Posts by tag: Race Bike

Ducati April 29, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 2007 Ducati 944 Race/Track Bike

RSBFS reader Tom caught a mean case of the track bug back in 2006, and embarked on an exciting custom project. He enlisted pro builders from south of his Canadian border and developed a 944cc desmodue with a titanium chassis. The result is faired in Sharkskinz 998, with 999 tank and seat fairing, all red of course.

 

Doug Cook at ARC Fabrication fabricated the chassis from titanium.  The resulting frame is bizarre and beautiful, but the geometry, suspension and brakes are all reworked 900SS so handling is a known quantity.  Bruce Meyers at BCM Motorsports in Laconia rebuilt Tom's 900SS into a ported and polished race engine, with oversize cylinders resulting in 944cc, fed by 41mm Keihin flat-slide carburetors.  Tom enlisted BlackStone Tek to make a set of carbon fiber wheels for the project, and ARC supplied two underseat exhausts, one muffled to usual racetrack requirements, and the other open for unrestricted events.

 

Real life stepped back in the picture after the build was complete and Tom could only claim a few track events in the each of the next few years, on display since then.  The bike has been run but has low hours and is undamaged.  Pictures show the artful fabrication and sanitary presentation, from polished swingarm to tidy cockpit.  Tom's own thoughts on the bike:

This is truly a unique and amazing track bike ridden only occasionally for two or three seasons.  The full race motor (including STR cams, 41 mm FCR's, over-sized race pistons, ported and polished heads, blueprinted, etc.) was built by BCM Motorsports in New Hampshire.  The titanium frame, stainless exhaust pipes and red carbon fiber cans were built by Doug Cook.  The welds on the ti-frame, exhaust and the cans are pure art.  The bike has new front and rear Michelin slicks, 916 triple clamps, Rizoma brake fluid reservoirs, straight-through megaphones (they're wild!), cast iron rotors, Brembo levers, Shorai lithium battery, etc.  The bike weighs approximately 320 pounds and, it really flies, brakes fantastically (one finger) and turns like crazy.

Hard to fathom the number hours that went into this build, but the quality shows that a pro builder starts from a different plane than a shade-tree race mechanic.  The desmodue is a nice choice for a club racer, without liquid cooling and readily available.  Probably not the right mount for a novice track rider, but for someone ready to step up to a purpose-built lightweight, this is a singular opportunity.  Tom asks $9,500 and can be reached - here -.

-donn

 

 

Featured Listing – 2007 Ducati 944 Race/Track Bike
Ducati April 19, 2018 posted by

Trick Track Toy: Low-Mileage 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale

To some, it might seem like sacrilege to take a gorgeous, expensive, limited-edition Ducati superbike and turn it into a trackday toy. But if you've got the money to spend on something you can afford to wreck and want the very best, you can't go wrong with today's Ducati 1098R track bike. Honestly, homologation-special Ducatis don't really make practical roadbikes anyway: their uncomfortable ergonomics, race-bred handling, and ridiculous power only makes sense in an unrestricted environment.

History I'm sure will be kind to the Terblanche-styled 999. But at the time, the successor to the storied 916 was a relative sales flop, in spite of it being better in virtually every way. Power was up, electronics were more sophisticated, and the solo seat models even offered adjustable ergonomics. Unfortunately, the restyle went just a bit too far for Ducati's conservative fan base, but Ducati quickly learned their lesson. The 1098 that followed was really Ducati walking back their radical mandate, at least in terms of styling. It's a good-looking bike, but obviously kind of derivative, which was really the whole point after all. It may be my least favorite Ducati superbike, but apparently I'm crazy because I know more than a few guys who love it unreservedly. And you can't argue with the performance: in ultimate, 1098R form seen here, the v-twin pumped out a claimed 180hp, a huge jump over the earlier bike.

A big bump in displacement certainly helped: the 1098R actually had a larger 1198cc engine to exploit the full displacement allowed by World Superbike regulations at the time, an interesting reversal of the more recent Panigale 1299R that displaces less for the same reason... Aside from the bump in displacement that resulted from a larger bore and shorter stroke, the R also used titanium valves and connecting rods to help the bike rev higher. And while the 180hp is basically the minimum required for entry into the literbike club these days, the massive 99 lb-ft of torque should be enough to widen eyes everywhere.

Possibly the most significant aspect of the 1098R, aside from its competition-derived engine, was a race kit exhaust and ECU "intended for off-road use only" that liberated an additional 9hp and also activated the revolutionary Ducati Traction Control system with 8 levels of adjustability. It was relatively crude, compared to today's systems, but was undeniably effective and was used on Ducati's MotoGP and WSBK machines of the time.

After all that, it's almost easy to overlook the bike's trick suspension that included an Öhlins TTX36 twin-tube shock at the rear and represented pretty much the very best roadgoing suspension money could buy at the time. Just 300 examples of the 1098R were imported to the US, priced at $40,000. This one is number 277 of a total 450 produced worldwide and has only 2,800 miles on it, although most of those have accumulated on closed courses, and track miles are kind of like dog years...

From the original eBay listing: 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale

ONLY 2,800 MILES

#277 of 450

THIS BABY IS BAD!

PLEASE UNDERSTAND THIS IS A TRACK BIKE, NOT A STREET BIKE

The 1098 R is the ultimate Superbike. The most advanced, most powerful twin-cylinder motorcycle ever built. It is the product of a team of designers and engineers focussed on one objective only – to win.

The ‘R’ is a race bike, pure and simple. Its competition specification and superior components together with advanced electronics and race-proven chassis technology deliver a level of performance that empowers you with confidence and capability. On the road, it distinguishes you as a connoisseur of high-performance motorcycles. On the track it promotes you to a higher level of riding and closer to realising your dreams.

World Superbike rule changes mean that the road-going ‘R’ version is closer than ever to our factory race bike. The 1098 R is not a replica – it’s the real deal. An incredible 180hp L-Twin Testastretta Evoluzione engine in a race-winning Trellis chassis set-up tips the scales at an unbelievably lightweight 165kg (364lbs) and comes with a race kit that introduces Ducati Corse’s world championship winning traction control system.

Once again, Ducati raises the bar and sets the world standard for sport bikes while turning the heads and racing the hearts of enthusiasts throughout the world.

The 1098 R – Built to Win

If you have a need for speed, then this is your answer. 

This motorcycle was bought stock from the Ducati Dealership in 2012 when it had only 331 miles. The previous owner has upgraded numerous parts over the past few of years. I do have most of the original parts here in a box. The bike does have a couple minor scratches and chips (most have been professionally touched-up). Normal wear items for a track bike. This 1098 has always been serviced at the Ducati Dealership. Please understand; THIS IS A TRACK BIKE, not a street bike. 

The Buy It Now price for this low-mileage, race-ready homologation special is a reasonable $19,995. That's less than other 1098Rs we've seen, but of course it's likely to see a harder life than most and that's going to make it less desirable to collectors. 180hp and primitive traction-control seen here might not sound all that impressive, in this age of the cornering-ABS-equipped, up-and-down quickshifter-ed, traction-controlled, 206hp at-the-wheel Panigale 1299R Final Editions. But this 1098R most definitely is a very significant and collectible homologation-special Ducati from the dawn of the Electronics Era, when rider aids shifted [see what I did there?] from simply improving safety to making riders faster. If you've got the cash to splash, this is a pretty cool way to get your trackday kicks, and a race track actually seems a more appropriate place for a 1098R than collecting dust in some collection.

-tad

Trick Track Toy: Low-Mileage 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale
Suzuki March 28, 2018 posted by

Worth the Trip: 1983 Suzuki RGB500 for Sale

This time of year, really interesting sportbikes can be a little thin on the ground, so our online searches naturally take us farther afield. In this case, all the way to Japan for a 1983 Suzuki RGB500 that was the Grand Prix racing inspiration for the two-stroke RG500Γ. This Mk8 version was highly-developed, although the earliest iterations of the bike were notoriously brawn-over-brains machines, with plenty of power but sometimes terrifying high-speed handling...

Suzuki's initial foray back into Grand Prix competition in the early 1970s was built around a production-based, water-cooled parallel twin borrowed from their T500 Titan, which saw limited success. Something different was needed if Suzuki wanted to win, and that meant the development of a brand-new four cylinder engine that featured a pair of cranks, disc valves, and the now famous square-four architecture. The new four-cylinder machine was first competed in 1974 and won its first Manufacturer's Title in 1976, then went on to dominate Grand Prix racing for years, and actually drove the shift from four-stroke machines to smokers: if you wanted to compete, you made the switch. That change defined prototype motorcycle racing up until 2002, when rules changes specifically intended to allow four-strokes to compete on more equal footing were introduced.

The original design for Suzuki's new square-four used front and rear cylinder banks that were the same height and made 110hp, although later versions used the more familiar "stepped" arrangement familiar to fans of the Gamma and made even more power. Suspension and tire technology took a while to catch up with the engine's brutal performance: 120hp may not sound like much today, but two-strokes deliver that power in a famously abrupt manner, and the early machines ate tires and chains with startling regularity. By 1982, the bike weighed 238lbs and produced over 120hp, with top speeds of up to 170mph and the RGB500, helped along by talented riders like Barry Sheene and Randy Mamola, was a dominant force in top-level motorcycle racing throughout the 1980s.

From the original Yahoo! Japan listing: 1983 Suzuki RGB500 for Sale

Racer RGB 500 I-MK 8 Works specifications. (Marco Rukkinelli player in Japan has riding)

Frame engine · swing arm Other than Works parts · Exterior manufacturer original.

(Engine) Works Mechanic · Full Overhaul (Replacement of new parts such as expendable parts)

It is running for 2 hours including a mustard and test course.

Basically present car verification. On... examination can receive person hope, in any case present condition delivery no claim.

A bid please those who can understand old racers · those who can understand by image.

Since cancellation of a bid can not correspond, please bid carefully under self-responsibility.

Those who can withdraw to Saitasa city, or if you can arrange for land transportation by yourself as a guideline after about a week after a successful bid

If it is BAS, we will bring it to Kashiwa depot for 5000 yen.

BAS Please bear the shipping fee from Kashiwa Depot by the highest bidder

Please, no jokes about the listing: I ran this though Google Translate so the original seller isn't responsible for any atrocious syntactical mistakes. Although I'm really interested in "a mustard and test course." Obviously, potential buyers won't be worried about the need to register their purchase, since this isn't a street bike. You'd just need to figure out whether to to race or display this bit of history.

-tad

Worth the Trip: 1983 Suzuki RGB500 for Sale
Yamaha March 26, 2018 posted by

Race ready: Deus-restored 1973 Yamaha TD3

As a road racing icon, the Yamaha TD series really needs no introduction. The internet is positively lousy with rhapsodic accounts of its achievements on a racetrack in the hands of big names and amateurs alike. Not just screamingly fast, the 250cc parallel twin TDs were reliable as the sunrise, which made them very hard for contemporary iron to top.

1973 Yamaha TD3 for sale on eBay

They're still darlings of vintage racers, aided by simple air-cooled architecture and widely available parts. This 1973 Yamaha TD3 has been made race ready by Woolie's Workshop, an arm of the Deus Ex Machina classic bike franchise. It has been updated with a front disc brake and an Ohlins steering damper to edge it closer to modern spec.

From the eBay listing:

Fresh from Deus’ Woolie’s Workshop

c.1973 Yamaha TD3 250cc Racing Motorcycle

The mainstay of 250cc and 350cc class racing at national and international level for many years, the twin-cylinder two-stroke Yamaha well deserved the title of 'privateer's friend'. The 250cc TD2 arrived in 1969, replacing the TD1C, and immediately proved capable of winning Grands Prix, privateer Kent Andersson triumphing in the German round at Hockenheim that year, one of Yamaha's most significant classic victories. The giant leap forward from the TD1C had been achieved thanks to a comprehensive redesign that saw the porting and exhaust system updated, superior Mikuni carburettors adopted and the chassis, suspension and brakes greatly improved. Looking like a scaled down Norton Featherbed, the TD2's chassis was a development of that used for the RD56 works racer. Kel Carruthers on the works Benelli 'four' denied Kent Anderson the 250cc World Championship in 1969 but the following year the TD2 came good when Rod Gould, riding a works machine entered by Yamaha Motor NV of Holland, took the title.

The TD3 was an evolutionary step forward in the long line of successful Yamaha air-cooled two-strokes, and as it happens it would also be the last in its line. Released by the Japanese marque in 1972, the TD3 benefitted from a horizontally split crankcase, which holds the 247cc internals, producing about 50bhp and a redline in excess of 10,000 revs, which can propel the diminutive little racer’s 230 pounds to blistering racing performance figures with incredible reliability.

Fresh from Deus Ex Machina’s “Woolie’s Workshop”, this 250cc Yamaha 2-Stroke screamer was built to be competitive. Like all the builds out of Woolie’s Workshop, it has that ‘final 5%”, which is always the most assiduously earned and separates the great bikes from the mere good ones. Every component was addressed, rebuilt, refinished and restored with Woolie’s exquisite attention to detail, including engine, gearbox, and all cycle parts. Upgrades include the Ohlins steering damper and disc front brake. Built to race, but with no track time since the build, this is a fantastic opportunity to own a custom purpose-built race bike to be a class winning AHRMA machine. Tuck in, hold on, and safety-wire your bum to the seat….

Sold on a Bill of Sale.

For further information and additional photos, please visit: GloryMotorworks.com/Motorcycle-Sale

The bike has been run but not raced since it was finished, so it is just waiting for a vintage racer to give it the neck wringing it so richly deserves.

 

Race ready: Deus-restored 1973 Yamaha TD3
Yamaha March 18, 2018 posted by

Wild Kingdom – 1974 Yamaha TZ750

No less a rider than Giacomo Agostini abdicated his dynasty at MV Agusta when Yamaha introduced the 4-cylinder 2-stroke 700cc racebike. He won the 1974 Daytona 200 with it, and its 750cc progeny went on to a 12-year run on the beach.  This newly restored example has matching numbers and a nicely documented race history.

1974 Yamaha TZ750 for sale on eBay

As ever, specs for a race machine are a liar's poker affair.  The engine had a nasty tone even at idle and was good for 140hp at full song.  The frame was a twin downtube arrangement and the swingarm was all new, spread at the rear wheel but converging at the bottom pivot and top where the shock mounted, the Monocross went on to bigger and better.  Initially a pair of RD350 race engines joined at the hip, the TZ750 was more purpose-built, water cooled though the crankcase bristles with fins.  Expansion chambers mostly taking the path of least resistance - except for the left which wound around and through the frame.  Triple hydraulic disk brakes provided the retro-force.

The owner has treated this TZ750 to a rare level of restoration, both mechanically and cosmetically.  Just part of the eBay auction's comments :

This bike has The Holy Trinity for the most discerning collectors and enthusiasts: Provenance, Rarity and Condition! What you see here is the culmination of a 10 year, no cost spared, meticulous frame-off restoration. The resto was done on a complete, running, period correct, and 'as raced' TZ from the 1970's. Amazingly, during the bike's campaign both here and abroad, it appears to have never been crashed or blown-up. The exact Factory paint scheme and colors were precisely replicated from Factory original. The Shipping Invoice (see pic, courtesy of NATS Forum) shows #159 being a genuine 1st batch racer. There were a total of 219 TZ750A's built;  few remain today.

Rather too specialized for a hobbyist, exercising the TZ-750 will take commitment.  Maintenance hours will be more numerous than "flight" hours.  But this race veteran is sorted and shouldn't bring too many surprises.  As the owner states:

The bike was built to run, but assembled primarily for display and ease of cleaning.

Successful to the point of domination, the TZ-750 will likely be invited back to any event it attends.  The fairing's well-drawn lines are sure easy on the eyes.  Mechanically, it's better than new - improvements to the exhaust system made and impossibly light brake disks, with blank livery as shipped.  Likely never to turn another hot lap, the velvet ropes beckon.  But once photographed, the years of racing history are in the books, and the soundtrack from a demonstration lap or two is all that's missing...

-donn

Wild Kingdom – 1974 Yamaha TZ750
Suzuki March 15, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – Street-Registered 1986 Suzuki RG500 Racebike

Update 3.15.2018: SOLD IN ONE HOUR! Congratulations to buyer and seller. -dc

Please note: Ted from AutoManiaGP has asked us to open the comments on this post in the hopes that the RSBFS community can assist in determining what has been done to construct this bike. There was no accompanying documentation and we would appreciate your help by examining the pictures and commenting with any additional information you can provide. The text below is our first shot but we look forward to what else can be learned. Please forward widely and thank you for your help! -dc


Suppose you had been a racer, and owned a race team, over the years acquiring intimate knowledge of several different brands of factory race gear - what might you build as a street machine?  The few production years of Suzuki RG500 Gamma imprinted Mike Canepa of 10K Racing, and he put together a race-derived machine with Spondon Engineering chassis, with trackside details stem to stern, in race livery.

Suzuki RG500 For Sale at AutomaniaGP

Suzuki's RG500 used a twin-crank square-four two stroke, with almost unmatched power-to-weight, 95 hp in factory street tune.  No doubt well above that with racing carburetors and exhaust.  Like any privateer's racebike, specs are hard to come by, but this RG appears to have a Spondon chassis, an English specialty manufacturer with a long history of chassis development for major manufacturers and well-heeled weekend warriors.  The twin spars are at least twice the size of a road-going RG.  Later upside-down Showa forks are installed, with Nissin 6-pot front calipers radially mounted.  The swingarm is thought to be from a Yamaha TZ250, an asymmetrical fabrication with a massive right side but straight left side with a brace to allow the chain to pass through.  Fairings are quite like a later RGV-500, with air scoops just above the front fender feeding the four sidedraft carbs inside.

Unlike any actual racer, this RG500 is clean, polished, and road legal despite the Skoal Bandit graphics.  Trim carbon mudguards are installed, along with a full featured instrument cluster.  Conflicted as the four expansion chambers and turn signals, there's a locking gas cap on the tank.  The fairing's post-and-pin supports are safety-wired to keep the cotter pin around.  Consigning dealer Automania of Oregon has a great collection of pictures - here - and says this about the bike:

Mike Canepa, owner of race team 10-K Racing was in the later stages of building this race bike for the street when he passed. I had been hearing about it for over two years and unfortunately did not pay attention to what he was telling me at the time. Hind sight is 100%. The engine is V-4 Two Stroke out of a 1986 Suzuki RG500 according to the records we found, but everything else has been a guess or information others have offered up. It was not finished, but he had been riding it recently.

This motorcycle is based on a 1986 Suzuki RG500 but everything except the engine is either custom or race track sourced. The rear swing arm looks to be from a 1991 Yamaha TZ250, the front forks Honda RS250 and the frame appears to be a Spondon that had no identifying numbers or manufactures id on it. It has been titled with an assigned OR State VIN plate and the bike is registered for the street. I am open to anyone looking at the images and suggesting where they think the parts came from. Don’t be shy…

The selling price is $16,695. The VIN# is ORSPERG9G1003 and miles are unknown.

Hard to tally up the hours and dollars invested in this racer-with-lights, though the preparation is immaculate.  Likely the frame has a pedigree, and Spondon Engineering has quite a following, even a fan website for reference.  Power-to-weight is probably more important here than on a factory machine, and the weight should be closer to 300 than 400 lbs.  Evidently inspected by Oregon DMV, it is titled and has road registration, which speaks to how close to completion the bike is.  RG and RGV did well in the 500cc years of Grand Prix racing, accounting for four championships and seven constructor's titles.  Automania invites knowledgeable comment and asks $16,995 for this one-of-one, and can be reached at (541) 479-8888 or emailed - here -.

Featured Listing – Street-Registered 1986 Suzuki RG500 Racebike