Posts by tag: SuperBike

Honda April 13, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 1969 Honda CB750

Even legends take a few baby steps - Honda’s landscape-changing big four was originally manufactured on low-production tooling, known as “sand-cast”.  The smooth 67 hp model sold over 50,000 units the first year, and went on to around 400,000 sales, a lifetime achievement for any other manufacturer.  This early production CB has had a white-glove  restoration using period correct parts and techniques.

1969 Honda CB750 for sale on eBay

Known as the original superbike, the big CB750 was designed with some simplicity in mind.  Low-friction plain bearings are used throughout the engine, and the cylinders are undersquare with a longer stroke than bore, partly in order to limit crankcase width.  The cam chain and intermediate drive share the middle of the one-piece crankshaft for strength.  The switch to disk brakes had just begun but Honda cast theirs in rust-resistant stainless to ensure the clean look stayed nice.  The twin tube steel frame might’ve been the most traditional and not-over-engineered part of the package.  Early on a kickstarter was included though electric start was standard.

Subject of a three-year restoration completed in 2014, this CB was built with NOS parts for the engine and cosmetics.  An NOS wiring harness and exhaust system were sourced for the build, as few survive at their age.  A crucial un-restored tank was found in Candy Blue Green, though it post-dates the sand-cast era.  With the pebble-surfaced cases that "sand cast" refers to, the engine was rebuilt by Honda specialist Mark McGrew in Minnesota.  The complete package is easy on the eyes, the chrome rear fender echoing the front, and the quartet of headers making their way down and back.  Looking head-on shows the lightness and surprising ground clearance available.  Moto Borgotaro is located in Brooklyn, NY - here is a short excerpt from their complete offering which you can view - here - :

“Sand cast” guru Andy Morris of Hampton Bays, New York built this bike. Morris has worked on 15 “sand cast” CB 750s and nearly 50 later versions – he is so good that he can correctly assemble one of these Hondas from a tub of parts without reference to any manual – and he remembers buying # 2659 from a shop in Pennsylvania in the late 1990s. Its restoration took him three years and he used only OEM NOS replacement “sand cast” parts except for the rear rim which he had to have re-plated. All the fasteners, the spokes, the wiring harness, the four exhaust pipes, and other components came out of Honda parts boxes.

www.motoborgotaro.com

For all intents a "new" 1969 motorcycle, this CB750 has turned only 756 miles since completion.  It just looks like fun waiting to happen, at least to riders of a certain age.  My intro to the model was my buddy's CB550 in 1974, and even that seemed endlessly powerful compared to the trail bikes and vertical twins that were more my speed.  Though the standard layout had a self-limiting effect on top speed, it could do almost anything and torque was  always available.  It was also another chapter in the Honda quality story, the single cam engine being eminently reliable.  Strangely enough, the introductory model was also the most powerful, as horsepower figures waned through the emissions legislation and gas crisis years.

Honda used the pre-production molds to cast around 7,000 engines, which would be a successful year for most manufacturers and a full lifespan for more exotic models.  But as usual Honda was looking over the horizon, to around 40,000 machines each year with total production over 400,000.  This museum quality CB750 could be the opener for a collection of Honda superbikes, or the capstone for a history of earlier Hondas.  Moto Borgotaro can be contacted - here -.

Featured Listing – 1969 Honda CB750
Suzuki March 23, 2018 posted by

Two stroke restomod: 1986 Suzuki RG500

The problem with owning classic sportbikes is that even in their best shape, they perform like they would have 30 years ago, which can be a terrifying affair if you're used to modern suspension and tires. Couple that with a take-no-prisoners 500cc two-stroke powerband, and you're really playing with fire. This 1986 Suzuki RG500 has had those concerns addressed, with mods to allow it to run modern tires and reworked suspension and brakes.

1986 Suzuki RG500 restomod for sale on eBay

The work was done by renowned RG500 tech Rick Lance, and the seller says no stone was left unturned. The bike was taken down to the chassis and gone over from top to bottom. The forks have been rebuilt and the anti-dive bypassed, and the engine has been treated to a mild tune, including a rare set of aftermarket expansion chambers.

From the eBay listing:

1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma. Full Rick Lance Gamma build "resto mod" from the frame up, in excellent condition, mods inc 17 inch wheels, GSXR brakes, Fox remote shock, upgraded forks internals, anti dive block off, plus all the usual Lance Gamma mods, filters, taps, clutch. Rare Tommy Crawford expansion chambers, motor has stock bore with mild tune, lightweight bodywork with single seat with excellent stock style paint scheme, less than one thousand miles since full build including the engine, suspension, gearbox, etc etc, as you would expect from a Rick Lance build it runs and rides perfectly, carburation is spot on pulling cleanly from idle to the red line.

Hard to find these now especially in this condition with everything being practically new, gets lots of attention where ever it goes, sounds amazing, from an era when GP bikes were 2 strokes and four cylinders there will never be anything like it again, own a piece of history!

Clean GA title in my name, located in North Georgia USA Can assist with shipping

The price is an eye-watering $26,500, which is staggering even as the price of nice stockers is climbing. That said, if a modern-style two-stroke superbike is your thing, we doubt you could build your own for cheaper.

Two stroke restomod: 1986 Suzuki RG500
Ducati March 16, 2018 posted by

Fresh Street Racer: 1993 Ducati 888 SP05

The Ducati 888 filled the gap between the brand-redefining 851 and the legendary 916, bumping the 851's fuel-injected, liquid-cooled, four-valve L-twin to 888cc. The inbetweener status didn't phase the bike much, though, as it was enough for Doug Polen to net back-to-back World Superbike championships in '91 and '92. Production ended in '94 as the world geared up for the Tamburini-penned 916. Ducati sent fewer than 300 to the States.

1993 Ducati 888 SPO5 for sale on eBay

This 1993 Ducati 888 SP05 is number 270 of 500, and has covered just 125 miles since its original UK delivery. The SP versions of the 888 never made it to our roads, as they couldn't get past American DOT laws. Now that the bike has reached the magic 25-year mark, it might be possible to bring it in and secure registration, though it probably should be ridden sparingly.

From the eBay listing:

THE BIKE SPECIALISTS,
TRADING STANDARD AWARD WINNERS.

We are pleased to present the opportunity to own a very rare collectable Ducati 888 SP5. This example is number 270 of just 500 made. A beautiful 1993 model having covered just 125 miles from new. This is the ultimate concourse example and the best we have ever seen

This bike is supplied with the original handbook, and will have a full belt service and MOT prior to the new owner taking possession.

The 888 was a motorcycle manufactured as an upgrade to the 851. The earlier 851 had introduced liquid cooling, computerised fuel injection and four-valve heads to Ducati's two cylinder motors. After increasing the capacity of the 851 to 888 cc they then released the iconic 888 SP5 in 1993.

A small deposit will secure this Ducati and we offer finance packages to suit and can also arrange delivery both UK and worldwide.

The bike is listed with a classified ad, meaning that the price -- about $55,000 USD -- won't change over the course of the listing.

Fresh Street Racer: 1993 Ducati 888 SP05
Ducati January 16, 2018 posted by

Palm Trees not Included – 2008 Ducati Monster S4RS Tricolore

With a great portion of the country below freezing ( so cold here yesterday I couldn't tell if my heated gear was even working ) the palm trees in this eBay offering got my attention - and the S4RS in the foreground isn't too shabby either.  The 1098-based flagship is a bona fide naked superbike.

2008 Ducati S4RS Tricolore for sale on eBay

Ducati's Monsters became the brand's best-seller shortly after their 1993 introduction.  Most often seen with an air-cooled desmodue, the model was treated to a parade of water-cooled desmoquattros in the 2000's.  The S4RS is the ultimate for testastretta fans, the 130hp L-twin completely visible.  In Tricolore trim, Öhlins are found at both ends, carrying gold-painted Marchesini Y-spoke alloys.  Carbon fiber is used for the cam belt covers and radiator guards, and in this case the Termignoni mufflers.

 

This San Diego owner has been sparing with the mods and the miles, beside the Termi's, just LED blinkers, shorty levers and the way-too-angular Rizoma mirrors.  Not sure if the Speedymoto water pump housing implies a past failure, but though it's a stressed part on the 1098, the Monsters had better cooling without the fairing.  From the eBay auction:

I'm the 2nd owner whom purchased from original owner. Bike has 4,350 original miles. All original paper work in hand. I wanted this bike for years and purchased as the last bike I'd ever own. This bike is immaculate with no issues. Minted #77/400 ever made with only 240 release into the US. 
 
 
 998 Testastretta water cooled engine, Ohlins suspension, Termignoni full exhaust, Brembo brakes, Rizoma mirrors, LED light, front and rear, Marchesini wheels. Bike rides and shifts perfectly. 380 lbs. dry with 131hp makes this and experienced riders dream.   Bike is covered, garage stored, near seen rain, and adult owned.
 
The S4RS was way over-equipped for it's all-purpose mission, unless you consider its real role to generate showroom excitement.  The bikini fairing got good marks but not for a longer trip at speeds the bike found easy.  The last flagship before the 2010 re-styling, the S4RS looks almost quaint today, voluptuous and rounded, understandable with everything out in the warm breeze.
-donn
Palm Trees not Included – 2008 Ducati Monster S4RS Tricolore
Bimota December 29, 2017 posted by

Race History: Ex-Anthony Gobert Bimota SB8K for Sale

Both a flamboyant racer and a cautionary tale, Anthony Gobert was a hugely talented rider who fell from grace after a failed drug test. Several times, actually. Racing today is obviously a far cry from the wild days of the 60s and 70s, where playboy racers partied with stewardesses well into the night before getting up the following morning to risk life and limb while nursing a hangover. Today's riders generally treat racing as the serious profession it has become, instead of as a way for daredevils to travel and booze it up on someone else's dime. I'm sure Gobert's missteps would have been laughed off in another era, but a failed test for marijuana, of all things, ended his MotoGP dreams in 1997, although he continued to race in Superbikes events in a variety of classes. Somewhere along Gobert's slow downward spiral, he got a ride on this Bimota SB8K and managed to make an underfunded machine from a tiny manufacturer briefly competitive, a testament to his talent.

Bimota's SB8 was really the TL1000R that Suzuki wasn't able to build, and one of their most successful models. There's no doubting the liquid-cooled, 996 v-twin engine's prowess: it's been used in various iterations by Suzuki since 1997 to power both sports and touring models. More importantly, both Cagiva and Bimota saw the potential for the engine to power some serious sporting hardware, and just needed to work around the layout challenges posed by the v-twin. As can be seen by the Ducati Panigale's side-mounted rear shock, a transverse 90° v-twin is very long, making it difficult to package efficiently in a compact sportbike while simultaneously maximizing swingarm length. Suzuki used an innovative rotary damper with roots in Formula 1 to support the rear of their TL1000S and TL1000R. Unfortunately, while the concept was sound in theory, it didn't work so well in practice, as the undersized unit tended to overheat and cause handling to go from "stable" to "exciting" without much warning.

Bimota took that throbbing, 138hp lump of an engine and put it into a machine that could much more fully exploit its obvious possibility. As with all Bimotas, the SB8's real party trick was a state-of-the-art frame. While I'm a sucker for Ducati's classic trellis unit, the SB8 used a wild composite design based around stiff, lightweight aluminum spars with carbon fiber side plates and a self-supporting carbon fiber tail section. You can see Bimota's solution to that rear suspension issue, peeking out on the right side of the bike from behind the main frame spar. Ultimately, the SB8 weighed in at nearly 50lbs less than the TL-R, although the bike is uncharacteristically broad and bulky for a v-twin, ironic considering the amazingly slim design of the Ducati 996. It's exotic for sure, but not especially pretty, and the carbon air tubes on the original SB8R also meant you'd better know where those hand controls are without looking, or you'd be craning your neck awkwardly trying to find the high-beam switch or cancel the turn signals. Best not to use them.

Of course, the locations of headlight and turn signal switches matter little in this particular case, since this is the updated SB8K version that did away with the massive carbon tubes in favor of a more conventional intake system. And this bike doesn't have signals or lights anyway, since it's the very World Superbike machine that Gobert used to win at Philip Island in 2000, reminding everyone of his talent, if not his self-control. Many who worked with him feel he could have been one of the all-time greats, and flashes of his brilliance can be seen in results he achieved on the SB8K.

From the original eBay listing: Ex-Anthony Gobert Bimota SB8K for Sale

ex-Anthony Gobert, winning in Philip Island April 2000.

VIN: 00071

This is a legendary bike in a WSBK history for who remembers the victory in april 2000 in Philip Island when Fogarty ended his career... also it is an ICON for the Italian racing motorcyles enthusiasts and the Bimota collectors. 

Only 2 FACTORY bikes were built for the 2000 WSBK, frame #71 and frame #73. This is the only of the 2 fully preserved, complete (with telemetry) and owned by BIMOTA FACTORY from year 2000 to 2017. Full history know, fully untouched since the 2000 season ended.

The bike is fitted with SUZUKI FACTORY TL1000R magnesium/dry clutch engine but tuned then for Bimota by one of the TOP mechanics in the Italian motorcycling history, Franco Farne'... yes the Ducati legend! The bike comes with some spares: engine cases, 2 heads, spare rear wheel, box with bits and pieces.

Letter of verification by the FACTORY present.

Parade, race and collect!

Be sure to check out the photos in the gallery above. The shot of the injectors and one of the high-capacity radiator with the cutout for the front cylinder are especially cool. This is yet another ex-race machine being offered by the same seller as the YB4 racebike from a couple weeks back and, a bit of expected racing wear and tear and some significant discoloration on the swingarm, appears to be in very nice condition. There are several days left on the auction, and bidding is up to just under $9,000 with the Reserve Not Met.

-tad

Race History: Ex-Anthony Gobert Bimota SB8K for Sale
Featured Listing December 16, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R for Sale

There are no points for second place. Unbeknownst to Kawasaki and Honda, both manufacturers were developing the Next Big Thing in the 1970s, an affordable, reliable, inline four-cylinder motorcycle displacing 750cc's. Unfortunately, Honda's CB750 was first to market by several months, leaving Kawasaki with the unenviable choice: be the also-ran, or delay their machine to come up with something special. The Z1 that followed may not have been first, but the 903cc engine meant its performance blew the CB750 into the weeds, and the Kawasaki Z1R seen here was an evolution of that muscular 70s machine.

Of course, by the time the Z1R was introduced, the overall package was pretty long-in-the-tooth, with a dual-shock rear suspension and spindly front forks. Most of the updates were cosmetic, with more modern, angular styling and cast wheels. Frame reinforcements and triple disc brakes improved handling and stopping, and a displacement bump to 1015cc took care of the straight-line performance enhancements. The 550lb wet weight and long wheelbase mean that it won't exactly carve corners, but that same long wheelbase should make it easy to blast away from stoplights in a howling cloud of tire and exhaust smoke.

While the Z1R may not have been cutting-edge when it was new, time has been kind to it and the crisp styling and classy silver-blue color look very sharp today. Like all 70s muscle bikes, the Z1R has definitely been increasing in value, perhaps as a result of its association with its even wilder sibling, the turbocharged Z1R TC. The seller refers to this as a "nut and bolt, frame-off restoration" and it certainly looks the part.

From the original eBay listing: 1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R for Sale

Coming out of my private collection (only because I just restored another 1978 Z1R) is my matching numbers 1978 Kawasaki Z1R with 9,300 original miles in pristine restored condition. This was a full nut and bolt, frame-off restoration with no expense spared, with over $20,000 in parts, labor, and paint refinishing.

The engine was completely disassembled and bead-blasted, then rebuilt to factory specifications with new: pistons, rings, camshafts, cam chain and adjuster, transmission undercut, multi-angle valve job, bearings, seals, carburetors were rebuilt and synchronized, all the hardware new old stock "NOS" or re-plated/zinced/re-chromed.

The frame was bead-blasted, treated, and powder-coated in a matching "OEM" black finish. The forks and brake calipers/master cylinders were completely rebuilt. The wheels were bead-blasted and powder-coated back to "OEM" standards with new tires, "NOS" cables, and wiring harness.

The bodywork was meticulously refinished using the "OEM" paint code and looks like it did when it sat on the Kawasaki showroom floor. The tank and side cover emblems are new old stock "NOS." The original Kawasaki 4-into-1 Z1R exhaust has been replaced with a very similar late 70s triple-chromed 4-into-1 exhaust that looks stock but sounds better. 

Every single part, nut, and bolt has either been replaced with new, rebuilt, or refinished to the highest "OCD" restoration standard. She looks, starts, and runs just like she did in 1978. Please don't hesitate to call or text me with any questions or concerns: 954-816-0806 Bob.

This immaculate, show-winning Z1R is worthy of any motorcycle museum, and will be your pride and joy, sitting in your private collection.

Don't miss out. Tell your wife these bikes are appreciating 15% or more each year and you can get it in time for Christmas.

Happy Holidays and Merry Christmas!

Honestly, I haven't crunched the numbers, but I'd bet he's right about that rate of appreciation: the values of 1970s superbikes have been steadily climbing for years now, and with plenty of folks who owned these when they were new looking to relive a lost youth, I don't see that changing anytime soon. Plus, if you do need to sell the significant other on your intended purchase, keep in mind that long, flat 1970s seat should make it a viable date-night ride, compared to a more modern sportbike!

-tad

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R for Sale