Posts by tag: Race Bike

Yamaha March 18, 2018 posted by

Wild Kingdom – 1974 Yamaha TZ750

No less a rider than Giacomo Agostini abdicated his dynasty at MV Agusta when Yamaha introduced the 4-cylinder 2-stroke 700cc racebike. He won the 1974 Daytona 200 with it, and its 750cc progeny went on to a 12-year run on the beach.  This newly restored example has matching numbers and a nicely documented race history.

1974 Yamaha TZ750 for sale on eBay

As ever, specs for a race machine are a liar's poker affair.  The engine had a nasty tone even at idle and was good for 140hp at full song.  The frame was a twin downtube arrangement and the swingarm was all new, spread at the rear wheel but converging at the bottom pivot and top where the shock mounted, the Monocross went on to bigger and better.  Initially a pair of RD350 race engines joined at the hip, the TZ750 was more purpose-built, water cooled though the crankcase bristles with fins.  Expansion chambers mostly taking the path of least resistance - except for the left which wound around and through the frame.  Triple hydraulic disk brakes provided the retro-force.

The owner has treated this TZ750 to a rare level of restoration, both mechanically and cosmetically.  Just part of the eBay auction's comments :

This bike has The Holy Trinity for the most discerning collectors and enthusiasts: Provenance, Rarity and Condition! What you see here is the culmination of a 10 year, no cost spared, meticulous frame-off restoration. The resto was done on a complete, running, period correct, and 'as raced' TZ from the 1970's. Amazingly, during the bike's campaign both here and abroad, it appears to have never been crashed or blown-up. The exact Factory paint scheme and colors were precisely replicated from Factory original. The Shipping Invoice (see pic, courtesy of NATS Forum) shows #159 being a genuine 1st batch racer. There were a total of 219 TZ750A's built;  few remain today.

Rather too specialized for a hobbyist, exercising the TZ-750 will take commitment.  Maintenance hours will be more numerous than "flight" hours.  But this race veteran is sorted and shouldn't bring too many surprises.  As the owner states:

The bike was built to run, but assembled primarily for display and ease of cleaning.

Successful to the point of domination, the TZ-750 will likely be invited back to any event it attends.  The fairing's well-drawn lines are sure easy on the eyes.  Mechanically, it's better than new - improvements to the exhaust system made and impossibly light brake disks, with blank livery as shipped.  Likely never to turn another hot lap, the velvet ropes beckon.  But once photographed, the years of racing history are in the books, and the soundtrack from a demonstration lap or two is all that's missing...


Wild Kingdom – 1974 Yamaha TZ750
Suzuki March 15, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – Street-Registered 1986 Suzuki RG500 Racebike

Update 3.15.2018: SOLD IN ONE HOUR! Congratulations to buyer and seller. -dc

Please note: Ted from AutoManiaGP has asked us to open the comments on this post in the hopes that the RSBFS community can assist in determining what has been done to construct this bike. There was no accompanying documentation and we would appreciate your help by examining the pictures and commenting with any additional information you can provide. The text below is our first shot but we look forward to what else can be learned. Please forward widely and thank you for your help! -dc

Suppose you had been a racer, and owned a race team, over the years acquiring intimate knowledge of several different brands of factory race gear - what might you build as a street machine?  The few production years of Suzuki RG500 Gamma imprinted Mike Canepa of 10K Racing, and he put together a race-derived machine with Spondon Engineering chassis, with trackside details stem to stern, in race livery.

Suzuki RG500 For Sale at AutomaniaGP

Suzuki's RG500 used a twin-crank square-four two stroke, with almost unmatched power-to-weight, 95 hp in factory street tune.  No doubt well above that with racing carburetors and exhaust.  Like any privateer's racebike, specs are hard to come by, but this RG appears to have a Spondon chassis, an English specialty manufacturer with a long history of chassis development for major manufacturers and well-heeled weekend warriors.  The twin spars are at least twice the size of a road-going RG.  Later upside-down Showa forks are installed, with Nissin 6-pot front calipers radially mounted.  The swingarm is thought to be from a Yamaha TZ250, an asymmetrical fabrication with a massive right side but straight left side with a brace to allow the chain to pass through.  Fairings are quite like a later RGV-500, with air scoops just above the front fender feeding the four sidedraft carbs inside.

Unlike any actual racer, this RG500 is clean, polished, and road legal despite the Skoal Bandit graphics.  Trim carbon mudguards are installed, along with a full featured instrument cluster.  Conflicted as the four expansion chambers and turn signals, there's a locking gas cap on the tank.  The fairing's post-and-pin supports are safety-wired to keep the cotter pin around.  Consigning dealer Automania of Oregon has a great collection of pictures - here - and says this about the bike:

Mike Canepa, owner of race team 10-K Racing was in the later stages of building this race bike for the street when he passed. I had been hearing about it for over two years and unfortunately did not pay attention to what he was telling me at the time. Hind sight is 100%. The engine is V-4 Two Stroke out of a 1986 Suzuki RG500 according to the records we found, but everything else has been a guess or information others have offered up. It was not finished, but he had been riding it recently.

This motorcycle is based on a 1986 Suzuki RG500 but everything except the engine is either custom or race track sourced. The rear swing arm looks to be from a 1991 Yamaha TZ250, the front forks Honda RS250 and the frame appears to be a Spondon that had no identifying numbers or manufactures id on it. It has been titled with an assigned OR State VIN plate and the bike is registered for the street. I am open to anyone looking at the images and suggesting where they think the parts came from. Don’t be shy…

The selling price is $16,695. The VIN# is ORSPERG9G1003 and miles are unknown.

Hard to tally up the hours and dollars invested in this racer-with-lights, though the preparation is immaculate.  Likely the frame has a pedigree, and Spondon Engineering has quite a following, even a fan website for reference.  Power-to-weight is probably more important here than on a factory machine, and the weight should be closer to 300 than 400 lbs.  Evidently inspected by Oregon DMV, it is titled and has road registration, which speaks to how close to completion the bike is.  RG and RGV did well in the 500cc years of Grand Prix racing, accounting for four championships and seven constructor's titles.  Automania invites knowledgeable comment and asks $16,995 for this one-of-one, and can be reached at (541) 479-8888 or emailed - here -.

Featured Listing – Street-Registered 1986 Suzuki RG500 Racebike
Yamaha March 15, 2018 posted by

Racetrack Refugee: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale

Yamaha's R7 was among the last in a long line of machines from the Age of Homologation Specials, where the manufacturers competing in AMA and World Superbike racing created limited runs of insanely expensive bikes that looked like production models, but were chock full of trick bits like adjustable steering heads and exotic engine internals. For the most part, these were based on pretty common machines from each manufacturer's lineup. But in situations where nothing in the manufacturer's stable really matched their needs, companies sometimes whipped up a bike whose whole production run was designed to allow the bike to compete in a variety of racing classes. By the late 1990s, the 750cc class was pretty much on its way out as a viable category for streetbikes, but that didn't stop Yamaha from introducing their very trick and hideously expensive YZF-R7. How trick? Well the frame was claimed to have been based on Yamaha's 500 Grand Prix machine. Just 50 were imported to the US out of 500 built in total. And how expensive? Well, the R7 was $32,000 late-nineties dollars, and that was before you included the race kit that actually made it fast.

Just one problem: from the factory, the R7 made just 106hp, which didn't really provide the performance the looks or pricetag promised. The solution? Just pony up for the race kit that activated a second, dormant test of injectors and replaced the airbox for a revised part that unleashed a more appropriate 162hp but also gave racebike-like reliability. The biggest limitation of the R7 was that engine, and unleashing the full potential could be tricky and expensive, so owners that wanted to use their bikes on the road sometimes switched out the 749cc engine for the 998cc unit from the R1, which seems to have been done in this particular case. I'm under the impression that this was a relatively simple swap and, although it could be considered sacrilege, actually had several benefits: it gave very similar maximum power to the original engine, but with far more midrange, and it also meant the original engine could be saved to preserve the bike's value for future collectors. That appears to have been done here, although the seller's description does leave me with some questions.

This R7/R1 hybrid appears to have been built to a high standard by Graves Yamaha, so I'm sure they knew what they were doing and I've no doubt the bike is very special. But it would really help if the owner was clearer about what he has: he calls the powerplant a "OWO1 1000 superbike motor" but the OW01 was 749cc, although the five-valve inline four was related to both the R7 and the 998cc R1 units. The OW02 engine was supposedly based on that earlier engine and has the same displacement to conform to class limitations, but I'm not sure it can simply be punched out to a full 1000cc.

More likely, it has a later R1 engine, which was, as stated above, the simpler, much more reliable way to get the fully-unleashed R7's 162hp without all the explode-y engine drama. Maybe it's a full-factory superbike R1 unit? The seller also mentions the "half R7 and half R1 frame" which would require some very serious surgery if true. And which halves were used? Front and back? Left and right? Maybe it's the R7 Deltabox with the R1 subframe? It's also listed as a 1998 model, but I was under the impression that the bike was sold in 1999 and 2000.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale

This bike was built in house built by factory Graves race team and was one of Chuck Graves personal bikes. It might be one of only two left, this bike has every goodie you could imagine on it: Brembo brakes, Ohlins forks and rear shock, superbike radiator and tank, swing arm, custom half R7 frame and half R1 frame, Yamaha OWO1 1000 superbike motor, rear Brembo brakes, thumb brake, brake lines, rearsets, Akro pipe, after market wheels, chain sprocket kit, offset triple clamps. This bike new with the race kit harness was $43,000 and only 32 came to the US that year, it is a very limited production bike, to rebuild this bike in today's time would cost over $100k plus the 1000 donor bike for parts, this bike looks like it just rolled off the race truck.

All-in-all, this modified R7 is a very cool machine, with plenty of very trick bits plainly visible, but I'd definitely want some answers to my questions before bidding on this one. Many, many questions, but worth asking, considering it is a Yamaha R7, after all. I'd especially want to know if the original motor is included, as a good chunk of the bike's value is wrapped up in its originality, and while this might be an amazing machine and a true track-day weapon, all those modifications likely hurt the collector value. As always, if you have any insight into the bike, please feel free to fire away in the comments!


Racetrack Refugee: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale
Honda March 8, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Ex-Zarco 2012 MotoBi TSR6 Moto2 bike

Update 3.8.2018: This seller has renewed their Featured Listing for this Moto2 race bike! Thank you for continuing to support the site and good luck with the sale! -dc

After five seasons showing equal parts promise, poise, ruthlessness and speed in the Moto2 World Championship, Frenchman Johann Zarco moved up to MotoGP for 2017 and earned Rookie of the Year honors on his way to sixth overall in the championship. In a fitting tribute to that accolade, today's featured listing is the 600cc Moto2 machine upon which he took home Rookie of the Year in the intermediate class in 2012.

His remarkable 2017 season followed back-to-back championships in Moto2, and he brought with him to the 1,000cc class a loose-is-fast, cutthroat style common to Moto2 riders. His 2012 bike, like all Moto2 rides, is powered by a highly modified inline four based on the Honda CBR600 engine. It resides in a proprietary MotoBi frame, which are becoming scarcer as the team has since left the Moto2 World Championship stage.

The seller says he bought this bike directly from team JiR after the engine was refreshed and broken in on a dyno. It is reportedly in ready-to-race condition, though it has been on display since it was purchased. It wears Mobil oil livery from the 2012 LeMans round of the championship, and bears Zarco's signature on the tank cover. The seller says he can supply spare parts with the purchase on request.

From the seller:

2012 MotoBi TSR6 Moto2.
Former team JIR, ridden by Joahn Zarco in the 2012 Moto2 World Championship.
Frame number TSR-001
Engine number PR01E1000062A
This bike with Zarco ended at 10th place in the Championship and in the same year Zarco was awarded with the "Rookie of the year" prize.
The bike is in virtually "as new" conditions.
Engine has been overhauled by team JIR just before the delivery and has been breaked-in on the dyno.
Has received all the upgrades from the standard TSR6 and is presented in the Le Mans "Mobil 1" scheme as per French Grand Prix of 2012.
It is provided of standard HRC dash as per buyer's request.
The bike has been purchased by actual owner directly from team JIR and the same team provided full statement of rider/placement/results and has been kept on display since.
The bike is ready to be used.
Spare parts are available upon request.

Contact the seller:
Matteo Franchini
Phone: +39 338 6621149
Price 67.000 euro

The frame is stamped with serial number 2012-001, and will come with a spate of documentation stating its authenticity. As Zarco's star continues to rise in the MotoGP World Championship, the bike's value is sure to increase. Particularly in the latter half of the 2017 season, Zarco found pace where the factory men could not, and very nearly won the final round in Valencia, four places ahead of nine-time champ and factory Yamaha man Valentino Rossi.

Featured Listing: Ex-Zarco 2012 MotoBi TSR6 Moto2 bike
Suzuki February 20, 2018 posted by

Better Than the Real Thing? 1980 Suzuki XR69 Replica for Sale

We don't normally like to post up bikes that stray too far from stock, but this very useable, purpose-built replica of Suzuki's XR69 seemed too well put together to pass up. And certainly, this isn’t just some GS1000 with an aftermarket fairing slapped into place with some stickers holding it together. It's gorgeous, painstakingly crafted, and fully-prepped to compete in vintage racing classes. In some ways, it's even better than a real XR69. Crash one of those, and you've destroyed a valuable investment, a living historical racing document. Crash this one, and it's just money, and significantly less money than an actual XR69.

The original XR69 was a late 70s/ early 80s four-stroke superbike, a bit like a WSBK and MotoGP hybrid. The engine was obviously based on Suzuki’s production GS1000, but power for the race engine quickly outstripped the ability of the stock platform to handle it, so Suzuki provided frames and suspension parts from their two-stroke GP bikes, and the bikes suddenly handled as well as they went. 1981 saw a switch from a dual shock setup to a Full Floater rear suspension and even better handling. Surprisingly, engines were developed by Pops Yoshimura instead of Suzuki’s in-house racing department, and the 997cc DOHC, 16-valve inline four put 134hp through the GS1000's five speed gearbox. The package was updated with a dry clutch in 1983 and top speed was 170mph, depending on gearing.

This one obviously has some minor differences. It uses a monoshock rear that would more likely have been found on the 1981 model and appears to use 17" wheels at both ends. But the frame looks pretty authentic to my inexpert eye and the overall effect is very impressive.

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Suzuki XR69 Replica for Sale

For Sale: Suzuki XR69 - A replica of the factory Yoshimura 1980 Suzuki XR69 raced for endurance racing in Europe ridden by Wes Cooley. This bike was built for the sole purpose of racing the International Challenge at Phillip Island in Australia. I have raced this bike last year and is extremely fast and performs like a modern bike. The suspension has been transformed by Dave Moss out of California and is flawless for me.

Pro mod built crank with 493 Katana rods. displacement: 1280cc. 39mm CR Keihin carbs. 31mm titanium intake valves. Stainless steel 27mm exhaust valves... extensive porting, new springs, ti retainers, hard faced cams and rocker arms. $6k in the head. No expense spared in building this engine as well as bike! All work performed by Larry Cook Racing in Portland OR.  Undercut transmission. Billet clutch hub with brand new Barnett clutch plates. Sigma Slipper clutch. Dynatek 2000 ignition with grey coils. Wego A/F gauge. Chromoly outstanding CMR custom built frame out of Canada. Custom 4:2:1 exhaust by Hindle. Brand new Ohlins rear shock with different springs. EBC front rotors and pads with unbelievable stopping power. Able to be started on the end of crank with hand starter. All making 171.5 hp. at the rear wheel with 110 fuel. There is more power to be found with different fuels!!Has tremendous power down low as well.

An extremely comfortable ride as well! Recently completely rebuilt because of top end oiling issue with new sleeves and custom pistons and tested at Utah. Perfect and Ready to go for Phillip Island with Dunlop newer slicks (1 practice session and 1 break-in session on Dyno) For all you professionals wanting to race a bike for Team USA at Phillip Island 2019 this is the one that will get you in the pointy end of the race.

What's this really worth? Well, it obviously has very minimal historic value, not being an actual historic racing motorcycle. But it is a fully-built racing machine built to compete on the vintage circuit and that $26,000 asking price seems pretty fair, considering the parts and labor that have gone into this one. The market for a replica historic racing motorcycle may be small, but this one will hopefully find the right buyer.


Better Than the Real Thing? 1980 Suzuki XR69 Replica for Sale
Honda February 9, 2018 posted by

Crown Jewel: Ex-Nicky Hayden Erion Racing 1999 Honda CBR900RR

Beyond the tragedy of losing a young life with so much unspent potential, the death of Nicky Hayden robbed from American motorcycling the last great talent to take a DIY mentality born on a dirt track to the world stage. The loss will resonate for years, as Hayden's influence touched every corner of the sport in the United States.

Nicky Hayden 1999 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

This is a chance to own a piece of Hayden's legend, an early brick in his road to the 2006 MotoGP World Championship. This is one of two 1999 Honda CBR900RRs Hayden campaigned for Erion Racing in the AMA's Formula Extreme category. We featured the other bike in the collection four years ago. In each case, the seller has offered direct confirmation that the bike is real from Kevin Erion.

From the eBay listing:

Erion Racing cbr 900rr ridden by Nicky Hayden in the 1999 AMA Formula Extreme series.
This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to own one of the bikes raced by the 2006 World Champion Nicky Hayden. This is not a replica...Certification documentation provided by Kevin Erion.

No mention is made of the bike's running condition, though it looks to have been left mostly in as-ridden shape, minus sponsor decals. It still bears Hayden's iconic 69 number plate. It's crass to mention value given the circumstances, but if the bike is indeed the real thing, its pedigree is without question and its mystique is likely to grow.

Crown Jewel: Ex-Nicky Hayden Erion Racing 1999 Honda CBR900RR