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Posts by tag: track bike

Ducati September 9, 2018 posted by

Super Single: 1993 Ducati Supermono for Sale

One of the most collectible Ducatis of all time, the Supermono isn't even a v-twin. It is, as the name implies, powered by a single-cylinder engine. If you're a bit confused by this and thinking, "Hmmmm... I don't remember there being any Ducati singles in the 90s..." you're not actually crazy. There weren't any Supermono roadbikes and only about 65 Supermono racebikes ever built between 1993 and 1995.

Race bikes are built to race, but are generally designed to conform to a very specific set of series rules. In Supermono's case, it was the European Sound of Singles, a single-cylinder class designed to support World Superbike racing. It won just about everything it was eligible to race in.

The reason is revs: where most big single-cylinder race bikes are derived from dirtbikes and hammering their riders to dust inside their leathers by 7,000rpm, the Supermono can happily spin up past 10,000. The Ducati's party trick? It's a single that thinks it's a twin.

Looking at the engine, it's pretty obvious that, in building their racing single, Ducati simply blanked off the rear cylinder on one of their liquid-cooled four valve v-twins, keeping the horizontal piston for a nice, low center of gravity. But they also used a dummy connecting rod that simulated the forces of the second piston, likely increasing friction and rotational mass compared to a normal single, but massively reducing vibration.

That ability to rev meant power as well, and the claimed 65hp at 10,500rpm from the 549cc engine gave the bike a serious advantage, compared to other bikes in the class. Later bikes had displacement increased slightly to 572cc for a bit more power. The rest of the bike was incredibly light weight, with liberal use of magnesium castings on the engine and a few other parts, so the complete Supermono tipped the scales at a featherweight 267lbs dry.

Brick-wall brakes from the much heavier 888 bring the bike to a very sudden stop when necessary, which probably wasn't all that often, considering the bike's cornering abilities. Interestingly, this one appears to have been upgraded with modern radial brake and clutch master cylinders, for improved braking and... clutching.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati Supermono for Sale

1993 Ducati Supermono. #16 of 65. Originally delivered to Sweden.  

Video of #16 running https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tii5G9mm4wI

A new timing belt was fit prior to the video.

The video represents the last time it was ran.  It was set up for long term storage immediately after. Retrospeed, of Belgium Wisconsin was commissioned to prove that the bike was mechanically sound, change fluids and to set up for long term storage in February of 2014.

New slicks would need to be fit prior to track use.

Any and all questions can be directed towards Brady at Retrospeed 262-483-5399 

The owner, an Italian collector, is thinning his motorcycle collection to make room for a car purchase.

The Supermono is not titled, none were as they were produced for the sole purpose of racing.

The factory 955 Corsa in the last picture will be coming for sale soon.

The Supermono was never an entry-level racer like KTM's RC390R and was pretty eye-wateringly expensive even when new: $30,000 or so in 1993. These days? You're looking at something like this bike's $125,000 starting bid, which seems to be in line with recent examples. This particular bike is in far away Belgium... Wisconsin! Happily, the seller includes a video of the bike running before it was packed up for storage, so those of us who merely have the means to debate the values of these bikes can actually get a sense of what one might be like in person.

-tad

Super Single: 1993 Ducati Supermono for Sale
Ducati June 29, 2018 posted by

Trick Track Single: 1995 Ducati Supermono for Sale

Some bikes take time to find their audience, but the Ducati Supermono was always going to be a classic. Created to compete in the Sound of Singles race series that supported World Superbike in the mid 1990s, the Supermono was a bit of a throwback to Ducati's past: a pure racebike with exotic components, quality suspension, some very innovative technology and, as the name suggests, just one cylinder.

Single-cylinder engines are lightweight, torquey, and mechanically simple, which makes them ideal for offroad applications and economic commuters. But they aren't all that suited for modern sports motorcycles, since vibrations caused by one cylinder limit maximum revs and therefore horsepower, and can be more than a little unpleasant for the rider at sustained high rpm, unless numb hands and blurry vision are your thing.

Ducati had a solution and, as is typical of companies with limited resources, it made use of as much existing hardware as possible but with an interesting twist. The new engine used most of the liquid-cooled, four valve v-twin engine from the 888 and 916, but with the rear cylinder blanked off, which seems simple enough. But here's the twist: a dummy connecting rod was fitted to approximate the force of a second piston and connecting rod of the missing vertical cylinder.

Ducati ended up with a 549cc single that could rev to 11,000rpm happily and made 65hp with a dry weight of 267lbs, although a larger, 572cc version came along in 1995. Brakes were the same as the much heavier 916,  so stopping power could be considered adequate and the bike handled as well as you'd expect. The bike was liberally sprinkled with carbon fiber: the gauge cluster, fuel tank, rearset brackets, and the self-supporting rear subframe were all made from the material. Engine cases, triple clamps, and wheels were all lightweight magnesium.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Ducati Supermono for Sale

Probably one of the most collectible sport bikes of this generation, enter the Ducati Supermono racer. This 1995 model is one of only 25 produced in 1995. Total production from 1993-1995 was 67, rare. The most unique attribute is the way Ducati did the motor, using an 888 Corsa motor and counterbalancing system consisting of a second attached to a lever pivoting on a pin fixed in the crankcase, hence the name "doppia bielletta" [double con rod].

This is a one-owner bike out of a 60+ bike private collection. Original bill of sale, docs, etc. The bike is in stellar condition.

Approximately 67 were made between 1993 and 1995 and, as you'd expect from the mission statement, most were raced, and quite successfully: it pretty much dominated any class where it was allowed to compete. Styling was by Pierre Terblanche and is pretty much perfect: lean and efficient and spartan. You can clearly see the influence this design had on the revised 900SS, but the style doesn't quite translate: on the Supermono it looks clean and technical and light, but on the Super Sport it looks fussy and contrived. So what price perfection? Well this one has an eye-watering $149,000 starting bid, which shockingly seems a pretty fair place to start, considering what other examples have sold for.

-tad

Trick Track Single: 1995 Ducati Supermono for Sale
Ducati June 20, 2018 posted by

Track Day Exotic: 2015 Pierobon X60R for Sale

I've spent some time poking around the Pierobon website, realizing that I will likely never own a Pierobon-framed track bike. As the seller mentions in their listing, this Ducati 1200DS-powered Pierobon X60R is one pricey piece of kit: the earlier F042's frame alone goes for about $3,500. And that's before you add a swingarm, fuel tank, appropriately snazzy suspension components, lightweight wheels, brakes, some minimalist bodywork... Oh yeah, and a motor. Two-valve Ducatis may not have as many parts as their liquid-cooled, four-valve stablemates  but it's not like that makes fully-built race motors cheap. Sure, you could just stick a dead stock 1100DS motor in there and call it a day, but why would you do that?

Oh, I'm sorry, you're lost. You're thinking, "Who the hell is Pierobon?"

If you're a racing fan, you might have heard of them. Located in Bologna, not far from Ducati's headquarters, they're fabrication specialists that have supplied frames and subframes, as well as swingarms and fuel tanks to Ducati's World Superbike and MotoGP teams for over 50 years. These days, they make track and racebike kits like the X60R that fit Ducati's two and four-valve engines, as well as lightweight replacement frames for all of Ducati's superbikes, up to and including the Panigale. That's right, they make a lightweight frame for the frameless Panigale. So if you've decided that the Pani's monocoque is just a bit too stiff and lacking in feedback, or if you just miss that signature trellis, Pierobon has you covered there.

I've always felt that a properly-prepared air-cooled Ducati twin would be really fun in a lightweight road or track bike and apparently the two-wheeled artists over at Pierobon felt the same way. As you can see from the photos, a finished X60R is elegant, minimal, and very expensive, as it uses only the very best components available. The resulting 300lbs wet is two-stroke territory but the 120whp obviously isn't. That's a pretty killer power-to-weight ratio and the Ducati twin, although pretty far removed from the street version in terms of output, should still have pretty great midrange shove, without the need to constantly rev the nuts off it.

From the original eBay listing: 2015 Pierobon X60R for Sale

This is a very special race/track bike, one of 75 worldwide. They are all very light (312 lbs wet, w/ fuel for a 9 lap sprint, just weighed on a FIM scale) nimble and a blast to ride, feels like a 250 GP bike with Superbike power. It has all race spec Ohlins suspension, Brembo brakes and Marchesini magnesium wheels.

I bought this at the end of the 2016 season from a friend who had won 4 different championships with it during the 2015 and 2016 seasons and decided he wanted to buy a Suter 500 to play with. I had Boulder Motor Sports (the US distributor) go through the bike completely and prep it for the 2017 season spending over $8k to do a full rebuild and prep, this type of prep makes it basically like new. See the receipts in the pics. 

These bikes cost around $70k new as base model then up depending on the build. The motor is a Boulder spec w 120rwhp and 81ft lb tq, tuned to run on pump race 110. I have only taken it out on a few track days so its ready for a full season of racing and more. If you're just a track day junkie this will only need oil changes for years of  track use. The spec motor Brian built is super durable.   It comes with the rear stand and a extra rear sprocket for super short tracks. The gearing on it now works just about everywhere.

There is a spare brand new higher spec motor refreshed by MotoCorse available and a spare set of wheels too, these are at added cost, just inquire.

Why am I selling? I never got around to racing it as I have been focused on my other 2 Pierobon's a 848 powered X80R and a full electronic X60, I am short on space so its time to let one go. I have the reserve set at a reasonable price, fair to both. With only 75 in the world there wont be many chances to get one at a major discount from new. Just raced my 2010 spec X60 to a first in BOTT at Road America this past weekend. Cant say enough about the Pierobons and how they handle    

Pierobon is the name behind most of the racing chassis built for the Ducati factory racing team dating back to the 70's and into World Superbike along with being behind the success that Casey Stoner had on the Ducati GP bikes.

Frankly, considering how much these things cost new, the prep that's gone into it, the quality of the components, and the basically brand-new, ready-to-roll condition of this X60R, the seller's $30,000 Buy It Now price is kind of a steal. The appeal is naturally very limited though: this is a racebike with no historic value, or a very expensive, exotic track day toy. Hopefully, the right buyer will snap this one up while the rest of us consider selling organs so we can afford one of our own.

-tad

Track Day Exotic: 2015 Pierobon X60R for Sale
Ducati April 19, 2018 posted by

Trick Track Toy: Low-Mileage 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale

To some, it might seem like sacrilege to take a gorgeous, expensive, limited-edition Ducati superbike and turn it into a trackday toy. But if you've got the money to spend on something you can afford to wreck and want the very best, you can't go wrong with today's Ducati 1098R track bike. Honestly, homologation-special Ducatis don't really make practical roadbikes anyway: their uncomfortable ergonomics, race-bred handling, and ridiculous power only makes sense in an unrestricted environment.

History I'm sure will be kind to the Terblanche-styled 999. But at the time, the successor to the storied 916 was a relative sales flop, in spite of it being better in virtually every way. Power was up, electronics were more sophisticated, and the solo seat models even offered adjustable ergonomics. Unfortunately, the restyle went just a bit too far for Ducati's conservative fan base, but Ducati quickly learned their lesson. The 1098 that followed was really Ducati walking back their radical mandate, at least in terms of styling. It's a good-looking bike, but obviously kind of derivative, which was really the whole point after all. It may be my least favorite Ducati superbike, but apparently I'm crazy because I know more than a few guys who love it unreservedly. And you can't argue with the performance: in ultimate, 1098R form seen here, the v-twin pumped out a claimed 180hp, a huge jump over the earlier bike.

A big bump in displacement certainly helped: the 1098R actually had a larger 1198cc engine to exploit the full displacement allowed by World Superbike regulations at the time, an interesting reversal of the more recent Panigale 1299R that displaces less for the same reason... Aside from the bump in displacement that resulted from a larger bore and shorter stroke, the R also used titanium valves and connecting rods to help the bike rev higher. And while the 180hp is basically the minimum required for entry into the literbike club these days, the massive 99 lb-ft of torque should be enough to widen eyes everywhere.

Possibly the most significant aspect of the 1098R, aside from its competition-derived engine, was a race kit exhaust and ECU "intended for off-road use only" that liberated an additional 9hp and also activated the revolutionary Ducati Traction Control system with 8 levels of adjustability. It was relatively crude, compared to today's systems, but was undeniably effective and was used on Ducati's MotoGP and WSBK machines of the time.

After all that, it's almost easy to overlook the bike's trick suspension that included an Öhlins TTX36 twin-tube shock at the rear and represented pretty much the very best roadgoing suspension money could buy at the time. Just 300 examples of the 1098R were imported to the US, priced at $40,000. This one is number 277 of a total 450 produced worldwide and has only 2,800 miles on it, although most of those have accumulated on closed courses, and track miles are kind of like dog years...

From the original eBay listing: 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale

ONLY 2,800 MILES

#277 of 450

THIS BABY IS BAD!

PLEASE UNDERSTAND THIS IS A TRACK BIKE, NOT A STREET BIKE

The 1098 R is the ultimate Superbike. The most advanced, most powerful twin-cylinder motorcycle ever built. It is the product of a team of designers and engineers focussed on one objective only – to win.

The ‘R’ is a race bike, pure and simple. Its competition specification and superior components together with advanced electronics and race-proven chassis technology deliver a level of performance that empowers you with confidence and capability. On the road, it distinguishes you as a connoisseur of high-performance motorcycles. On the track it promotes you to a higher level of riding and closer to realising your dreams.

World Superbike rule changes mean that the road-going ‘R’ version is closer than ever to our factory race bike. The 1098 R is not a replica – it’s the real deal. An incredible 180hp L-Twin Testastretta Evoluzione engine in a race-winning Trellis chassis set-up tips the scales at an unbelievably lightweight 165kg (364lbs) and comes with a race kit that introduces Ducati Corse’s world championship winning traction control system.

Once again, Ducati raises the bar and sets the world standard for sport bikes while turning the heads and racing the hearts of enthusiasts throughout the world.

The 1098 R – Built to Win

If you have a need for speed, then this is your answer. 

This motorcycle was bought stock from the Ducati Dealership in 2012 when it had only 331 miles. The previous owner has upgraded numerous parts over the past few of years. I do have most of the original parts here in a box. The bike does have a couple minor scratches and chips (most have been professionally touched-up). Normal wear items for a track bike. This 1098 has always been serviced at the Ducati Dealership. Please understand; THIS IS A TRACK BIKE, not a street bike. 

The Buy It Now price for this low-mileage, race-ready homologation special is a reasonable $19,995. That's less than other 1098Rs we've seen, but of course it's likely to see a harder life than most and that's going to make it less desirable to collectors. 180hp and primitive traction-control seen here might not sound all that impressive, in this age of the cornering-ABS-equipped, up-and-down quickshifter-ed, traction-controlled, 206hp at-the-wheel Panigale 1299R Final Editions. But this 1098R most definitely is a very significant and collectible homologation-special Ducati from the dawn of the Electronics Era, when rider aids shifted [see what I did there?] from simply improving safety to making riders faster. If you've got the cash to splash, this is a pretty cool way to get your trackday kicks, and a race track actually seems a more appropriate place for a 1098R than collecting dust in some collection.

-tad

Trick Track Toy: Low-Mileage 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale
Yamaha March 15, 2018 posted by

Racetrack Refugee: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale

Yamaha's R7 was among the last in a long line of machines from the Age of Homologation Specials, where the manufacturers competing in AMA and World Superbike racing created limited runs of insanely expensive bikes that looked like production models, but were chock full of trick bits like adjustable steering heads and exotic engine internals. For the most part, these were based on pretty common machines from each manufacturer's lineup. But in situations where nothing in the manufacturer's stable really matched their needs, companies sometimes whipped up a bike whose whole production run was designed to allow the bike to compete in a variety of racing classes. By the late 1990s, the 750cc class was pretty much on its way out as a viable category for streetbikes, but that didn't stop Yamaha from introducing their very trick and hideously expensive YZF-R7. How trick? Well the frame was claimed to have been based on Yamaha's 500 Grand Prix machine. Just 50 were imported to the US out of 500 built in total. And how expensive? Well, the R7 was $32,000 late-nineties dollars, and that was before you included the race kit that actually made it fast.

Just one problem: from the factory, the R7 made just 106hp, which didn't really provide the performance the looks or pricetag promised. The solution? Just pony up for the race kit that activated a second, dormant test of injectors and replaced the airbox for a revised part that unleashed a more appropriate 162hp but also gave racebike-like reliability. The biggest limitation of the R7 was that engine, and unleashing the full potential could be tricky and expensive, so owners that wanted to use their bikes on the road sometimes switched out the 749cc engine for the 998cc unit from the R1, which seems to have been done in this particular case. I'm under the impression that this was a relatively simple swap and, although it could be considered sacrilege, actually had several benefits: it gave very similar maximum power to the original engine, but with far more midrange, and it also meant the original engine could be saved to preserve the bike's value for future collectors. That appears to have been done here, although the seller's description does leave me with some questions.

This R7/R1 hybrid appears to have been built to a high standard by Graves Yamaha, so I'm sure they knew what they were doing and I've no doubt the bike is very special. But it would really help if the owner was clearer about what he has: he calls the powerplant a "OWO1 1000 superbike motor" but the OW01 was 749cc, although the five-valve inline four was related to both the R7 and the 998cc R1 units. The OW02 engine was supposedly based on that earlier engine and has the same displacement to conform to class limitations, but I'm not sure it can simply be punched out to a full 1000cc.

More likely, it has a later R1 engine, which was, as stated above, the simpler, much more reliable way to get the fully-unleashed R7's 162hp without all the explode-y engine drama. Maybe it's a full-factory superbike R1 unit? The seller also mentions the "half R7 and half R1 frame" which would require some very serious surgery if true. And which halves were used? Front and back? Left and right? Maybe it's the R7 Deltabox with the R1 subframe? It's also listed as a 1998 model, but I was under the impression that the bike was sold in 1999 and 2000.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale

This bike was built in house built by factory Graves race team and was one of Chuck Graves personal bikes. It might be one of only two left, this bike has every goodie you could imagine on it: Brembo brakes, Ohlins forks and rear shock, superbike radiator and tank, swing arm, custom half R7 frame and half R1 frame, Yamaha OWO1 1000 superbike motor, rear Brembo brakes, thumb brake, brake lines, rearsets, Akro pipe, after market wheels, chain sprocket kit, offset triple clamps. This bike new with the race kit harness was $43,000 and only 32 came to the US that year, it is a very limited production bike, to rebuild this bike in today's time would cost over $100k plus the 1000 donor bike for parts, this bike looks like it just rolled off the race truck.

All-in-all, this modified R7 is a very cool machine, with plenty of very trick bits plainly visible, but I'd definitely want some answers to my questions before bidding on this one. Many, many questions, but worth asking, considering it is a Yamaha R7, after all. I'd especially want to know if the original motor is included, as a good chunk of the bike's value is wrapped up in its originality, and while this might be an amazing machine and a true track-day weapon, all those modifications likely hurt the collector value. As always, if you have any insight into the bike, please feel free to fire away in the comments!

-tad

Racetrack Refugee: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale
Kawasaki November 23, 2017 posted by

A Pair of Kawasaki ZX7RR Muzzy Raptors for Sale

If you replace or heavily modify every single component of a motorcycle, does it become something entirely new? That's kind of the philosophy at work behind the Muzzy Raptor, a thoroughly massaged version of Kawasaki's ZX7RR built by tuner extraordinaire, Rob Muzzy. That might sound like the stage name of an 80s glam rocker, and "Raptor" could definitely be the name of a hair-metal band, but Rob Muzzy's memorable moniker is outshined only by his incredible racing successes in both AMA and World Superbike.

Muzzy basically disassembled a brand-new Kawasaki ZX-7Rs and rebuilt it from the ground up to build each Raptor, using top-shelf suspension and engine internals, including gear-driven camshafts. Various exotic options were available, including adjustable steering heads and swingarm pivots, along with a very slick, 916-esque single-sided swingarm. The Formula USA class or "FUSA," required that a minimum of fifty road-going examples be built. Muzzy probably didn't build quite enough Raptors to qualify, but it seems no one complained too loudly.

Roadbikes displaced either 750 or 850cc, although this pair of competition machines appear to be fitted with 800 and 750cc motors, presumably to meet race class requirements. Both engines have been heavily massaged, with the aforementioned gear-driven cams, and you can see the Öhlins forks and AP six piston front calipers for handling to match the power.

From the original eBay listing: A Pair of Kawasaki ZX7RR Muzzy Raptors for Sale

Twin Muzzy Raptor FUSA Race bikes. These were ridden by Dave Sadowski in FUSA and owned by a privateer. He made a deal with Muzzy to allow Sadowski to run the bikes at several FUSA events. Raptors have gear drive cams, gear drive oil pumps, billet crank, 800cc, with many World Superbike parts, custom pistons, valves, rods... you name it, they have it! One bike currently has the 800 motor, the other bike (with body off) has 1998 Doug Chandler 750 AMA motor. Spare freshly serviced 800 motor comes with bikes. Have all paper work to verify bikes and 750 motor from Muzzy.

Included with the 2 bikes are as pictured:

  • Spare 800 motor that was freshened by Muzzy with 0 time on it. All motors Tuned/maintained by Vic Vasola. Motors were sent back to Muzzy or direct to Vic ever 2 race weekends.
  • Body sets as pictured, I think there are 3-4 spare sets in various conditions. One brand new set.
  • 1 carbon fiber tank with cap
  • 3 spare magnesium wheels with rotors as shown.
  • These are very rare bikes and if they become legal for AHRMA Next Gen Superbike you will have a ready to win package.
  • Bikes will come with PA titles.

I have a ton of spares that are also available that I will sell separate which include several new mufflers, titanium headers, gearing, steering damper, pegs, levers, clutch parts, brake and clutch masters/perch/levers, wiring, coolant plumbing, stock forks, ohlins shocks, steering and engine mount eccentrics, fenders, front and rear sub frames, battery box... The list is huge and there is everything you need to race these bikes. I also have a 1997 ZX7RR street bike in pieces, all body work freshly painted by Sean Lezott of Connecticut Cycle Refinishing.

Hilariously, the bikes are claimed to come with Pennsylvania titles, so I'm guessing that you could theoretically convert them back to road use, assuming you live someplace with a permissive DMV. The Buy It Now price for the package is $39,995. For that price you get a pair of racing motorcycles and a boatload of spares, including bodywork and engines and, as the seller says, enough to use the bikes in anger. Considering the raw materials in this package, that seems like a good deal for someone looking for race-ready bikes or some very serious track day machinery.

-tad

A Pair of Kawasaki ZX7RR Muzzy Raptors for Sale




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