Posts by tag: tamburini

MV Agusta September 4, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1999 MV Agusta F4 Serie Oro

9/4/2017 Update: Significant price decrease and a live auction now underway! Links updated. -MI

The rebirth of MV Agusta in 1998 was a storied affair, a huge investment, and was centered around the introduction of the F4. The F4 was a single model that represented the direction of the new company, encompassing both style and substance. The style came from the Cagiva Research Center with legendary designer Massimo Tamburini (co-founder of Bimota and designer of the Ducati 916 series). The substance was a powerful one-two punch of history and performance. The result was phenomenal, beautiful, and utterly exclusive.

The first 300 F4s that were released worldwide were Serie Oro machines. The term "Oro" refers to the golden color of the components. But this was not mere paintwork or some marketing ploy. Instead, MV Agusta took the old-fashioned route and sculpted a bike out of unobtainium. The metal components that might be aluminum on other bikes were created in magnesium on the Oro. Magnesium is a magic material that is lighter in weight than aluminum, just as strong (or stronger in some cases), but more difficult to work with. It is an expensive, labor-intensive method to lose weight, and shows the extent of the craftsmanship that went into the launch of the F4. Components created in magnesium on the Oro include the striking wheels, frame side plates and the huge swingarm.

Exotic materials did not end with the metals. Carbon fiber usage is extensive on the Oro, including all of the painted and unpainted bodywork, the tail section and the entire gas tank. Today carbon fiber is ubiquitous - seen nearly everywhere. In 1999, this was still aerospace and F1 material, and the labor to produce these pieces was far higher than other mass production methods, including injection molded plastics (ABS) seen on many bikes of the era. The overall silhouette of the bike is familiar, yet unique. The F4 has earned many accolades as one of the most beautiful motorcycles ever produced, and it is easy to see why. It is the culmination of where Tamburini started with the Ducati 916; more aggressive in some places, yet rounder and softer in others. The MV Agusta colors of red and silver highlight the proportions wonderfully.

All was not simply style, however. For motivation, MV Agusta created an all-new 750cc powerplant. It is a 750cc inline four with DOHC, but there is much more here as well. Engaging with the engineering genius of the Ferrari F1 team, MV Agusta created a cylinder head with the valves arranged in a radial pattern for maximum airflow and combustion efficiency. To this they added electronic wizardry in the form of multipoint fuel injection and an induction discharge electronic ignition to complete the package. The organ pipe exhaust system (4-2-1-2-4) serves both as a powerful visual focal point at the back of the bike while also routing the exhaust plumbing up high out of the way, aiding in cornering clearance. The noise of an F4 at full song is beautiful music indeed.

On the chassis side, the six piston front calipers and the master cylinder were development updates from the Cagiva-Nissan partnership in 500cc GP racing. Both Pirelli and Michelin - at the behest of Tamburini - created special tires to suit the F4 model specifically. Suspension features include a MV Agusta-spec front fork built by Showa that includes quick release front axle clamps - yet another bit of attention to detail that shows the agonizing efforts MV Agusta went through to create the Oro.

From the seller:
1999 MV Agusta F4 Serie Oro
No 279/300
VIN ZCGF400AAXV000279
Mileage: 7800mi
Fantastic condition and ridden regularly. The only blemishes are a 3/16” scratch on the left side fairing (see close up fairing image) and there are some rock chips on the wheels that have been touched up (see wheel images).

7500mi service (including valve adjustment) recently completed and the rear wheel bearings were replaced as a pre-emptive measure at the same time (these are the two major maintenance items to watch out for on the early F4s).

Includes tool kit, owners manual, factory rear stand, both "gold” keys

I encourage prospective buyers to view the F4 in person if possible or ask any questions they may have via e-mail:

Contact: mvagustaf4oro@gmail.com

Price: Asking $36,000 OBO $32,000 Buy It Now or LIVE eBay auction

MV Agusta was determined to return to the sport of motorcycling where they once dominated with an effort worthy of the name. In the Oro, they succeeded in building both a very special motorcycle and one that works exceptionally well. That takes time, and tremendous finances. The rumor is that the Cagiva 500cc GP program was killed to help fund the F4 development, freeing up both cash reserves and engineering staff. That's how serious the rebirth of MV Agusta was in 1998, and that is how much effort went into creating the Oro model.

The MV Agusta Serie Oro is a rare and special machine. These bikes were frightfully expensive when new, and this immaculate example looks to be priced right in the range for a well-loved Oro today. With extremely limited numbers in the US (estimated at approximately 60), each individually numbered bike has the identification that makes it exclusive and distinctive. Looking good while going fast will never be a problem on this F4; your exclusivity is virtually guaranteed. And thanks to bikes like this Serie Oro, the legend of MV Agusta lives on. Contact mvagustaf4oro@gmail.com for more details.

MI

Bimota May 26, 2017 posted by

Gone Too Soon: 1997 Bimota SB6R for Sale

The SB6R could have been Bimota's biggest seller of all time. Certainly the earlier SB6 sold in quantities that nearly qualify as mass production, with nearly 1,200 built. Unfortunately, the utter failure of the overreaching two-stroke V-Due low-sided the company into a crash barrier and the GSX-R1100-powered SB6R was not part of the brand's renewal, killing it after just 600 were made. Sharp styling aside, the SB6's party piece is that absolutely massive-looking aluminum frame that uses Bimota's "Straight Connection Technology" concept to link the steering head stock and the swingarm pivot as directly as possible for optimized handling.

Great idea, but those big slabs of aluminum limit access to a number of important components, including the front sprocket and the alternator drive. This is a problem because the front sprocket will likely need regular replacement, considering the power and torque available, and the alternator drive needs cooling air to keep it from failing. So just what do I mean when I say that the frame "limits access"? Well both components require the engine to be at the very least unbolted from the frame and lowered, something that might deter owners just a bit...

Built during the same era as Ducati's original 916, the Bimota SB6R goes about being a fast motorcycle in almost the opposite way as its Bolognese rival: bulging and stout-looking where the 916 is impossibly slim at the waist, beam frame versus a trellis, and powered by an inline four versus a v-twin. But both featured stump-pulling torque over high horsepower: the GSX-R mill in the SB6R is backed by a five-speed gearbox and I've yet to hear anyone complain that it needs a sixth...

That engine is a bit like the small-block Chevy of the motorcycling world, and plenty of folks out there have tuned them to make fairly outrageous horsepower. Today's SB6R looks like it's gone that route: it isn't exactly stock, although the modifications are all under the skin and committed to the pursuit of absolute speed. A wise move, as the bike's aesthetics represent one of the bike's strong points. But is the seller's asking price just one toke over the line?

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Bimota SB6R for Sale

Exotic Italian red handmade superbike.

Bimota SpA (www.bimota.it) was started in 1973 in Rimini, Italy, by Valerio Bianchi, Giuseppe Morri, and Massimo Tamburini (Bi-Mo-Ta). They design and build their own line of exotics, and the company and its people have also been involved with designing/developing Ducati, MV Agusta, and Lamborghini motorcycles. Bimota would study the market to see which drive trains they believed to be best of breed, purchase their components directly from those manufacturers, remanufacture and enhance them to Bimota standards, and then design and build an exotic motorcycle based on the new drive train. Bimota model numbers indicate which drive trains they were based on - SB (Suzuki), DB (Ducati), YB (Yamaha), KB (Kawasaki). Bimota also collaborated with other major brands on special models, and both SB and YB models have won world superbike and other class championships. True to the exotic business model, the company would only build a limited number each year, with very few making it to the U.S. market.

This SB6R was originally purchased new from Bimota by owners of a professional U.S.-based race team in the late 1990's, intending it as one of their anchor bikes.

Prior to race homologation, the principal team owner suffered major injury and the team was closed. Approximately $70,000 had been invested in this SB6R up to that time, but it hadn't yet raced and still remains in street legal configuration. If memory serves correctly, the original owner's dynomometer certificate listed 182 horsepower. This SB6R still has its original Bimota uprated (150+ HP) GSXR 1100 drive train, which was further blueprinted/uprated (to 1200 CC)/race-configured by a professional Suzuki team in the US. This Bimota can essentially be serviced and tuned by a competent professional Suzuki technician.

The second owner of the SB6R was a friend of the original owners and purchased it when the team was closed. He was also a colleague in my area of business (telecom), and I purchased it from him as he was retiring and moving away. The SB6R has always remained in climate controlled indoor storage and is only ridden briefly at the beginning and end of each season to keep it in good operating condition. Both the second owner and I bought the SB6R as collectors, not racers.

The purchaser should appreciate that it is essentially a race vehicle that remains street legal. Response can be startlingly quick and strong across even low RPM ranges due to Bimota's proprietary pressurized air box system. No tricks or gadgets, just simple, beautiful Italian race design on top of bulletproof horsepower.

Though not fully race homologated as intended, it will not ride and handle like a milder/more-comfortable/easier-to-ride street bike. It is designed for one rider of average racer size/weight and has no pillion or pegs for a second passenger. Riding posture and controls are designed for racing. Steering is designed to be more stable at high speeds, rather than more flexible at low speeds, and so is dampened and has less range of motion than normal street bikes. It is jetted for ~5000 feet altitude, and when cold will need to be warmed up patiently with graduated choke adjustments before being initially ridden (~15 minutes). Throttle control should be gentle and moderate, as response is fast and strong. Experienced riders (including me) have been caught by surprise when rolling in too much throttle in ordinary street riding conditions (especially from stops). The transmission is race configured (1-up, 4-down), which is the reverse of what is normal for street bikes (1-down, 4-up), and has a harsher sound and feel because it is heavier duty.

The buyer will arrange and pay for pickup. We've used a few different bike haulers over the years and they've always worked out fine. If the buyer happens to be in the Inland NW United States, I occasionally drive to Spokane or Bozeman for business and may be willing to deliver there or points between if serendipitous.

10% of sale proceeds go to the MARSOC Foundation.

Like many Bimotas of the era, the SB6R handles with aplomb, goes like stink, and looks the business, but the details let the side down: maintenance issues, including a gauge cluster prone to failure, and generally indifferent construction. It is one of my very favorite 1990s exotics, but that doesn't change the fact that the seller's asking price of $25,000 is extremely optimistic. It's very nice, but most SB6Rs are pretty well-preserved, and previous examples haven't gotten higher than around $15,000 before either selling outside eBay or going to the highest bidder. Is the extra attention lavished on the engine worth $10,000, or is it just gilding the lily? If you're a wealthy collector looking for a very nicely prepared, but decidedly non-stock SB6R, this might be just what you're looking for.

-tad

Gone Too Soon: 1997 Bimota SB6R for Sale
Ducati May 12, 2017 posted by

Radical: 2002 Ducati 998R

Of all of sport bike manufacturers, Ducati seems to have been the only one that focused on a single concept: a luscious, 90 degree twin with desmo valve actuation. From that point onward, anything goes - and Ducati went truly radical in evolving the concept. From the original two-valve, air-cooled twins to the legendary 851, to the groundbreaking 916 series, Ducati invented - and then reinvented - their version of the superbike. And since 2000, the bike to have within the Ducati lineup has always been the "R" model. The R designates something special, some mad technical wizardry under the covers, and lots of carbon fiber. Once the stuff of aerospace, carbon has become the foundation on which fast motorcycles are born. Today's example is a 998R, the second "R" in the series (following the 2001 996R). This model is seen by the Tamburini faithful as the last of the 916-derived bikes. The oft-scorned (yet successful) Terblanche-designed 999 was waiting in the wings.

2002 Ducati 998R for sale on eBay

Unlike many badge-engineered models (i.e. branding and "limited edition" number plate), the R bikes are special; they vary drastically from the standard Ducati models. In the case of the 998R, that means a different set of engine cases with a deeper sump, a significantly different bore and stroke (104.0 mm × 58.8 mm - which actually displaces 999 cc), and trick titanium internals. This is the Testastretta engine evolution that would go on to power the 999R. Body panels are carbon (in addition to the front fender and entire tail section), and suspension components are heavily upgraded. In this case, you can expect nothing but fully adjustable Ohlins units front and rear. Wheels are Marchesini Corse, saving rotational weight over non-R pieces. Weight was down over the standard model, while power was up: expect about 403 lbs dry and 136 HP.

From the seller:
For offer here is a spectacular 2002 998R with 4400 miles.
There is tons of information and specs on this bike easily found - numbered, low production race-spec bike with Titanium Corsa internals, Carbon bodywork, etc. This is a an excellent example that is set up to ride with a Sargent seat and upright clip-on's. Other mods include a period Casoli Carbon tail section, Woorcraft clutch cover. Full Termignoni exhaust, Marchesini Magnesium wheels, Ohlins suspension. Bike has been fully serviced by ECS in Middletown NY - fresh tires, belts, fluids and needs nothing. Truly a beast - immense power and feather light chassis and handling makes for a totally unique ride. A few original parts accompany the bike - there are minor blemishes here and there, but overall excellent original condition.

This 998R looks pretty clean for its age. The mileage is not excessive, nor has it been a garage queen. Part of the mileage equation is likely due to the aftermarket risers, making what is normally a torture rack a bit more comfortable on the street. On the plus side the seller notes a full service, including belts. This is a big deal, as Ducati services are not cheap, and skipping the service cycle can result in very expensive noises. From the sounds of the ad, this bike is ready to hit the road (just make sure you find a nice, curvy one).

The last of the 916-era R bikes do not grow on trees. They do not pop out of the woodwork every day, nor are they cheap. Like all great homologation bikes, this R is rare...and expensive. Bidding is already up to $20,000 USD, and there does not appear to be a reserve in sight. How high will this one go? We won't know for a few days yet, but check it out here if you are interested. Good Luck!!

MI

Radical:  2002 Ducati 998R
Ducati December 2, 2016 posted by

Beginning of the End – 2002 Ducati 998

2002 saw Ducati introduce the testastretta engine into a production model, and work was wrapping up on the succeeding 999.  The 998 was the best of the 916/996 chassis, with the 123 hp EVO engine, and reviewed as the bike to own once in your life.

20161202-2002-ducati-998-right

2002 Ducati 998 for sale on eBay

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20161202-2002-ducati-998-right-fairing  20161202-2002-ducati-998-right-tank

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With its revised valve train, the 998cc narrow head motor was heavily oversquare and delivered rated power at  10,000 rpm, with a wide torque band.  The now iconic trellis frame and underseat exhaust hid the details beautifully.  43mm Showa forks are complemented by the Ohlins monoshock and steering damper.  320mm Brembo brakes are up front, with 220mm single rear.  The classic superbike fairing was available with one or two seats, this one a monoposto with a white number area front and rear.

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20161202-2002-ducati-998-left-fairing  20161202-2002-ducati-998-right-engine-unfaired

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Evidently a two-owner bike, this 998 has a little over 7,000 miles and looks super clean.  Though the mind wanders to the dark side when a lower-mile bike has had a repaint, it looks like a nice upgrade from the factory paint.  And while we could quibble about the yellow accents, the unfaired photos allay most fears of damage history.  From the eBay auction:

Up for sale here is my beautiful, immaculate 2002 998 Monoposto. Previous owner added the following items: Termi slip-ons, adjustable levers, Ohlins steering damper, fender eliminator, Samco hoses, upgraded clutch slave, and a few carbon bits. He also had all bodywork painted by a highly-regarded painter in the northeast who made subtle changes to the "Ducati 998" font on the side fairings and pinstripes framing the white number plates. Aesthetics are obviously in the eye of the beholder but I find both to be much better looking than the stock look. OEM wheels are also powder-coated black.

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20161202-2002-ducati-998-right-front-wheel  20161202-2002-ducati-998-left-rear-wheel

20161202-2002-ducati-998-left-engine-unfaired

Thankfully this 998 has been cared for, with good attention to maintenance and nice farkles all over.  The lightweight battery and keyless gas cap are unmentioned but great mods.  Before the jump to overwhelming power that followed a few years later, the 998 was the ultimate machine of the game changing 916/996 family.  Factory jitters forced the 998 to share the showroom with the 999 in 2003, and was available by special order in 2004-5.  The 999 took over factory race efforts and but the 998 did well for privateers in the supersport classes.

-donn

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Beginning of the End – 2002 Ducati 998
Ducati December 1, 2016 posted by

Nearly New: 1998 Ducati 916 With Just 245 Miles for Sale

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Much ink has been spilled waxing poetic about Massimo Tamburini's masterpiece, the Ducati 916. The bike was such a common sight throughout the 90s as the two-wheeled incarnation of lust, it's become a bit... familiar, and it's easy to forget just how shockingly sexy this bike was when it was introduced: the incredibly slim waist, the single-sided swingarm, the undertail exhausts, and those huge side-panels, bare of graphics except for simple Ducati logos.

1998-ducati-916-l-side

Under the curvy new skin, the mechanicals were an evolution of Ducati's 888: a liquid-cooled, four-valve 90° v-twin displacing 916cc and producing 114hp, backed by a six-speed gearbox and a traditional, rattly dry clutch. That powerplant was housed in a stiff, lightweight steel trellis frame that helped define Ducati superbikes until the nearly frameless Panigale came along.

1998-ducati-916-r-rear

The 916 was impractical, uncomfortable, and expensive both to buy and to maintain. But it was also impossibly desirable and undeniably fast. If you're looking for one now, prices have become very reasonable, at least in terms of the initial purchase: they're still expensive to maintain and require regular attention. And that combination of "uncomfortable" and "expensive to buy and maintain" means that there are plenty running around in excellent condition and with very low miles. But ones with just a couple hundred miles on the odometer like this one are few and far between.

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From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 916 for Sale

Yes this beautiful Superbike has 245 miles on it.  It would have had less but I had to drive it to see Frankie Chili the Superbike star to sign the tank.  I bought from a guy who owned a huge plumbing company who bought it at Sotheby's charity auction in 2002 brand new in Vegas after being signed by Ben Bostrom. Several other amazing guys signed tank but unfortunately while sitting in my office got cleaned by a cleaning person and ruined the signatures.   Bike is in my storage next to Jet Tunning, one of the Premier Motorcycle tuners in all of CA.  Bike has not been started since 2006.  Battery disconnected and fuel drained.  Bike is 100% original, never dropped or scratched. Clean Title as expected.  I bought this bike as art.  It was enjoyed by 1000s of folks who loved the fact that this was the body style that put Ducati back on the map in the 1990s.  Office building sold and now in warehouse covered.  Needs a good home where someone can hang it over a bar, or put in a collection, or maybe just rode hard for the first time in its life.  Thanks for looking.

1998-ducati-916-r-side

The $7,500 asking price is high for a bog-standard 916, or it would be, if it wasn't virtually brand-new. As it is, that seems like a decent price for such a pristine machine, although I'd be tempted to just clean the badly-smudged signatures off the tank for a dead-stock look. It's a shame, since they'd be a very cool addition for a display bike if they were in good condition... And honestly, "display" is probably what will happen to this bike: there are plenty of nice, well-maintained bikes around if you're looking for one to ride, and this bike would probably need a comprehensive service if you wanted to actually ride it.

You'd also probably want to remove those "916" decals from the side panels: earlier 916s with the older graphics had the displacement displayed but, when Ducati switched to their new corporate logo, it was dropped until the introduction of the updated 996. Not a good aesthetic choice, but very easy to fix.

-tad

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Nearly New: 1998 Ducati 916 With Just 245 Miles for Sale
MV Agusta December 8, 2015 posted by

Matte Tamburini: 2004 MV Agusta 750 SPR

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I know some people think of the MV Agusta as "the-Ferrari-of-motorcycles", in large part due to the fact that the engine was derived from the 1990–1992 Ferrari Formula One engine.  While it is true that early in the design process Ferrari engineers assisted in the development of the engine, MV deviated from the Ferrari design pretty early in the 750 design.  MV Agusta did keep one important feature; the radial valves.  To my knowledge the MV Agusta 750/1000 lineup is the only radial-valved street legal motorcycle currently in production.

Personally I think the MV 750 and subsequent 1000cc model are more like an Aston Martin than a Ferrari in that the basic layout and look hasn't changed much since the 750cc model was introduced in 1999 as the first of the relaunched MV Agusta model.  The F4 750 SPR was released in 2004 as the final evolution on the F4 750 platform.

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2004 MV Agusta 750 SPR for sale on eBay

While the layout of the 750/1000cc has remained pretty much constant, the F4 SPR did have some improvements over its earlier brethren. The SPR included a bump in horsepower up to 146 hp which gave the bike a top speed of 180+ mph.  This increase was due in large part due to its new cylinder head, new inlet ducts, and a redesigned the combustion chamber.  The SPR also came with Marzzochi 50mm forks and everything was wrapped up in matte grey bodywork, special silver start wheels and some carbon fiber bodywork (front fender, chain guards, air ducts covers).  Only 300 SPR units were produced so it definitely meets the Raresportbike criteria.

A review of the SPR can be found here.

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This particular SPR has no real info posted about it from the seller but looks to be in excellent shape.   Mileage is 2,832 so its not crate new and I do think I can see a few small scuffs on the bodywork near the gearchange lever and the rear mudguard/hugger, but otherwise it looks pretty good.

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What is this SPR worth?  Well its a 300 unit all Italian sportbike so its not going to be bargain basement.  At the same time its not the most desirable of the relaunched MV Agusta 750 configurations for collectors (that honor belongs to uber rare SP-01 which carries the signature of Mr. Tamburini on each).   Prices on the SPR hovered around $10,000 USD for the last few years but now seem to be slowly rising so the Buy-It-Now prices for this SPR is $12,500 USD is actually right in line.

The SPR  may not ever reach RC30/RC45 type prices (sorry Ian) but its still an all Italian sportbike that looks great and would be a fine representative of the reborn MV Agusta in any collection.

-Martin/Dallaslavowner

Matte Tamburini:  2004 MV Agusta 750 SPR