Posts by tag: pantah

Ducati May 9, 2018 posted by

Tasteful Upgrades: 1988 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Designed to resemble their race-winning TT1 machines and the very last bike built before a buyout by Cagiva, the Ducati F1 was a bit rough around the edges but, in spite of a kit-bike feel and build quality, was a true thoroughbred. The F1 and its variants languished in obscurity for a while, since it wasn't quite a classic and didn't offer a more modern Ducati's refinement or parts availability.

The F1 used a version 749cc Ducati's air and oil-cooled two-valve Pantah motor, tuned to produce 76hp. With just over 400lbs to push around, performance wouldn't give the inline fours from Japan much trouble in a straight line, but it could handle with the best of them.

The two-valve engine was caged by a trellis frame by Verlicchi and wrapped in bodywork that was decidedly old-school, compared to more modern machines like Suzuki's "Slingshot" GSX-R. Ergonomics were clearly an afterthought, with even the air-cleaners sticking out from the bodywork, waiting  to foul the rider's knees.

It's not the most collectible version of the F1, but comes with some very nice extras. F1s had a 16" front and 18" rear wheel combination, but the Oscam parts fitted to this example both appear to be 16". They definitely look trick, with the polished rim and modular construction. The seller includes plenty of information about this bike, as you can see below, and it looks like the bike is ready to go.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

1988 Ducati 750 F1, only 19,411 miles, many Monjuich upgrades, great condition

Details:

  • 1988 Ducati 750 F1 (ZDM750R/2)
  • only 19,411 miles, Monjuich upgrades
  • very rare in this condition
  • selling for senior friend who is second owner
  • never raced but has taken part in a few track days
  • V2, 4-stroke, 70HP, Desmo
  • air cooled, 5-speed, chain drive
  • dual front disc brakes, single rear disc
  • only 416 lbs, very quick, not a beginner bike!
  • one key, factory owners manual and 750 Montjuich shop manual
  • fully street legal once you remount the turn signals (all wiring there)

Upgrades and extras:

  • 2-into one Ducati Montjuich pipe
  • Second Ducati Montjuich tailpiece with seat reworked by Sargent
  • Montjuich fender
  • Oscam wheels (very rare)
  • Throttlemeister-style throttle lock
  • rear paddock stand

OEM parts included:

  • Stock front and rear wheels
  • Factory F1 pipes, very solid with minor surface ticking, great candidate for blasting and repainting
  • Factory centerstand and OEM swingarm
  • Factory chainguard
  • four turn signals and pigtails, all need new stalks

Cosmetic:

  • Overall cosmetics are very nice, paint glossy, no rash on panels
  • small garf in belly pan, top edge of fairing, and spot where tailpiece meets seat
  • few rubs on rear subfender
  • few jacket scratches on tank 
  • seat in very good shape
  • no dents in tank
  • few oxidized spots on Oscam wheels but nice shape overall

Mechanical:

  • tires have zero miles: Michelin A59X and M59X
  • tires are 2004 and 2005 build date but were properly stored in heated shop so still soft
  • bike starts easily, runs, rides and brakes well
  • fresh oil and K&N filter, brake fluid flush, clutch fluid flush
  • front calipers and master cylinder put thru ultrasonic and rebuilt
  • carbs ultrasonic treated and rebuilt with kits installed
  • new brake pads
  • new timing belts
  • valves set
  • new fuel taps (Bevel Heaven) and fuel lines
  • new engine cover seals
  • repacked steering head bearings
  • lubed cables
  • horn feeble at times and not working others
  • turn signal circuits all there and work but no signals mounted
  • tripmeter reset works but not hard mounted
  • sidestand has been shortened

Well, 19,000 miles on a well-maintained Ducati Pantah isn't anything to be scared of, but sure isn't museum-piece low or anything to brag about... But it does appear to have been sympathetically owned, very well maintained, and sensibly updated. The seller also includes a short clip of the bike idling and revving, along with plenty of additional pics. Bidding is very active and up to $9,000 with a few days left on the auction. Folks are asking for north of $20,000 for Laguna Secas and Montjuichs, although basic F1s seem to be much more modestly valued. Given the upgrades and the amount of time left on the auction, I expect this one to go a good bit higher before the auction ends.

-tad

Tasteful Upgrades: 1988 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale
Cagiva May 5, 2018 posted by

Have Blue – 1987 Cagiva Alazzurra 650SS

Cagiva re-badged the Pantah for 1985 and tried on their own badging and design features.  The Alazzurra had toned down its testosterone content a bit, but was improved in some good ways.  This 1987 example has been a labor of love for its present owner, who has made some long term investments in the bike's future.

1987 Cagiva Alazzurra 650SS for sale on eBay

The belt driven cams of the desmodue help the Alazzurra push 55 hp and 36 ft.-lbs. torque.  Right side-up 35mm forks and dual Marzocchi shocks are appropriately light weight, as are the 260mm dual disk brakes.  The supersport fairing flows sweetly and it looks like there is beaucoup ground clearance.

 

The Virginia owner has  made several improvements to the Alazzurra, without indulging in any sort of bling - well, maybe the red brake lines.  Here is his rundown from the eBay auction:

Since I've owned it, I've done the following:

1- fixed a leaking base gasket ($100 + labor)
2- adjusted the valves to the perfect spec. ($150 + My Labor)
3- replaced the belts ($40 + My Labor)
4- new chain and custom rear sprocket ($80 + My Labor)
5- upgraded stainless steel brake & clutch lines and hardware with speed bleeders ($180 + My Labor)
6- rebuilt the ignition sensor wires ($30 + My Labor)
7- powder coated the exhaust ($100 + My Labor)
8- brand new battery ($65 + My Labor)
9- rebuilt the carbs ($60 + My Labor)
10- rebuilt the key ignition switch. ( + My Labor)
11- replaced the leaking petcock and fuel hoses. ($130 + My Labor)

I've REALLY enjoyed working on and riding a true Italian cult bike. I don't have to sell it, but it's time to move on. 

There is also a cold start video - here -.

Cagiva soon realized that tossing out a well-known name and competition history was folly, leaving the friendly Elefant in a tough position.  Luckily this Alazzurra has weathered that storm and looks ready for a long weekend on the Blue Ridge Parkway, perhaps as the new owner takes her north or south and home again...

-donn

Have Blue – 1987 Cagiva Alazzurra 650SS
Ducati May 2, 2018 posted by

One Owner: 1993 Ducati Superlight for Sale

Prior to and even during the era of the 916, Ducati still needed to shift their relatively slow, old-tech 900SS. The 916 obviously grabbed headlines, handled like it was on the proverbial rails, and looked like sex. But it was also prohibitively expensive for the plebs to buy and especially to maintain, hideously uncomfortable for regular riding, and an all-around experts-only machine. The 900SS, on the other hand, was the everyman exotic, a real Ducati, but one that was based on slightly outdated technology. Today's Superlight helped stimulate a bit of fresh interest in the working-man's Italian sportbike by adding a bit of style, lightness, and shockingly yellow paint.

The fact that it's down a bit on straight-line performance doesn't mean it's a bad bike though, far from it. And "outdated technology" also means "simpler to maintain." Changing Ducati's toothed rubber cam-drive belts is a two-year or 12,000 mile service, whichever comes first. But the procedure is pretty straightforward and can be done by any competent mechanic. The valves on the two-valve engine aren't all that tricky either and the lack of liquid-cooling and the associated hoses and bracketry mean access isn't all that difficult. That is more work than a Japanese sportbike of the same period, but no one buys a now-classic sportbike thinking it won't need a bit of work, and at least here that work is pretty simple to do.

The Superlight was basically a 900SS with fully-adjustable suspension, a solo tail, open clutch, upswept exhausts pipes that increased cornering clearance, lightweight composite Marvic wheels with a distinctive polished rim, and the critically important numbered plaque on the triple clamp: just 861 were sold in 1993 so these are very rare, if not all that high-performance. Obviously, red is the traditional, and often preferred color for Ducatis, but it seems a shame that more aren't painted yellow like this example, since very, very few motorcycles look good in yellow. The handling of the 900SS was never in doubt, and the older Super Sport has much more comfortable ergonomics than the admittedly extreme 916. Just fit a more supportive Corbin saddle, throw on a backpack, and head out for a long day of riding, without concern that you'll need to down half a bottle of ibuprofen when you get back.

If eyeball-squashing acceleration is the only metric by which you judge a motorcycle, you're going to hate this bike. If you think a 170hp bike just isn't fast enough, this isn't your machine. But there's a reason that the two-valve, air-and-oil-cooled Pantah in its various iterations gets mentioned on every "best motorcycle engine ever" list: that sucker has character. I'm biased here: I think it's the best-sounding motorcycle engine of all time, especially with a bit of extra boom liberated by some carbon-fiber cans. But it also just has a great, punchy midrange that just kind of slings you forward after each shift. The 70-75 horses a good 900 makes at the rear wheel may not sound like much on paper, but it's plenty to whip you along a canyon road and legions of Ducati fans aren't just buying these because of some perceived mystique. I mean, of course some of them are just buying a name, the idea,  but the same is probably true of the majority of motorcyclists in one way or another.

This collector bike is more of a rider, though: it's a little scruffy, some of the panels have fatigue cracks around their mounting points, and it generally needs some attention to the details. But if the mechanical bits are all in good working order, you can do a bit of a rolling-restoration on it while enjoying the sound and feel of your vintage-ish Ducati. Starting bid is about half what a cleaner, lower-mileage Superlight might sell for, so if you're handy with the wrenches, this might be a great way to pick up an appreciating classic for cheap.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati Superlight for Sale

I’m the original and only owner. The Superlight was bought new in Austin, Texas and has a clear title. The yellow color was only available in the US. I’m a mechanical engineer and performed all routine maintenance myself. The bike has never been crashed. It is all original except the muffler brackets broke and were replaced and the rear wheel fatigued and was replaced with an appropriate Ducati Monster rear wheel. The bike is in fantastic condition with only some spider cracks in the body work in the usual places as shown in the pics. New Michelin tires, seat and windshield are in great shape, 26,041 miles. Comes with pictured rear stand. Runs, rides great.. You won’t be disappointed. 

Miles aren't as low as some other examples we've seen, but aren't anything to worry about: well-maintained Pantah engines can triple this mileage with ease. Just change the belts and adjust the valves, top off with oil occasionally between changes if the level gets low, and enjoy. The weak spots are well-known and relatively simple to sort out, parts to maintain them are widely available, and most everything on the Superlight is shared with the more common SS-SP and SS-CR versions. Aside from those Marvic wheels of course. It's a shame the rear wheel isn't the correct item, but with no takers so far at the $4995 opening bid, I expect this will be on the cheap side for a Superlight. Grab this one, pocket the savings, and prowl eBay for a matching rear.

-tad

One Owner: 1993 Ducati Superlight for Sale
Ducati April 26, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Update 5.2.2018: Price reduced to $16,750! Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Update 3.16.2018: Recently serviced late last year at local Ducati specialist, including new timing belts, idler and tensioners, valve adjust,all fluids changed - including brake and forks, and carb rebuild with new accelerator pump. New price is $18,500 or best offer.
Contact Adam by email: adam_chovanak@yahoo.com

If you were looking to jump onto the Ducati 750 F1 bandwagon early with an eye towards making big money flipping one... That ship has sailed: these Pantah-powered race replicas now command some serious money. For years, these occupied the same place as the early Super Sport, in part because they straddle two generations of Ducatis, pre and post-Cagiva ownership, but don't seem to fully belong to either. They've got a slightly shed-built quality from the older era, combined with the "modern" Pantah L-twin and more 80s style. When new, build quality was criticized and suspension, as delivered, was a bit crude. But the potential was there from the beginning in bikes like today's featured 750 F1 Laguna Seca, it just needed a bit of development.

The 750 F1 used Ducati's characteristic trellis frame, designed in this case by Verlicchi and visibly wrapped around the lightweight aluminum tank. It was powered by a 749cc version of their air/oil-cooled, two-valve twin making a claimed 76hp and styled to look like the successful TT1 race bikes of the period. Dry weight was just 385lbs and the 16" front and 18" wheel gave nimble handling. The Montjuich, Santa Monica, and this Laguna Seca were all limited editions of the F1 that were priced higher when new and featured improved performance and a higher top speed.

For years, the F1 languished forgotten and relatively unloved, but the fact that it was conceived before the company's takeover by Cagiva and the perceived mass-production that followed seems to be the exact quality now driving the increase in prices. Looking closely, there's one obvious indicator that the F1 came before Cagiva's ownership: bikes that came later reversed the rear cylinder so that both carburetors could be fitted into the engine's vee for much more efficient packaging. Some F1s have awkward pod filters fitted that bulge out from behind the fairing, but this example doesn't bother with something as trivial as "air filtration" and just has mesh screens to keep out rocks, stray animals, and small children.

ZDM750LS-750139 / DM750L1-750238

Recently out of long-term collection in Japan - this Marco Lucchinelli Replica is a time capsule in beautiful shape with only ~2500km  / 1600 miles. Original paint and bodywork is excellent; red paint on the beautiful trellis frame very nice with some darkening on the upper surface of each tube. Clip-ons and muffler have visible surface corrosion. Runs great - bike starts right up, idles well and runs like it should. Original mirrors included in sale.

The F1 Laguna Seca, along with the Santa Monica and Montjuich, represented the pinnacle of the factory Pantah-based TT race-bikes. These hand-built race-replica bikes were closely based on the forks F1 racers with open-throat Dell'Orto carburetors, 10:1 compression pistons, bigger valves and less restrictive exhaust. Transmission uses straight-cut (like the works bikes) instead of helical primary drive gears. The Laguna Seca is fitted with Verlicchi aluminum swing-arm and solo seat.

Widely acclaimed when new - Cycle World stated, "They May Be Bargains. This last Ducati is a throwback in the spirit of the 750 SS of 1973, the F1's most famous predecessor. Like the 750 SS, the F1 is the Italian sportsbike of its era."

Mick Walker summarized in his 1989 Ducati Buyers Guide, "If you find, or already own, an F1 my advice is to hang on to it. If you are doubly lucky to have been able to afford one of the 'limited edition' models, then guard it with your life, for you have a real classic of the future. Any one of the Monjuich, Laguna Seca or Santamonica models is worth a full five stars, for they are both beautiful and rare."

This gem will make a fabulous addition to your collection. Offering with low reserve and reasonable buy-it-now. Currently on it's importation paperwork - Japanese de-registration certificate / English translation of certificate / NHTSA HS7 / EPA 3520-1 / CBP 7501 (stamped). Washington State title is available for $400 documentation fee approx. 5-week wait. WA state buyers responsible for Tax & License.

As the seller mentions, the bike isn't cosmetically perfect, but no bike that's thirty years old and in original condition is likely to be. Bodywork is very sharp, but some of the exposed metal parts have some surface corrosion but the paint on the bodywork looks very nice and mileage is extremely low at just 1,600. The seller is asking for $16,750

-tad

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale
Ducati March 19, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Carbon-Bodied 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale

Italian bikes are sometimes accused of putting style before function, but I think it's more accurate to say that they prioritize performance and style over comfort and practicality... But in the case of the Ducati MH900e, style was far and away the most important priority, and everything else came after. Penned by Pierre Terblanche, the MH900e was meant to evoke Mike "The Bike" Hailwood's race-winning Isle of Man TT NCR-prepped machine and the replica MHRs that followed. The "e" at the end of the name was for "Evoluzione" as the bike is the spiritual successor of those storied machines.

The MH900e's concept bike looks are wild and impractical, but its beating heart is Ducati's long-serving oil and air-cooled two-valve L-twin. Displacing 904cc, the twin pumps out an honest 75hp at the rear wheel along with respectable midrange torque. It's obviously not a powerhouse, but the 410lb machine has Ducati's race-bred frame geometry and quality suspension at both ends. The riding position is committed, with a long reach to low bars over the tank, high rearsets, and a tall seat that requires long legs if you want to put your feet flat at traffic lights.

Frankly, there are just two things really stopping the bike from being a great back-road bike like the later Sport Classics: the brutal ergonomics and the insane, Harley Sportster-sized fuel tank. The ergonomics you can justify, but the tiny, 2.2 gallon tank means about 90 miles between stops, even with the two-valve twin's surprisingly decent mileage. It's a little shocking, since the bike looks like it'd have a generously-sized fuel cell, but most of what you're looking at is apparently an airbox.

Luckily, California Cycleworks makes a much larger 4.6 gallon unit that doesn't require any permanent modifications to the bike to install. It appears to still be available and would make the bike much more practical. With just 2,000 produced between 2001 and 2002, they're rare and valuable enough that most seemed doomed to a life as display pieces, but that's a shame, considering the excellent handling, solid reliability, and easy-to-service engine.

From the Seller: 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale

Ultra Rare 2002 Ducati MH900e for sale

Limited production 1812 of 2000
Mileage: 4,500 Miles
US bike from Oregon
Clean title like new condition
Price: $19,600 USD

Factory upgraded Ducati Performance carbon fiber bodywork and tasteful parts including:

  • DP Clutch Cover
  • DP Slave Clutch Cylinder
  • DP Signals
  • Speedy Moto Pressure Plate & Basket
  • Rizoma Handle Bar Grips
  • Rizoma Mirrors
  • Staintune Slip-on Exhausts

Bike comes with:

  • Owner plaque
  • T-Shirt
  • Rear stand

All services done. Timing belts changed in 2017. New tires. Needs nothing. Bike is as is and does not come with additional parts.

Bike is located in Vancouver BC Canada. Serious inquiries only. No PayPal. Wire or cash only. The bike can be easily exported back to the US because it is an US bike. Shipping can be arranged at buyer’s cost.

Price in USD

Contact Jacky by email with your interest: jacky_wang99@hotmail.com

It is unfortunate that the original bodywork and other parts don't seem to be included, but the Ducati Performance panels are obviously an appropriate modification and look great, even if exposed carbon fiber reduces the visual ties to the red and silver of the original NCR bikes. The bike also includes a set of Staintune exhausts that look very similar to the stock system but let the bike sound more appropriately Ducati-ish. Considering the prices of Sport Classics these days, the $19,800 asking price seems pretty reasonable, and is in line with other examples of the MH900e that we've seen lately.

-tad

Featured Listing: Carbon-Bodied 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale
Ducati March 7, 2018 posted by

Uncompromising: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Ducati's mid to late-80s bikes existed in a kind of limbo: the modern sportbike was taking shape, and the Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca was birthed during this transitional period. The 750 F1 and its variations weren't quite the refined-ish, modern-ish, mass-produced-ish machines of the Cagiva era, but they weren't the nearly hand-crafted bikes of the Fabio Taglioni era either. The Laguna Seca was named after the famous California race track where Marco Lucchinelli found success in 1986, and just 200 examples were built.

The 750 F1 used a Verlicchi-designed steel trellis frame that gave it a look familiar to fans of later Ducatis, and the bike was powered by a 749cc version of their air and oil-cooled engine, here producing a claimed 76hp. Notably, the F1 still has the rear cylinder in its original configuration: later SS models had the rear cylinder rotated 180° to place both carburetors in the vee of the engine for much more elegant packaging. The bike was wrapped in bodywork designed to resemble Ducati's successful TT1 race bikes, with 16" wheels front and rear, while a dry weight of just 385lbs meant the now-familiar two-valve Pantah engine didn't have much mass to push around, giving the bike a 136mph top speed.

Quality was a bit kit-bike and the bikes were relatively crude as delivered, but the potential was there for a seriously fast motorcycle, if one took some time to develop it. Almost as if Ducati didn't bother finishing the bikes, knowing that most owners would modify them to suit their needs anyway.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

The only changes to this bike upon delivery was the installation of the proper directionals, rear brake light switch and horn for street use. I installed a proper muffler in the place of the very loud Verlicchi megaphone. The bike also received an upgrade to the wheels and discs although retaining the 16"size. Magnesium Marvic/Akront rims as on the Monjuich and full floating discs replaced the original cast F1 style wheels and semi floating discs. All original parts are included in the sale. The bike is in excellent condition with only 2830 miles and has never been raced. Mileage as shown in photo is in kilometers.

The F1 and its variants spent years undervalued, but at this point, values have increased significantly, and the opening bid for this example is a cool $20,000. The bike is, as the seller indicates, not completely original, but the changes made are period correct and the parts needed to return it to stock are included. The original machine was basically a race bike with lights, so the addition of some small, folding bar-end mirrors is probably a wise concession to road safety: "First rule of Italian driving: what's behind me is not important..." I'd probably see about adding some low-restriction foam pods to those carburetors as well, since plenty of grit and sand can get past the mesh screens currently serving as "air filters."

-tad

Uncompromising: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale