Posts by tag: Replica

Bimota August 25, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Bimota HB1 Clone for Sale

Today’s Featured Listing Bimota HB1 is a bit older than we generally list on this site and isn’t technically the real thing: it’s a lovingly-crafted replica. Considering Bimota only made a handful of the original HB1s, that’s pretty much the best way to get your hands on one anyway… And while Bimota has been has struggled to find financial success and has been in-and-out of bankruptcy, there’s no questioning their racing pedigree and commitment to the sportbike art, so it seems fitting to showcase this machine here on our site.

Fans of RSBFS might be most familiar with their recent offerings that seem to offer up more bling and exclusivity than outright performance, but the decline of Bimota is more about the major manufacturers catching up to Bimota than any real failure in terms of concept or design. Bimota’s beginning was pretty unlikely, since the company was originally founded to manufacture heating and air-conditioning systems, But it’s hard to imagine that founders Valerio BIanchi, Giuseppe MOrri, and Massimo TAmburini didn’t at least have motorcycles in the back of their mind. Especially since the original HB1 prototype was built around the remains of a Honda CB750 crashed by Mr. Tamburini.

The reliable, powerful CB750 engine suited Bimota’s mission to a “T”: in the early 1970s, the Japanese manufacturers had definitely sorted their engines and were selling like hotcakes, but handling sometimes bordered on lethal, owing to frames with the approximate stiffness of al dente pasta. Instead of trying to build an entire motorcycle from scratch, Bimota simply took those powerful, reliable engines and fitted them with very few updates to lightweight, stiff frames and wrapped them in sleek, aerodynamic bodywork. They were fast, uncompromising, and very expensive.

Only ten original HB1s were ever made, although the HB2 that followed was nearly mass-produced, with 200 built. It may not be original, but this recreation, or replica, or tribute, or whatever you choose to call it was clearly a labor of love.

From the Seller: 1975 Bimota HB1 Clone for Sale

1 of 1 and only one in USA

Photography by Ryan Handt  Ryan Handt

Completed Sept 27, 2016

Lots detail on my Instagram

Bimota HB1 (Honda – Bimota 1) CB750 Clone

Bimota’s first Japanese / Italian hybrid

HB1 custom frame by Framecrafters

Carbon fiber tank, Seat fender and front fender

Over 50 custom designed parts all hand made

This is a true Stressed-member frame.

Photo below is of 1 of only 10 original Bimota HB1 750 ever built from BX-1 kit.

It appears there may only be 4 in existence and this clone.

Specifications:

Engine:

  • Engine 1974 Honda CB750K4 100% Rebuilt
  • Engine detailed by Rob
  • Megacycle Cam
  • K&N Air Filter
  • Custom Oil Pressure Gauge by Rob
  • Custom oil tank by Ian Halcott Twinline Motorcycles
  • Custom oil lines with custom CNC engine adaptors by Rob
  • Dynatek Electronic Ignition
  • 4X4 Custom Mandrel bent exhaust with hand bent megaphone silencers, Magni Style
  • Custom CNC exhaust hangers by Rob
  • Titanium and Stainless Steel fasteners

Frame:

  • Custom HB1 stressed-member frame by FrameCrafters.net, CNC frame parts by Rob
  • HB1 Carbon Fiber tank
  • Ducati petcocks
  • Carbon Fiber seat with leather upholstery and tail glove compartment
  • Carbon Fiber front fender
  • Paint and decals as original
  • Custom front and rear axles
  • Original type custom CNC eccentric chain adjuster by Rob
  • Custom axle spacer by Rob
  • Custom CNC brake disc spacers by Rob

Suspension+

  • Marzocchi shocks
  • Brembo front calipers
  • Caliper mounts designed and CNC by Rob
  • Dual front disc brakes with modified hub by Rob
  • Drilled rotors by Rob
  • Brembo caliper- rear disc brakes
  • Brembo rear master cylinder
  • Brembo master cylinder mount by Rob
  • New CB750 Front brake master cylinder
  • Custom made brake lines front and rear by Hel Performance
  • Fully tuneable Ceriani GP35R forks. Compression, rebound and preload adjustable
  • Custom adjustable offset triple tree, 45mm +/- 2.5mm or +/- 5mm by Rob
  • Tommaselli clip-ons
  • Tarozzi rear sets
  • Custom shift and brake rods by Rob
  • Excel aluminum shoulder rim
  • Stainless Steel spokes by Buchanan
  • Bridgestone BT45 tires
  • Road race grips
  • Electrical
  • MotoGadget M-Unit  with Custom wiring
  • Micro Processor operated supervised circuits
  • Hazard warning lights
  • Internal fusing with current monitoring with automatic circuit shut down
  • Semiconductor switching
  • Automatic turn signal shut-off
  • Programmable flasher Digital brake light modulator with flashing sequence
  • Integrated Starter relay Automatic headlight turn off during starter routine
  • Integrated horn relay
  • Integrated alarm system
  • LED circuit indicators for active circuits
  • Ceriani headlight mount with integrated led turn signals
  • Custom Front LED turn signals  by Rob
  • Classic tail light housing with LED lighting and signals
  • Original CB750 headlight with Halogen Tri-Bar lamp
  • Original CB750 handle bar controls
  • Original CB750 tachometer with custom Bimota HB1 dial by Rob
  • Dakota Digital speedometer
  • Custom dashboard and indicators by Rob
  • Anti-Gravity lithium battery
  • Custom CNC battery/solenoid tray by Rob
  • Solid State regulator/rectifier integrated into custom CNC starter cover

The seller also provided links to a few articles that feature the bike here and here that are definitely worth a look as well. It may not be the real thing, but this kind of detailed recreation is alright by me, considering the passion and craftsmanship that are clearly in evidence. Keep in mind that the original Bimotas were basically kit-bikes, especially in their earliest days, and probably into the 1980s and 1990s as well... so this painstaking Bimota HB1 tribute is  probably better-built and much better-finished than the original, and a modern electrical system means it will surely be more reliable. What price perfection? Well the seller is asking $33,000 for this stunning HB1 replica, which seems almost a bargain, considering the work and high-quality components that have gone into it.

Contact Rob with your interest by email: artrob1@optonline.net

-tad

Featured Listing: 1974 Bimota HB1 Clone for Sale
Derbi April 13, 2016 posted by

Catalonian – 2003 Derbi GPR50 Malossi

The sight of any Derbi will bring a twinkle to the eye of the Spanish nationals among you, but this very racy Malossi replica, with title, gets these folks thinking rather impractical thoughts.  An historic Spanish company, Derbi was founded in 1922 near Barcelona, and made bicycles until 1950, then moved into motorcycles.  Concentrating on the smaller bikes, they also raced, winning Grand Prix championships in the 50, 80 and 125cc categories.

20160413 2003 derbi gpr50 malossi left

2003 Derbi GPR50 Malossi for sale on eBay

20160413 2003 derbi gpr50 malossi right

Doing a very passable impression of a larger machine, the GPR50 does it with a single cylinder and just 9 hp.  The 50 cc's are fed by a 14mm Dell'Orto carburetor, and power is transferred by a 6-speed transmission.  Suspension is modern with 35mm upside-down forks and rear monoshock.  Brakes are single disks, 260mm front and 220mm rear.  Unlike most 50's the Malossi is rideable by a 170 lb. adult, helped by the 17 inch wheels.  The full bodywork has a biposto seat and great graphics package.

20160413 2003 derbi gpr50 malossi front

This GPR50 looks super in red with checkerboard and shows just about 600 miles.  The owner is a collector and seems very knowledgeable - from the eBay auction:

You are bidding on a rare Derbi GPR 50 Malossi Replica with only 592 miles on the odometer. The Derbi 50 GPR 50 was a joint effort between Cagiva and Derbi with Cagiva designing the frame and Derbi providing the high revving two stroke engine.

Below is a list of key aspects of the Derbi GPR 50:

1) It has a clear Colorado title with all the original paperwork. The Derbi is located in Denver, CO.

2) I purchased the motorcycle from the original owner to add to my collection. Unfortunately, I have unexpectedly bought two additional motorcycles and I am now out of room and one motorcycle has to go and the Derbi drew the short straw.

2) The Derbi literally looks like it just came from the dealer's show room floor. It has always been properly stored in a heated garage its entire existence and maintenance has been performed based on time and not mileage. The battery is always on a trickle charger and is in perfect working condition.

3) The Derbi runs perfectly and absolutely everything works.

4) The original owner put two very small scratches on the bottom of the lower fairing as he was unloading the motorcycle from his truck. The scratches are covered up by a decal.

5) Despite its small 50cc two stroke engine, the 6 speed transmission will easily propel the Derbi to well over 60 MPH.

20160413 2003 derbi gpr50 malossi dash

Named for Malossi S.P.A., which makes racing and tuning parts for small bikes and scooters, the GPR  could be fitted out with engine and suspension to keep up with traffic on the freeway rather than just around town, with the known risk of shortening the life span.  Derbi survives today, having been purchased by Piaggio in 2001, and their line of smaller bikes now includes enduro and hypermotard bikes.  Since none are available here, the Derbi will continue to be a specialty, in this case an almost perfect and street legal rarity...

-donn

20160413 2003 derbi gpr50 malossi cockpit

Catalonian – 2003 Derbi GPR50 Malossi
Ducati March 29, 2015 posted by

Feeling Foggy are ya? – 1999 Ducati 996S

1999 Ducati 996S Foggy Rep on eBay

996S_rightside

I'm going to level with you RSBFS readers... this one breaks my heart.  You see, it was for sale a mere 10 miles from me for just $4,500!  After 4 hours of text begging with the wife, I finally convinced her that this bike was a sound investment and we should take money out of savings so I could buy it.  I called and the guy said "Sorry, sold it 10 minutes ago."  My dream was crushed.  I have a feeling that I'll be crying myself to sleep when it finally sells.

OK, on to the bike itself!  The Ducati 996 was an evolutionary step forward from the legendary 916.  It retained all of the beautiful style of the original 916 but got a bump in power from an increase in displacement, two injectors per cylinder and a redesigned airbox.  This particular one has had some additional changes including the 5 spoke Marchesini wheels, Termi exhaust as well as an SPS carbon fiber airbox. 

996S_front

The seller has some maintenance information and details about the modifications that you can read that in the eBay listing here: 1999 Ducati 996S on eBay

The engine was rebuilt in 2002 under factory warranty (I have receipts for proof) by Gold Coast motorsports in New York at a cost of $5900.
At the time the bike has 10k miles. I do not know the maintenance history after this point. I cannot say if the bike was serviced or not after that point.
I can say the bike is clean, drips no oil, doesn't smoke and it runs fantastic. Obviously is sounds great with the Termi slip ons.

This one is badged #20 of around 200 996S's imported in 1999 ( the tailcone has a 996SPS Fogarty decal ). No shortage of confusion about the Fogarty "Foggy" replicas unfortunately, most information indicates that the 996 Foggy replicas were a UK-only deal ( to homologate the 996 engine ). Readily available replica decal kits didn't help matters. Perhaps a dealer-applied kit ? The U.S. received a Foggy tribute Monster in 2001.

996S_triple

Mike M. and Donn

Feeling Foggy are ya? – 1999 Ducati 996S
Yamaha December 31, 2014 posted by

Even Better Than the Real Thing? Yamaha YZR500 GP Replica

Update 12.31.2014: We first saw this GP replica in July when it failed to get any action with an opening bid of $26k. It's back on eBay now with a buy-it-now of $24,500. Happy New Year everyone! -dc

This Yamaha YZR500 GP Replica is the rarest of the rare, a one-of-a-kind opportunity to buy a one-of-a-kind motorcycle. Meant to recreate Yamaha’s iconic year 2000 OWK6 racing machine in the classic Marlboro livery, this bike may not be the original article, but is a hugely impressive machine in terms of the enthusiasm and money invested. Powered by a tuned 500cc V4 two-stroke engine and suspended by Yamaha R6 bits, with an authentic replica frame and bodywork, this might be the closest you’ll ever get to riding an actual GP machine.

2000 Yamaha YZR500 Replica L Front

I am no expert on these bikes, so I’d love to see the peanut gallery weigh in as to the accuracy of this replica. I’ve been next to full-on WSB and Moto GP motorcycles and it’s always interesting to me how they still basically look like motorcycles. Racing cars, especially Formula 1 machines, really look nothing like actual cars, aside from the four round rubber bits. But racing motorcycles? It’s the details that really impress, since they have the same basic silhouette as their road-going counterparts, but chock-full of amazing details.

2000 Yamaha YZR500 Replica L Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Yamaha YZR500 GP Replica for Sale

A replica of the legendary Yamaha YZR500 from year 2000. Based on a chassi handbuilt in aluminium by Mick Costin "Costin motorcycle enginering" Sydney Australia. An exact replica but made to accept the Yamaha RD500LC 2 stroke v4 engine. Also rear sets and suspension linkages comes from Mick. This one has a 1985 1GE engine rebuilt with new bearings, oil seals, clutch, pistons, and it is tuned "TSI mods" done by Orluff racing in sweden. 1 mm overbore. Samco silicon hoses for the modified Yamaha R6 radiator, Jim lomas custom made exhausts in stainless steel with carbon silencers. New Mikuni TM28 flatslide carburettors with new K&N Filters. The bike was run in a dyno bench in may 2014 and has 99 hp on the rear wheel. Forks, triple clamps, swingarm, rims and rear brakes comes from a 2006 Yamaha R6. Rear shock and front fender in carbon comes from a Yamaha TZ250, PVM radial front brake master cylinder, goodridge steel brake hoses to tociko 4 pot calipers. Galfer wave brake discs front and rear, new galfer brake pads, Fuel tank is a heavy modified unit from a VFR400 nc30 with a Pingel dual outlet fuel tap. Fairings are copys in glasfiber made by Motoforza from a 2000 YZR500 painted in Marlboro red. Standard RD 500 tacho and temp gauge, New Regina 520 chain and Afam alu sprockets, Only scrubbed in Michelin power supersport tires, The bike has only been ridden twice since it was built. I have many more pictures taken from building this bike that i will send to seriosly intrested buyer.

2000 Yamaha YZR500 Replica R Rear

I’m seriously impressed with the dedication and money that went into creating this motorcycle, but I’m not actually sure what you’d do with this thing after you buy it: it’s not the genuine article, so it’s a tough call for collectors, and it’s very, very pricey for a track day or vintage racing junky. On the plus side: you can actually ride it, without worrying you'll crash a priceless and historic racebike.

Or maybe, if you live in a more permissive state, it can, as the seller mentions, be registered for road use… How hilarious would that be? Suction cup a little projector-beam headlamp and a bicycle taillight, a pair of LED turn signals… I’d read recently that Britain actually has a special “track bike” MOT that allows limited use of track day bikes lacking the usually required road equipment to get to and from the racecourse during daylight hours.

2000 Yamaha YZR500 Replica R Side Engine

It’s certainly a very nice curiosity, and one I hope finds the right buyer. At $27,000 with the Reserve Not Met, that’s going to be a tall order. Please also note that the bike is currently in Sweden, if you didn't notice the non-USA license plates on the cars in the background of the photographs. Regardless, there’s very little time left on this auction, so move quickly if you want to get your hands on this one-of-a-kind motorcycle!

-tad

2000 Yamaha YZR500 Replica L Side

 

Even Better Than the Real Thing? Yamaha YZR500 GP Replica
Suzuki October 15, 2014 posted by

Kiwi Classic: 1983 Suzuki McIntosh Bathurst edition

bathurst1

Here is another bit of history for RareSportBike fans, a 1983 Suzuki McIntosh Bathurst Replica that needs a few pieces to be complete.

For those of you unfamiliar with these bikes, its important to remember that for a long time motorcycle racing allowed anyone to try their hand with whatever they could put together, sometimes with amazing results (John Britten and John Wittner are two examples of success). During this "wild-west" period a lot of racing was also held on street circuits, with the difference between success and significant injury being insanely narrow.

NOTE: Most motorcycle racing has moved away from street circuits to purpose built racetracks that are much safer and can accommodate more spectators.  A few street circuits are still in use such as the TT/Mountain Road course on the Isle of Mann and the Bathurst circuit in Australia, although Bathurst only runs cars currently.

bathurst5

1983 Suzuki McIntosh Bathurst project for sale on Ebay (AUS)

Back in 1982, New Zealand brothers Ken and Rodger Freeth had amazing racing success at Bathurst with a custom-framed Suzuki GS1000. Using their backyard-built machine, equipped with just a few spares and almost none of the equipment/resources of the bigger factory and privateer teams, they entered the Bathurst 500 motorcycle race and came away with the win.  Their success was repeated in 1985, proving that the Freeth brothers design wasn't a fluke.

bathurst4

Ken Freeth originally developed his triangular-styled chassis in the early ’80s because he found that while in-line four cylinder engines of that era were strong, the standard chassis the came with were holding them back in terms of handling. The first frames Freeth built were built for Kawasaki Z900 engines but he soon switched to using the Suzuki GSX engine. Freeth built approximately 40 McIntosh frames to suit the GSX engine which were then bundled into a Bathurst Replica package by a local dealer friend.

Ken’s ‘Bathurst replica’ streetbikes were on many people’s wish-lists but required a significant financial commitment since the cost of a Freeth Bathurst replica kit without an engine was almost equal to a standard/new GSX. Meanwhile the Japanese had started to introduce advanced aluminum chassis into their bikes and while the Freeth steel frames were lighter and offered more strength, the majority of buyers preferred buying a complete bike instead of one they had to build/"kit-up". And so, after two Bathurst wins and several New Zealand championships, the McIntosh Bathurst replica development effort was retired.

bathurst2

bathurst3

So what's this GSX Bathurst Replica worth? Well its definitely a rare sport bike with only 40-50 made and its definitely in good shape (take a look at the forks with the pristine anti-dive mounts!) The seller indicates it has been through a restoration but still needs a few things; it has a leaking fork seal, possibly a warped rotor, a non-standard exhaust, and installation/testing of a new wiring harness. Even with all these issues, bidding has been brisk. Current price at time of this post is almost 20,000 USD aleady without reserve being met.

Overall this is probably a bike for a collector who is somewhat mechanically inclined. It will probably be most appealing to someone from Australia or New Zealand who is familiar with bikes of the era.

-marty/dallaslavowner

Kiwi Classic:  1983 Suzuki McIntosh Bathurst edition
Kawasaki July 16, 2014 posted by

Sweet Ride, Man: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R-TC for Sale

Here's one I'd normally post up over at our sister site classicsportbikesforsale.com, but it's rare and it's a sportbike, so I thought this crowd could use a formal introduction to the Kawasaki Z1R-TC. If you’re one of those folks who equate “sportbikes” with “handling”, you may not be familiar with this hulking brute of a machine with a hand grenade for an engine and power to severely overwhelm the limited frame and suspension technology of the day. What's more exciting than that? I mean, Russian Roulette counts as a sport, right?

In the car world of the 1980’s, turbos seemed like the perfect way to increase power and performance in a world suddenly obsessed with efficiency and air quality, and they were getting slapped onto just about everything, so it was only a matter of time before the obsession with boost spilled over into the two-wheeled scene, and Kawasaki was way ahead of the curve on this particular trend.

1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC L Side

The TC was conceived as a quick way to move some lame-duck stock out of showrooms and give Kawasaki a performance feather in their cap. Collaborating with the Turbo Cycle Company, Kawasaki simply converted complete bikes with a bolt-on kit running 8-10psi of boost. Upgraded internals were available for purchase separately but were generally not installed.

In what would be an almost comical nightmare of liability today, buyers simply signed off on powertrain warranty waivers before whooshing off into the nearest wall, or blew themselves up when they ignored the sticker clearly warning them not to tamper with the wastegate to increase boost. Now who'd wanna do something like that?

1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC L Side Low

And even if you didn’t detonate your engine or wheelie into a tree, the very crude turbocharging technology led to wild, on/off boost delivery and made riding this a bit more terrifying than exciting: bendy 1970’s frame and suspension technology combined with an engine that was already plenty powerful before you stuck a honking big turbo on it to give you the worst of both worlds, and a challenge fit for the manliest of motorcyclists…

This particular machine is technically not one of the original bikes and is, according to the seller, a "tribute" built up from a regular Z1R. But honestly this probably feels pretty authentic, since the original bikes were mostly cobbled-together from completed stock bikes.

1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC Dash

I really do wish these people would roll their bikes out of the garage to take some of these pictures, though. It will probably help if you imagine Matthew McConaughey reading this out loud as his character from Dazed and Confused.

From the original eBay listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R-TC for Sale

Truly awesome looking Z1R turbo with custom Molly graphics and recently painted black bodywork updates,powdercoated frame, many chrome parts on engine,kickstand,etc...very nice Z1R mag wheels,1 of a kind custom seat,early ATP turbo kit with log header pipe + "F" flow high volume compressor complimenting the 1200cc big bore motor  This is not a bike for the timid or in-experienced pilot....even with only 8-10 lbs. boost ,its very VERY fast!(of course you can ride it all day long without getting on boost,its all in your right wrist you know) This is a one of a kind bike with many tasteful updates + cool improvements...tires are in great shape..bike is very stable at high speed with  front steering dampner,fork brace and fully adjustable Marzocchi rear shocks keeping things under control...

Look, let's be clear here: I'm sure those rear shocks are an improvement, but there's no way they actually tamed this beast. You think you're all slick, using trail-braking out there, or using a bit of rear brake to settle the suspension? Try this for some fancy footwork: the power delivery for the TC was so laggy that fast passing on the road called for you to hold the throttle open to keep boost up, while dragging the brakes to keep the speed under control, waiting for an opening in traffic. Sort of like a rolling drag-strip launch...

1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC R Side Front

An exciting, hugely flawed stopgap before the much more modern GPz that followed, the Z1R-TC and the other turbo bikes of the era were an interesting footnote in motorcycling history. While not necessarily all that fast on a winding road, these are massively entertaining on the boost and could be a fun, point-and-hang-on-for-dear-life machine for scaring unsuspecting riders of modern bikes.

Ultimately, the turbo craze was a dead-end for motorcycles: they significantly increased complexity with no real upside: their power delivery was not really suitable bikes of the period and, in most cases, a simple displacement boost proved to be a more effective, reliable way of increasing performance. But whatever, man. Maybe people were just too square to get it.

-tad

1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC R Side

Sweet Ride, Man: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R-TC for Sale