Posts by tag: oil cooled

Suzuki January 29, 2018 posted by

Bonkers – 1990 Suzuki GSX-R750

Hardly altering its good looks, Suzuki made several changes to the GSX-R750 for 1990 - beefier frame, 4-into-1 exhaust, and a lot of internal changes to the air/oil-cooled I-four.  This Texas example is nice overall, but the evil lurking on the garage shelves bit the tank pretty hard.

1990 Suzuki GSX-R750 for sale on eBay


Suzuki had tried their shorter-stroke race engine design in 1988-89 road machines, but returned to a torquier 70 x 48.7 mm bore and stroke for 1990.  Great efforts were made to help the engine rev more easily, with lighter pistons, threading connecting rods bolts right into the rods, with 38mm Mikuni carburettors and changes in the head to address cracks between the spark plug and valve seats.  The result was 115 hp at 11,000 rpm and 57.5 ft.-lbs. torque.  While ROW machines got new upside-down forks, they wouldn't arrive here until 1991.


Having seen some use with 28,000+ miles, this GSX-R is quite stock, showing just the Carbon-Tech exhaust.  Hard to know the reason for the fading of the middle fairing section, perhaps it is a decal which hasn't aged as well as the paint.  The parts and bikes dealer says this in the eBay auction:

All Original aside from the pipe
One Owner Bike
Only fault is a ding in the tank and a small rub on the lower left fairing as shown in the pictures
Recent refresh
Runs and Rides Great
You will be hard pressed to find another like this one
28k Miles
Clean Title and Ready to Ride


Suzuki hung on to the racey feel of the GSX-R, with a serious riding position and requiring a resolute hand at turn-in time.  The quality suspension and lighter weight make the bike, as Colin Chapman said, faster everywhere.  Complete and stock GSX-R750's don't pop up every day, and while the new owner will have to take care not to let any refurbishment blow up the re-sale value, this sure looks like a good candidate.




Bonkers – 1990 Suzuki GSX-R750
Suzuki January 17, 2018 posted by

Literally Found in a Barn: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

The term "barn find" pretty much says it all: the collectible car or motorcycle in question was found sitting in an actual barn, where the previous owner stored it when it stopped running. Possibly hidden under a layer of dust, old blankets, back issues of Playboy, and mold. The implication is that it is in complete, original condition, but has been somewhat neglected cosmetically and mechanically. The term gets thrown around regularly as a sort of shorthand for "original, low-miles, and in need of restoration," but seems to be exactly the case for this Suzuki GSX-R1100K "Slingshot."

The second generation GSX-R1100's nickname came from the quartet of 38mm semi-flatslide Mikuni "Slingshot" carburetors that fed the dual overhead cam, four-valve, inline four engine. It actually displaced 1127cc, up a bit from the original's 1052cc, but still featured Suzuki's Advanced Cooling System or "SACS" to keep things within optimal temperatures. SACS used a multi-chamber oil pump to effectively cool and circulate the oil, with circuits in the cylinder head and jets directed at the pistons. Later GSX-R1100s adopted a more conventional set up with a radiator and coolant, but here Suzuki stuck with the concept that simpler was better and lighter, although the Big K isn't exactly a flyweight. Mass continued to creep up throughout the 1100's successive generations and the new frame used here was both stiffer and heavier than the one found on the Slabbie. With a dry weight of 462lbs, the "K" version was never going to be particularly agile, so it was more of a GT than an actual sportbike, something that Suzuki tried to rectify the following year when they made changes to the suspension.

Unfortunately, the GSX-R1100K never really matched up with expectations: I have an old issue of SuperBike magazine that describes it as "... quite pretty. To look at, sure, but never to ride." But it's really the beefy engine that defines the GSX-R1100 experience anyway. It was a powerhouse, the Small Block Chevy of the time: endlessly tunable with a wealth of performance parts available. People set them up for drag racing, and even created road-race hybrids by squeezing the 1100 engine into the GSX-R750, which is pretty much the same idea Bimota had when they built their lightweight and extremely quick SB6, although it was a very tight fit in both cases...

Of course, a GSX-R1100 by its very nature isn't necessarily all that uncommon, but ones in this kind of condition are very rare these days: the powerful engine, reasonable ergonomics, and good wind protection meant they got used as intended, racking up huge miles, battle scars, and less-than-tasteful aesthetic "upgrades" popular at the time. People looking to make them into the corner-carvers the looks advertised tried all manner of fixes that worked or didn't in varying degrees, but the end result was very few remain as delivered by Suzuki, and even fewer have covered so few miles. With just 722 miles on the odometer, I doubt you'll find a less used example anywhere outside a museum.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

1989 Suzuki GSXR 1100 perfect condition with 722 miles,  was a barn find been stored since 1991 but not climate control storage literally in a barn. The bike was redone but didn't need much as the miles are so low. The body was completely done to perfect factory spec's no cracks or any problems, the wheels are original but do have a bit of chips,  bike runs great and needs nothing. Full tune tires everything done including carbs. This one for collection beautiful bike and super rare. Also comes with passenger seat parts. Bike will sell no matter what

The seller's opening bit is set at $7,000 which seems pretty fair considering the condition and low miles, but there are no takers yet with very little time left on the auction. It's a shame the pictures aren't better lit, since I think this is the very best-looking version of the long-running GSX-R series, especially in classic Suzuki blue-and-white. If you're looking to actually ride it, I'd expect there are plenty of shops out there who can recommend suspension changes to make a Slingshot handle, probably using off-the-shelf Suzuki components, along with brake upgrades and weight saving measures. At the very least, you can probably swap the original 2-into-2 exhaust for a 4-into-1 and save 20 pounds. But honestly, the original bike offered plenty of stability, even if it lacked agility, and this one should probably be enjoyed for what it is: a freeway blaster par excellence or a great two-up weekend rider. Given the low mileage though, I'd bet it might end up stored away in a collection somewhere.


Suzuki December 28, 2017 posted by

Number One: Prototype 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

Although displacement was technically a bit more than a liter, the first generation Suzuki GSX-R1100 really established the modern literbike formula: take a big inline four engine, and squeeze it into a 600 or 750 sized package. The philosophy that created the iconic Gixxer was initially tried out with Suzuki’s GSXR400, and the result was so good they applied the same lightweight methodology to a 750cc machine, and the GSX-R750 was born in 1985, with the 1100cc version following in 1986. Frames of the 750 and 1100cc versions aren’t identical, but are pretty similar, with the 1100 using thicker square-section aluminum tubing to increase rigidity and handle the extra power of the larger engine.

The 1100 engine actually displaced 1052cc and shared its SACS oil-cooling system with the 750cc version: in both cases, Suzuki avoided the additional weight and complexity that water-cooling would bring by using air and oil to keep the twin-cam, four-valve engine within appropriate operating temperatures. But the high-performance engine needed some additional help to keep from exploding, so the Suzuki Advanced Cooling System used a complex oil pump to circulate oil, lubricate bearings, cool the heads, and even featured oil jets directed at the bottom of the pistons. With 137hp on tap, the big Slabbie was a bit of a monster, as it had just 489lbs dry to push around. That’s obviously not hugely impressive today, but keep in mind that the bike’s 75lb-ft of torque isn’t all that far off a modern superbike and meant that the big Gixxer could pull like a freight train.

The 1100 wasn’t exactly agile, but it did handle well for the time on its 18” wheels with tires that are laughably skinny by today’s standards. The 1100 featured a set of sophisticated anti-dive forks and Suzuki’s Full-Floater linkage rear suspension kept the power in check, while providing a less punishing ride than was typical of hard-core sportbikes of the era. A modern-ish brake set up with a catchy Deca-Piston name slowed things down for the next bend: a pair of four-piston calipers up front mated to a twin piston item in the rear meant ten whole speed-retarding pistons were on hand to keep you from crashing into a hedge when the world turned twisty after you got a bit too liberal with your right hand. It all added up to a bike that was a little on the heavy side, but one that offered good stability and world-class power, a wildly fast GT with Japanese reliability. Obviously, companies like Bimota used the same elements to create their lightweight road weapons prior to the introduction of the GSX-R, but Suzuki took that basic formula, added a dash of reliability, and brought it to the masses.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

Obviously the posted asking price is a silly one, but we are open to all offers that respect this motorcycles exceptional condition as well as its rarety and we will not scoff at anyones idea of what its value should, would or could be in todays international bike collectors market place

Suzuki GSX-R1100 No. 1 Details

This mid 1985 build / 1986 first registered Suzuki GSXR-1100 was one of the centerpieces of our small private collection and is one of just a handfull of bikes left from said collection which we have been dissolving this past year, mostly due to age and health related reasons and because we are consolidating all our personal items and scaling back from multiple locations to just one place to live and because we are giving up our motorcycle hobby alltogether

This is not a 'normal' motorcycle in 'average' condition so the text describing it and this sale's particulars might be somewhat different than what one would normally see in a listing here on Ebay. Please go to our Seller Feedback Rating to see what previous buyers have consistently been saying about us in the past 17 years in regards to every single item we have sold here on Ebay

The first GSXR 1100 was a groundbraking motorcycle in more ways than one, it started the era of large displacement, light weight Superbikes in the mid-80-ies

Being able to own an original, genuine, verifiable with factory documentation, unrestored Vin-1/Engine-1 vehicle of any type, make or model has got to be at the top of most collectors list of must-have‘s.

The vehicle being a top displacement model from one of the major motorcycle manufacturers should make it even more desirable


Mid-1985 build earliest prototype Suzuki GSX-R1100 in existence

Was the secret 'Star' in our small personal bike collection for many years

Verifiably a genuine Serial No.1 and Engine No.1 motorcycle. One of a small number of GSX-R1100-eds build by hand in the factory to set up the subsquent 1986 assembly line production run. This motorcycle was build with a handmade, prototype frame, on a prototype frame jig and it contains many one-off features and components.

Details on request in person would be best; to list just a few major ones:

This GU74 series bike has the early prototype exhaust without the toe-heatshield, it also has the early version clutch cover without any oil-amount stamped in the specific location where all other bikes have the cc amount stamped in

It has the correct, prototype-only all metal footpegs for rider and passenger since the rubber/metal type was not yet ready for use. It has all the original bodywork pieces mounted, in the original factory paintjob.

Some of the panels have some lines and colors that do not really match and line up correctly and do not match any other painted-alike original bike of the same type.

There are many more differences and details on this special bike,

too much to list them all here in this basic description

A correct and proper title exists for this motorcycle as does its original November 1985 first print Din-A5 owners manual.

Also present is the correct, original and super rare 4-language, first edition spareparts manual, printed in Dezember of 1985 in which this specific motorcycle’s exact Vin Number is listed as the starting Vin for the entire series of GSXR 1100 bikes for the next 3 year production run.

Four original sales brochures including the first edition english market version with print date of December 1985 are included in the memorabilia folder. The original keys, 4 correct A27 dark tinted turnsignals, the original toolkit with the rare Suzuki air gauge in its pouch, used for fork pressure and tires and the original GSX-R prototype factory display stand for motorcycle shows complete this offering.

We have owned this motorcycle for many years and have done a lot of research into the history of these early prototype GSX-R 1100-eds (the GSX-R750 also had some early prototypes build in the factory in Japan, none of which we have ever seen come up for sale in the past 15 years)

We have never seen any prototype GSXR-1100 for sale, they were not supposed to be sold to the public, being used mostly for press events, cycle shows and as photo models for the many different manuals and brochures. They were also being returned to the factory after they had been used for all these events and most of them were destroyed

Rumors of an early prototype 1100 existing in the UK in a private collection have so far not been confirmed. In any case, the bike offered here for sale is one of a kind, completely original, never repainted, never restored, exceptionally well kept up mechanically as well as cosmetically and should deserve a place in a serious motorcycle collection or possibly a private museum of some sort. It was ridden extensively in its 33 years, but always cared for and babied to keep it in this exceptional condition

We have prepared an online photo album showing this motorcycle in detail in more than 100 high quality images that might be of interest to a serious collector.

The seller mentions the "silly asking price" and $250,000 [yes, you read that correctly] is certainly silly for anything short of TE Lawrence's Brough Superior or a MotoGP bike in rideable condition with a truckload of spares. But they're just putting that out there, and are open to offers. Which is a good thing because, as cool as this is, I doubt it's worth anything near $250,000. Obviously, a rare bike is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, but I get the feeling that only a very particular sort of collector will want to pony up, since although it's rarer, it's also a little bit cruder, from the seller's description. The question is: what is it worth? Well, nice original "slabbie" GSX-Rs sell for around $7,000 or so, with only the GSX-R750 LEs really getting much higher. This one could obviously worth much more, being a prototype machine and the very first registered example of a bike that pretty much defined the modern superbike. I'll be curious to see where it ends up.


Number One: Prototype 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale
Suzuki October 12, 2017 posted by

Slab-Sided Collectible: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale

It's hard to imagine that, just a couple years before the introduction of the GSX-R750, Suzuki's top-performing repli-racer was the stylish, but very last-generation GS1000S, a bike with twin shocks, handlebars, a center-stand, and a bar-mounted bikini fairing. The original "Slabbie" GSX-R750 that came along in 1985 brought modern endurance-racing style to the masses and codified the formula laid out by much rarer and more exotic machines like the Bimota SB2. This particular GSX-R750 Limited Edition claws back some exotic cachet from the Italian brand, and is one of just 299 imported to the USA to meet AMA homologation requirements.

The heart of the GSX-R was an oil and air-cooled inline four with dual overhead cams and four valves per cylinder. It lacked liquid-cooling in a bid to save weight, reduce complexity, and improve reliability, but still had a few high-tech tricks up its sleeve: Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or "SACS" featured a double-chambered oil pump was designed to more efficiently circulate and cool the bike’s lubricant, along with oil jets that sprayed the bottom of the pistons. The aluminum frame used a mono-shock rear and four-piston brake calipers clamped triple discs. The Limited version added a very trick dry clutch, lightweight solo seat tail section, and the GSX-R1100's electronic anti-dive forks.

The Limited was differentiated by the striking red, white, and blue paint seen here on the distinctive, slab-sided bodywork, compared to the standard white-and-blue or red-and-black available on the regular GSX-R. When new, the bike was the most expensive Japanese sportbike, and was priced at $6,500, a shocking $2,000 more than the standard model. Performance advantages were very minimal but that wasn't really the point and this is, to my mind, the best-looking version of the early GSX-R.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition for Sale

Race homologation special. It has 4545 miles. This bike is in as near perfect collectors condition for a 31 year old bike. Motorcycle was just fully serviced (ie carbs were serviced; all fluids changed; new tires added, as originals showed signs of cracking.)

These bikes have surged in price, exceeding $20K in most cases.

If you are looking at this bike, you know what it is, so NO LOW BALL OFFERS!!!!

The seller is correct that prices have surged, and his bike appears to be in excellent, very original condition that includes a stock exhaust that could be either "cool and retro" or "shockingly ugly" depending on your predilection for slotted heat shields. Certainly it's of value to collectors. Unfortunately, while his $20,000 asking price is fair, it actually seems just a bit on the high-side, at least looking at Limited Editions we've featured here on RSBFS in the past. I'm not sure just how far off his asking price an offer would have to be before it qualifies as "a low ball offer," but I have a feeling he may be disappointed. Will at least one buyer meet his asking price? It's very possible: those same recent bikes I mentioned didn't quite get to $20,000 but were very close.


Slab-Sided Collectible: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale
Suzuki July 8, 2017 posted by

Suzuki Saturday – 1988 Suzuki GSX-R750

1988 brought the first comprehensive update to the 750 Gixxer, with a revised frame and shorter stroke engine, "slingshot" carburetors and 17-inch wheels.  A little heavier than the introductory GSX-R, the 1988 was still lighter than the competition and had the more rigid chassis and additional power to improve overall performance.   Looking very original and excellent for its 22K miles, this GSX-R750 has had some nice mechanical care as well.

1988 Suzuki GSX-R750 for sale on eBay


In the engine re-design, Suzuki took 4mm from the stroke and added 3 to the bore, more oversquare and with lower reciprocating losses than before.  Peak power and torque are at 11,000 rpm, while the redline is at 13,000.  The high-volume SACS oil cooling system was also heavily revised, with larger, less restrictive tubing, and a 4-into-2 exhaust was required to limit muffler size.  Brakes and forks are built for the era, and dual headlight fairing has fresh air intakes running back to the airbox.


The Illinois owner of this GSX-R has preserved the cosmetics, and actively maintained the running gear.  Suspension has been updated in the rear, rebuilt in the front, brakes improved, and engine maintenance is up to date.  From the eBay auction:

This gorgeous GSX-R is completely stock except for tasteful/safety modifications, including:
-New Pirelli Rosso II tires
-Galfer steel brake lines, front and rear pads
-Penske rear shock
-New EBC clutch and springs
-Forks are serviced, new oil, new seals
-Swing arm and link have new bearings and seals
-New oil and filter
-New wheel bearings
-Valves adjusted
-All electrical components work as they should


The GSX-R750 reviewed as a quick-handling powerhouse, with serious racebike ergonomics, and very nearly beat the company's own 1100 to the 1/4-mile traps.  A nicely resolved update to a ground breaking design.  This particular GSX-R is a win-win, great factory cosmetics and all maintenance issues addressed...


Suzuki Saturday – 1988 Suzuki GSX-R750
Suzuki March 28, 2017 posted by

Rare Slabbie: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750R Limited Edition for Sale

Update 3.28.2017: Previously seen in October 2016, this GSX-R Limited is back on eBay with a starting bid of $13,500. Links updated. Good luck to buyers and seller, -dc.


It’s interesting how some bikes seem to come up for sale in waves, like owners who've had their bikes for years see similar bikes up for sale and think, “Hey, I’d better get in on that before demand is all gone!” Or maybe it has to do with the ages of the bikes and the related ages of the owners… Regardless, we’ve seen a number of Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Editions come up for sale recently, in a range of conditions, but this example appears to be very clean and original.


The original GSX-R750 was a pretty significant bike when it was introduced in 1985, and it became an icon for good reason: the fully-faired styling, aluminum-frame, and monoshock suspension helped to define the modern sportbike, and was adopted by millions of hooligans and squids as their bike of choice. Plus, they do look pretty sharp in Suzuki’s traditional blue-and-white paint.


The GSX-R750 was powered by an oil and air-cooled inline four to save weight and reduce complexity compared to water-cooling, although it did use dual overhead cams and featured four valves per cylinder. The temperatures generated were kept in check by Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or "SACS" that featured a double-chambered oil pump to more effectively circulate and cool the bike’s lubricant, along with oil jets that sprayed the undersides of the pistons. In spite of the obvious cooling fins cast into the engine, it’s actually oil that does most of the cooling in the Gixxer.


Based on the regular GSX-R that was introduced in 1985, the Limited Edition was intended to homologate specific parts for superbike and endurance racing, Suzuki’s equivalent of the Yamaha OW01. Parts exclusive to the LE were the vented dry clutch [clearly visible in the above picture] and electronic anti-dive forks that contrasted with Honda’s mechanically-operated forks. The seat unit offered no passenger accommodations, as befitted the bike’s race-bred styling.


From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750R Limited Edition for Sale

The bike is an amazing piece of history, absolutely gorgeous and has been in my collection for some time. However I am feeling my mortality and so it is time to pass it on to a new owner. I have rode this bike sparingly over the past years but have maintained it both mechanically and cosmetically in a temperature controlled environment. Cosmetically, the bike is in excellent condition for a 30 year old bike, with the exception of a very, very small soft dimple in the right hand upper rear corner of the tank that a good PDR tank man could take care of but in my neck of the woods there are none. (had to place light to see it) All original equipment to best of my knowledge, but will let you be the judge. I understand in terms of a collector bike originality is important. I noticed the exhaust pipe was not right after purchase, the heat shield louvres were horizontal rather vertical as they should be ...and spent a tidy sum to make it right.

Mechanically the bike is “spot on” (just tuned) but you may want to do some fine tuning as well as set the bike up to accommodate you personally, or simple admire for what it is, and will be in the future. One fork seal starting to slightly weep, and if you planning on riding I would suggest new tires as these are getting on in years.

I am not going into the history or the desirability of this particular model. It is generally well known by any student of the early superbikes that maybe interested in this bike. And if not there is considerable available on-line or from knowledgeable resources. Also for some, what it is, and is not as far as originality will be a subject of debate, I personally do not regard myself as a expert so I have attempted to display the bike in the best way I can by removing the plastics. Someone willing to pay what I am asking at least deserves to have the opportunity to evaluate the bike in the proper manner. All in all, I personally feel it a very nice example in comparison to the limited number eBay sales I have monitored in the past.


Just 299 examples were imported in 1986, making this one rare Suzuki. This example has a few minor nicks and chips, but looks very clean and complete, with bidding up north of $11,000 and the reserve not met. There are several days left on the auction and active interest, which should come as no surprise, considering a recent, very non-original example sold for over $19,000!



Rare Slabbie: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750R Limited Edition for Sale