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Posts by tag: pantah

Ducati September 5, 2018 posted by

Keep it Simple: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

I appreciate simplicity. Simple HVAC knobs on a car's center stack. Black coffee. Bikes like the Ducati 900SS FE. Modern technology is great, but if you've seen the new Ducati Panigale V4 with the bodywork removed, you realize that the cost is massive complexity and the knowledge that, if something goes wrong once the bike is out of warranty, things could get expensive really fast... And while TCS and cornering ABS are really great ways to keep even experienced motorcyclists safe, some of these bikes are so powerful that you need electronics just to rein in the wild performance. But bikes like the 900SS manage to be both entertaining and very simple, suggesting that maybe we've gotten lost somewhere along the way.

"FE" stands for "Final Edition" and was obviously a way to sell a few blinged-up examples of the stone-axe simple Supersport before an updated version arrived in 1999 that used bronze in place of chipped flint. The bike is almost painfully basic: it's powered by Ducati's 904cc air-cooled two-valve v-twin, fed by a pair of Mikuni CV carbs and backed by a six-speed gearbox, now with extra Dry Clutch Rattle™. There are no variable power modes. There is no traction control, no ABS. No electronically-actuated exhaust flappers or phased variable cam lobes, heated grips, GI Joe Kung-Fu Grips, or cellphone charging ports.

What you do get is Ducati's charismatic 900SS with a solo tail, upswept exhaust pipes that increase cornering clearance, and a numbered plaque on the top triple clamp. Just to show that you're one of 300 very special people. Obviously, the 84 claimed horses aren't going to impress anyone these days, and honestly they didn't even when the 900SS was brand new. But the bike is relatively light, the geometry race-bred, the brakes relatively strong, and the engine flexible and fun. A bike like this is never going to win in a spec-sheet bang-for-your-buck competition, and anyone who dismisses this bike as being "overhyped and slow" is probably missing the point.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

Ducati 900 SS FE, 1998. #193/300. 12,804 miles, bike is in excel cond. Serviced at Ducati Dallas, valves adjusted, timing belts, Motul oil and filter, fuel filter, K&N air filter, etc.

Bike has 3 spoke Marchesini magnesium wheels, braided stainless hydraulic lines, Termignoni carbon high mount mufflers, carbon tank protector.

These bikes are getting hard to find in this cond, this is a nice running and riding Supersport.

Crating service available.

This one appears basically stock, with the addition of magnesium wheels, stainless brake lines, and Termi pipes. All of which are things I'd want on my very own 900SS, and upgrades that are generally acceptable among collectors. Note that the pictures appear to show the stock FE wheels, which I don't believe were magnesium, as the owner claims. Miles aren't barn-find low, but very reasonable for a machine this old, and should give a new owner room to add some without decreasing the bike's value significantly. Because the point of this bike is to ride it.

-tad

Keep it Simple: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale
Bimota August 17, 2018 posted by

Styling Exercise: 1998 Bimota DB3 Mantra for Sale

Bimota's stock-in-trade has always been aggressive, lightweight racebikes for the road but, every once in a while, they throw us a curveball. Or even the occasional knuckleball like this DB3 Mantra. An unapologetically road-biased machine, Bimota's third Ducati-powered special featured upright ergonomics, an oval-section trellis frame shared with the later DB4, a roto-molded fuel tank that included a storage cubby at the back in an ill-advised nod to practicality, and styling could be called "wild" if you were feeling gracious.

It was polarizing then and now, but if you like the looks, you shouldn't let anything discourage you from buying one: the hard parts are all easy to service, reliable, and pretty entertaining. Ducati's air and oil-cooled two-valve v-twin has been around forever, and is relatively simple to service and parts are readily available to maintain them. Yeah, the regular belt-changes are kind of annoying, but easy to do if you know your way around an engine, and the valves generally aren't too much of a problem either. And if the bike's 85 claimed horses from the 904cc twin don't adequately blow your hair back, you can build yourself a high-compression, 944cc monster that should do a pretty good job of stretching your arms.

The styling was slightly insane, but the bike handled very well, with a 43mm Paioli fork out front and an adjustable Paioli shock out back. The oval-section trellis frame was stiff and very light: just 11 pounds. Basically, it was a lighter, weirder, much more expensive Monster with better suspension. Like all Bimotas, it makes no sense from a financial perspective, as performance advantages over a Monster that cost half as much were minimal. But 454 Mantras found buyers, which makes the bike pretty much volume production for Bimota.

This example is a second-generation Mantra, with updated styling at the front, tubular handlebars instead of raised clip-ons, and Antera wheels to replace the earlier Marchesini hoops. I have a soft spot for these, as it was one of the first bikes that, as a non-rider, really caught my eye when it was new. Weird as they are, I still kind of dig the DB3 and would have one in a collection if I could afford to:

A: Have that plastic, burl-wood dash replaced with something stupid, like genuine wood or some nice carbon fiber.
B: Replace the horrible four exhaust pipes and the ludicrously-styled hangars with something much simpler.

Remove the taller screen, fit some simple bar-end mirrors and have fun.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Bimota DB3 Mantra for Sale

This is an excellent example of a DB3. 400+ made, 23 in red. Very few in the US. Very low mileage at under 9200. Ducati 900 engine just has been serviced with new belts, oil and plugs. New AGM battery. New Conti tires. Previous owner removed the complicated fuel pump system and now it is just gravity fed.

Here are the 3 issues. Without a choke cable, it is a little hard starting until fuel gets in the carbs. With a cable, I imagine it would go on the first try. Once started, restarts fine. Tach works 50% if the time, loose connection? Lastly has a slight whistle noise at an exact rpm. Ducati said it is caused by lack of the factory air box. It hurts nothing, just the flow of air... These are 3 minute things, but I go for full transparency. The bike is in great shape. Very unique Italian styling.

"Very unique Italian styling" might be the epitome of understatement in this case. But the bones are good and the DB3 should make a pretty great weekend roadster for cruising, carving up traffic, and shocking onlookers. "What is that?" is something I'd expect you'll hear pretty often, riding the Mantra. So what's it worth? Well the Bimota pedigree and rarity certainly makes it more valuable than an equivalent 900SS or Monster powered by the same engine, with similar performance. But by how much? Values for 90s Bimotas are currently at a bit of a low-ebb, although I doubt that can continue forever. Bidding on this one is very active and up to just about $5,000 with another day left on the auction.

-tad

Styling Exercise: 1998 Bimota DB3 Mantra for Sale
Ducati July 10, 2018 posted by

Racer Replica: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale

The original listing for this 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica includes some good general information, but I'd love more specific details about the components. The seller mentions the frame was supplied by Roy Thersby, but did he build the frame, modify the frame, or just paint it? At a glance, it appears to be from a 90s SuperSport, which makes sense, considering the rest of the running gear. So it appears that what we're dealing with here is a fully-built 90s 750SS with brilliant retro-bodywork and paint. And headlamps. Those massive, retina-burning headlamps.

The original TT2 that inspired this build was a lightweight, Pantah-powered racebike displacing 597cc with a Verlicchi frame and Marzocchi suspension. Built between 1980 and 1984 the bike was very successful in competition and ultimately spawned the Ducati F1 road bike.

The engine in this replica is a 750, but it's looks to be the 90s version, since both carburetors live in the engine's vee: the 80s Pantah-engined bikes had both facing rearward, with the vertical cylinder's jutting out awkwardly towards the rider's knee. And the wheels are clearly 17" parts, in keeping with the 90s theme. Great for finding modern, sticky rubber, but not the most authentic-looking, if that's the goal, since the original used 18" hoops. And why choose non-adjustable front forks on this bike? Even set up properly, I'm surprised the builder didn't at least use the adjustable units available on certain 900SS models, since the upside-down forks give the game away anyway that this isn't really an 80s race bike.

Not doubting the craftsmanship, but there are some other choices I'm not big on, starting with the Koso instruments. I'm sure they're reliable and legible, but I don't really like them on recent Bimotas and I really don't like them on a retro-looking special. Something classic from MotoGadget would have given similar function with a much more appropriate look. The bar-end signals are a cool touch, but a bit too shiny for my taste and the grips and Union Jack tank pad are way too modern. And the M4 exhaust is perfectly fine on a GSX-R750 but a "classic" Ducati? But all that is relatively easy to change to suit the new owner's preferences anyway.

If it sounds like I don't like this bike, you'd be wrong: I'm really just picking nits and all of these minor issues are easily forgotten, looking at the red-and-yellow bodywork and those awesome endurance-racing headlamps. And although the listing doesn't go into too much detail regarding the engine, the Pantah engine can be tuned to make good power and, in a lightweight package, should make for a very entertaining bike.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale

For the Ducati connoisseur, this beauty will enhance any collection. Frame came from British Ducati legend Roy Thersby. The bike was built by vintage Ducati guru Scot Wilson as his personal ride. Scot is the owner of Italian Iron Classics in Tucson, AZ. I've had the pleasure of owning a couple of Scot Wilson's builds and they are very carefully planned and meticulously executed.

The 750 engine was built by Tom Hull of Phoenix to "Pro-Thunder" standards with Carrillo rods, dual spark, lightened internals and all the special bits you'd expect. The engine was moth-balled after a rule change, acquired for this build and has about 1,000 miles on it. 40mm Del Ortos, fork set by Computrack. GP shift but could be changed. The bike was just serviced, all fluids changed, fuel tank cleaned, carbs cleaned and carefully checked over. It's ready to go.

The bike is street legal, has a clear Massachusetts title and goes like crazy. Headlights are Hella style as used for endurance racing. Bar-end turn signals are installed so the bike will pass my state registration inspection. The paint is as good as it gets and looks as fresh as the day it came from the painter's shop. If you are looking at this bike I don't have to tell you about Ducati F1-R's or TT2's. I've had the opportunity to do a (very careful) track day at a Ducati event and the bikes gets lots of attention. If the track's not your thing you could proudly show it at any event and it would draw a crowd.

While undeniably cool, bikes like this are always tricky when it comes to determining value. They're not collectible in the conventional sense, in that they're not real race bikes or limited-production factory machines: they've been built using high-quality components, but they're basically really nice lash-ups, "bitsas" made from the very best bits. Of course, a real TT2 would likely sell for far more than the $22,500 the seller is asking, and considering the quality and names attached, I'm thinking this is a pretty damn good deal as long as the lack of originality doesn't bother you, and you're ready for the snobs to give you static when they ask you "is it real?" But honestly, if anyone gives you a problem, you should just blind them with those massive Hella lamps.

-tad

Racer Replica: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale
Ducati June 27, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Carbon-Bodied 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale

Update 8.12.2018: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Italian bikes are sometimes accused of putting style before function, but I think it's more accurate to say that they prioritize performance and style over comfort and practicality... But in the case of the Ducati MH900e, style was far and away the most important priority, and everything else came after. Penned by Pierre Terblanche, the MH900e was meant to evoke Mike "The Bike" Hailwood's race-winning Isle of Man TT NCR-prepped machine and the replica MHRs that followed. The "e" at the end of the name was for "Evoluzione" as the bike is the spiritual successor of those storied machines.

The MH900e's concept bike looks are wild and impractical, but its beating heart is Ducati's long-serving oil and air-cooled two-valve L-twin. Displacing 904cc, the twin pumps out an honest 75hp at the rear wheel along with respectable midrange torque. It's obviously not a powerhouse, but the 410lb machine has Ducati's race-bred frame geometry and quality suspension at both ends. The riding position is committed, with a long reach to low bars over the tank, high rearsets, and a tall seat that requires long legs if you want to put your feet flat at traffic lights.

Frankly, there are just two things really stopping the bike from being a great back-road bike like the later Sport Classics: the brutal ergonomics and the insane, Harley Sportster-sized fuel tank. The ergonomics you can justify, but the tiny, 2.2 gallon tank means about 90 miles between stops, even with the two-valve twin's surprisingly decent mileage. It's a little shocking, since the bike looks like it'd have a generously-sized fuel cell, but most of what you're looking at is apparently an airbox.

Luckily, California Cycleworks makes a much larger 4.6 gallon unit that doesn't require any permanent modifications to the bike to install. It appears to still be available and would make the bike much more practical. With just 2,000 produced between 2001 and 2002, they're rare and valuable enough that most seemed doomed to a life as display pieces, but that's a shame, considering the excellent handling, solid reliability, and easy-to-service engine.

From the Seller: 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale

Ultra Rare 2002 Ducati MH900e for sale

Limited production 1812 of 2000
Mileage: 4,500 Miles
US bike from Oregon
Clean title like new condition
Price: $19,600 $18,000 USD

Factory upgraded Ducati Performance carbon fiber bodywork and tasteful parts including:

  • DP Clutch Cover
  • DP Slave Clutch Cylinder
  • DP Signals
  • Speedy Moto Pressure Plate & Basket
  • Rizoma Handle Bar Grips
  • Rizoma Mirrors
  • Staintune Slip-on Exhausts

Bike comes with:

  • Owner plaque
  • T-Shirt
  • Rear stand

All services done. Timing belts changed in 2017. New tires. Needs nothing. Bike is as is and does not come with additional parts.

Bike is located in Vancouver BC Canada. Serious inquiries only. No PayPal. Wire or cash only. The bike can be easily exported back to the US because it is an US bike. Shipping can be arranged at buyer’s cost.

Price in USD

It is unfortunate that the original bodywork and other parts don't seem to be included, but the Ducati Performance panels are obviously an appropriate modification and look great, even if exposed carbon fiber reduces the visual ties to the red and silver of the original NCR bikes. The bike also includes a set of Staintune exhausts that look very similar to the stock system but let the bike sound more appropriately Ducati-ish. Considering the prices of Sport Classics these days, the $19,800 $18,000 asking price seems pretty reasonable, and is in line with other examples of the MH900e that we've seen lately.

-tad

Featured Listing: Carbon-Bodied 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale
Ducati June 20, 2018 posted by

Track Day Exotic: 2015 Pierobon X60R for Sale

I've spent some time poking around the Pierobon website, realizing that I will likely never own a Pierobon-framed track bike. As the seller mentions in their listing, this Ducati 1200DS-powered Pierobon X60R is one pricey piece of kit: the earlier F042's frame alone goes for about $3,500. And that's before you add a swingarm, fuel tank, appropriately snazzy suspension components, lightweight wheels, brakes, some minimalist bodywork... Oh yeah, and a motor. Two-valve Ducatis may not have as many parts as their liquid-cooled, four-valve stablemates  but it's not like that makes fully-built race motors cheap. Sure, you could just stick a dead stock 1100DS motor in there and call it a day, but why would you do that?

Oh, I'm sorry, you're lost. You're thinking, "Who the hell is Pierobon?"

If you're a racing fan, you might have heard of them. Located in Bologna, not far from Ducati's headquarters, they're fabrication specialists that have supplied frames and subframes, as well as swingarms and fuel tanks to Ducati's World Superbike and MotoGP teams for over 50 years. These days, they make track and racebike kits like the X60R that fit Ducati's two and four-valve engines, as well as lightweight replacement frames for all of Ducati's superbikes, up to and including the Panigale. That's right, they make a lightweight frame for the frameless Panigale. So if you've decided that the Pani's monocoque is just a bit too stiff and lacking in feedback, or if you just miss that signature trellis, Pierobon has you covered there.

I've always felt that a properly-prepared air-cooled Ducati twin would be really fun in a lightweight road or track bike and apparently the two-wheeled artists over at Pierobon felt the same way. As you can see from the photos, a finished X60R is elegant, minimal, and very expensive, as it uses only the very best components available. The resulting 300lbs wet is two-stroke territory but the 120whp obviously isn't. That's a pretty killer power-to-weight ratio and the Ducati twin, although pretty far removed from the street version in terms of output, should still have pretty great midrange shove, without the need to constantly rev the nuts off it.

From the original eBay listing: 2015 Pierobon X60R for Sale

This is a very special race/track bike, one of 75 worldwide. They are all very light (312 lbs wet, w/ fuel for a 9 lap sprint, just weighed on a FIM scale) nimble and a blast to ride, feels like a 250 GP bike with Superbike power. It has all race spec Ohlins suspension, Brembo brakes and Marchesini magnesium wheels.

I bought this at the end of the 2016 season from a friend who had won 4 different championships with it during the 2015 and 2016 seasons and decided he wanted to buy a Suter 500 to play with. I had Boulder Motor Sports (the US distributor) go through the bike completely and prep it for the 2017 season spending over $8k to do a full rebuild and prep, this type of prep makes it basically like new. See the receipts in the pics. 

These bikes cost around $70k new as base model then up depending on the build. The motor is a Boulder spec w 120rwhp and 81ft lb tq, tuned to run on pump race 110. I have only taken it out on a few track days so its ready for a full season of racing and more. If you're just a track day junkie this will only need oil changes for years of  track use. The spec motor Brian built is super durable.   It comes with the rear stand and a extra rear sprocket for super short tracks. The gearing on it now works just about everywhere.

There is a spare brand new higher spec motor refreshed by MotoCorse available and a spare set of wheels too, these are at added cost, just inquire.

Why am I selling? I never got around to racing it as I have been focused on my other 2 Pierobon's a 848 powered X80R and a full electronic X60, I am short on space so its time to let one go. I have the reserve set at a reasonable price, fair to both. With only 75 in the world there wont be many chances to get one at a major discount from new. Just raced my 2010 spec X60 to a first in BOTT at Road America this past weekend. Cant say enough about the Pierobons and how they handle    

Pierobon is the name behind most of the racing chassis built for the Ducati factory racing team dating back to the 70's and into World Superbike along with being behind the success that Casey Stoner had on the Ducati GP bikes.

Frankly, considering how much these things cost new, the prep that's gone into it, the quality of the components, and the basically brand-new, ready-to-roll condition of this X60R, the seller's $30,000 Buy It Now price is kind of a steal. The appeal is naturally very limited though: this is a racebike with no historic value, or a very expensive, exotic track day toy. Hopefully, the right buyer will snap this one up while the rest of us consider selling organs so we can afford one of our own.

-tad

Track Day Exotic: 2015 Pierobon X60R for Sale
Ducati May 9, 2018 posted by

Tasteful Upgrades: 1988 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Designed to resemble their race-winning TT1 machines and the very last bike built before a buyout by Cagiva, the Ducati F1 was a bit rough around the edges but, in spite of a kit-bike feel and build quality, was a true thoroughbred. The F1 and its variants languished in obscurity for a while, since it wasn't quite a classic and didn't offer a more modern Ducati's refinement or parts availability.

The F1 used a version 749cc Ducati's air and oil-cooled two-valve Pantah motor, tuned to produce 76hp. With just over 400lbs to push around, performance wouldn't give the inline fours from Japan much trouble in a straight line, but it could handle with the best of them.

The two-valve engine was caged by a trellis frame by Verlicchi and wrapped in bodywork that was decidedly old-school, compared to more modern machines like Suzuki's "Slingshot" GSX-R. Ergonomics were clearly an afterthought, with even the air-cleaners sticking out from the bodywork, waiting  to foul the rider's knees.

It's not the most collectible version of the F1, but comes with some very nice extras. F1s had a 16" front and 18" rear wheel combination, but the Oscam parts fitted to this example both appear to be 16". They definitely look trick, with the polished rim and modular construction. The seller includes plenty of information about this bike, as you can see below, and it looks like the bike is ready to go.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

1988 Ducati 750 F1, only 19,411 miles, many Monjuich upgrades, great condition

Details:

  • 1988 Ducati 750 F1 (ZDM750R/2)
  • only 19,411 miles, Monjuich upgrades
  • very rare in this condition
  • selling for senior friend who is second owner
  • never raced but has taken part in a few track days
  • V2, 4-stroke, 70HP, Desmo
  • air cooled, 5-speed, chain drive
  • dual front disc brakes, single rear disc
  • only 416 lbs, very quick, not a beginner bike!
  • one key, factory owners manual and 750 Montjuich shop manual
  • fully street legal once you remount the turn signals (all wiring there)

Upgrades and extras:

  • 2-into one Ducati Montjuich pipe
  • Second Ducati Montjuich tailpiece with seat reworked by Sargent
  • Montjuich fender
  • Oscam wheels (very rare)
  • Throttlemeister-style throttle lock
  • rear paddock stand

OEM parts included:

  • Stock front and rear wheels
  • Factory F1 pipes, very solid with minor surface ticking, great candidate for blasting and repainting
  • Factory centerstand and OEM swingarm
  • Factory chainguard
  • four turn signals and pigtails, all need new stalks

Cosmetic:

  • Overall cosmetics are very nice, paint glossy, no rash on panels
  • small garf in belly pan, top edge of fairing, and spot where tailpiece meets seat
  • few rubs on rear subfender
  • few jacket scratches on tank 
  • seat in very good shape
  • no dents in tank
  • few oxidized spots on Oscam wheels but nice shape overall

Mechanical:

  • tires have zero miles: Michelin A59X and M59X
  • tires are 2004 and 2005 build date but were properly stored in heated shop so still soft
  • bike starts easily, runs, rides and brakes well
  • fresh oil and K&N filter, brake fluid flush, clutch fluid flush
  • front calipers and master cylinder put thru ultrasonic and rebuilt
  • carbs ultrasonic treated and rebuilt with kits installed
  • new brake pads
  • new timing belts
  • valves set
  • new fuel taps (Bevel Heaven) and fuel lines
  • new engine cover seals
  • repacked steering head bearings
  • lubed cables
  • horn feeble at times and not working others
  • turn signal circuits all there and work but no signals mounted
  • tripmeter reset works but not hard mounted
  • sidestand has been shortened

Well, 19,000 miles on a well-maintained Ducati Pantah isn't anything to be scared of, but sure isn't museum-piece low or anything to brag about... But it does appear to have been sympathetically owned, very well maintained, and sensibly updated. The seller also includes a short clip of the bike idling and revving, along with plenty of additional pics. Bidding is very active and up to $9,000 with a few days left on the auction. Folks are asking for north of $20,000 for Laguna Secas and Montjuichs, although basic F1s seem to be much more modestly valued. Given the upgrades and the amount of time left on the auction, I expect this one to go a good bit higher before the auction ends.

-tad

Tasteful Upgrades: 1988 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale




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