Posts by tag: pantah

Ducati October 3, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Update 10.3.2017: Recently serviced at local Ducati specialist, including new timing belts, idler and tensioners, valve adjust,all fluids changed - including brake and forks, and carb rebuild with new accelerator pump. New price is $19,500 or best offer.
Contact Adam by email: adam_chovanak@yahoo.com

If you were looking to jump onto the Ducati 750 F1 bandwagon early with an eye towards making big money flipping one... That ship has sailed: these Pantah-powered race replicas now command some serious money. For years, these occupied the same place as the early Super Sport, in part because they straddle two generations of Ducatis, pre and post-Cagiva ownership, but don't seem to fully belong to either. They've got a slightly shed-built quality from the older era, combined with the "modern" Pantah L-twin and more 80s style. When new, build quality was criticized and suspension, as delivered, was a bit crude. But the potential was there from the beginning in bikes like today's featured 750 F1 Laguna Seca, it just needed a bit of development.

The 750 F1 used Ducati's characteristic trellis frame, designed in this case by Verlicchi and visibly wrapped around the lightweight aluminum tank. It was powered by a 749cc version of their air/oil-cooled, two-valve twin making a claimed 76hp and styled to look like the successful TT1 race bikes of the period. Dry weight was just 385lbs and the 16" front and 18" wheel gave nimble handling. The Montjuich, Santa Monica, and this Laguna Seca were all limited editions of the F1 that were priced higher when new and featured improved performance and a higher top speed.

For years, the F1 languished forgotten and relatively unloved, but the fact that it was conceived before the company's takeover by Cagiva and the perceived mass-production that followed seems to be the exact quality now driving the increase in prices. Looking closely, there's one obvious indicator that the F1 came before Cagiva's ownership: bikes that came later reversed the rear cylinder so that both carburetors could be fitted into the engine's vee for much more efficient packaging. Some F1s have awkward pod filters fitted that bulge out from behind the fairing, but this example doesn't bother with something as trivial as "air filtration" and just has mesh screens to keep out rocks, stray animals, and small children.

ZDM750LS-750139 / DM750L1-750238

Recently out of long-term collection in Japan - this Marco Lucchinelli Replica is a time capsule in beautiful shape with only ~2500km  / 1600 miles. Original paint and bodywork is excellent; red paint on the beautiful trellis frame very nice with some darkening on the upper surface of each tube. Clip-ons and muffler have visible surface corrosion. Runs great - bike starts right up, idles well and runs like it should. Original mirrors included in sale.

The F1 Laguna Seca, along with the Santa Monica and Montjuich, represented the pinnacle of the factory Pantah-based TT race-bikes. These hand-built race-replica bikes were closely based on the forks F1 racers with open-throat Dell'Orto carburetors, 10:1 compression pistons, bigger valves and less restrictive exhaust. Transmission uses straight-cut (like the works bikes) instead of helical primary drive gears. The Laguna Seca is fitted with Verlicchi aluminum swing-arm and solo seat.

Widely acclaimed when new - Cycle World stated, "They May Be Bargains. This last Ducati is a throwback in the spirit of the 750 SS of 1973, the F1's most famous predecessor. Like the 750 SS, the F1 is the Italian sportsbike of its era."

Mick Walker summarized in his 1989 Ducati Buyers Guide, "If you find, or already own, an F1 my advice is to hang on to it. If you are doubly lucky to have been able to afford one of the 'limited edition' models, then guard it with your life, for you have a real classic of the future. Any one of the Monjuich, Laguna Seca or Santamonica models is worth a full five stars, for they are both beautiful and rare."

This gem will make a fabulous addition to your collection. Offering with low reserve and reasonable buy-it-now. Currently on it's importation paperwork - Japanese de-registration certificate / English translation of certificate / NHTSA HS7 / EPA 3520-1 / CBP 7501 (stamped). Washington State title is available for $400 documentation fee approx. 5-week wait. WA state buyers responsible for Tax & License.

As the seller mentions, the bike isn't cosmetically perfect, but no bike that's thirty years old and in original condition is likely to be. Bodywork is very sharp, but some of the exposed metal parts have some surface corrosion but the paint on the bodywork looks very nice and mileage is extremely low at just 1,600. The seller is asking for $27,500 $19,500 which seems fair, considering what regular F1s have been going for of late. As you may have guessed, this Featured Listing is being offered by the same seller as yesterday's RG400Γ and it is also a Japanese import, with paperwork that should allow the bike to be legally titled, depending on your local DMV.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale
Ducati August 19, 2017 posted by

Rare Duck: 1986 Ducati 400 F3 for Sale

The stories of our favorite motorcycle manufacturers are often littered with failures and bankruptcy. Some brands even saw multiple deaths, followed by zombie-like resurrections where the victim simply came back wrong, like Gage from Pet Sematary… Truly, “Sometimes dead is better…” Luckily, Italian purveyor of accessible exotics Ducati seems pretty stable these days, rumored purchase by Harley Davidson notwithstanding. But it wasn’t always that way, and today’s Ducati 400 F3 represents a rare collectible from a transitional era of their history when they teetered on the edge of failure.

Designed before Ducati was taken over by Cagiva but produced during their ownership, it was styled to resemble the successful TT race bikes of the late 70s and early 80s. The 750 F1 and lookalike F3 used Ducati’s signature trellis frame developed by Verlicchi and wrapped around the company’s two-valve, air and oil-cooled Pantah engine. In this application the v-twin had yet to have the rear cylinder rotated 180° to situate both carburetors together in the engine’s vee as seen in the later SS and Monsters, so you can see the rear velocity stack/filter sticking out in the breeze, where it probably interferes with the rider’s leg but hey, it’s a Ducati!

And that was really the problem with the F1/F3 to begin with: build quality was generally pretty poor, more kit-bike than the product of a major motorcycle manufacturer, and the suspension was crude. But the elements were there to make a great bike, it just needed a bit of development… It was almost as if Ducati assumed buyers intended to race them, and didn’t bother finishing them. Today's F3 was a Japanese market version of the F1 with a smaller, 400cc displacement. The seller suggests that it may be the only example in the USA and certainly, I can't remember seeing one for sale here. It's had a cosmetic restoration, but is otherwise in original condition.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Ducati 400 F3 for Sale

VERY RARE and might be the only one of these models in the USA.

Japan was one of the biggest markets for Ducati in the 1980s but limited motorcycles to only 400 cc, so smaller versions of the Ducati 750F1 were sold there as the Ducati 400F3 from 1986-88. This 1986 Ducati 400F3 with only 7657 km (4758 miles) was imported from Japan in 2016. 

The paint on the bike was badly faded and the complete bike was torn down and frame and complete bodywork were repainted (powder coating on the frame).  All decals are factory correct decals for this year model.

A Limited run of 509 Ducati 400 F3 bikes were built in 1986 and this bike is number 209 (VIN ZDM400R*400209) and is shown on a numbered factory plaque fitted to the top of the seat fairing, see picture.

The bike is in very good running condition and include:

  • New paint
  • New decals
  • Powder coated frame and swingarm
  • New battery
  • New chain
  • New steering bearings
  • New petcocks
  • Engine serviced (Oil, Oil filter, Timing belts)
  • Engine is 100% factory stock

This vehicle is being offered as-is with no warranty expressed or implied. Please call for specific details on this vehicle.

PLEASE NOTE! THIS MOTORCYCLE IS SOLD WITH A "BILL OF SALE" ONLY AND DOES NOT HAVE A TITLE.  EBAY DOES NOT HAVE THE OPTION TO LIST THIS IN THE ITEM SPECIFIC SECTION! CONTACT ME FOR MORE INFORMATION IF NEEDED.

Obviously, a two-valve, 400cc v-twin isn't going to be particularly fast, but I doubt anyone considering a purchase will seriously care. This is a bit of history, a collectible. The lookalike 750 F1 has experienced a serious spike in value the past few years. Although the smaller-engined F3 won't offer the same performance, it should represent a solid investment as it is very rare, especially here in the USA, although bidding is very low so far, at just over $4,0000 with the Reserve Not Met.

-tad

Ducati March 14, 2017 posted by

Odd Duck: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600TL for Sale

Pantah Week continues with this very rare, and very oddly-styled machine. When you say "Ducati" to pretty much anyone, it conjures up images of sleek, exotic, often uncomfortable machines designed to win at all costs on track and inflame the desires of motorcyclists all over the world. What you wouldn't normally imagine is something like this basically brand-new Ducati Pantah 600TL...

While the sport-touring oriented bodywork of the 600TL may not be to everyone's taste, there's nothing wrong with the components under the skin: it's motivated by the same 583cc, two-valve v-twin and five-speed gearbox as the 600SL sportbike. It uses the same as well, so handling should be excellent, although it is less stable at high speeds than its sportier brother and the top speed is lower. That funky black front fender looks like a replacement item, but period ads and photos suggest that this is in fact the original part.

 

Obviously there have been a few styling misfires from Ducati over the years: their Giorgetto Giugiaro-styled 860GT was certainly not well-liked when new, although time and a general love of all things bevel-drive have seen values of even that much-maligned machine steadily increasing in value. And sportier 600SLs languished in unloved obscurity until recently, when prices have begun to rise, along with bikes like yesterday's 750 F1. Will time be as kind to the the 600TL? It may be too soon to tell, but this particular bike has virtually no miles on it and is basically a museum-piece, so it might be a good place to start for weird Ducati speculators.

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600TL for Sale

This is a brand new 1982 600TL.  It has 2.9 miles on it.  It comes with book, tools and parts manual.  I bought this bike from the stocking Ducati dealer in Ohio.  He told me that in 1982 30 600TL came to the US and that this is one of them.  The bike has never been driven, the battery has never had battery acid in it.  It has a Conti muffler, 36 Din Delorto carbs.  This bike has all custom papers and duty paid for Canada, but the US title is still on hand.  This bike is extremely rare, it may be the only new one in the world!

Normally rare, zero-mile bikes are a recipe for a static display. But in this case, all the parts you'd need to get it roadworthy should be readily available. You could probably even slot in a much larger, more powerful version of the venerable L-twin with a bit of work... The starting bid is set at $8,250 with no takers as yet although there is still plenty of time left on the auction. I've never seen one for sale before, and it's very rare here in the USA, but that doesn't necessarily mean that it'll ever really be worth all that much to collectors, except as an oddity.

-tad

Odd Duck: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600TL for Sale
Ducati March 13, 2017 posted by

Middle Child: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Until pretty recently, Ducati's 750 F1 was the redheaded stepchild of the Ducati family: it wasn't a bevel-drive and so wasn't really considered worthy of being considered a "classic" Ducati, didn't have the reliability [cough, cough] of the modern two-valve twin, or the performance credentials of the liquid-cooled four-valve superbikes. But values have been rising rapidly in recent years, and the F1 represents an important bridge between two eras of Ducati sportbikes.

The 750 F1 was built around their proven trellis frame and a 749cc version of the Pantah two-valve L-twin, tuned to produce 76hp and was wrapped in bodywork designed to resemble the successful TT1 racing machines. Wheels were the height of 80s fashion, with a tiny 16" hoop up front and 18" at the rear. This was the very last Ducati produced before Cagiva took over and it uses a pair of carburetors configured like the older bevel-drive bikes instead of the later machines that nestled both units in the engine's vee. Not the most efficient from a packaging standpoint, with those air cleaners jutting out bodywork.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Original surviving example with 3850 original miles. Runs very well indeed. Its tight and everything works. Toolkit and owners manual included. Will need tires if ridden aggressively. An uncompromising street legal Italian thoroughbred.

Bidding is up above $10,000 with the Reserve Not Met and very little time left on the auction. These are the very last Ducatis before the modern era that was ushered in by Cagiva, and that gives them a special place in Ducati's history, and the uptick in values reflects that. This example looks very clean and is in excellent condition, with low miles and the seller even includes a short video of the bike roaring up the street!

-tad

Middle Child: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale
Ducati February 28, 2017 posted by

Pantah-stic: 1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale

Ducati's first motorcycle was the Cucciolo [or "puppy" in Italian], which was basically a simple engine strapped to a bicycle, an affordable tool to get the Italian population mobile and back to work after the end of World War II. Certainly a far cry from the frameless, race-inspired exotica they're famous for today. This NCR 600TT hails from the middle period of Ducati's history, and is powered by the grandfather of all their modern v-twin engines, the single overhead cam, two-valve Pantah.

They're famous for the format today, but Ducati didn't start out making v-twin sportbikes. Instead, once they graduated from producing simple, efficient people-movers, they built and raced single-cylinder motorcycles of various displacements, before eventually building their first v-twin. The hottest versions of those earliest v-twins featured Ducati's trademark Desmodromic valve-actuation that has become their engineering trademark. But they also used a complex and expensive-to-manufacture system of tower shafts and bevel gears to operate the overhead cams, and Ducati needed to increase profitability to stay afloat, so introduced a parallel twin that was much more compact and affordable to produce and assemble, much to the horror of famous engineer Fabio Taglioni.

That parallel-twin engine proved to be a massive flop, but Taglioni continued to develop the v-twin on his own, and the Pantah was the result. The revised v-twin swapped the tower-shaft and bevel-drive cam-drive of the earlier engine for a much simpler rubber belt arrangement. This meant the engine was less expensive to manufacture, but also meant owners needed to religiously maintain their bikes, as failure of the toothed rubber belt led to catastrophic engine damage. Today's Ducati engines are direct descendants of that original two-valve v-twin.

This particular Pantah-powered machine is literally a racebike with lights, and includes frame, bodywork, and preparation by NCR. If you're not familiar, NCR are best known today for their high-performance and obsessively lightweight Ducati parts, as well as for converting already expensive exotica into completely un-affordable, even more exotic exotica. But before that, they were originally a race team. The race team, in fact, responsible for Ducati's many racing successes until the creation of their in-house racing division, including Mike Hailwood's famous TT-winning bike, so they've been around the track a few times. Although the bike does include a headlight, a tail light, and turn signals, it appears that wasn't enough to get past rigorous TÜV certification and the bike couldn't be registered for road use in Germany where it was stored for many years. Maybe a new American owner will have more luck?

From the original eBay listing: 1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale

The 1981 Ducati Scuderia N.C.R was one of the preeminent motorcycle racing teams of all time. They were the de-facto Ducati factory race team from the early 1970s until Ducati took it in-house with Ducati Corsa in 2000. They continued as privateers and had success with rider Ben Bostrom. The company was then sold and continues as a specialist builder of very high end motorcycles.

NCRs wins on the world stage are almost too numerous to mention. But Imola 200 winners Paul Smart, Isle of Man TT winners Mike Hailwood were all on the bevel drive NCRs. The string of wins by Tony Rutter on the belt drive TT2 were all Nepoti and Caracchi machines that made NCR a household name with their distinctive logo of a speeding helmet clad dog.

Nepoti and Caracchi Racing designed their own frame for the belt drive Pantah based series. This was the 600TT. It differs from the more common TT2, which was more of a Ducati design. A total of nine frames were made by Verlicchi and a further two by DM. All but two were racing frames. Of these two street bikes produced, this is the only one built with an alloy gas tank. Imagine a genuine NCR with a steering lock.

This bike has spent most of its life unused in Germany. The owner tried to convert his Pantah to a NCR framed machine, but the TUV would not allow it, due to their ultra-strict type certification. Throughout 1980s, 90s and 2000s it was in hiding. It re-surfaced in 2006 and was recommissioned. However the German owner was still not able to use it.

It came to America several years ago and has been in a private collection museum ever since. It has a US tile as the original donor Ducati Pantah.

Gas has been drained and battery removed for storage and display. We are selling this incredible machine for a client of ours and all technical questions will be answered as quickly as possible but may take time to get as he has limited access. Sold on a clean, mileage exempt US title.

VIN#DM500SL661261

Bidding is up to just north of $9,100 with plenty of interest and plenty of time left on the auction. In general, the earlier bevel-drive bikes are considered the most desirable and collectible Ducatis, but this is an exceptionally rare and cool motorcycle, considering the direct links to NCR and the fact that it's theoretically a roadgoing racebike. Obviously you should be careful to consult with your local DMV if you plan to register this machine for road use, but this one might be best used as the crown jewel in a collection anyway, considering it's status as just one of two ever built.

-tad

Pantah-stic: 1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale
Ducati September 29, 2016 posted by

In the Beginning… 1980 Ducati Pantah 500 SL for Sale

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-l-side

By the late 1970s, it was pretty obvious that Ducati needed to update their line: performance wasn't really all that much of a problem, but their famous L-twin was very expensive to manufacture. So when the time came... They simply tossed the whole thing out the window and started over, with a parallel-twin that used simple springs to actuate its valves. On paper, it probably seemed like a great idea, as the new machine offered up improved packaging and was much cheaper to manufacture. In reality? It was a disaster, since the new 500GTL wasn't especially good-looking, ate crankshafts for breakfast, and generally offended everyone. Luckily,  Fabio Taglioni had continued work on the belt-drive L-twin he’d wanted to build as a replacement all along and descendants of the Pantah 500 SL still power air-cooled Ducatis today.

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-r-side

The new engine swapped the complicated and expensive tower-shaft and bevel-drive arrangement for a simple set of rubber belts to operate the cams, and the Desmo system that was formerly reserved for the most sporting Ducatis was made standard across the board. The changes made for a quieter engine that was less expensive to build, but meant that owners were stuck with pricey and frequent maintenance requirements unless they planned to do the work themselves. It was the first Ducati to use their signature trellis frame and the engine as a stressed member. In spite of the modest displacement, these have the usual Ducati sound and flexible powerband, and handling is generally considered to be exemplary.

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-dash

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Ducati Pantah 500 SL for Sale

This ground-breaking 500 twin established the pattern which Ducati would follow for the next 20 years and on. 

Ducati's foray into the world of vertical parallel twins in the mid-1970s proved to be a horrid experience, so designer Fabio Taglioni called a halt to those 350 and 500s and went back to the drawing board. The result was the Pantah 500 SL which first appeared in Milan in 1979 and went on to spawn entire subsequent generations of belt-driven, OHC, 90-degree V (or L) Ducati twins.The first Pantah used the engine dimensions from the Grand Prix racer of 1973 at 74mm by 58mm to give 499cc. Apart from the bore and stroke dimensions, this was an entirely new design of air-cooled engine although the five-speed gearbox was a development from earlier machines. Running 9.5:1 compression, the Pantah output 50bhp at 8500rpm, which was measured as an impressive 46bhp at the rear wheel and equated to a top speed of around 115mph. Weighing just 180kg, the Pantah was nimble and peppy and it impressed the test riders of the time. 'The handling and roadholding are quite exceptional,' said Bike magazine. 'There's nothing like a thoroughbred Italian for finding out how a motorcycle should really handle.'

This example has been garage stored for the last two years, and was in running condition when placed into storage. In need of battery and carb job. Brake lines, fuel lines, tires replaced in 2013. Bike has traveled less than 100 miles since then. The bike is complete and will make a fine ride for a luck rider.

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-front

With under 10,000 miles on the odometer, this bike obviously needs a bit of cosmetic work and the battery and carburetor rebuild the seller mentions, but appears very complete, aside from the popular but non-standard two-into-one exhaust. These were languishing at the bottom of the Ducati heap for a while there, but prices have been steadily rising in the past few years.

-tad

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-l-side2

In the Beginning… 1980 Ducati Pantah 500 SL for Sale