Posts by tag: pantah

Ducati March 19, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Carbon-Bodied 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale

Italian bikes are sometimes accused of putting style before function, but I think it's more accurate to say that they prioritize performance and style over comfort and practicality... But in the case of the Ducati MH900e, style was far and away the most important priority, and everything else came after. Penned by Pierre Terblanche, the MH900e was meant to evoke Mike "The Bike" Hailwood's race-winning Isle of Man TT NCR-prepped machine and the replica MHRs that followed. The "e" at the end of the name was for "Evoluzione" as the bike is the spiritual successor of those storied machines.

The MH900e's concept bike looks are wild and impractical, but its beating heart is Ducati's long-serving oil and air-cooled two-valve L-twin. Displacing 904cc, the twin pumps out an honest 75hp at the rear wheel along with respectable midrange torque. It's obviously not a powerhouse, but the 410lb machine has Ducati's race-bred frame geometry and quality suspension at both ends. The riding position is committed, with a long reach to low bars over the tank, high rearsets, and a tall seat that requires long legs if you want to put your feet flat at traffic lights.

Frankly, there are just two things really stopping the bike from being a great back-road bike like the later Sport Classics: the brutal ergonomics and the insane, Harley Sportster-sized fuel tank. The ergonomics you can justify, but the tiny, 2.2 gallon tank means about 90 miles between stops, even with the two-valve twin's surprisingly decent mileage. It's a little shocking, since the bike looks like it'd have a generously-sized fuel cell, but most of what you're looking at is apparently an airbox.

Luckily, California Cycleworks makes a much larger 4.6 gallon unit that doesn't require any permanent modifications to the bike to install. It appears to still be available and would make the bike much more practical. With just 2,000 produced between 2001 and 2002, they're rare and valuable enough that most seemed doomed to a life as display pieces, but that's a shame, considering the excellent handling, solid reliability, and easy-to-service engine.

From the Seller: 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale

Ultra Rare 2002 Ducati MH900e for sale

Limited production 1812 of 2000
Mileage: 4,500 Miles
US bike from Oregon
Clean title like new condition
Price: $19,600 USD

Factory upgraded Ducati Performance carbon fiber bodywork and tasteful parts including:

  • DP Clutch Cover
  • DP Slave Clutch Cylinder
  • DP Signals
  • Speedy Moto Pressure Plate & Basket
  • Rizoma Handle Bar Grips
  • Rizoma Mirrors
  • Staintune Slip-on Exhausts

Bike comes with:

  • Owner plaque
  • T-Shirt
  • Rear stand

All services done. Timing belts changed in 2017. New tires. Needs nothing. Bike is as is and does not come with additional parts.

Bike is located in Vancouver BC Canada. Serious inquiries only. No PayPal. Wire or cash only. The bike can be easily exported back to the US because it is an US bike. Shipping can be arranged at buyer’s cost.

Price in USD

Contact Jacky by email with your interest:

It is unfortunate that the original bodywork and other parts don't seem to be included, but the Ducati Performance panels are obviously an appropriate modification and look great, even if exposed carbon fiber reduces the visual ties to the red and silver of the original NCR bikes. The bike also includes a set of Staintune exhausts that look very similar to the stock system but let the bike sound more appropriately Ducati-ish. Considering the prices of Sport Classics these days, the $19,800 asking price seems pretty reasonable, and is in line with other examples of the MH900e that we've seen lately.


Featured Listing: Carbon-Bodied 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale
Ducati March 16, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Update 3.16.2018: Recently serviced late last year at local Ducati specialist, including new timing belts, idler and tensioners, valve adjust,all fluids changed - including brake and forks, and carb rebuild with new accelerator pump. New price is $18,500 or best offer.
Contact Adam by email:

If you were looking to jump onto the Ducati 750 F1 bandwagon early with an eye towards making big money flipping one... That ship has sailed: these Pantah-powered race replicas now command some serious money. For years, these occupied the same place as the early Super Sport, in part because they straddle two generations of Ducatis, pre and post-Cagiva ownership, but don't seem to fully belong to either. They've got a slightly shed-built quality from the older era, combined with the "modern" Pantah L-twin and more 80s style. When new, build quality was criticized and suspension, as delivered, was a bit crude. But the potential was there from the beginning in bikes like today's featured 750 F1 Laguna Seca, it just needed a bit of development.

The 750 F1 used Ducati's characteristic trellis frame, designed in this case by Verlicchi and visibly wrapped around the lightweight aluminum tank. It was powered by a 749cc version of their air/oil-cooled, two-valve twin making a claimed 76hp and styled to look like the successful TT1 race bikes of the period. Dry weight was just 385lbs and the 16" front and 18" wheel gave nimble handling. The Montjuich, Santa Monica, and this Laguna Seca were all limited editions of the F1 that were priced higher when new and featured improved performance and a higher top speed.

For years, the F1 languished forgotten and relatively unloved, but the fact that it was conceived before the company's takeover by Cagiva and the perceived mass-production that followed seems to be the exact quality now driving the increase in prices. Looking closely, there's one obvious indicator that the F1 came before Cagiva's ownership: bikes that came later reversed the rear cylinder so that both carburetors could be fitted into the engine's vee for much more efficient packaging. Some F1s have awkward pod filters fitted that bulge out from behind the fairing, but this example doesn't bother with something as trivial as "air filtration" and just has mesh screens to keep out rocks, stray animals, and small children.

ZDM750LS-750139 / DM750L1-750238

Recently out of long-term collection in Japan - this Marco Lucchinelli Replica is a time capsule in beautiful shape with only ~2500km  / 1600 miles. Original paint and bodywork is excellent; red paint on the beautiful trellis frame very nice with some darkening on the upper surface of each tube. Clip-ons and muffler have visible surface corrosion. Runs great - bike starts right up, idles well and runs like it should. Original mirrors included in sale.

The F1 Laguna Seca, along with the Santa Monica and Montjuich, represented the pinnacle of the factory Pantah-based TT race-bikes. These hand-built race-replica bikes were closely based on the forks F1 racers with open-throat Dell'Orto carburetors, 10:1 compression pistons, bigger valves and less restrictive exhaust. Transmission uses straight-cut (like the works bikes) instead of helical primary drive gears. The Laguna Seca is fitted with Verlicchi aluminum swing-arm and solo seat.

Widely acclaimed when new - Cycle World stated, "They May Be Bargains. This last Ducati is a throwback in the spirit of the 750 SS of 1973, the F1's most famous predecessor. Like the 750 SS, the F1 is the Italian sportsbike of its era."

Mick Walker summarized in his 1989 Ducati Buyers Guide, "If you find, or already own, an F1 my advice is to hang on to it. If you are doubly lucky to have been able to afford one of the 'limited edition' models, then guard it with your life, for you have a real classic of the future. Any one of the Monjuich, Laguna Seca or Santamonica models is worth a full five stars, for they are both beautiful and rare."

This gem will make a fabulous addition to your collection. Offering with low reserve and reasonable buy-it-now. Currently on it's importation paperwork - Japanese de-registration certificate / English translation of certificate / NHTSA HS7 / EPA 3520-1 / CBP 7501 (stamped). Washington State title is available for $400 documentation fee approx. 5-week wait. WA state buyers responsible for Tax & License.

As the seller mentions, the bike isn't cosmetically perfect, but no bike that's thirty years old and in original condition is likely to be. Bodywork is very sharp, but some of the exposed metal parts have some surface corrosion but the paint on the bodywork looks very nice and mileage is extremely low at just 1,600. The seller is asking for $27,500 $18,500


Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale
Ducati March 7, 2018 posted by

Uncompromising: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Ducati's mid to late-80s bikes existed in a kind of limbo: the modern sportbike was taking shape, and the Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca was birthed during this transitional period. The 750 F1 and its variations weren't quite the refined-ish, modern-ish, mass-produced-ish machines of the Cagiva era, but they weren't the nearly hand-crafted bikes of the Fabio Taglioni era either. The Laguna Seca was named after the famous California race track where Marco Lucchinelli found success in 1986, and just 200 examples were built.

The 750 F1 used a Verlicchi-designed steel trellis frame that gave it a look familiar to fans of later Ducatis, and the bike was powered by a 749cc version of their air and oil-cooled engine, here producing a claimed 76hp. Notably, the F1 still has the rear cylinder in its original configuration: later SS models had the rear cylinder rotated 180° to place both carburetors in the vee of the engine for much more elegant packaging. The bike was wrapped in bodywork designed to resemble Ducati's successful TT1 race bikes, with 16" wheels front and rear, while a dry weight of just 385lbs meant the now-familiar two-valve Pantah engine didn't have much mass to push around, giving the bike a 136mph top speed.

Quality was a bit kit-bike and the bikes were relatively crude as delivered, but the potential was there for a seriously fast motorcycle, if one took some time to develop it. Almost as if Ducati didn't bother finishing the bikes, knowing that most owners would modify them to suit their needs anyway.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

The only changes to this bike upon delivery was the installation of the proper directionals, rear brake light switch and horn for street use. I installed a proper muffler in the place of the very loud Verlicchi megaphone. The bike also received an upgrade to the wheels and discs although retaining the 16"size. Magnesium Marvic/Akront rims as on the Monjuich and full floating discs replaced the original cast F1 style wheels and semi floating discs. All original parts are included in the sale. The bike is in excellent condition with only 2830 miles and has never been raced. Mileage as shown in photo is in kilometers.

The F1 and its variants spent years undervalued, but at this point, values have increased significantly, and the opening bid for this example is a cool $20,000. The bike is, as the seller indicates, not completely original, but the changes made are period correct and the parts needed to return it to stock are included. The original machine was basically a race bike with lights, so the addition of some small, folding bar-end mirrors is probably a wise concession to road safety: "First rule of Italian driving: what's behind me is not important..." I'd probably see about adding some low-restriction foam pods to those carburetors as well, since plenty of grit and sand can get past the mesh screens currently serving as "air filters."


Uncompromising: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale
Ducati January 5, 2018 posted by

Pristine Entry-Level Italian: 2003 Ducati 620 Sport with Just 936 Miles!

Made for just two years between 2002 and 2003, the Ducati 620 Sport was intended as an affordable way into Ducati ownership for riders more interested in the Ducati brand than in actual speed. But Ducati being Ducati, they were unable to build a sporty bike that actually handled badly, and they managed to create an entry-level machine that encapsulated the best and worst of the brand. Of course, that means that it may not be ideal for the newer riders it was obviously targeting: the riding position is extremely aggressive for a bike with such modest ability, typical Ducati steering lock means an inconveniently large turning circle, and the suspension is harsh.

The silver and black on the 620 recalls the style of the original 1980s Pantah, which is closely related to the 620 Sport in more ways than one. The Pantah was the very first Ducati to be powered by their then-new 500cc L-twin that had the single overhead-cams driven by toothed rubber belts, instead of a complex arrangement of tower shafts and bevel gears. This change to belts meant the engines were simpler to produce, but at the cost of maintenance, since the rubber belts require regular replacement, a service that's ignored at the owner's peril: second-hand two-valve Ducatis are currently very cheap, but a wrecked engine can quickly turn your affordable exotic into a pricey proposition...

The 620 uses the crank from the 750 for a slight increase in displacement to 618cc and a bump in torque, compared to the earlier 583cc 600SS, while the addition of Marelli fuel-injection means a broader spread of power with fewer hiccups, compared to the original's carburetors. Like the Pantah, the 620 uses a five-speed gearbox and a wet clutch, instead of the 900's six-speed and dry clutch arrangement. A gearbox with fewer cogs in a smaller-engined bike might sound like a retrograde step, but the torquey, flexible v-twin works well with the wider ratios of the five-speed and the wet clutch means it will take more abuse, which is ideal for the newer riders and commuters dealing with traffic.

Although the bike is down on power compared to its bigger siblings and pretty much anything in the 600cc class, the 60 claimed horses and 29 lb-ft of torque mean the bike is responsive, if not particularly fast when you're hustling the 400lb machine through a set of curves, which is really where the Ducati shows its breeding. The fork and shock are relatively primitive and non-adjustable, but the bike shares its frame and basic geometry with the 900SS so handling is very good, even if the ride quality is a bit harsh, while a pair of Brembo calipers and discs up front mean stopping power on par with much more powerful machines.

Interestingly, these rare bikes seemed to get snapped up by racers looking for an affordable v-twin platform to modify into a production race bike when they come up for sale. You may be thinking, "Why the hell would you do that when there are loads of liquid-cooled, four-valve Suzuki SV650s lying around?" Apparently, the Ducati's sporty frame geometry makes for a better-handling foundation, and I'm sure there are also some weight penalties imposed on the more sophisticated SV to keep racing close.The air and oil-cooled, two-valve twin responds very well to tuning and is supposedly much more reliable than the Suzuki unit as well, especially when used in racing applications.

From the original eBay listing: 2003 Ducati 620 Sport for Sale

Collectors dream! 2003 Ducati 620 SuperSport with 936 original miles!

I purchased the bike from the original owner with 580 miles on it who had it stored in a climate controlled garage.

No wreck or "tip over" damage, stock original except for some tasteful decals the original owner added on, I just left them on.

Clear NC title in my name.

Owned by mature 55 year old, I'm needing to change to a different riding position so selling my sporting motorcycles.

No wheelies, no gearbox abuse, no track use, just country roads near my house.

No smoking or weird engine noises. Starts, idles, shifts gears and runs as new.

No leaks of any kind, oil, fuel, forks, brakes.

Stock motorcycle, no intake, fuel, exhaust or electrical modifications, no aftermarket computers, no headers, none of that stuff

Recent maintenance performed:

Oil and filter change
Timing Belts
Spark plugs
Brake fluid change (with new Ducati caps and seals on reservoirs)
Internal rubber fuel lines (OEM Ducati)
Fuel filter (Mahle)
Tires (Shinko 009 Radials)
Yuasa MF battery
Kaoka cruise control

Chain and sprockets still as new, no rips or tears on seat, windshield nice and clear.

Mufflers have no dings or scratches.

Inside fuel tank perfectly clean, no rust, no sealant. Some very small scratches on top of tank near filler, hard to see but if you look closely at the photo of right side of tank you can make them out.

Still has a full set of original keys, owners manuals,tool kit, owners card,etc. as shown in photo. Also still have the original key fobs from the factory with ID numbers.

Sale also includes Factory Service manual and a Haynes manual.

It is ready to ride, collect or display, a beautiful time capsule Ducati.

Runs great, just had it out last week for a ride in nice weather. The motorcycle rides great, nice and smooth, gears change effortlessly. It is ready to ride and needs nothing... No disappointments here!

Motorcycle is located near the coast of NC, if you would like to see in person let me know.

This thing is pretty immaculate, as you'd expect from a bike with just 936 miles on the odometer. I'm not sure the matte silver really flatters the lines of the Terblanche-styled SuperSport, but it's certainly more subtle than the usual red or yellow. Bidding hasn't even reached $2,500 yet with the reserve met and time left on the auction. So whether you plan to buy this nearly museum-quality Super Sport as a rider, an odd footnote to complete your air-cooled Ducati collection, or as the raw material for forging a class-dominating v-twin race bike, this looks like a pretty good place to start. Although it would be a shame to chop it up... Power will never really be much to write home about, but a quick stop on eBay will turn up some nice, used suspension bits from a 900 or 1000 SuperSport that should bolt up easily and improve the bike's handling further.


Pristine Entry-Level Italian: 2003 Ducati 620 Sport with Just 936 Miles!
Ducati August 19, 2017 posted by

Rare Duck: 1986 Ducati 400 F3 for Sale

The stories of our favorite motorcycle manufacturers are often littered with failures and bankruptcy. Some brands even saw multiple deaths, followed by zombie-like resurrections where the victim simply came back wrong, like Gage from Pet Sematary… Truly, “Sometimes dead is better…” Luckily, Italian purveyor of accessible exotics Ducati seems pretty stable these days, rumored purchase by Harley Davidson notwithstanding. But it wasn’t always that way, and today’s Ducati 400 F3 represents a rare collectible from a transitional era of their history when they teetered on the edge of failure.

Designed before Ducati was taken over by Cagiva but produced during their ownership, it was styled to resemble the successful TT race bikes of the late 70s and early 80s. The 750 F1 and lookalike F3 used Ducati’s signature trellis frame developed by Verlicchi and wrapped around the company’s two-valve, air and oil-cooled Pantah engine. In this application the v-twin had yet to have the rear cylinder rotated 180° to situate both carburetors together in the engine’s vee as seen in the later SS and Monsters, so you can see the rear velocity stack/filter sticking out in the breeze, where it probably interferes with the rider’s leg but hey, it’s a Ducati!

And that was really the problem with the F1/F3 to begin with: build quality was generally pretty poor, more kit-bike than the product of a major motorcycle manufacturer, and the suspension was crude. But the elements were there to make a great bike, it just needed a bit of development… It was almost as if Ducati assumed buyers intended to race them, and didn’t bother finishing them. Today's F3 was a Japanese market version of the F1 with a smaller, 400cc displacement. The seller suggests that it may be the only example in the USA and certainly, I can't remember seeing one for sale here. It's had a cosmetic restoration, but is otherwise in original condition.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Ducati 400 F3 for Sale

VERY RARE and might be the only one of these models in the USA.

Japan was one of the biggest markets for Ducati in the 1980s but limited motorcycles to only 400 cc, so smaller versions of the Ducati 750F1 were sold there as the Ducati 400F3 from 1986-88. This 1986 Ducati 400F3 with only 7657 km (4758 miles) was imported from Japan in 2016. 

The paint on the bike was badly faded and the complete bike was torn down and frame and complete bodywork were repainted (powder coating on the frame).  All decals are factory correct decals for this year model.

A Limited run of 509 Ducati 400 F3 bikes were built in 1986 and this bike is number 209 (VIN ZDM400R*400209) and is shown on a numbered factory plaque fitted to the top of the seat fairing, see picture.

The bike is in very good running condition and include:

  • New paint
  • New decals
  • Powder coated frame and swingarm
  • New battery
  • New chain
  • New steering bearings
  • New petcocks
  • Engine serviced (Oil, Oil filter, Timing belts)
  • Engine is 100% factory stock

This vehicle is being offered as-is with no warranty expressed or implied. Please call for specific details on this vehicle.


Obviously, a two-valve, 400cc v-twin isn't going to be particularly fast, but I doubt anyone considering a purchase will seriously care. This is a bit of history, a collectible. The lookalike 750 F1 has experienced a serious spike in value the past few years. Although the smaller-engined F3 won't offer the same performance, it should represent a solid investment as it is very rare, especially here in the USA, although bidding is very low so far, at just over $4,0000 with the Reserve Not Met.


Ducati March 14, 2017 posted by

Odd Duck: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600TL for Sale

Pantah Week continues with this very rare, and very oddly-styled machine. When you say "Ducati" to pretty much anyone, it conjures up images of sleek, exotic, often uncomfortable machines designed to win at all costs on track and inflame the desires of motorcyclists all over the world. What you wouldn't normally imagine is something like this basically brand-new Ducati Pantah 600TL...

While the sport-touring oriented bodywork of the 600TL may not be to everyone's taste, there's nothing wrong with the components under the skin: it's motivated by the same 583cc, two-valve v-twin and five-speed gearbox as the 600SL sportbike. It uses the same as well, so handling should be excellent, although it is less stable at high speeds than its sportier brother and the top speed is lower. That funky black front fender looks like a replacement item, but period ads and photos suggest that this is in fact the original part.


Obviously there have been a few styling misfires from Ducati over the years: their Giorgetto Giugiaro-styled 860GT was certainly not well-liked when new, although time and a general love of all things bevel-drive have seen values of even that much-maligned machine steadily increasing in value. And sportier 600SLs languished in unloved obscurity until recently, when prices have begun to rise, along with bikes like yesterday's 750 F1. Will time be as kind to the the 600TL? It may be too soon to tell, but this particular bike has virtually no miles on it and is basically a museum-piece, so it might be a good place to start for weird Ducati speculators.

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600TL for Sale

This is a brand new 1982 600TL.  It has 2.9 miles on it.  It comes with book, tools and parts manual.  I bought this bike from the stocking Ducati dealer in Ohio.  He told me that in 1982 30 600TL came to the US and that this is one of them.  The bike has never been driven, the battery has never had battery acid in it.  It has a Conti muffler, 36 Din Delorto carbs.  This bike has all custom papers and duty paid for Canada, but the US title is still on hand.  This bike is extremely rare, it may be the only new one in the world!

Normally rare, zero-mile bikes are a recipe for a static display. But in this case, all the parts you'd need to get it roadworthy should be readily available. You could probably even slot in a much larger, more powerful version of the venerable L-twin with a bit of work... The starting bid is set at $8,250 with no takers as yet although there is still plenty of time left on the auction. I've never seen one for sale before, and it's very rare here in the USA, but that doesn't necessarily mean that it'll ever really be worth all that much to collectors, except as an oddity.


Odd Duck: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600TL for Sale