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Posts by tag: SFC

Laverda August 10, 2018 posted by

Blue-Chip Classic Friday: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale

Back in the 1960s and 1970s you could buy race cars and race bikes that were basically road-legal, vehicles you could actually drive or ride to the track and reasonably expect to be competitive with pretty minimal changes. Of course, those days are long gone: race machines often share very few components with their road-going counterparts and frequently bear little resemblance to any sort production vehicles whatsoever. But today's Laverda 750 SFC was a machine from the tail end of that earlier era and was very much a race bike with some lights and signals slapped on to make it vaguely road-worthy.

I mean, just take a look at that taillight: was it thoughtfully integrated into a specially-designed cut-out? Nope, it was literally bolted to the sloped rear face of a solo tail section that was obviously designed with a number-plate in mind. The instruments are basically just a tach, ignition barrel, and indicator light bolted to the inside of the fairing: this thing is the epitome of crude, at least in terms of creature-comforts and finish. Speedo? Who cares? Just figure out what revs approximate which highway speeds in top gear and assume you could just outrun cops of the period anyway.

But forget refinement: the mechanicals are where it's at, and the bike has those in spades. Early models used a huge alloy drum brake, and later machines like this one a pair of discs, giving the bike it's name: "Super Freni Competizione" or basically "Super Braking Racebike." Laverda used the very best components available everywhere they could, and the basic parallel-twin was overbuilt and very durable, making it ideal for endurance racing.

Ceriani forks, Bosch ignition, and Nippon-Denso electrical components, and that 744cc parallel twin with five main bearings, backed up by a five speed gearbox that put the bike's claimed 75hp to the rear wheel. This example isn't some museum-piece and the seller mentions it's done quite a bit of track time. How much? Who knows: like many SFCs, this one lacks a speedometer, and therefore an odometer. The tach looks non-standard, although I've seen several different types fitted to the original bikes. It's hard to tell from the pic, but maybe it's a Scitsu unit?

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale

Am 76 and it's time to let go of my collection. Started collecting about 50 years ago and the main objective was to buy one owner high end cars and motorcycles for pleasure and investment. I won't bore you repeating the history of the 750 SFC Laverdas - If you are reading this you already know of the Laverda 750 SFC's iconic competition accomplishments, background and rarity. Hand built by a small number of employees, there were only 100 of these limited production Laverda 750 SFC competition motorcycles manufactured in 1974. Recently brought out of storage, it is an authentic two owner (I am the 2nd owner) matching numbers factory original survivor. I purchased it from the gentleman who bought it new at a dealership in Florida. He raced it on every motorcycle race track East of the Mississippi up until around 1984, when he found out he had terminal cancer and put the bike in storage. He did not want to sell it but had to liquidate his holdings. It is a beautiful piece of art. The engine had a complete overhaul from a company called Megacycle in California after it's last race and is in fresh like new original condition. Runs perfectly. What a sound. An exhilerating deep throbbing sound that can only come from a Laverda 750 SFC. It has been cleaned and the brakes rebuilt. It is in it's original racing condition complete with period stickers, as it came off the last track. The engine mount tab is indeed stamped "SFC" from the factory. My collection included many motorcycles but I kept this one for the last and had no intention of ever selling it - but to be realistic it needs to move along to another caretaker. I have framed photos of it being raced at different tracks and the original 1974 owners manual. Please read the complete description so you will understand all conditions and any issues. THERE IS NO TITLE - Sold on a Georgia bill of sale and Georgia Sheriffs Department inspection certificate. I will answer all email questions and consider offers.

Just 549 total were built between 1971 and 1975. So the Buy It Now for this race-bred classic? A mere... $195,000?! Well, maybe that's a mistake. I mean, it is eBay after all. So the starting bid is... $150,000?! Wow, I guess he is serious. Well I'll be curious to see if anyone bites. Seems like a major auction might be a better bet for something like this, but who knows? Certainly the SFC is one of the most valuable and collectible bikes of the era, and prices are certainly headed in that direction.

-tad

 

Blue-Chip Classic Friday: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale
Laverda March 10, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC

The 1974 Laverda SFC is the high-water mark for 1970s Italian sportbikes, representing the pinnacle of Laverda's race bike development and the final SFC offered in the states, as the US mandated left-side shift after September of '74.

The Laverda's big parallel twin made about 75 horsepower, heady grunt for an era where 100 ponies was still the stratosphere. Changes between '73 and '74 included new 36mm carbs and a dual-disk front brake setup.

Quite apart from the power, the Laverda was incredibly scarce, light suave. It is the antithesis of the Japanese race replicas, where weight and power hold sway over aesthetics.

This SFC has been updated tastefully and restored, and presents in near-showroom condition. Moto Borgotaro has a reputation for bringing the finest quality machines to market, and this SFC is no exception. The iconic orange paint, delicate and beautiful aluminum tank and signature bullet fairing are all without blemishes and the running gear is free of spots, stains or drips.

From the seller:

THIS BIKE'S STORY

—By Ian Falloon (Falloon Report October 2014)

Although it was always a limited edition, even after 1973 when the factory stopped racing the 750 twin, the SFC continued, incorporating many of the developments learnt from three successful years of racing.

The 750 SFC was thus a true racing machine, built to the highest standards, that could be ridden on the street and a limited edition replica of a factory racer.

Racing experience during 1973 saw the development of a new frame and this made its way to the 750 SFC in 1974, further distancing this model from the production 750 SF2

Representative of the second US specification batch (with numbers between 17110-17166), we introduce you to #17148.
One of the most significant updates for 1974 was the pair of Dell’Orto PHB 36 carburetors, without accelerator pumps. A racing two-into-one megaphone (as on this example) accentuated the lean race replica profile, and the claimed power for the 1974 750 SFC was 75 horsepower at 7,500 rpm.

A two-into-one reverse cone exhaust system was an option on the 750 SFC. This exhaust system only fits the SFC frame.

1974 LAVERDA SFC DETAILS
Frame #17148
Engine #17148
Dell’Orto PHB 36mm carburetors
Borrani aluminum wheel rims
Ceriani suspension
Electron rear hub and sprocket carrier
High quality aluminum replica gas tank
Nippon Denso instruments
Smaller European taillight
Verlicchi twin cable throttle
Completely serviced

www.motoborgotaro.com

Visit Moto Borgotaro's site for details on how to inquire about this fantastic piece of race replica history.

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC
Laverda February 14, 2017 posted by

Love, Italian Style: 1985 Laverda RGS1000 SFC for Sale

Considering I can comb eBay for months on end and not see a single Laverda for sale, it's crazy that we've seen not just one but three worthy examples representing a couple different eras recently. From the 1990s Formula that might be more familiar to our readers, to the more vintage 1984 Jota and today's Laverda SFC1000, fans of the Breganze Bruisers have been spoiled for choice of late. The RGS1000 SFC was a bit of a last gasp for the original Laverdas before their death and subsequent resurrection during the Zane-era, a technological dinosaur that had been continually updated since the early 1970s to keep up with the ever increasing pace of sportbike development. Laverda knew they were falling behind the curve, as were all of the European brands, and they recast themselves as purveyors of elegant sportbike alternatives for distinguished gentlemen to help justify high prices, outdated technology, and "classic" styling. And even though the RGS wasn't a sportbike in the high-revving, light-weight idiom, it was still a blood-and-thunder brute with high-quality suspension, stability, and very real road-going performance.

Certainly, the "SFC" name of this very exclusive RGS variant was a bit of a cheat: produced in very limited quantities, the original SFC was based around Laverda's parallel-twin and was a barely-disguised racebike with lights stuck onto it to make it "street-legal" in the loosest sense of the phrase. Obviously, laws regarding that kind of thing were much simpler back then... SFC was an acronym for “Super Freni Competizione” which translates to “super braking competition”  and referred to the huge aluminum drum brake found on the original bikes. Later machines used a pair of discs as seen here, which provided less sexy but more reliable stopping power.

The engine was Laverda's long-serving and very charismatic three-cylinder 981cc engine, here with a 120° crankshaft that made for smoother running, along with high-performance cams and other assorted go-fast bits to raise the power from 85 to 95hp. Early examples of the Jota, Laverda's original, hairy-chested three-cylinder sportbike, used a 180° crankshaft that basically ran like a four-cylinder with a miss. It was good for power, but vibrated excessively and was eventually replaced with a smoother-running 120° crank. Even though the revised crank is considered a bit of an abomination by some Laverda purists, condemned of the sin of being "too civilized," if you've ever heard one of the 120° bikes, "civilized" isn't the first thing that springs to mind... It's raw and very Italian, and sounds like a Stradivarius violin crossed with a chainsaw being used to cut down a tree made of silk, dark chocolate, and truffles, or some other equally ludicrous simile. Basically, if you're expecting the soft whir and refined yowl of a modern Triumph triple, you'll be sexually aroused, pleasantly surprised, or horrified, depending on your feelings about earplugs.

So even though this was intended as a high-performance motorcycle, it was a bit behind the times when it was new. But if calling this an "SFC" is technically a bit of a stretch and merely a calculated dip into past glories to paint a moribund package a brighter shade of orange, this is still a very special motorcycle, as can be seen from the description below.

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Laverda RGS1000 SFC for Sale

This unique SFC 1000 – one of a tiny number made – is in great original shape. It is a perfect runner receiving all it needs in the past four years to operate as new. The serial number shown is correct...0001.  Here's the story behind it:

This bike was built for Alexander Claren, a Cologne architect who designed Ewe Witt’s dealership (the German importer of Laverdas).  Claren saw the prototype bike at the Cologne motorcycle show and had to have one. He persuaded Witt to order one – requesting number 0001 - from the factory for immediate delivery and thus it was built ahead of the production line. The first production bike was number 1001, following Laverda’s usual numbering protocol. There are a series of letters from Piero Laverda in the file that accompanies the bike confirming the numbering.

SFC 1000 production ran alongside the RGS, RGS Corsa and various RGAs from 1985 through 1989 but few were made. SFC 1000 specifications changed only in detail as tiny batches of bikes were constructed. The most important visual differences were the color – red or black – and the wheels – three-spoke Oscam cast wheels or Akront wire spoke rims. The engine in all SFC's starting with this bike was to Corsa specification – that is 95bhp at 8000rpm - 5-speed, Marzocchi forks and rear shocks, Brembo Gold Line brakes, and either Smiths or Veglia instruments. All top quality components.

Two additional sets of factory exhausts and silencers come with the bike.  These are: a set of three into two in chrome (some SFC's had black, some had chrome) and a rare set of three into one.  The ignition currently on the bike is a modern Sachse electronic with selectable advance curves, but the factory original unit also comes with the bike. Note:  mileage shown is in km.

These bikes are rare. Don't miss an opportunity to own this one.

They were making these things, or titling them anyway, as late as 1988 by which point this machine would have been horribly outclassed by the latest generation of four-cylinder sportbikes from Japan. But while that might have mattered when the bike was new, it's pretty irrelevant now: it has classic looks you'd never confuse with a GSX-R or ZX or FZR or even FJ that would have mopped the floor with the RGS. And the bike's lardy 500lb dry weight was motivated by a stout 95hp so it's not exactly slow, even now.

So what's it worth? Well not much, unless you're an aficionado, so the $14,500 starting bid might seem outrageous if this is your first time clapping eyes on an SFC1000. But if you're a Laverda fan, that seems like a very reasonable place to start, considering what other rare Laverdas like the original Jota and even the standard RGS are going for these days.

-tad

Love, Italian Style: 1985 Laverda RGS1000 SFC for Sale
Laverda November 3, 2016 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC for Sale

eBay shows sold for $52,500. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

1974-laverda-sfc-l-side

Today's featured listing is a bit older than the bikes we usually feature on this site, but you can't argue that a Laverda SFC is both very rare and a sportbike. It was a machine from the era where you could pull your mirrors and turn-signals off, assuming the bike had them to begin with, drive to the track, and race. In fact, many SFCs sell with the roadgoing bits still in a box... The SFC, which stood for "Super Freni Competizione" or basically "Super Brakes Competition" and was the homologation version of Laverda's 750cc parallel twin powered SF roadbike. The earliest bikes used a huge drum front brake, while later examples like this 1974 model used a pair of discs up front to provide the super stopping promised by the name. All of the SFCs had that funky, tacked-on taillight that looks like it's best viewed from the air and the solo tail-section ready and waiting for a white numberplate.

1974 Laverda SFC for sale on eBay

1974-laverda-sfc-r-side-front

Far more heavily-constructed than British twins of the period, Laverda's engine featured five main bearings and, although the resulting bike was a bit on the heavy side, the SF and SFC machines did well in endurance racing. Reliability was helped by Laverda's insistence on using the very best parts from a variety of manufacturers: Ceriani forks, Bosch ignition, and Nippon-Denso electrical components meant that, although the Laverdas were expensive, they were quality machines.

1974-laverda-sfc-tank

The bike was electric-start only, with a right-foot shift for the five-speed gearbox. Compared to the regular SF, the SFC engine featured an updated frame, suspension, and significant internal revisions, tuned and dyno'd at the factory for a claimed 75hp. That power peaked at 7,500rpm which is, you'll note, at the top of the red band on the suspiciously Honda-looking tach, so I guess you just keep the needle in the red for best results?

1974-laverda-sfc-clocks

Just 549 were built between 1971 and 1975, and this example looks to be in beautiful condition, with just a few tiny modern touches like the stainless-steel braided brake lines and an electronic ignition, both of which should add a bit of modern safety and reliability and are certainly in the spirit of the bike.

From the seller: 1974 Laverda SFC for Sale

1974 Laverda SFC comes set up with steel tank, and includes original fiberglass tank in excellent condition. 18,171 miles, ready to ride and collect. This is an excellent rider, set up correctly with DMC ignition. Considered by many, including myself to be the ultimate '70's Italian sport bike.

Paint details: restored perfect condition paint
Frame: Excellent, restored condition
Wheels: Restored - excellent
Electrical details: Everything in correct working order, set up with DMC electronic ignition
Riding: Smooth. Fast. Violent endless power in every gear.

Disclaimer: Every single bike I buy and sell, I personally go through—-not someone else, I am the owner operator of my small business, and I take what I do very seriously. I work on the bikes, I ride the bikes. I have been working on this lovely Italian crap for a long time, I know the differences between the bikes, how they should work, the history etc.. If you are serious about buying true collector piece from someone who not only has a passion for these bikes, but works on them, rides them, collects them – then call me. Jokingly people say to me, “these bikes don’t seem so rare as there are so many in your shop” well….. I consider myself a custodian for these machines, they should go to people who will love, and appreciate them..

Other details:
Excellent restored condition with receipts
Steel tank
Original fiberglass tank included with sale
18,171 miles
all receipts
original shocks included with sale
On SFC registry

1974-laverda-sfc-engine

The seller includes a couple of clips of the bike starting and being ridden and two things are abundantly clear: first of all, Brooklyn is a pretty lousy place to enjoy a 70s Italian race bike and second, a Laverda twin sounds very different than a parallel twin from Norton or Triumph.

The auction ends on Sunday and the current bid is $32,300 with reserve met.

The bike is being sold by Moto Borgotaro, a well-known shop that specializes in European bikes of the era. Seriously: check out the "For Sale" section of their site to see the kind of machines that have passed through on the way to finding new owners.

-tad

1974-laverda-sfc-r-side

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC for Sale
Laverda November 17, 2014 posted by

Tangerine Dream: 1975 Laverda SFC for Sale

1975 Laverda SFC R Side

This Laverda SFC is bit of a throwback to another era, when you really could buy a motorcycle, ride it to the track, rip off the lights, and actually compete at the professional level. Sure, there are classes today that require bikes to be largely stock, but this Laverda is really more like the equivalent of a World SuperBike machine. With a headlight.

1975 Laverda SFC L Side Tailsection2

It’s just too bad that Laverda name-owners Piaggio don’t have room in their lineup for a revived Laverda. Their modern sporting range is taken up by Aprilia and their retro-sport line is all Guzzi, but I could see Laverda as a sort of Italian alternative to Triumph: practical, real-world sportbikes and standards with only a dash of nostalgia. It almost worked when they revived Laverda in the 1990’s. Unlike many of the other recent stabs at brand-revivification, the Zane-era bikes were actually affordable, and they still make for a pretty cool Ducati alternative. Down a bit on outright power, but with superlative handling.

1975 Laverda SFC Dash

Of course, you’ll get a lot of, “Laverda, who makes that?” at your local bike-night. But that’s okay. My personal experience is that only the very best kind of people know Laverda. I have a battered old Laverda t-shirt and it attracts attention everywhere I go. Random strangers approach me in restaurants, in the checkout line at the grocery store, even at IKEA to ask me about it.

So Laverda is gone, but not forgotten, and this 1975 SFC really helps to explain the love people have for the orange bikes from Breganze, Italy.

1975 Laverda SFC R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1975 Laverda SFC 750 “Elettronico” for Sale

VIN 18300 Engine 18300

This is "the real thing", numbers on the register and it is the rariest and most desiderable model of the serie, the "Elettronico" of 1975. On top of this it has a works race history being raced by Giuseppe Uberti Foppa (works Laverda rider listed also in the SFC register book) at the 500kms of Monza in 1975, with certification signed by him.

The bike was restored in the Factory in the early 80's and kept as a jewel since, totally original genuine parts, even the fiberglass body, throttle, all small bits, no repro's or nos.

Bike is "on the button" with even new tyres, showroom conditions. The best i have seen in the last 20 years! Bulletproof investment. Bike is currently located in Italy, 33080 Roveredo in Piano (Pordenone) but i can get them delivered all around the World at cost, no problem. We can supply US contact as reference.

Built between 1971 and 1976, the SFC or “Super Freni Competizione” was an homologation-special with an engine full of race-spec parts that pushed power to 80hp and road-legal lights and signals tacked on as a nod to streetability. Many SFC’s show up for sale with those parts packed away safely in a cardboard box…

1975 Laverda SFC R Grip

Not especially light, but very stable, the Laverda parallel twins were renowned for their durability. The 750cc engine featured five main bearings and parts not built by Laverda were sourced, regardless of origin, for their quality: Ceriani suspension, Bosch ignition, and Nippon-Denso electrics.

Only 549 were ever produced, making this one rare and very desirable machine, and the signature on the tail section and pristine condition only make it more so.

-tad

1975 Laverda SFC L Side

Tangerine Dream: 1975 Laverda SFC for Sale
Laverda June 21, 2014 posted by

Out With an (Orange) Bang:1988 Laverda SFC1000

Unable to compete with the ruthless, technological march of the Japanese manufacturers, Laverda’s SFC 1000 was an attempt to capitalize on their past endurance racing glories, a last gasp before they went under, prior to their relatively brief resurrection in the 1990’s. To be honest, I didn’t even realize that Laverda was still making bikes in 1988, so I’d imagine this was bike was built 1985 and sat untitled for a couple years.

1988 Laverda SFC 1000 L Side

1988 Laverda SFC1000 for sale on eBay

SFC originally stood for “Super Freni Competizione”, basically “super braking competition” a reference to the huge drum brake on the front of the very first SFC twins, later replaced by a pair of discs. Powered by a 750cc parallel-twin , the original SFC was produced in very limited numbers, the epitome of a “racer for the road” and many were quickly stripped of their street-legal lighting for track duty. This was probably for the best: the SFC was fast and very brutal, and probably didn’t make a good road tool for casual riders.

Not so with the SFC 1000, which was basically a renamed and slightly restyled version of the “executive express” RGS, the SFC1000 was a far more street-oriented bike built around Laverda’s charismatic three-cylinder engine. Earlier triples had a 180° configuration that ran like a four-cylinder with a miss, but later examples like this one used a smoother 120° engine that lost some character but was much more user-friendly.

1988 Laverda SFC 1000 Engine

And while the big triple had evolved into a more conservative machine in terms of its mission, don’t think it couldn’t hustle: on track, you could lean these over enough to grind the generator cover into dust.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Laverda SFC1000 for Sale

Very clean, with upgrades–all easily reversible to full factory-original, if desired.
Imported by me from New Zealand in 2010.
Never dropped, raced, or mistreated.

I am the second owner since new.

New coils, wires, plugs, timing chain, electronic ignition, custom slanted intake manifolds, Mikuni carbs, lubricants, bar-end mirrors, battery, throttle cables, grips, windshield, air filters, tune-up, rear brake caliper rebuild, sprockets, X-ring D.I.D. chain.

Valves meticulously adjusted.
Custom Mikunis by Mike Nixon.
Custom manifolds by Red Cawte.

1988 Laverda SFC 1000 Dash

They may have been obsolete at the time they were sold new, but these Laverdas actually represent an opportunity to buy what amounts to a classic bike at the pinnacle of its development: in 1988, this may have looked like a dinosaur, but today it just screams “useable classic”!

Which might explain why this particular bike featured over on our sister site not too long ago: Classic Sport Bikes for Sale 1988 Laverda SFC1000.

1988 Laverda SFC 1000 Rear Suspension

Overall, this example looks to be in excellent, very orange condition. One caveat: the bike was originally imported from New Zealand, so make sure that you check with your local DMV to make sure there won’t be any issues with registration before you park this in your garage. Or living room.

-tad

1988 Laverda SFC 1000 Engine2

Out With an (Orange) Bang:1988 Laverda SFC1000




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