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Posts by tag: Race Bike

Ducati September 17, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 2000 Ducati 748RS track bike

Showing up to your local track day on any late '90s or early-aughts Ducati is pretty close to the best way to elevate your cred above the herds of hammered SV650s and GSXRs buzzing around each other like a mobile swap meet. To be the guy on the 2002 996 is to be the guy the pimpled youths suddenly revere. But at RSBFS, we exist to take you to the stars. Behold: the 2000 Ducati 748RS. The never seen, seldom mentioned carbon fiber-bodied race homologation version of the already serious 748R. We're bringing you this bike as a featured listing from our buddy Dave at Seattle Used Bikes. You're welcome.

The 748RS was made in insanely low numbers -- something like 50 were built -- and its engine cases were filled with unobtanium parts that made the bikes fragile, expensive and ludicrously fast. It sports thinner chromoly frame rails than the stock machine, and the chassis is bedecked adjustable with Ohlins suspension at each end. Handling the gases produced by the special mill was a 54mm Termignoni exhaust system unique to the 748RS. Slowing things down is a humongous set of Brembos bolted to featherweight Marchesini wheels. They came from the factory with stunning naked carbon fiber bodywork, though this bike has been given the proper Ducati Corse paintwork.

Into the mid-aughts, the 748RS saw success in the AMA Battle of the Twins and Pro Thunder categories. Sadly, this machine's first owner, who was campaigning it in Pro Thunder, died racing an SV650. Time and the relentless march of technology mean that this bike won't be competitive in anything but classic racing series now, but that seems more fitting than to just throw it at a few track days.

This example has sat mostly dormant since its turn of the century racing career. Its engine was overhauled and further hot rodded to 853cc in 2007 when the second owner acquired it, but it hasn't seen any action save for a break in and some dyno runs. We'll let Dave fill in the details:

This is another bike from our friends private collection of very special bikes. A very limited edition 2000 Ducati 748RS. Ducati produced a very limited run of 748RS machines (around 15 first year), which were intended as full racing machines and as such came with no road-going equipment. The engine internals and components were vastly different from any road-based Ducati, using a variety of light-weight, high-strength materials making them extremely expensive to purchase, run and maintain. The RS came with a 54 mm exhaust system and a slightly smaller size and gauge of Chromoly tubing was used on the frame to reduce weight even further.

This particular bike was campaigned in Southern California in the AMA Pro Thunder series back in the day. Sadly, in the early 2000’s, the owner of the bike passed while racing an SV650. The ‘RS sat unused for several years until GP Motorcycles in San Diego was tasked with making it ready for sale on behalf of the former owner’s family. It was purchased by our customer in 2007 as a local track day toy. He immediately shipped it to Mark Sutton at the DucShop in the Atlanta area for a freshen-up. They found the motor to be a bit tired so it was decided to build an 853cc trackday weapon out of the ‘RS motor. No expense was spared in order to create one serious package, we have full build receipts as well. . $6500 later it was shipped back to Seattle and has been in storage here ever since. Sadly never making its way back to the track. The only use the bike has seen since then was on the dyno and around the DucShop parking lot. There were some upgrades performed along the way, the previous owner upgraded the bike with an even larger kit radiator from a 996RS and the longer magnesium swingarm. Along with Superbike spec Marchesini magnesium wheels with a 16.5″, we also have a new 17″ in a box available for sale.. Also if someone is serious about tracking this bike, there is a 2nd fresh 748RS crate motor available as well, it too was completely gone through and broken in at DucShop.

Sold with Bill of Sale only

No Financing options available on this one

Credits cards accepted.
Up to $150.00 documentation fee may be charged.

Seattle Used Bikes
4905 Aurora Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98103
dave@seattleusedbikes.comClosed Sun/Mon Find us on Facebook and the Web

If you wanna go truly fast, the same money will buy you a next-to-new Yamaha R1. But that would miss the point, and the glory of owning such a focused weapon. The bike will require the attention that only true thoroughbreds do, with new valves a necessity every 750 miles or so. Helpfully, this bike is available with a spare 748RS engine (but is not included), which should at least allow you to rotate mills at rebuild time.

The price for all this 748RS is just $14,000, spare 748RS not included. If you have the means, we'd highly recommend contacting Dave before it's too late.

Featured Listing: 2000 Ducati 748RS track bike
Featured Listing September 13, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Sorted Harley-Davidson XR750TT replica

9.13.2018: Now on eBay. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Looking at strange beasts like the 2019 Harley-Davidson FXDR, you'd be forgiven for forgetting that Harley ever had anything to do with road racing. Or turns in general, for that matter. Years and brand image have done much to erase the memory of the 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750TT, an honest-to-God, race-winning Milwaukee steed based around the firm's venerated 750cc flat track engine.

Harley built about 10 black and orange, fully faired examples of the XR750TT in '72, and in Cal Rayborn's hands they had a bunch of success in international match racing, despite putting out south of 100 horsepower, with most relying on front drum (!) brakes. The Lord works in mysterious ways, we guess.

Today's listing is a package:  The first bike is a turn-key replica of Rayborn's mount, albeit with some poetic license taken to tame some of the sketchiness of the original. For one thing, the builder stuck on a proper dual-disc brake setup. It also rides on a monoshock C&J frame and wears suspension from Ohlins and Forcella Italia. Beyond that, though, the bike is true to its roots, with a 1993 XR750 mill swaddled in lovely, delicate reproduction bodywork.

The second part of the package is a rolling chassis that is a nearly perfect replica of Rayborn's mount. The seller had intended to swap in the engine from the first bike to make a fairly faithful replica.

From the seller:

Harley Davidson XR750 Road Racer, C&J Frame Mono Shock, XR750 engine from 1993, Forcella Italia fork, Ohlins shock, Wire Wheels, complete Body Kit incl. fairing, partly new painted, new windshield, very good condition, runs great, race ready. Harley Davidson XR750TT Replika rolling chassis, complete except engine, Forcella Italia fork, Koni shocks, complete body kit, front wire wheel 18" and 16", many parts....

The Roadracer has been built in the late 90ies, based on a C&J Flattrack frame and a factory original 1993 XR750 engine.

Road racing fork Forcella Italia, Shock is Ohlins, brakes are high quality racing stuff. Equipped with the complete XRTT bodywork and Wire Wheels. This bike was raced by the pre owner in the late 90ies to middle 2000s at GrabtheFlag races and similar events in Europe.

The engine has been recently redone by the last owner and runs very good. I bought this bike 2 years ago and  rode this bike in 2017 only one day at a small race track for practice.

Additional there is a complete XRTT Replika Chassis with bodywork, only missing the engine. This bike was equipped with a XR1000 engine and was also raced in the late 90ies to early 2000s at european classic racing events. Fork is Forcella Italia, shocks are Koni, 16" and 18" front wheel.

My intention was to put the XR750 engine in the XRTT Replika Chassis, and ending up with a fine XRTT Replika, and buy a 90ies Sportster or Buell Engine for the C&J- Chassis and having a cool and powerfull Race Bike for Classic Races.

I would prefer selling as a package, for € 29000 OBO

Bikes are located in Berlin/ Germany.

Email: oldietech@t-online.de

The bike is across the Atlantic in Germany, but is very much worth the effort to import and turn into a once-in-a-while track day mount. With a full extra chassis waiting in the wings, there's little excuse to let it sit.

Featured Listing: Sorted Harley-Davidson XR750TT replica
Ducati September 9, 2018 posted by

Super Single: 1993 Ducati Supermono for Sale

One of the most collectible Ducatis of all time, the Supermono isn't even a v-twin. It is, as the name implies, powered by a single-cylinder engine. If you're a bit confused by this and thinking, "Hmmmm... I don't remember there being any Ducati singles in the 90s..." you're not actually crazy. There weren't any Supermono roadbikes and only about 65 Supermono racebikes ever built between 1993 and 1995.

Race bikes are built to race, but are generally designed to conform to a very specific set of series rules. In Supermono's case, it was the European Sound of Singles, a single-cylinder class designed to support World Superbike racing. It won just about everything it was eligible to race in.

The reason is revs: where most big single-cylinder race bikes are derived from dirtbikes and hammering their riders to dust inside their leathers by 7,000rpm, the Supermono can happily spin up past 10,000. The Ducati's party trick? It's a single that thinks it's a twin.

Looking at the engine, it's pretty obvious that, in building their racing single, Ducati simply blanked off the rear cylinder on one of their liquid-cooled four valve v-twins, keeping the horizontal piston for a nice, low center of gravity. But they also used a dummy connecting rod that simulated the forces of the second piston, likely increasing friction and rotational mass compared to a normal single, but massively reducing vibration.

That ability to rev meant power as well, and the claimed 65hp at 10,500rpm from the 549cc engine gave the bike a serious advantage, compared to other bikes in the class. Later bikes had displacement increased slightly to 572cc for a bit more power. The rest of the bike was incredibly light weight, with liberal use of magnesium castings on the engine and a few other parts, so the complete Supermono tipped the scales at a featherweight 267lbs dry.

Brick-wall brakes from the much heavier 888 bring the bike to a very sudden stop when necessary, which probably wasn't all that often, considering the bike's cornering abilities. Interestingly, this one appears to have been upgraded with modern radial brake and clutch master cylinders, for improved braking and... clutching.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati Supermono for Sale

1993 Ducati Supermono. #16 of 65. Originally delivered to Sweden.  

Video of #16 running https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tii5G9mm4wI

A new timing belt was fit prior to the video.

The video represents the last time it was ran.  It was set up for long term storage immediately after. Retrospeed, of Belgium Wisconsin was commissioned to prove that the bike was mechanically sound, change fluids and to set up for long term storage in February of 2014.

New slicks would need to be fit prior to track use.

Any and all questions can be directed towards Brady at Retrospeed 262-483-5399 

The owner, an Italian collector, is thinning his motorcycle collection to make room for a car purchase.

The Supermono is not titled, none were as they were produced for the sole purpose of racing.

The factory 955 Corsa in the last picture will be coming for sale soon.

The Supermono was never an entry-level racer like KTM's RC390R and was pretty eye-wateringly expensive even when new: $30,000 or so in 1993. These days? You're looking at something like this bike's $125,000 starting bid, which seems to be in line with recent examples. This particular bike is in far away Belgium... Wisconsin! Happily, the seller includes a video of the bike running before it was packed up for storage, so those of us who merely have the means to debate the values of these bikes can actually get a sense of what one might be like in person.

-tad

Super Single: 1993 Ducati Supermono for Sale
Laverda August 18, 2018 posted by

Objet d’Art: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale

Wow, two Laverda 750 SFCs in one week, both with very serious pricing. Although, of the two, this one appears to be more original and is in much nicer, if less patina-d condition and appears to... what the hell, it's decorating a New York City apartment?! Oh well, I guess if I had the money for real estate in NYC with a stylish freight elevator, I'd probably do exactly the same thing...

It has no real bearing on its quality but, since I don't get to see most of these bikes in the flesh, I do appreciate some decent photography, and the SFC is certainly a deserving subject. I realize that orange isn’t likely to be too many people’s first choice for their fantasy motorcycle, but it just looks so right on a Laverda: it’s a brash color on a purposeful bike. These really were road-legal race bikes, the ultimate development of Laverda’s rugged parallel-twin platform before their switch to the triple, and the SFC had a history of racing success.

Laverda got their start making agricultural machinery, and their natural tendency to overbuild everything to increase reliability extended to their motorcycles. The two-cylinder engine had five main bearings and the very highest-quality components were used wherever possible: Ceriani provided the suspension, Bosch the ignition components, and Nippon-Denso the starter. Introduced as a 650cc machine, the displacement was quickly increased to 750cc so it could compete against bikes from Triumph, Norton, Ducati, and Moto Guzzi.

The SFC or "Super Freni Competizione" was named for its enormous magnesium Ceriani four leading-shoe front brake, although the later machines used a more effective dual disc setup as seen here. The 1974 model also featured improvements to the frame to make it lower and lighter, and suspension was updated as well. Engines were far from standard, and the bikes produced between 71 and 80hp.

The seller mentions that the sale is motivated by a move to the West Coast. New York City seems to an outsider like it'd be an amazing place to be a biker, and the traffic means motorcycles make huge practical sense. But road surface quality that wouldn't look out of place in Berlin at the end of World War II and traffic that more closely resembles gladiatorial combat than any sort of cooperative endeavor combine to make motorcycle riding in NYC less fun than it should be. Traffic in much of California is pretty awful as well, but legal lane-splitting, beautiful roads, and year-round riding weather would have me reconsidering a sale of this one if it were on display in my living room...

From the original eBay Listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale

Original 1974 "17000 series" Laverda SFC #17093 in perfect unrestored condition. If you don't know the history of these extremely limited and hand-built racers, just Google them.  She is the best time capsule in existence for sure. She has not been on the road since the late 70's.  Previous to my purchase as third owner, she was in a private collection for 30+ years in the Southwestern USA. I purchased her from the second owner as he was selling his collection due to his advanced age and he wanted her to go to a collector who would hopefully leave her untouched. This SFC also has its original "2-into-1" exhaust pipe that I removed as the original "2-into-2" exhaust pipe looks better when the bike is on display.  The original "2-into-1" pipe is included in the sale. I have turned over the engine every other month over the last few years. She still has all of her original fuel lines, taps and all hardware as included from day one. The only missing item is the original battery... lol. She has 2,930 miles and still has her original tires. I have a collection of over 20 motorcycles of which this is my clear favorite. She resides in my home office in New York City and I get to admire her every time I work at home. Time for her to find a new home as I am downsizing my collection as we are planing a move to the West Coast. I believe she deserves to reside in a museum or as any new owner seems fit. Re-commision her and take her to the track! I have often thought of re-commsioning her and taking her out as she should be ridden; but I never seem to be able to remove the original fuel lines and tires, etc. to make that happen. These time capsules are original only once in its life, and she remains that way to this day. I am happy to answer any questions.  f you would like to see any particular pictures, just ask. The bike can be seen by appointment in New York City. Deposit due within 24 hours and final payment by wire or bank check. If by bank check, bike does not leave my possession until the funds are cleared.  Good Luck!

This example is basically a museum piece, less a living document and more of an archival record, although the owner does "turn the engine over." I think he means "by hand" so I'm sure it will still need recommissioning if the new owner plans to ride it. It has a the full dash with both a tachometer and speedometer, something relatively rare among the SFCs I've seen for sale in the past few years: like many exotic bikes and cars of the period, they were a bit like snowflakes, and no two were exactly alike. With fewer than 600 produced during the entire run, the SFC is one of the most desirable sportbikes of the 1970s, and prices have obviously been increasing as a result. What's it worth? Well last week's was obviously a bridge too far for our readers, but this one, while still a very expensive proposition, is slightly less of one: the Buy It Now is only $135,000! Perhaps the nearly perfectly-preserved condition helps justify the asking price, although the last couple examples we featured were less than half that and in very nice condition...

-tad

Objet d’Art: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale
Laverda August 10, 2018 posted by

Blue-Chip Classic Friday: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale

Back in the 1960s and 1970s you could buy race cars and race bikes that were basically road-legal, vehicles you could actually drive or ride to the track and reasonably expect to be competitive with pretty minimal changes. Of course, those days are long gone: race machines often share very few components with their road-going counterparts and frequently bear little resemblance to any sort production vehicles whatsoever. But today's Laverda 750 SFC was a machine from the tail end of that earlier era and was very much a race bike with some lights and signals slapped on to make it vaguely road-worthy.

I mean, just take a look at that taillight: was it thoughtfully integrated into a specially-designed cut-out? Nope, it was literally bolted to the sloped rear face of a solo tail section that was obviously designed with a number-plate in mind. The instruments are basically just a tach, ignition barrel, and indicator light bolted to the inside of the fairing: this thing is the epitome of crude, at least in terms of creature-comforts and finish. Speedo? Who cares? Just figure out what revs approximate which highway speeds in top gear and assume you could just outrun cops of the period anyway.

But forget refinement: the mechanicals are where it's at, and the bike has those in spades. Early models used a huge alloy drum brake, and later machines like this one a pair of discs, giving the bike it's name: "Super Freni Competizione" or basically "Super Braking Racebike." Laverda used the very best components available everywhere they could, and the basic parallel-twin was overbuilt and very durable, making it ideal for endurance racing.

Ceriani forks, Bosch ignition, and Nippon-Denso electrical components, and that 744cc parallel twin with five main bearings, backed up by a five speed gearbox that put the bike's claimed 75hp to the rear wheel. This example isn't some museum-piece and the seller mentions it's done quite a bit of track time. How much? Who knows: like many SFCs, this one lacks a speedometer, and therefore an odometer. The tach looks non-standard, although I've seen several different types fitted to the original bikes. It's hard to tell from the pic, but maybe it's a Scitsu unit?

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale

Am 76 and it's time to let go of my collection. Started collecting about 50 years ago and the main objective was to buy one owner high end cars and motorcycles for pleasure and investment. I won't bore you repeating the history of the 750 SFC Laverdas - If you are reading this you already know of the Laverda 750 SFC's iconic competition accomplishments, background and rarity. Hand built by a small number of employees, there were only 100 of these limited production Laverda 750 SFC competition motorcycles manufactured in 1974. Recently brought out of storage, it is an authentic two owner (I am the 2nd owner) matching numbers factory original survivor. I purchased it from the gentleman who bought it new at a dealership in Florida. He raced it on every motorcycle race track East of the Mississippi up until around 1984, when he found out he had terminal cancer and put the bike in storage. He did not want to sell it but had to liquidate his holdings. It is a beautiful piece of art. The engine had a complete overhaul from a company called Megacycle in California after it's last race and is in fresh like new original condition. Runs perfectly. What a sound. An exhilerating deep throbbing sound that can only come from a Laverda 750 SFC. It has been cleaned and the brakes rebuilt. It is in it's original racing condition complete with period stickers, as it came off the last track. The engine mount tab is indeed stamped "SFC" from the factory. My collection included many motorcycles but I kept this one for the last and had no intention of ever selling it - but to be realistic it needs to move along to another caretaker. I have framed photos of it being raced at different tracks and the original 1974 owners manual. Please read the complete description so you will understand all conditions and any issues. THERE IS NO TITLE - Sold on a Georgia bill of sale and Georgia Sheriffs Department inspection certificate. I will answer all email questions and consider offers.

Just 549 total were built between 1971 and 1975. So the Buy It Now for this race-bred classic? A mere... $195,000?! Well, maybe that's a mistake. I mean, it is eBay after all. So the starting bid is... $150,000?! Wow, I guess he is serious. Well I'll be curious to see if anyone bites. Seems like a major auction might be a better bet for something like this, but who knows? Certainly the SFC is one of the most valuable and collectible bikes of the era, and prices are certainly headed in that direction.

-tad

 

Blue-Chip Classic Friday: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale
Ducati July 10, 2018 posted by

Racer Replica: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale

The original listing for this 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica includes some good general information, but I'd love more specific details about the components. The seller mentions the frame was supplied by Roy Thersby, but did he build the frame, modify the frame, or just paint it? At a glance, it appears to be from a 90s SuperSport, which makes sense, considering the rest of the running gear. So it appears that what we're dealing with here is a fully-built 90s 750SS with brilliant retro-bodywork and paint. And headlamps. Those massive, retina-burning headlamps.

The original TT2 that inspired this build was a lightweight, Pantah-powered racebike displacing 597cc with a Verlicchi frame and Marzocchi suspension. Built between 1980 and 1984 the bike was very successful in competition and ultimately spawned the Ducati F1 road bike.

The engine in this replica is a 750, but it's looks to be the 90s version, since both carburetors live in the engine's vee: the 80s Pantah-engined bikes had both facing rearward, with the vertical cylinder's jutting out awkwardly towards the rider's knee. And the wheels are clearly 17" parts, in keeping with the 90s theme. Great for finding modern, sticky rubber, but not the most authentic-looking, if that's the goal, since the original used 18" hoops. And why choose non-adjustable front forks on this bike? Even set up properly, I'm surprised the builder didn't at least use the adjustable units available on certain 900SS models, since the upside-down forks give the game away anyway that this isn't really an 80s race bike.

Not doubting the craftsmanship, but there are some other choices I'm not big on, starting with the Koso instruments. I'm sure they're reliable and legible, but I don't really like them on recent Bimotas and I really don't like them on a retro-looking special. Something classic from MotoGadget would have given similar function with a much more appropriate look. The bar-end signals are a cool touch, but a bit too shiny for my taste and the grips and Union Jack tank pad are way too modern. And the M4 exhaust is perfectly fine on a GSX-R750 but a "classic" Ducati? But all that is relatively easy to change to suit the new owner's preferences anyway.

If it sounds like I don't like this bike, you'd be wrong: I'm really just picking nits and all of these minor issues are easily forgotten, looking at the red-and-yellow bodywork and those awesome endurance-racing headlamps. And although the listing doesn't go into too much detail regarding the engine, the Pantah engine can be tuned to make good power and, in a lightweight package, should make for a very entertaining bike.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale

For the Ducati connoisseur, this beauty will enhance any collection. Frame came from British Ducati legend Roy Thersby. The bike was built by vintage Ducati guru Scot Wilson as his personal ride. Scot is the owner of Italian Iron Classics in Tucson, AZ. I've had the pleasure of owning a couple of Scot Wilson's builds and they are very carefully planned and meticulously executed.

The 750 engine was built by Tom Hull of Phoenix to "Pro-Thunder" standards with Carrillo rods, dual spark, lightened internals and all the special bits you'd expect. The engine was moth-balled after a rule change, acquired for this build and has about 1,000 miles on it. 40mm Del Ortos, fork set by Computrack. GP shift but could be changed. The bike was just serviced, all fluids changed, fuel tank cleaned, carbs cleaned and carefully checked over. It's ready to go.

The bike is street legal, has a clear Massachusetts title and goes like crazy. Headlights are Hella style as used for endurance racing. Bar-end turn signals are installed so the bike will pass my state registration inspection. The paint is as good as it gets and looks as fresh as the day it came from the painter's shop. If you are looking at this bike I don't have to tell you about Ducati F1-R's or TT2's. I've had the opportunity to do a (very careful) track day at a Ducati event and the bikes gets lots of attention. If the track's not your thing you could proudly show it at any event and it would draw a crowd.

While undeniably cool, bikes like this are always tricky when it comes to determining value. They're not collectible in the conventional sense, in that they're not real race bikes or limited-production factory machines: they've been built using high-quality components, but they're basically really nice lash-ups, "bitsas" made from the very best bits. Of course, a real TT2 would likely sell for far more than the $22,500 the seller is asking, and considering the quality and names attached, I'm thinking this is a pretty damn good deal as long as the lack of originality doesn't bother you, and you're ready for the snobs to give you static when they ask you "is it real?" But honestly, if anyone gives you a problem, you should just blind them with those massive Hella lamps.

-tad

Racer Replica: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale




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