Posts by tag: Paul Smart

Ducati December 6, 2017 posted by

Smart Bargain? 2006 Ducati PS1000 LE

The world of Ducati is littered with factory limited edition models. Many of these editions are simply visual; a different color of paint or a splattering of carbon fiber accessories. But make them in few enough numbers, and they become far more rare and desirable than the standard model on which they are built. Consider, then, the Paul Smart commemorative model. Created by grafting homage elements of the 1970 green frame 750SS racer onto the new SportClassic platform, the PS1000 LE was a truly unique machine in both form and function.

2006 Ducati PS1000 LE Paul Smart for sale

Built one year only, the Paul Smart edition was created to celebrate the milestone of a certain 1972 Imola race. Hoping to cash in on the nostalgia of the iconic green frame bevel drive desmo, designer Pierre Terblanche started with a standard SportClassic Sport 1000 model and added the visual elements of sliver paint on the plastics and of course the green painted frame. Chuck in adjustable Öhlins suspension front and rear, a steering damper, and lower clip-ons (which are a bit of stretch for smaller riders) and you have a fair bit of distinction over other SportClassic models. Worldwide, the Paul Smart was restricted to just 2000 examples.

From the seller:
2006 Paul Smart Limited Edition, PS1000LE DUCATI, Rare and collectable. This is a factory-made sort-of replica of the Green frame Ducati that legendary Paul Smart made famous. Only a few thousand of these made, less than 1000 came to the USA. Great condition, low mileage. Fast and beautiful. I have the factory racing ECM, but did not install it as it is plenty fast already. Termignonis installed. Stock exhaust included. Speedimoto Belt Covers, bar end mirrors, New battery, Rebuilt title, cosmetic damage only, rebuilt by Paul Smart expert using factory parts.

The interesting thing about Ducati limited edition models is that they really work - both as a functional motorcycle as well as an investment vehicle. By and large, most recent LE models are worth more today than when originally sold. Just take a look at a clean SuperLight, the internet sensation MH900e, or any of the other numbered editions released by Bologna. Paul Smart has name recognition amongst the Ducatsi faithful, and these PS1000 LE examples are behaving in a very similar financial manner than the limited edition models that preceded it.

Paul Smart models have been chasing upwards from the high teens into the $20k region, and we have seen asks as high as $30k. Historically, Ducati PS-LE models are decent investment vehicles provided they are original and relatively stock. That is where caveat emptor enters the picture. Literally translated into "let the buyer beware," the ask for this very pretty Paul Smart edition is a relatively scant $13,500. The details are clearly missing, but the tell is the rebuilt title. No question that accident damage is the cause. The real question is if these models will become coveted enough to warrant investment in a bike with a black mark on its permanent record. Check it out there, and then let us know what you think: bargain or bad call? Good Luck!!

MI

Smart Bargain? 2006 Ducati PS1000 LE
Ducati November 14, 2017 posted by

Built to the Hilt: 2006 Ducati PS1000LE

As special editions to begin with, Ducati Paul Smart 1000LEs generally see duty as garage queens, left largely stock and original. This one certainly has led a pampered existence thus far, but clearly was owned by someone who did not know the phrase "leave well enough alone."

2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE

The list of additions is long, but includes a Termi exhaust, two Schedoni seats, and a smattering of pieces from Rizoma. Cosmetically the bike is immaculate, and given its ultra-low mileage, it should be mechanically sound, too, though it might benefit from a once-over to make sure time hasn't eroded its rubber and plastic parts.

In anticipation of mid-aughts Ducati nylon fuel tanks' propensity to swell in the presence of ethanol fuel, the seller is including an unused, OEM gas tank.

From the eBay listing:

2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE Limited Edition bike. IMMACULATE!! Always garaged. Never dropped. Perfect condition. Rare bike in as new condition. ******Comes with an OEM replacement tank that has never been used. Also, has not one, but TWO Schedoni seats (one tan, one black; both suede). Extras include:

Titanium Termi 2 into 1 exhaust

Titanium NCR rear sets, shifter and rear brake pedal

FLEDA LED rear light system

FLEDA front turn signals

Bar end mirrors

Rizoma grips

Rizoma reservoirs

Brushed aluminum chain guard

Elusive OEM lower fairings with #16

NCR titanium gas cap

Rizoma open clutch cover

Rizoma brushed aluminum belt covers with clear windows

CRG Brake and Clutch levers

Too much to list all. Have all original parts that were removed as well.

Bike can be seen in Manhattan Beach, CA. Buyer to arrange shipping from Los Angeles, CA

Good Luck! I reserve the right to sell outside of eBay and cancel auction at any time.

Being a Paul Smart bike, and one laden with aftermarket bits and bobs, the asking price is upper-echelon. With ten days left in the sale, the bike has attracted a few followers at its $29,500 asking price.

Built to the Hilt: 2006 Ducati PS1000LE
Ducati November 10, 2017 posted by

Unlikely Racebike: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale

One school of thinking about fast bike riding posits that the goal is speed, and that the motorcycle itself is a mere tool for achieving that end. But although a track-day GSX-R makes plenty of sense from a purely practical point of view, practical can be a little boring, so why not go fast with a bit more style? A buddy of mine is a fan of the MV Agusta F4 and found an example hiding in the Pacific Northwest with a shockingly low price a while back. Apparently, the rear wheel bearing failed ["Oh, don't worry, they all do that..."], leaving the bike an unrideable, but repairable albatross around the owner's neck, and he was selling it at a shockingly low price. It might seem like sacrilege to turn Tamburini's masterpiece into a track hack, but let's face it: that's where it belongs, since it sucks out loud as a road bike. And it just seems much cooler to go racing or track day riding on something like an F4, or a Bimota YB9, or today's Ducati SportClassic Paul Smart 1000LE.

Powered by the twin-plug "Dual Spark" version of Ducati's air and oil-cooled two-valve v-twin that was good for a claimed 92hp, the SportClassic line wasn't especially fast in a straight line, and you'd think that, racing cues aside, the Paul Smart is more of a bike for posing during weekend espresso runs to the local cafe than the foundation of a race-winning machine. In stock form, you'd basically be right: obviously, wire wheels aren't ideal for a real performance machine, and that air-cooled engine isn't exactly a powerhouse. But Ducati really don't seem to know how to build something purely for posing, and the basic platform is very sound. Throw in some top-shelf suspension bits like the Öhlins TTX rear shock and FGRT819 forks on this bike, replace those heavy wire wheels with some magnesium hoops, fit some lightweight bodywork, build a big-bore engine with the very best parts, and the result is something pretty special.

Obviously, if you plan to actually race your collectible Ducati, you've got to carefully build the machine to meet specific class requirements. Luckily, that's already been done in this case. According to rider "Fast Frank's" web bio, it looks like this Paul Smart was prepped for the AMA's PRO Moto-GT2 or maybe the Lightweight Superbike class. Racers can feel free to chime in in the comments.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE Race Bike for Sale

2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000 Limited Edition Road Racer

This bike has an Excellent history of winning races and Championships at the hands of Fast Frank

Chassis Specifications:
AIM Dash
Ohlins FGRT819 forks with DLC coated for tubes, forks built by Fast Bike Industries
NCR adjustable offset triple clamps
NCR Fairing Bracket
Custom built Ohlins TTX rear shock (built by Ohlins USA)
Brand new Marchesini Magnesium Wheels
ETI Carbon/Kevlar Fuel Tank, underside of tank covered in Gold heat resistance tape
New Brembo HP Front brake Rotors
Brembo RCS19 Brake and Clutch master cylinders
Brembo Mono Block front brake calipers
Lightened rear brake rotor
Spiegler brake lines
Vortex Clip-ons
Air Tech Fairing and seat
Custom Paint by Asher Finishing (the flags on the tank are hand painted)
Hand made Aluminum belly Pan
Carbon fiber vented front fender
Carbon fiber rear fender
Fast Frank Front and rear wheel quick change kits
Under mount rear brake caliper
Shorai Lightweight battery
75% of hardware is Titanium
DID ERV3 520 Chain
Motion Pro Rev 2 Throttle
Rizoma Brake Lever Guard
Quick Shifter

Engine Specs:
2009 Ducati M1100 Engine (cases are lighter, stronger and have top mount ign pickup and oil sprayers under piston)
Lightened, balanced and knife edged crank
Carrillo Rods
1098 Crank Main bearings
Pistal 100mm 1123cc Pistons
Millenium tech bored and plated cylinders
JPrecision CNC ported heads with 47mm intake and 41mm exhaust valves
MBP Valve collets
Low resistance closing rocker springs
NCR Race Cams
NCR Large Oil Cooler
Micro Tech ECU
Magnesium Valve Covers
NCR Magnesium Side engine cases
Ducati Slipper Clutch
SC Projects Racing carbon muffler with Termignoni Headers
Tip Over Sensor
Ducati Superbike Stator/rotor (lighter weight)
Lightened primary and cam gears
Billet aluminum cam belt pulleys
Custom 8mm Spark plug wires
MotoCorse over sized throttle bodies and velocity stacks with K&N filters
Billet engine breather

I normally try to edit parts lists down a bit, but this one is pretty exhaustive and the inclusion of some choice NCR parts suggests very deep pockets: this obviously not some quick-and-dirty conversion from a salvage-titled roadbike into an affordable trackday ride, it's a fully-developed, race-winning machine. The starting bid is set at $44,995 which is probably far less than it cost to build. Obviously, the owner will never recoup their investment, and their loss is your gain, assuming you have a air-cooled Ducati racebike-sized space in your garage and enough skill to take advantage of this example's well-developed handling.

-tad

Unlikely Racebike: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale
Ducati October 26, 2017 posted by

Smarty Pants: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart

When Paul Smart rode a green-framed 750 to victory at Imola in 1972, Ducati history was made. No longer a bit player with smaller bikes, Ducati proved that they could compete on the world's stage. And since that 1972 victory, Ducati has hunted down championship after championship. They have also reached back into the land of nostalgia a few times and brought back neo-retro designs to evoke images of the older bikes, but wrought with newer technology. The early 2000s brought us the Sport Classic lineup, and few are as classic as the Paul Smart replica delivered in 2006.

2006 Ducati Paul Smart Replica for sale on eBay

At the heart of this machine is the same tried and true desmodue 2-valve, air-cooled motor found throughout the Sport Classic lineup (as well as the air-cooled monsters and the SuperSport series). A many-generation evolution of the venerable Pantah "rubber band" power plant, the belt driven valves and simple air cooling are offset by new tech such as twin spark computer controlled ignition and fuel injection. With loads of torque and wonderful character, the 1,000cc L-twin has plenty of grunt and makes all the right noises. The rest of the bike is a revised classic interpretation of the original green frame, with traditional Ducati frame and fairing artistry. There are numerous unique design elements (check out that asymmetrical swing arm with a single shock), and the whole package is wrapped nicely in green and silver.

From the seller:
2006 Ducati Paul Smart

2nd owner. Bike had 400 miles on it when I bought it about 8 years ago.
Termignoni Exhaust with race ECU
Rizoma Grips
Rizoma Reservoirs
CRG Mirrors
CRG RC Levers
Alpina Tubeless Aluminum Wheels
Fleda Brake/Turn signals
JCPB Fork Guards
Supersprox
Pit Bull stand
Battery tender/charger
Also have a full Zard Stainless 2-2 exhaust (louder than the Termis)

I have all the factory signals, exhaust, mirrors, sprocket, chain etc that came on the bike, as well as a Zard 2-2 Stainless full exhaust. There is a blemish on the engine case (pictured), and small crack on the rubber of the right hand grip, which are the only noticeable flaws on the bike. $800 service from Pro-Italia couple hundred miles ago.

Just don't ride the bike enough, sold the MH900E a while back, for the same reason.

The Paul Smart replica machines (also known as the PS1000LE) were made in limited numbers - data seems to indicate 500 were sold in the US out of a global total of 2000 bikes. That not only makes this an exclusive piece of kit, it also means that the laws of supply and demand start coming into play. Green-framed 750s are so far out of reach of mere mortals that it is not even worthwhile to look. The PS1000LE commanded a premium over the standard Sport Classic when introduced, but speculation and collectors have driven these up considerably since then. This particular bike is not stock, but the seller claims to have most of the stock items. The recent service from a well-known Southern California Ducati shop is another bonus.

The seller is looking for big dollars here: potential buyers need to pony up $24,000 USD just to get this auction started. That is potentially in the range for a great example of this breed (we have seen asks as high as $30k), but may be a bit too stiff for an opening move. The market will tell us where this one goes, although as of yet there have been zero bids. Check it out here to see all of the details and watch the fun (if it starts). If you are in the market for a Smart, you could certainly do worse. Good Luck!!

MI

Smarty Pants: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart
Ducati July 25, 2017 posted by

Big Green: 1974 Ducati 750 Supersport

When it comes to really famous, really collectable Ducatis, it is hard not to imagine the image of a green frame 750ss. Created by Ducati to celebrate the dominance of the 750cc race bikes, the Supersport has become THE streetable icon of a bygone era of brute mechanical setup and rider bravery. Devoid of electronics, slipper clutches, big brakes, sophisticated suspension or even modern tire technology, bikes of this time relied upon the skill of the rider to adjust to conditions - exactly what Paul Smart did to triumph at the 1972 Imola 200. The green frame 750 Supersport was intended as a tribute, but grew to be a tremendous success on its own. Today more people know about the street 750ss than the Italian race (and racer) that inspired it's creation.

1974 Ducati 750 Supersport for sale on eBay

In the early 1970s, Ducati really wanted to win - which is what the likes of Norton and MV Agusta were doing. In what is now familiar Ducati fashion, they did what any manufacturer would do: they threw piles of money at it (although much of this was sweat equity and ingenuity, as Ducati was still a small manufacturer). The 500cc racer's frame was developed by UK frame maker and famed GP racer designer Colin Seeley. Ducati developled the engines in-house, and shipped Seeley early prototype cases to help finalize the bike design. By 1971 - with test rider Mike Hailwood - it was determined that the Seeley frame was too light for the 750cc class. Fabio Taglioni, chief designer and technical director of Ducati, had already incorporated some of Seeley's design elements into a heavier, street bike frame. That was modified to become the legendary racer; yet victory was initially elusive. With mechanical failures having been sorted out in 1971 season (best finish was Phil Read's second to yet another Agostini win), Ducati pulled out all the stops. They fielded a total of EIGHT bikes for the 1972 Imola 200 race, and managed to pull off first and second against the likes of MV Agusta, Norton and Honda factory efforts. It was this victory that cemented Ducati's racing reputation - and the foundation for the street machine.

From the seller:
Genuine Greenframe . Exceptional condition . Currently in Great Britain . I will airfreight to Australia for the successful bidder . Prices are going nuts on these . Buy now or be priced out of the market forever .
Engine number 075318 DM750.1
Frame number DM750SS 075061

Note : Bike is for sale in Great Britain . Will sell to however meets my price .

It's the real thing and 99% correct, sold new in Germany and been there all its life until now, restored some years back and in a private collection for the past 20 years.
It’s very original with a few small details that aren’t correct but all the major components are in very good shape and correct like the rims, cases, frame and yes I think the glasswork is original but its difficult to be 100% sure on this as it could also be 30 year old repro stuff, but whatever it is it's certainly not new or fresh.

It's been re painted in the past. The parts that are non- original as far as I can tell are:
Later Tomaselli Daytona throttle.
Lefthand hi/lo/horn switch
Malossi inlet manifolds and later PHM 40mm Dell’Ortos
> I have bought one original carb so far .
Alloy mesh on original bellmouths
Drilled front brake discs
Later Marzocchi rear shock absorbers < I have a set of original shocks . Headlamp bracket painted green instead of satin black Both front fairing brackets cut down to take one bolt instead of two There is also a broken fin on the rear cylinder. Easy to repair . A front Brembo master cylinder fitted but the original Scarab comes with it. Mechanically its excellent and runs and rides superbly, the condition is very nice but you can see it's not a fresh restoration.

The 1974 Ducati 750 Supersport has often been referred to as one of the most beautiful motorcycles ever produced. The Gugenheim museum highlighted the green frame prominently in their exhibit "The Art of Motorcycle." And collector value for these bikes has soared - to what many consider unreasonable levels. Built by Ducati's race shop in limited numbers (401 is the generally accepted number), this was a true race replica. Sporting triple disk brakes (claimed to be the first street bike to offer this feature), and the cases right out of the racer, the 750ss street bike made concessions for the road; a strengthened crankshaft, provisions for an oil cooler (although none was originally fitted), and different carburetors. The green frame Ducati is said to be the only round case, bevel drive desmo bike produced for the street. The bike even retains the racer's semi-transparent stripe on the tank; a no-need-for-a-gauge solution to determining fuel levels.

This is collector-grade machinery, and with it comes a collector-grade price tag. The opening ask for this auction is a cool $190,000 USD - with a reserve in place. The bike was originally sold in Germany, however it now resides in the UK. At this price, only museums, small countries, or heirs to the Microsoft fortune need apply. But it is good to dream, right? To find a nearly original 1974 Ducati 750ss in this type of condition is a mega-rare event, and you can be assured it will not repeat any time soon. Check it out here and good luck!!

MI

Big Green: 1974 Ducati 750 Supersport
Ducati July 4, 2017 posted by

First Year Legend Alert: 1975 Ducati 900 SS

The 1975 Ducati 900SS is something every serious collector has on their list and given that 1975 production was less than 250 units, today's post is quite an occasion.  This nice but not pristine version is located in Manhattan Beach, California USA but I wouldn't be a bit surprised to see it go to an international sale.

1975 Ducati 900SS For Sale on eBay

To understand the significance of this bike and why it is so prized, you need to look back to 1970 when the top level GP racing class was pretty much a battle between MV Agusta (with legendary rider Agostini) and Japanese two-strokes.  Ducati had left racing over 10 years earlier due to budget constraints but was now flush with new backing and had a new series of larger displacement machines under development.  In 1970 the company decided it would be going back to the track, in part to help increase visibility to their new machines but also to help in development.

Ducati hit the track in 1970 with a new 500cc L-twin engine with two-valve desmo heads but the new machines were still no match for the then dominant Agostini and MV Agusta.   In 1972 Ducati announced a new 750cc machine that incorporated the lessons learned over the last 2 seasons along with special racetrack-oriented cams, twin spark plugs, 40mm Dell’Orto carbs and billet connecting rods.  Other top shelf bits included Marzocchi forks and triple-disc brakes.

The new 750cc machine was set to debut at Imola on April 23, 1972.   Did it work?  Well, here is what happened when GP rider Paul Smart (yes, THAT Paul Smart) took the new Ducati out for qualifying:

"On the last lap I wound it up as fast as I felt comfortable.  I wasn't going completely flat out because it was basically just a safety-wired street bike..it still had the Dunlop TT100 street tires and even still had the centerstand lugs in place.   When I brought the bike back to the pits all the Ducati mechanics were jumping up and down...it turns out I had just broken Ago's track record.”

 

The new Duc actually finished 1-2 at Imola and the public immediately clamored for a 750ss for the street.  At the end of the 1972 season Ducati promised to make replicas of the Imola winning machine available to the public but  Ducati was still a small manufacturer so this didn't actually happen until 1974.  During this 2 year period the Japanese were undergoing a crash course in development and quickly catching up to its European rivals so when Ducati finally delivered the promised Imola replica 750cc machines they also introduced a new 860cc machine, the 900 SuperSport/SS.   The new "big" Duc was essentially the 750 series machine with more power and fortunately for Ducati, this wasn't a case where more power upset the balance of the bike. The new 900ss was able to continue the performance success of the 750 for several years.  Consider this - it was on a 1978 900SS that a just-out-of-retirement 38 year old Mike Hailwood would ride to a legendary victory at the Isle of Mann TT.

Okay, we have covered the history and ties to famous racers like  Paul Smart and Mike Hailwood, but you may still be wondering why this bike is so high on so many collectors lists.  The answer is that not only is it a first year bike but it also had some unique to the year components    The 1975 edition actually had many of the same components as the the 750cc Imola race replicas.  These components were offered on the 900ss for the 1975 year only.

A quick comparison of the components for the 900ss model years is below as an example:

1975 900ss  1976 900ss
 Gas Tank  Fiberglass  Steel
 Carbs  40mm  32mm
 Exhausts  Conti Lafranconi
 Turn signals  No  Yes
 Shift  Right side  Left side

 

Simply put, for many Ducati fans and collectors the 1975 900ss is considered to be the closest you can get to the race bikes ridden by people like Smart and Hailwood.

One final factor to consider regarding the why the Ducati is so highly prized by collectors is the generally acceptance that the 750/900ss Ducati along with the Laverda 750SFC and the Norton Commando were the first modern "GP-bikes-with-lights and a horn."  You could even think of the Ducati as the progenitor of bikes such as the Ducati 888SP3 and Desmosedici.

Now as for this specific example, here is a summary of what the seller has to say

  • #214 of 246 produced in 1974
  • Has only 12,000 kilometers/roughly 7,500 original miles in its 42 year lifespan.
  • Brembo disc brakes front and rear with all new brake pads, front forks were rebuilt and new seals added.
  • DMC electronic ignition installed as well as new voltage regulator.
  • It is a 42 year old survivor and it has some imperfections. At some point in the past Ethanol cause the gas tank to leak. It also caused a "bubble like" line at the base of the gas tank. It has since been treated by GTL of Los Angeles and DOES NOT LEAK anymore. The leaks caused paint to come off the swingarm, and some other areas of the frame.  There are also, "blemishes" on both side covers and gas tank.  
  • Also, the right underside of the muffler is scraped and the left has some light scratches.

So then, what's this first year bit of Italian goodness going to cost?  A quick search of Classic Sport Bikes for sale  shows 1970's 900SS going for around $32,000 USD a few years ago, but those weren't first year bikes.  Bonhams had a pristine 1974 750cc version that went for about $50,000 USD a few years ago as well but that was in better condition and wasn't a 900SS.   I am thinking  this one is going to attract attention from serious collections and wouldn't be at all surprised to see this one go for between $45,000-60,000 USD right from the listing.

One final note- there is no Buy-It-Now option on this one.  While patience is a virtue for collectors, given the rarity of this bike I think someone is going to make the owner an offer they can't refuse/the chances of this one being relisted are low.  To put in simply, if this one is on a list for your collection you might want to move quick.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

Post Script:  Happy Canada Day and 4th of July ya'll!!!

First Year Legend Alert: 1975 Ducati 900 SS