Posts by tag: R1

Yamaha August 23, 2018 posted by

Great bike, bad timing: 1992 Yamaha YZF 750SP with 4,017 miles

Today's post is a bit of homolgation era goodness, a 1992 Yamaha YZF750R/SP.  The SP isn't currently as desired by collectors as other 750cc machines, such as a 1st/2nd generation Suzuki GSXR-750R or Kawasaki ZX7RR, nor is it as technologically important as the OW01 or R7.  Yet the YZF750SP was dominant for multiple years in Superbike racing and was recently rated as possibly the best 1990's 750cc homolgation machine by Practical Sportbikes (April 2017).  Combine this with it only being produced from 1993-1996 and with this one showing only 4,017 miles, it certainly seems worthy of a post here on RSBFS.

1992 Yamaha YZF750SP with 4017 miles

Ask a group of sportbike fans what the "best" 1990's 750cc machine was and you will no doubt get a variety of answers.  Some will say it was the GSX-R750, the bike that really launched the repli-racer craze and the last of the air cooled monsters.  Others might say it was the Yamaha OW01, R7 (Ow02) or perhaps the Kawasaki ZX7RR...you might even get a few votes for the landmark Honda VFR750, a progenitor of the V4 philosophy that now rules MotoGp.   Ask this same group about the Yamaha YZF750R SP and perhaps you get a few comments of "um..yeah..nice bike" or shrugs but very few would probably initially list it as the best 750cc of the 1990's.   But consider this...it won the Suzuka 8 hour in 1996 which made it the the only non-Honda to do that in over 10 years and it dominated in Superbike Racing in the UK from 1996-1998.  Think about that timeframe for a second..notice anything?   It means the SP was dominant on the track for 2 years after the company stopped making it, a truly amazing result.

In case you are wondering how Yamaha achieved this the answer is in typical Yamaha fashion the SP was developed as an evolution, not a revolution.   Like the preceding OW01, the SP came equipped with Yamaha's EXUP system which delivered both high rpm performance and good mid-range.  The 3/4 liter powerplant was wrapped up in a new deltabox frame designed by the same man who would lead Yamaha's R1 effort. And handling was done by adjustable forks and 6 piston calipers, a first on a production machine.  The SP also came with flatside carbs, a close ratio gearbox, adjustable swingarm pivot and lots of other trick goodies designed to help it dominate on the track.

Now let's turn out attention to this particular offering.  Listed as a 1992 model imported from Japan, this one looks to be in excellent condition.  The seller does provide some  recent maintenance history, the summary of which is as follows:

  • 4017 miles (6465 kilometers)
  • Imported from Japan and now has a legal Washington State clear title
  • Carburetor was recently ultrasonically cleaned and adjusted, and a full service tune-up was performed which included new, tires, spark plugs, chain, air filter, brake pads, an oil change, and fluids flushed. All of the lighting, switches and electrical components work as they should
  • No cracks on any of the body panels, but there are some minor nicks and scrapes on a few of the panels. The wheels are perfect with no rock chips or scratches anywhere. The frame and engine have no corrosion and are nice and clean

NOTE:  I did note a fairing scuff on the riders right side lower (zoom in on the pic below on the ebay auction, you can see it in the 'Yamaha' Blue lettering) and I am not sure if the exhaust is OEM or aftermarket but other than that this bikes looks completely OEM.  I do wish the pics were taken in more direct sunlight though.

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So this brings us to the question, is this bike worth the $13,000 USD asking price?  Well when it was new the YZF asking price was $15,000 so the asking price is actually not outrageous and finding one in this condition and mileage seems unlikely anytime soon so the price seems right on.  Still this is a 26 year old motorcycle so its not going to appeal to a lot of people/the chances of major price appreciation from this point seem small.   Personally I think this one will appeal most to a homologation-era collector. I can envision it parked between a OW01 and R7 or maybe gleaning in the sun next to a ZX7RR.

Marty/dallaslavowner

Great bike, bad timing:  1992 Yamaha YZF 750SP with 4,017 miles
Yamaha March 15, 2018 posted by

Racetrack Refugee: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale

Yamaha's R7 was among the last in a long line of machines from the Age of Homologation Specials, where the manufacturers competing in AMA and World Superbike racing created limited runs of insanely expensive bikes that looked like production models, but were chock full of trick bits like adjustable steering heads and exotic engine internals. For the most part, these were based on pretty common machines from each manufacturer's lineup. But in situations where nothing in the manufacturer's stable really matched their needs, companies sometimes whipped up a bike whose whole production run was designed to allow the bike to compete in a variety of racing classes. By the late 1990s, the 750cc class was pretty much on its way out as a viable category for streetbikes, but that didn't stop Yamaha from introducing their very trick and hideously expensive YZF-R7. How trick? Well the frame was claimed to have been based on Yamaha's 500 Grand Prix machine. Just 50 were imported to the US out of 500 built in total. And how expensive? Well, the R7 was $32,000 late-nineties dollars, and that was before you included the race kit that actually made it fast.

Just one problem: from the factory, the R7 made just 106hp, which didn't really provide the performance the looks or pricetag promised. The solution? Just pony up for the race kit that activated a second, dormant test of injectors and replaced the airbox for a revised part that unleashed a more appropriate 162hp but also gave racebike-like reliability. The biggest limitation of the R7 was that engine, and unleashing the full potential could be tricky and expensive, so owners that wanted to use their bikes on the road sometimes switched out the 749cc engine for the 998cc unit from the R1, which seems to have been done in this particular case. I'm under the impression that this was a relatively simple swap and, although it could be considered sacrilege, actually had several benefits: it gave very similar maximum power to the original engine, but with far more midrange, and it also meant the original engine could be saved to preserve the bike's value for future collectors. That appears to have been done here, although the seller's description does leave me with some questions.

This R7/R1 hybrid appears to have been built to a high standard by Graves Yamaha, so I'm sure they knew what they were doing and I've no doubt the bike is very special. But it would really help if the owner was clearer about what he has: he calls the powerplant a "OWO1 1000 superbike motor" but the OW01 was 749cc, although the five-valve inline four was related to both the R7 and the 998cc R1 units. The OW02 engine was supposedly based on that earlier engine and has the same displacement to conform to class limitations, but I'm not sure it can simply be punched out to a full 1000cc.

More likely, it has a later R1 engine, which was, as stated above, the simpler, much more reliable way to get the fully-unleashed R7's 162hp without all the explode-y engine drama. Maybe it's a full-factory superbike R1 unit? The seller also mentions the "half R7 and half R1 frame" which would require some very serious surgery if true. And which halves were used? Front and back? Left and right? Maybe it's the R7 Deltabox with the R1 subframe? It's also listed as a 1998 model, but I was under the impression that the bike was sold in 1999 and 2000.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale

This bike was built in house built by factory Graves race team and was one of Chuck Graves personal bikes. It might be one of only two left, this bike has every goodie you could imagine on it: Brembo brakes, Ohlins forks and rear shock, superbike radiator and tank, swing arm, custom half R7 frame and half R1 frame, Yamaha OWO1 1000 superbike motor, rear Brembo brakes, thumb brake, brake lines, rearsets, Akro pipe, after market wheels, chain sprocket kit, offset triple clamps. This bike new with the race kit harness was $43,000 and only 32 came to the US that year, it is a very limited production bike, to rebuild this bike in today's time would cost over $100k plus the 1000 donor bike for parts, this bike looks like it just rolled off the race truck.

All-in-all, this modified R7 is a very cool machine, with plenty of very trick bits plainly visible, but I'd definitely want some answers to my questions before bidding on this one. Many, many questions, but worth asking, considering it is a Yamaha R7, after all. I'd especially want to know if the original motor is included, as a good chunk of the bike's value is wrapped up in its originality, and while this might be an amazing machine and a true track-day weapon, all those modifications likely hurt the collector value. As always, if you have any insight into the bike, please feel free to fire away in the comments!

-tad

Racetrack Refugee: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale
Yamaha March 13, 2018 posted by

The beginning: 1998 Yamaha YZF-R1

After lagging slightly behind throughout the '90s with a host of beautiful-but-dated or comfortable and fast-but-heavy steeds, Yamaha came out of its corner swinging in '98 with the all-new R1. It was covered in decals advertising age-old Yamaha marketing terms like Genesis and Ex-Up, but the new machine was a beast the way the CBR900RR had been five years earlier.

1998 Yamaha R1 for sale on eBay

With the gearbox slammed on top of the output shaft, the R1 had a tiny wheelbase, weighed nothing and made in the neighborhood of 140 horsepower. There were few superlatives at the time to do it justice, and the line it spawned continues to set the benchmark for sportbikes.

This 1998 Yamaha R1 wears the distinct red-and-white livery, which I much prefer over the blue and silver that was also on offer. It is clean enough to eat your dinner off of, and has turned in just shy of 10,000 miles.

From the eBay listing:

1998 Yamaha YZF-R1

Quite possibly the most sought after collectible production Japanese Sport Bike of the last 25 years. No sportbike collection is complete without one and they are becoming very hard to find.

This is a wonderful example of a one owner 1998 Yamaha R1 in the coveted Red & White. Is it perfect? No. Is it super clean and probably the nicest one for sale in the country today? Yes.

A true 9993 miles, runs like new and everything works perfectly. This R1 has spent its whole life in an air conditioned garage.

The R1 has a couple of period correct mods that include an under tail eliminator and flush mount turn signals. The bike could easily be reconfigured to completely stock as the parts are all still available from Yamaha for around $300.

The amazing thing is that it still has its factory exhaust, windscreen, levers and the paint and decals are in exceptionally fresh condition. The only blem is a small crack in the paint on the tank that just appeared when it was about two years old.

As the magazines of the time dubbed it “Twitchy Bitch” it of course has an Ohlins steering damper.

Now for a couple of very cool and rare bits. Along with the R1 comes the original dealer large vinyl showroom marketing poster, original brochure and a genuine Yamaha accessory seat cowl. As a Yamaha dealer for the better part of twenty years, I had never seen another poster or brochure.

This is a “no reserve” auction and the bike will sell.

Bid strong as this may be the last best chance to add this to your sportbike collection.

If you have any questions don’t hesitate to email or call.

Happy Bidding!

Jason

It will not be long before these beasts start seeing their values climb, much the same way slab-side Gixxers have of late. This one is offered with no reserve, and yet is north of $5,000 with a healthy chunk of time left in the auction. We'd jump on this one while the jumping is good.

The beginning: 1998 Yamaha YZF-R1
Yamaha August 29, 2017 posted by

Rare Beast: 2006 Yamaha MT-01 for Sale

Most of the time, I try to walk the straight and narrow with my posts, sticking to highly-strung, fully-faired speed demons and racetrack refugees. But sometimes my obsession with the weird and rare gets the better of me and I just have to post stuff like this Yamaha MT-01, even if it's coloring outside the lines a bit from a strict “sportbike” point of view. The MT-01 is really much more a muscle bike in the vein of a Ducati Monster or Suzuki BKing than an out-and-out sportbike, but there’s much more going on here once you scratch the surface.

The drivetrain specifications definitely don’t scream “sportbike”: the air-cooled, four-valve per cylinder engine had twin spark plugs for optimal combustion across the face of the huge pistons and was originally found in Yamaha/Road Star Warrior, although in this installation, it featured a lightened flywheel and the first v-twin application of Yamaha’s EXUP valve. The long-stroke unit’s 97mm x 113mm gave 1670cc, good for 89hp and 112 lb-ft of torque, enough to hustle the 540lbs dry hunk of metal along pretty smartly, with minimal need to work the five-speed box. I've never actually heard one run, but reviews all praise the thudding, Harley-esque exhaust note.

If that’s not particularly inspiring to you canyon-carvers, note that the rest of the bike is more Mr Hyde to the drivetrain's Dr Jekyl: that huge lump of an engine was a fully-stressed member and the fully-adjustable upside-down forks and radial front brakes came right off the 2004-2005 R1. The MT-01 had 17” wheels at both ends so you can fit the very stickiest modern rubber and, if that’s not enough to clarify the bike's sporting intent, the 2009 version was available with full Öhlins suspension and Pirelli Diablo Rosso tires straight from the factory.

There's a school of thought that suggests fast road riding is best accomplished by not having to worry about shifting too much. That constant gear-lever-dancing, while fun, isn't as fast as simply surfing a wave of torque in one gear, especially on unfamiliar roads. On track, I'm sure it'd get murdered by a good 600cc supersport. On a winding back road? I bet that same 600 would have a hard time shaking this thing, and period reviews of the bike were very positive.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Yamaha MT-01 for Sale

This torque monster is basically new. There are less than 400 km on this unit. The motorcycle was on the showroom floor and was never stored outdoors. The bike has no wear on its tires and the little nubs on the tires from manufacturing are still there. No accessories added or changed. The color is silver with blue accents. Very limited production on these bikes. 2006 was the first year of production. There is one imperfection or mark from the bike being moved in the showroom. This mark is in the pictures and is cosmetic. The reason I still have this awesome bike is just that. I was going to keep it but just don't have time to ride it. I owned the Yamaha dealership and kept this one for myself.

The MT-01 is an unusual machine, and that's a big part of the appeal.  Build-quality was very high, as the bike was a flagship model for Yamaha, although they haven’t really retained their value in their original markets, as the bike never really seemed to find the right audience. What’s one worth here in the USA? Good question, but this one appears to be in nearly perfect condition, and the seller is asking $12,000. If you could find a way to register it here [the bike is for sale in Canada] it'd make quite a conversation starter at your local bike hang out.

-tad

Rare Beast: 2006 Yamaha MT-01 for Sale
Yamaha August 14, 2017 posted by

First-Year Hot Rod: Modified 1998 Yamaha R1

When the 1998 Yamaha R1 debuted, it quickly dispatched the undisputed king of the streets, the Honda CBR900RR, with a lither frame, more focused suspension and roughly 20 more horses than the suddenly-underwhelming Honda.

1998 Yamaha R1 for sale on eBay

At the top of most magazine comparison tests even today, it was arguably the R1 that kick started the literbike craze, helping to relegate a crop of race-replica 600s to the "beginner bike" category in the minds of wannabe Rossis the world over.

Even in 1998, the R1 sneaked in under 400 pounds dry and spat out a still-impressive 150 horsepower.

The example here looks clean and has been extensively worked over, though the ad offers scant details and virtually no description.

Obvious changes are Dymag carbon fiber wheels, trick Ohlins suspension pieces, Brembo brakes, an Akrapovic exhaust and a one-piece superbike-style handlebar setup.

The seller claims the engine carries "performance" pistons and cams, but does not specify beyond that. The bike also has a carbon fuel tank and fenders, Mikuni rearsets and a Sergeant seat.

From the eBay listing:

1998 YAMAHA R-1 PLEASE FREE TO CALL WITH ANY QUESTIONS WWW.SPECIALIZEDMOTORS.COM OFFICE 954-622-0466 CELL ANTHONY 954-540-8495

Inline 4 Cylinder 1000cc Engine
High Performance Pistons And Cams Dyno Tuned
Ohlins Road And Track Forks With Graves Carriers
Ohlins Rear Shock With Titanium Spring
Dymag Carbon Fiber Wheels

Brembo Rotors
Brembo Billet Front Calipers
Sargent Seat
Carbon Fiber Fuel Tank And Fenders
Superbike Handlebar Conversion
Stainless Steel And Titanium Akrapovic Exhaust
Mikuni Rear Seats
520 Chain Conversion
Chrome Engine Covers
Quick Shifter

The Buy-It-Now is set at $6,900, a price no doubt inflated by the myriad additions. With six days left in the listing, we'd say the ask is in the ballpark, but it will take a special buyer to pull the trigger.

First-Year Hot Rod: Modified 1998 Yamaha R1
Yamaha June 6, 2017 posted by

Like a virgin: 2006 Yamaha YZF-R1 LE with only 6 miles!

For many, the classic Yamaha race livery will always be the bumble bee yellow and black, an iconic combination forever immortalized by King Kenny Roberts. It is a color scheme that has adorned many models - from the TZs and RZ racers of the 1970s to the RDLC and RZ350 editions in the 1980s. It is bold, it makes a statement, and it is quintessential Yamaha. But is there more than just color here?

Yamaha YZF-R1 Limited Edition for sale on eBay

This Limited Edition YZF-R1, built to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the company, takes a page out of the Ducati playbook: take a good machine, beef it up in minor ways, add a splash of graphics, limit the number of bikes released, and sell each at a premium. The LE model of the R1 is really no different. Take a standard 2006 R1 - itself a very good open class bike. Add upscale Ohlins suspension front and rear, with a trick height adjuster out back (10mm range of motion). Dress it up with some custom Marchesini wheels (pattered after Rossi's MoviStar racer), shod it with super-sticky rubber, and add a slipper clutch for that little bit extra performance. Drape it in race bike livery that really makes it stand out. Anodize everything else to match. Give it an onboard lap timer to really sell the racing theme. Assign each one a number plaque and sell it at a premium. In this case, a $18,000 MSRP.

From the seller:
2006 Yamaha 50th Anniversary R1 Limited Edition R1 LE being Sold by Original Owner/Collector purchased in April 2006

Six…Yes ONLY Six Delivery Miles!

Bone Stock Original

Bike No. 243 of Serialized Production limited to 500 Units imported to the US

Original MSRP of $18,000

More from the seller:
Sale of Bike comes complete with the following included:

BRAND NEW Complete with Tags Yamaha 50th Anniversary Vintage Leather Jacket – Size XL (Original Purchase Price of $769.95/One currently listed on eBay for $829.99)

BRAND NEW Complete with Tags Yamaha 50th Anniversary Vintage Pants – Size 36

BRAND NEW in Box Arai RX-7 Corsair Colin Edwards Laguna Seca 50th Anniversary Helmet – Size L (Original Purchase Price of $759.95)

[Above Only Worn for Photo as modeled by 16 year old son, who is not included in sale as per Mom!]

Two Original Keys on Yamaha 50th Anniversary Key Chain(s)

BRAND NEW Yamaha 50th Anniversary Vintage Gear Bag

Additional Owner’s Manual in Plastic (In addition to original Owner’s Manual under seat)

New Service Manual; Original 2006 Yamaha Sportbike Brochure; and Color Copy of MSO

Additional Gold Drive Chain sealed in Plastic

Original Born with Yuasa YTZ10S Battery plus New YTZ10S Battery purchased on 05.24.17

The trouble with the "limited edition" format is that it has never really worked for the Japanese - apart for ultra-exclusive homologation bikes. Under the covers, this is really just a tarted up R1, of which Yamaha sold by the tens of thousands. With the Limited Edition Anniversary bike, Yamaha restricted output to approximately 500 units in the United States, and about an equal amount spread across the rest of the world.

This particular R1-LE is about as clean a bike as you are likely to see and comes with that looks like a pile of extra stuff. With only 6 miles on the clock (supposedly delivery / dealer prep miles), you are looking at essentially a brand new bike. A brand new bike that is 11 years old, that is. Will this one appreciate in value over time? It is hard to tell with any bike, but a rise in value is not likely to occur in the near term. And if there is a rise in value, it will likely be due to the fact that the bike is still in "as new" condition more so than the fact that it is an Anniversary edition. Still, it is a very cool bike - and one that we should be thankful Yamaha created. Check it out here, and then jump over the Comments and share your thoughts: Worth more for the miles or the LE graphics? Good Luck!!

MI

Like a virgin: 2006 Yamaha YZF-R1 LE with only 6 miles!




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