Posts by tag: TT

Honda October 27, 2017 posted by

Time Travel: 1989 Honda GB500 TT for Sale

At a glance, you might be thinking, “Hey, when did I get redirected to ClassicSportbikesforSale?” But no, this isn’t a vintage machine, it’s a Honda GB500 TT that was built in 1989. Strangely, it was both ahead of its time and retro, something that was really only achieved by the GB500 and Moto Guzzi’s 1000S. These days, classic is king, and many of the major manufacturers are cashing in on their heritage: Ducati, BMW, Triumph all have very successful lines of retro-styled bikes with modern performance. But in the late 1980s, the classic-style craze hadn't really caught on yet here in the US, and the GB500 has languished in obscurity for a long time, although used examples command decent prices and values are now on the rise.

Styled to evoke British classics from the 50s and 60s like Norton's famous Manx racers, the GB500 is one of those “everything you need and nothing you don’t” kind of machines, assuming you’re not trying to cut some serious lap times at the track or stalk superbikes in the canyons. Powered by a sleeved-down version of Honda's XL600, it’s simple, fun, and easy to maintain. The four-valve single gave 33hp at the rear wheel, enough to push the 390lb wet machine to a top speed north of The Ton: 108mph in period tests. It's not very fast in a straight line, but handling was very good and it's obviously a handsome machine: anyone who doesn’t know what it is will probably assume it’s much, much older than it is, and you'll get plenty of questions.

So with good looks, reliability, and usable performance, why didn’t it sell very well? Well it actually did sell pretty well in its home market. But in the late 1980s, vintage nostalgia hadn’t really taken off in the US, where the bike was sold for just two years: 1989 and 1990. Part of the problem might have been that you could still buy the real thing for reasonable prices, so the main reason to get one was that you wanted the style of a 50s or 60s British bike without the hassle. The price didn't help either: it was a well-built machine, but the $4200 Honda wanted was just $500 less than a Kawasaki ZX-7, so it's pretty obvious why the bike wasn't popular among "more is more" American motorcyclists.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda GB500 TT for Sale

The GB500 TT derives its name from "Great Britain, 500cc and from the Tourist Trophy" a classic 37-mile motorcycle circuit on the Isle of Man.
It was originally produced 1989-1990. It is a 498cc SOHC single cylinder with a 5 speed transmission at approx. 390 lb. It has both an electric push start and a kick start. Paint is a metallic black-green with gold pin-striping and lettering, as well as chrome wire wheels. Although the British inspired the style of the bike, Japan polished the details and improved on the engines' smoothness and durability.

My bike is the 1989 GB500.

I am the second owner and bought this bike form a collector on 08/1998. It had 1,853 mi on it at the time. I have kept it garaged and rode it for pleasure around town. The current mileage 5,226. It is in great condition. The bike is light, easy to handle and fun to ride. Its vintage British styling turns heads. It has Metzler tires. The bike has a couple of faint paint scratches on the tank. It runs great. It has a Supertrapp exhaust that reduces the overall weight and makes the bikes single cylinder thumper earn its name. The chrome on the Supertrap is slightly aged. I also have the original exhaust system that goes with the bike. I previously purchased a Corbin dual seat made specifically for this bike. This also goes with the bike.

This is a classic bike so serious buyers who are interested in this particular bike should respond. I am asking $ 6,500. If you want to have to look at the bike in person I will meet serious buyers only. If you want to take the bike for a ride you will need to bring the asking price in cash as collateral.

The $6,500 asking price is at the high end of the spectrum for a decent GB500, but this one looks especially nice, with extremely low miles. If you like the style of a classic Triumph or Norton, but want something you can ride every weekend without having to gap the plugs, replace the points, reattach wayward brackets, make sure all the lights work, and clean up puddles of oil, the GB500 is a surprisingly classy and faithful replica of the real thing, without all that famous British bike "character..."

-tad

Time Travel: 1989 Honda GB500 TT for Sale
Honda September 12, 2017 posted by

Trophy Bike: 1986 Honda GB400

The cafe racer craze makes an appearance on a regular, cyclical basis. From the original cafe bikes "doing the ton" through sanctioned TT events such as the Isle of Man, the cafe racer evokes a rebel streak with a distinctly English flair. Sporting, brash, forward and yet somehow very basic, the cafe racer stirs your inner Mike Hailwood to life. And while authentic cafe racers are custom affairs, manufacturers such as Norton, Triumph, Royal Enfield, BSA and Vincent have all had a hand in producing models in this image. Honda, too, tried their hand at the cafe scene. The result was the "GB" series of Tourist Trophy-inspired bikes, including today's rare GB400.

Rare 1986 Honda GB400 for sale on eBay

The Honda GB was born from humble beginnings. Utilizing a necked-down XL600 thumper motor, the GB was made available in both 400cc and 500cc configurations. The stone-simple and reliable air-cooled single was augmented by a a solo seat (a dual-seat model was available), a TT-style fairing, and clip-on bars. Wire wheels and a requisite megaphone-style muffler gives it some element of English authenticity. Those sidecovers? Made of metal, just like back in the day. Technology intervened in the manner of electric start (a kickstarter is attached to be period correct) and a single disk brake up front. The rest is basic but effective. Like the SRX models from Yamaha, the GB was a throwback to the past, a nod to lightness and simplicity and a relative failure.

From the seller:
It took me forever to find one of these and due to something coming up I have to sell it. I'd planned to keep it for the rest of my life so this is truly a regretful sale.

I bought it with 5600km. It currently has less than 11,000km. I have meticulously looked after it. This is the work I've done to it:

Three oil and filter changes up to now. It is important to change the oil on these often.
New front and rear brakes
Cleaned carburetor
New Bridgestone Battlax BT45 tyres put on at 6000km - great tyres in the rain
Installed gold DID525 X-ring Chain and aftermarket rear sprocket at 6000km
the guy at the shop said the front sprocket was good enough to not need changing.
Aftermarket foot pegs (still have the original pegs that you can have)
Shaken valid until 2019 (only important if you are buying in Japan)

I also have an extra carburetor kit that can come with it if you ever need to clean the carb further down the line.

More from the seller:
I never use the electric start but it works fine. This is my daily driver, it kick starts every morning literally on the first kick, every time. Exceptionally reliable. It's really light, really forgiving, and fantastic for Japanese roads.

Never dropped, crashed or anything like that.

I think it had been sitting for a long time before I picked it up. There is some pitting on the engine block, handlebars and some faded paint behind the rocket cowl. Cosmetically I would say it is about 7/10.

Mechanically, it's a excellent. I don't know how to polish metal but I've always kept it clean. I have always parked it with a cover everyday and overnight. It also comes with the factory installed centre stand.

I have seen some online sell overseas for a lot more. These are rare and the value will only increase over time, especially ones like this with such low miles.

Available in Japan and export markets from 1985 - 1990 (and the US as a 500cc model in 1988-1990), the GB is a relatively rare machine. Sales were stronger in home markets and European pockets, but the US turned up its collective nose at this faux Brit bike. Today these are coveted machines for what they represent. This particular 400cc example was never seen in the US, and today resides in Japan where it was born. Check it out here if you are hankering for a reliable throwback - grab your pudding bowl and goggles and try for the ton. Good Luck!!

MI

Trophy Bike:  1986 Honda GB400
Triumph July 31, 2016 posted by

Rev. 1.0 – 2000 Triumph TT600

Taking the sportbike fight right downtown, Triumph's all-new 600 made a valiant run at the big four.  Light weight, nice handling, and quality components, it unfortunately had to be shipped before the fuel injection could be adequately tweaked.  And though software updates have corrected the throttle response issues, the damage to the reputation caused the TT to be superseded after only three years.

20160730 2000 triumph tt600 right

2000 Triumph TT600 for sale on eBay

20160730 2000 triumph tt600 left

20160730 2000 triumph tt600 right rear

Triumph's twin-spar alloy frame carries 43 mm Kayaba forks and monoshock, both fully adjustable.  Quality Nissin brakes use dual 310 mm front rotors and 220 mm rear.  The rounded full fairing incorporates two fresh air intakes above the fork legs.  At a time when most manufacturers were using four carburetors, Triumph made a big wager on Sagem electronic fuel injection.  Peak power was competitive at 110 and nearly 13,000 rpm, but rideability suffered from the faulty fuel injection map.

20160730 2000 triumph tt600 front

20160730 2000 triumph tt600 left rear wheel

With just about 8,500 miles, this TT looks great with its polished exhaust and recent tires.  The mid-west owner says this in the eBay auction:

Here for sale rare 2000 Triumph TT 600 in excellent condition.  The bike is running, riding and shifting excellent and has only 8441 miles (as of today).

It is 600cc 4 cylinder water cooled engine with 110hp and 68Nm. 6 speed and 154mph top speed.

Very nice example of British sport bike.

20160730 2000 triumph tt600 left front

20160730 2000 triumph tt600 right front wheel

Most TT600's received updated software under warranty, but it might be worth checking the maintenance records on this machine.  Triumph's return to the sportbike market should've been a great success.  Once the fuel delivery woes were sorted, the bike got great reviews as a nicely equipped sharp handler - maybe without Japanese street cred but a fine start.  This one looks smart in red and appears to be a cared-for example, might end up being a bargain.

-donn

20160730 2000 triumph tt600 cockpit

Rev. 1.0 – 2000 Triumph TT600
Ducati May 28, 2015 posted by

Pre-Poggipolini – 1982 Scuderia NCR 600 TT

Around the corner from the Ducati factory in Borgo Panigale, NCR founders Nepoti, Caracchi, and Rizzi began to modify and race Ducatis in 1967.  Their lightweight chassis and race team became a presence in endurance racing, winning the Isle of Man TT in 1978 with Mike Hailwood aboard.  Early in the trellis-frame's development, Pantah-based 600cc bikes were built to Tourist Trophy specifications ( by more than one tuner ), and this NCR 600 ready for the road may be more rare than a factory TT2.

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right

1982 Scuderia NCR 600 TT for sale on eBay

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt left front

Most of the Ducati V-twin 600cc engines have 80mm bore and 58mm stroke, displacing 583cc, though there was an 81mm bore update, displacing 597cc and using 40mm rather than 36mm Dell-Orto carburetors.  In the neighborhood of 60 hp is available mostly north of 6000 rpm, with two-into one exhaust, dry clutch and 5-speed transmission.  Three 260mm Brembo disk brakes provide the stoppage, very light looking 18-inch wheels suspended by 35mm forks and monoshock rear.  At a weight which should be just over 300 lbs, handling this bike will be a joy.

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt left grip  20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt left tank

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt left engine detail  20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right rear wheel

Though one might want to fit air filters for the road, the discretely lighted 600 TT displayed appears ready for a ride.  The owner's comments mention a 2005 restoration, and the bike looks at least excellent, though there is no odometer, it's nearly 35 years old.  The alloy tank, half-fairing and monoposto seat fairing look unblemished, as does the frame.

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right front wheel  20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt frame

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right engine  20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right rear wheel

From the eBay auction:

Believed to be one of only two 600cc street bikes made by the legendary Ducati race team. The 600 TT is purely a NCR design, where the better known TT2 is more a Ducati product. Approximately seven NCR 600 TT race bikes and two street bikes were built. This bike was most likely built in Germany from a kit.

Unable to pass the ultra strict type certification the bike was placed into storage. It resurfaced in 2005 and was restored and rebuilt and serviced. Still unable to be used in Germany it was advertised for sale in 2012. I purchased it, and imported it into the United States. The bike has barely been used since being built.I have ridden it a few times, where it performed flawlessly.

It has a clean correct Tennessee title. The condition is excellent. The only non standard parts are the turn signals. The only fault is a small dent in the exhaust system.

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right front  20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt left tank

20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt right peg  20150527 1982 ncr 600 tt binnacle

Pedigree would seem critical for a bike with this kind of buy-it-now, and perhaps the previous owner, restorer, or NCR can provide a paper trail.  Unrecognizable on the road, a vintage Italian track day would be a good day out for this machine, hopefully it will not be relegated solely to display.

- donn

p.s. - After being purchased in 2001 by Poggipolini, an aerospace and motorsports titanium concern,  NCR continues to thrive hand-crafting exotic parts and Ducati-based bikes.

Pre-Poggipolini – 1982 Scuderia NCR 600 TT
Cagiva May 23, 2012 posted by

Classic Duck: 1986 Ducati F1

For Sale: 1986 Ducati F1

Update 5.23.2012: We first saw this Duc in November of last year and it's be relisted. Last time we saw bidding cross $10k with the reserve still in place. Currently at $5700 reserve not met. Links updated. -dc

From San Francisco, California comes this fantastic Ducati 750 F1 "B" model, with engine internals breathed on by the legendary Fast by Ferracci crew. While this is not a pristine example of the breed, it is in very nice condition and appears to have enjoyed considerable "experience" unknown to many garage queens. For more museum quality F1s, consider these posts HERE and HERE.

The Ducati F1 was as close to a race bike with lights that you could purchase back in the day. Patterned after the TT racers, the F1 was the base model of this stripped down series of bikes. Although the F1 is exclusive in its own right, the Montjuich, Laguna Seca and Santa Monica models were built upon the F1 base and offered more exclusivity and more performance. Still, the F1 was a strong runner for its day, and offered torque, light weight and nimble handling (thanks in part to the 16-inch front wheel).

Today's bike has a paltry 6,000 KM on the clock - that is approximately 3,700 miles for us metric-challenged US-based riders. This is not terribly high mileage, as this bike is pushing on 25 years of age. That works out to be about 148 miles per year, or about one tankful of gas per annum. That is not much at all.

From the seller:
This is a very nice example of a Ducati F1B "survivor" in original condition. The F1 is the epitome of Ducati's racing-bred efforts from the company's early resugence in the 1980s. The F1 is basically a factory-made, low-production racing motorcycle with added lights and turn signals. This one has very low miles.

The F1B was an evolution of the original F1A of the late 1980s- the F1B's have more engine development including a better combustion chamber and bigger valves that boosted performance. The earlier F1A's were slightly anemic by comparison as the earlier bikes merely borrowed the 650 Pantah/Alazzurra motor with the same sized valves and merely a larger 88mm bore. The F1B rectified this lower performance with these noted modifications.

The motor in this F1 was built by Ducati experts Fast by Ferracci. It uses quick- responding flat slide 38mm Keihin carbs, NCR #7 cams, and significant head work to squeeze the most from the high performance cams. The bike runs very well ....especially above 5000 rpm- It'll definitely straighten your arms, and it's noticeably quicker than a stock F1!

On top of the built motor, this F1 is outfitted with some very nice period racing equipment. A Silentium 2-into-1 racing exhaust system, a vented clutch cover, twin 280 mm full floating Brembo rotors. Menani front brake adapters with 3034 Brembo 4 piston brakes. Forks are 40mm Forcella Italias, the best period forks available. Tires are in good shape- approximately 60% left. The motor was recently serviced with fresh oil, a valve adjust and new belts. You can jump on and ride it home if you so desire.

The paint, particularly on the fairing panels and tail section, is in very good condition with nice patina developing. I would conservatively rate the cosmetic condition as a 6.5 out of 10, well above average. There are paint dings on the frame in the area near the rear wheel, from thrown gravel and road debris. Other paint dings are shown in the photos.

Like many F1's , this bike has some racing history. I was told that this bike was raced, when new, by an editor of an automotive magazine ( "Road and Track" is what I was told) Its racing number was #88.

F1's are rapidly appreciating, period superbikes. With the recent interest in and support for these fine machines at Ducstock and the TT2 symposium, prices will continue to rise.

Check out the multiple photos, and video of this fine example of a great running F1B. This would be a great daily driver, cafe racer, weekend canyon carver, or Sunday morning coffee- getter. It would be equally at home on display in your garage, office, or living room. Very few bikes draw as much attention or sheer awe as the F1.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The odometer reads in kilometers, so this has 6000km, not miles.

I added the VIN number to the bike's description per your requests. PLEASE note that the bike is a 1986 model, not a 1988.

The eBay auction lists this bike as a 1988, but the VIN checks out as a 1986. The seller has made a correction in his text which seem to indicate a simple mistake. The F1 was introduced in 1985 and ran through 1988, so this bike certainly looks to be legit. However as well caution all of our RSBFS readers: if are interested in a particular bike, do your homework and ask lots of quetions. In this particular case, I would love to know more about the racing history of this particular bike as I find vintage racers quite interesting.

The value of the 750 F1 series has been pretty solid in the $9,000 – $12,000 range as of late. Perfect bikes with no miles will go for higher (between $13k and $15k according to history) , and well used models a little less. We have seen some bikes listed for as high as $25k, but thus far I have no knowledge of one selling at that stratospherical price. This bike is up to $10,000 relatively quickly, and the reserve is still in place. The modifications and racing history may make up for the lack of "perfection" that some collectors desire. For me, this is *exactly* what I would hope to collect, as it is a bike that has been used and can be ridden. For your chance at this California beauty, click the link and jump over to the auction. Good Luck!

MI

Ducati August 26, 2011 posted by

1987 Ducati 750 F1 B

For Sale: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 B

I know we have been posting quite a few Ducatis as of late. This is not because we are slaves to the L-twins from Bologna so much as there seems to be a fantastic glut of collectable Ducs on the market these days. This particular 750 F1 is a great case and point.

This example is about as clean as you are likely to find in a 1980s vintage Cagiva-era Ducati. And if the rare model and exceptional condition is not enough to seal the deal, take a peek at the odometer. That's right, a whopping 22 kilometers. For those metric-challenged readers, the math works out to be less than 14 miles total - or about 1.8 miles per year.

From the seller:
1987 Ducati 750 F1 B original 22km

This Ducati has a clear Georgia title, never registered and in original condition and only 22km. The windscreen was replaced due to a crack (have original if buyer interested) There's a couple of small nicks from the bike being moved around but, no dents, no dings, no heavy scratches or rub marks on this gorgeous original tri-color paint.

It's absolutely stunning in person, piece of history that could be museum quality.

The clutch cover appears to have fluid spilled during a clutch bleed (seen in the photo). Everythings works!!! and in original condition. "Sold as is" and along with the bike goes the rear stand, a carburetor rebuild kit and the original windscreen (if interested). 2009 was the last time it was started and it ran and sounded fantastic from the Conti 2 in 1 exhaust, at that time I removed the all fuel (steel tank), changed fluids, drain carburetors and re-assembled but not tightened, removed battery. This bike has spent its 24 years indoors.

This bike is so clean and new, it seems unlikely that the new owner would be willing to put any miles on it. That thinking, while helping to preserve nearly 25 year old motorcycles as new, also prevents them from being ridden like they should. Imagine nevering hearing this beautiful TT race replica booming on the overrun. As an enthusiast, I tend more towards the riding than the collecting - but this one might change my mind...

Values for a 750 F1 has been pretty solid in the $9,000 - $12,000 range as of late. This bike is up to $11,800 at auction, with reserve still not met. All signs point to a bike deserving of a selling price at the top of the range; $13-15k would not be out of line for a machine in this condition pending any crazy reserve setting.

For more pictures and details and your opportunity to bid on this nearly new Ducati icon, click the link and jump over to the auction. Make sure you tell 'em you found it on RSBFS!

MI