale, Florida

 

f1 restored2

So whats this freshly restored 750F1B Tricolore worth?  At first the $22,000 USD Buy-It-Now price seems high given that recent versions of the tricolore have sold for around $17,500 USD.  The asking price seems more in line with the limited edition versions that were based on the F1B such as the Montjuich and Laguna Seca verions.

Then again, last year at the annual Las Vegas motorcycle auction a similar F1B tricolore was sold for over $20,000 and that bike had more miles than this one and hadn't been through a full restoration.   Personally I think the price for this one is a bit high but not outrageously so and would be a good addition for any collector interested in the mid-80's Ducati lineup.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Fresh Tricolore:  Recently restored 1987 Ducati F1




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