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Posts by tag: radial valves

Featured Listing July 27, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna #172/300 for Sale

7.25.2018: Josh has decided to upgrade this post to a Featured Listing. New asking price is $15k and interested parties can contact him here: jahshua@me.com

As much as I love the MV Agusta F4 750 in the classic red-and-silver colors, it's nice to know that it also looks pretty good in basic black-and-grey. Or flat-black. Or silver-and-blue, or... Reportedly, the design for the MV Agusta F4 was originally intended by Massimo Tamburini as the replacement for the venerable Ducati 916. And I'm sure in retrospect, Ducati very much wishes it had worked out that way, considering the reactions to their Pierre Terblanche-penned 999...

When it was introduced, I was a little disappointed that the new MV was powered by an inline four, instead of a v-twin. But the F4's radial-valved engine has a much more exotic quality than other four-cylinder engines: they sound sort of generically inline-y as they go by, but the pilot is treated to a much more complex noise. Or maybe I'm just infatuated.

In any event, this particular F4 is powered by the earlier, 749cc version of the engine. A claimed 126hp meant the MV was making the right power to compete in the 750cc class, but there were really two problems. One, it was also a bit heavier than other bikes in the class. And two, interest in the 750 class basically evaporated right as the F4 was introduced. Sure, Suzuki still made a GSX-R750, but it lived in the shadow of the new superbike king, the GSX-R1000. And the F4 750 couldn't hope to compete against performance like that.

F4s show up regularly for sale with incredibly low miles, which reinforces the bike's reputation for a punishing riding position. It also points out that they get bought as display items more than actual bikes. Which is sad, because they're pretty great, rewarding sportbikes. If you're expecting this to flatten your eyeballs, you will be very disappointed, and the F4 is hard, and uncomfortable, and very serious. Handling is more stable than agile, but the potential is there for a seriously rapid bike, if you're willing to deal with the uncompromising ergos and bit of extra weight.

From the original eBay listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna #172/300

The MV Agusta F4 was the motorcycle that launched the resurrection of MV Agusta in 1998. The F4 model was created by motorcycle designer Massimo Tamburini at CRC (Cagiva Research Center), following his work on the Ducati 916. 

The F4 series bikes have a four pipe undertail exhaust, single-sided swingarm, large front forks (50 mm diameter) and traditional MV Agusta red and silver livery on the F4 Series Oro. The F4 model is also one of the few production superbikes to have hemispherical chamber 4 valves per cylinder engine.

After meeting and becoming friends, Formula One Racing Legend, Ayrton Senna and MV Agusta President, Claudio Castiglioni began a close collaboration. Borne of a mutual passion for speed, performance, and the painstaking quest for excellence, their friendship continued to grow. 

Today this spirit continues, embodied in the form of a very special motorcycle, the MV Agusta SPR SENNA. Based upon the SPR’s increased performance and capability, the SENNA edition is further distinguished by its limited production (only 50 imported into the USA) and exclusive black color, distinctive red accents, and SENNA graphics.

The SENNA was produced in a limited worldwide quantity of 300 units worldwide, with proceeds benefiting the SENNA Foundation. 

The SENNA Foundation was created to assist in improving the lives of over 300,000 Brazilian children and contributes 100% of its proceeds to the development and implementation of social programs.

The F4 750 Senna was released in 2002 and is rated at 0-60 2.9 quarter mile 10.7 @ 135. The Senna was a limited production run of 300 bikes like the orginal F4 Series Oro. The Senna shared the 136 hp (101 kW) engine of the Evo 02 but with a higher redline of13900 rpm, and top speed estimated at 175 mph (282 km/h) @ 12750 rpm . The Senna also had some suspension upgrades and some carbon fiber bodywork compared to other MVs. 

MSRP was $24,995 in 2002. Only 50 units of 300 produced worldwide arrived in the USA and this one with only 188 miles is arguably the finest Senna available anywhere!

7.25.2018: Additional note from the seller:

A little background why I'm selling these bikes is that I am raising capital to start a business for the first time in my life so I need to trim the fat sort to speak. The Senna F4 is by far the cleanest most beautiful bike I've ever owned.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna #172/300 for Sale
BMW July 11, 2018 posted by

One for the Road: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale

These days, when someone says "BMW sportbike," two things happen. First, the squinty, asymmetrical S1000RR immediately springs to mind. Second, you don't immediately burst into a fit of laughing: not long ago, "BMW sportbike" would have been something of an oxymoron. But people forget that, sandwiched in between the sporty-toury R1100S and the game-changing S1000RR, BMW introduced the very trick, limited-production HP2 Sport.

It was really intended to set the stage for the S1000RR, to show that BMW could be taken seriously as a sportbike manufacturer, that they had the technological chops to make a world-class machine. Of course, in the case of the HP2 Sport, they were applying that technology to a platform that would seem to be the anti-sportbike at first. It uses the same basic layout as the R1100S: horizontally-opposed twin with a longitudinal crankshaft, shaft drive, and BMW's Telelever front end that used a traditional shock and A-arm set up, along with some fork tubes that aren't actually fork tubes.

That setup has some advantages over a conventional fork, but is generally heavier and more complicated. It also makes the location of a radiator difficult, something that's not such an issue here, since the flat-twin is oil and air-cooled. Speaking of that classic BMW engine: in the HP2, a whole catalog of exotic parts have been thrown at it to increase performance. New dual overhead cam heads, radial valves, and titanium connecting rods all add up to a claimed 128hp, and a 9,500rpm redline you could chase with the very first-ever, factory-equipped quickshifter.

In an R1100S, that power might not be much to shout about, but the HP2 has added lightness: carbon-fiber panels, a self-supporting carbon-fiber subframe, and a generally Lotus-like attention to detail meant a claimed dry weight of 392lbs. Not especially impressive in the sportbike world, but the package was sufficiently light to legitimately compete in terms of handling. And that was another surprise: the BMW Telelever system doesn't always "feel like it should" and is sometimes criticized for offering vague front-end feedback, but a sportier front shock from Öhlins seems to have cured that. Unlikely layout aside, the HP2 was an excellent handler, and the Brembo monoblock calipers provide ferocious retardation for the lightweight machine.

From the original eBay listing: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale

For auction is my 2009 BMW HP2 Sport. It is in very good condition with 20,532 miles on the clock. It is a great running machine and has been maintained well. It has no known mechanical defects and needs nothing. It has been ridden as it was meant to be, but never abused or track ridden, but has not been stored in a living room. If you want a museum piece with zero mileage then this particular bike isn’t likely for you. If you do however wish to own and ride the ultimate BMW boxer sport bike then this bike is for you and at about half the price of new or some recently posted here on eBay. This machine is serial number 79 as seen in the photos. No one really seems to know for sure how many HP2 sports were produced for the world market, much less the USA market, but it seems about 250 or so. This is the last of my collection of seven BMW motorcycles that I have decided to sell. I have accepted a new job in another state and so all but one of my bikes and cars are going to be sold in the next two months. I work a lot of hours and weekends as well so I don’t have time to ride any of them. These bikes need to be ridden, as opposed to sitting here on a trickle charger gathering dust. I have been on eBay for many years and have great feedback and represent things as they are. Thanks for the interest and I will try to respond to questions as quickly as possible.

There are actually several HP2s up for sale at the moment, but while most are treated like museum pieces, this one has been ridden extensively, although mileage is still low for a BMW twin. Keep in mind that the service schedule calls for those titanium connecting rods to be replaced at 30,000 miles, but at least engine access is easy and you're only looking at a pair of them... There isn't much time left on the auction, and bidding is up to about half what HP2s usually go for. It looks like it's in excellent condition and would be a great choice for a BMW fan looking to ride the ultimate twin in the way it was really intended.

-tad

One for the Road: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale
MV Agusta June 27, 2018 posted by

From the Racing Department: 2016 MV Agusta F4RC for Sale

The second generation of MV Agusta's superbike as exemplified by this F4RC was more sophisticated, more refined, but no less dangerous. It's not really a question of power: there are obviously plenty of other literbikes with similar [or better] power-to-weight ratios. It's the general sense of wildness, an absolute willingness to murder you if you get too familiar with it. I was speaking with a husband and wife over the weekend about one, describing how it just feels far more serious than something like an Aprilia RSV4 that makes similar power and weighs about the same. At the end, she said, "It has no pity." Which I think pretty much perfectly sums up the MV Agusta F4: it does not suffer fools gladly.

The team working on the second generation of the F4 faced a big challenge: how do you update a motorcycle that is widely considered to be one of the most beautiful designs of all time? How to you revise it so that it looks noticeably more modern, yet still maintains clear visual links to the earlier bike? I do prefer the original Tamburini bike, but it's hard to argue that MV didn't knock it out of the park: it's a bit more angular, a bit more technical, but still retains the overall shape and proportions that made the previous design so iconic.

Perhaps most importantly, the electronics are far more sophisticated and a huge leap forward for the bike, with 8-level traction control and multiple engine power maps for throttle sensitivity, torque, engine braking, and response. Your ego might make you think you need whatever the equivalent of "RACE" mode is, but for most riding, I'm sure a less-aggressive map would help the bike's tendency to wheelie and generally try to kill you. Honestly, with the kind of power this thing makes, it will always feel fast. Power was up significantly: even the "entry level" F4R made a claimed 195hp at the crank, and this 2016 F4RC was supposedly good for an outrageous 212hp. From cold, it still has the distinctive loping idle and a hard-edged, exotic wail when revved, but overall it feels far more refined than the earlier bike.

Ergonomics were improved as well, although that really isn't saying much and the bike is still pretty uncomfortable for anything like regular riding. Unfortunately, heat is still a significant problem and the F4 will still roast your thighs and try to boil over if you get caught in traffic. Keeping an eye on the temp gauge is difficult though: the updated LCD gauge cluster and blue lighting looks very sophisticated, but is difficult to read at a glance.

Interestingly, the bike wasn't even all that expensive when it was introduced in 2010, comparatively speaking. Sure, there was a premium to be paid for owning and Italian exotic, but the new F4 was priced just a few thousand dollars higher than a Yamaha R1, and while performance was similar, there's no comparison in terms of the bikes' styles. These days you can pick up a nice, low-mileage F4R for $12,000 and people will still think you're riding a bike worth ten times that. Seriously: I've overheard those conversations. Unfortunately, this particular F4RC is much closer to what the hoi polloi might be expecting, and the bike's asking price is a cool $35,995 although maybe those are Canadian dollars...

I'm generally not a fan of race-replica graphics, especially on a premium Italian motorcycle, but I think the RC red-white-green looks pretty sharp. The biggest draw for me is that stunning Termignoni exhaust that addresses the only real design element of the second generation F4 that I find disappointing. The organ-pipe setup on the first generation bike is terrific, but the revised design tried to maintain the four undertail pipes with an updated style that used squared-off tips, and generally looked like it was trying too hard. The twin Termignoni cans suit the bike well and sound amazing.

From the original eBay listing: 2016 MV Agusta F4RC Reparto Corsa for Sale

Used like new, very rare motorcycle MV Agusta, F4 RC Reparto Corsa AMG, 2016, 237 miles (380km), must see.

WSBK Ready, 212 Hp, Only 250 built around the world in 2016. Limited warranty available, not included, call us for details.

Price based on local pick-up, shipping available worldwide.

Contact us to check the shipping and/or customs fees according to your location.

Applicable sales tax.

Race ready motorcycle, it is up to the buyer to take the information according to his locality for the possibility of road registration.

We are not partners with Uship and do not confirm the accuracy of their quotation, call us for a more accurate price.

http://www.motosillimitees.com/fr/powersports/occasion/mv-agusta-f4-rc-reparto-corsa-amg-212-hp-2016/10766748/

Motos Illimitées

Well this is obviously being offered by a dealer and there isn't much information about the bike's history. But as usual with a bike that has so few miles, there probably isn't much to tell. If you want a nice F4, you certainly don't need to pay this kind of money, although it's pretty comparable to top-shelf Ducati Panigales and a bargain, compared to the Superleggera. Modern MV Agustas don't get much more collectible than this.

-tad

From the Racing Department: 2016 MV Agusta F4RC for Sale
MV Agusta April 14, 2018 posted by

Evolution: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 SPR for Sale

The MV Agusta F4 750 is so often referred to as "one of the most beautiful motorcycles ever created" that it's easy to forget it's actually a pretty good motorcycle as well. Sure, it's brutally uncomfortable and a little bit heavier than the competition, but the engineering is sound and it's an impressively refined piece, considering this was the company's first modern superbike, built from the ground up to compete against the very best sportbikes in the world. It fell a bit short of the mark, but not so far short you could consider it an actual failure, considering the bike's longevity.

The orignal F4 750 was introduced in 1999 and the later 1000cc version that followed in 2005 was basically the 750 with more displacement and some refinements, and every four-cylinder machine produced by the company was based on the same engine and frame, up until the complete redesign of the F4 for 2010. So you're looking at a pretty long-serving package, considering the normally rapid pace of sportbike development, and that second generation F4 introduced in 2010 is still used as the foundation for a mid-pack WSBK contender!

So what was wrong with the F4? Well basically, in a class where power-to-weight ratios are critical, the bike had just average power and about 50lbs too much weight. In any other motorcycle category, that would be pretty meaningless, but in the hyper-competitive sportbike world, it meant everything, especially when you consider the somewhat shocking cost of the F4. Ultimately, the F4 was just a step behind the leaders in a class that was now obsolete, as literbikes were suddenly the top dogs of the sportbike world. MV Agusta solved the power problems with their updated F4 1000 but the damage to their rep was done, and the bikes never really offered any performance advantage over a ZX-10 or GSX-R1000, with less reliability and a whole lot more cost.

The seller claims this is an SPR, but I was under the impression the SPR was introduced in 2004, the ultimate evolution of the F4 750 and is most commonly seen in flat black colors. Whether or not this is an SPR or an S, it's a later version of the bike and should be more refined and reliable than the first-generation examples. The included Power Commander is a nice touch: fueling on stock F4s is pretty terrible from the factory, lean through most of the rev range and then artificially rich at the top. It's especially noticeable on the 1000 but both versions benefit hugely in terms of usability from a fueling module and some dyno time. I've ridden a stock 1000 and a properly tuned example nearly back-to-back, and the difference is pronounced. The stock bike seems to almost bog when you whack the throttle open in the midrange, where as the tuned version pulls as you'd expect: like a freight train.

From the original eBay listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 SPR for Sale

Need garage space, so newer bikes must go! This 2002 MV F4 SPR was one of two California-legal MVs, purchased from Grand Prix Motors, San Diego. Original owner was importer for MV Agusta in 1970s, Commerce Overseas Corporation. Designer of the MV750S America: pictured in the foreground with this F4. The bike comes with a ton of MV Agusta history accumulated by Commerce Overseas, including racing photos from MV glory days! With only 8,000 miles, this F4 SPR is in "as-new" condition. Equipped with rare MV factory racing exhaust, bike is tuned with a Power Commander. New tires, recent service. Stunning example of the F4 that was produced in SPR form after initial hiccups with early models.

The bike has 8,250 miles on it and there are no takers yet at the $10,000 starting bid. For the most part, it's pretty commonly accepted that the later 1000 is a better bike overall and that the 750 is underpowered and slightly overweight. It is the original though, and rarer, and should prove to be the better investment over time. Plus, an MV is still an MV, and none of them are actually slow. Try to think of them more as... mature, with just a little bit of middle-aged paunch over an athlete's build. Put it this way: if you're riding an F4 and someone is faster than you are on track or down a given stretch of back road, the problem probably isn't the extra 50lbs the F4 carries over a GSX-R... The problem is probably you.

-tad

MV Agusta April 4, 2018 posted by

Signed by the Master: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 for Sale

An MV Agusta F4 750 Senna "signed by the master" would normally mean that it was signed by its creator, Massimo Tamburini. In this case though, the "master" in question is Giacomo Agostini, the famous rider who rode MVs to victory in so many races during the marque's heyday. The F4 was to be their return to prominence, and the 750cc displacement of the original F4 introduced in 1999 would have allowed it to compete in World Superbike, a series with roots in production-based motorcycles, rather than Grand Prix racing.

Unfortunately the F4 suffered in comparison to much more affordable bikes from the Japanese Big Four but, even at the time, the biggest disappointment seemed to come from the bike's lack of any performance advantage compared to the benchmark GSX-R750 and its high cost, rather than any real flaw in the bike itself. Given the exotic looks and racing pedigree, they expected riding nirvana and they got... a perfectly competent, fast motorcycle with typically uncomfortable Italian ergonomics and suspect electicals.

The 750 wasn't actually slow, it just wasn't any faster than a GSX-R750 and really, why would it have been? Aside from a shocking price tag, the big problem was that the achingly beautiful exotic was launched as a 750cc machine just as the class was being made redundant by rules changes in racing and the new breed of literbikes that fit 1000cc power into 750cc packages. MV released their updated 1000cc version of the F4 within a few years, but the damage was done to the bike's reputation, and you still hear people refer to the 750 as if it's a bit of a dog.

Claimed horsepower was 136, with 118 real-world ponies finding their way to the ground, which was nearly identical to a GSX-R of the same period. Unfortunately, weights were not identical: the F4 clocked in at nearly 50 pounds more, full of fuel, and it seems to carry that weight up pretty high. The riding position is definitely uncomfortable and, compared to modern machines, it's awkward at low speeds and runs hot in traffic. But get into a groove and a well set up F4 corners beautifully: it may never have been the most agile bike in its class, but it's a testament to the soundness of the original design that the same basic machine was able to remain competitive for ten years, at least in terms of handling.

I've never been particularly excited by the sound of an inline four, and the F4 doesn't sound all that exotic riding past. But from the saddle there's a metallic rasp not found on other bikes, and the engine has a frantic quality that gives the conventional inline four wail an exotic quality that sets it apart. This particular F4 is the limited-edition [aren't they all?] Senna edition, named after famed racing driver Aryton Senna. Miles are collector-bike low ad the bike is sporting the aforementioned signature of the great Ago on the windscreen.

From the original eBay listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna for Sale

Extremely rare and beautiful. Part of a small collection of bikes purchased new by NHL Hall of Famer Sergei Fedorov. Bike has been personally signed by legendary MV Agusta rider/ champion Giacomo Agostini! This bike is number 192 of 300 built for worldwide production. MV reported that only 50 of these bikes were imported to North America. Inline 4 cylinder engine designed with cooperation from Ferrari produces 136hp at 13900 rpms. 0 – 60mph in 2.9 seconds. Quarter mile in 10.7 at 136mph. Lightweight and extremely fast. These bikes are legendary not only for performance and handling but for design and collectability!

Bike is in excellent cosmetic, running and riding condition at 3200 miles. The sale includes original owner’s manual, spare key, spark plug tool, and factory red rear wheel bike stand.

The bike appears to be in excellent cosmetic condition, although we really don't care about claimed horsepower for a bike that was famously unexceptional in that regard. The bike wasn't "lightweight" or "extremely fast" but it was definitely a very serious performance machine and it is still one of the best-looking motorcycles ever built. I prefer the F4 in standard colors, with the cool, yellow-faced tachometer, but it certainly looks very special in the black, grey, and red seen here. F4s can be surprisingly affordable to buy at the moment, but values of the very rare Senna are a good bit higher, and Ago's signature certainly adds to the cool factor. Bidding on this example is up to $13,000 with very little time left on the auction.

-tad

Signed by the Master: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 for Sale
MV Agusta November 25, 2017 posted by

Private Dancer – 2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910S

Suppose you managed a specialty motorcycle shop and were smitten with particular exotic high-performance model ? Easy access to aftermarket enhancements and ready hands might result in a farkle-fest like this 2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910S.

2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910S for sale on eBay

 

MV Agusta's brilliant in-line four was an natural fit into the trellis frame for the boutique naked bike, the 908cc hemi providing 139 hp.  The Brutale came with a great deal of the performance and technology of the F4, but in a less showy and easier ergonomic package for use around town.  The 50mm Marzocchi forks and single-sided swingarm look right at home on the 910S, though making the plumbing look good on the fuel-injected, water-cooled standard must've been a challenge.

 

The Vegas-based owner of Bellissimoto hasn't had much time to ride this MV, but evidently bought it with a few updates, and made a bunch more.  Just to gauge the level of detail, the 6,000-mile bike is shown parked on a full-length mirror, and pictured on the cover of The Robb Report magazine.  Looking like a " what-if ? " wish list, here's the rundown from the eBay auction-

Carbon Fiber Upgrades:

Tail - Intake ducts - Upper frame covers - Key guard - Radiator guards - Underseat side panels - Front subframe/headlight bracket - Exhaust guards - Heel guards - Front fender (both pieces) - Rear fender - Upper and lower chain guards - Lower radiator surround

Hard Part Upgrades:

Scotts Steering Damper - Rizoma Handlebars - Rizoma Rearsets - Oberon Bar End Indicators w/ mirror mounts - CRG Arrow Bar End Mirrors - Domino XM2 Race Throttle with cables - MotoCorse Reservoir Covers - MotoCorse Adjustable Folding Levers - MotoCorse Billet Fender Eliminator - MotoCorse Turn Signals - MotoCorse Frame Plugs (complete kit) - LuiMoto Team Italia Seat Cover - Custom Headlight Fairing and Aluminum Mount with ZG Windscreen and custom paint - Full Titanium MV Agusta Racing Exhaust - Marchesini Forged Magnesium Wheels

 

The Brutale can seem smaller in person than it looks it pictures, and reviewed as a versatile canyon carver with great handling, that only needs a backpack since it's hard to strap anything on.  The auction shows a teaser starting bid, not even covering the upgrades - but as any shop owner will tell you, modifications are really an investment in the riding experience and won't return dollar for dollar.  This should be a great high-end rider, and the auction offers to mount new rubber at a discount for the new owner.  In this case, the most exotic naked bike has been fitted with highest-end updates, lightly used and practically a show bike.  Hardly what comes to mind when you say, " used motorcycle "...

-donn





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