Posts by tag: museum

Honda April 13, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 1969 Honda CB750

Even legends take a few baby steps - Honda’s landscape-changing big four was originally manufactured on low-production tooling, known as “sand-cast”.  The smooth 67 hp model sold over 50,000 units the first year, and went on to around 400,000 sales, a lifetime achievement for any other manufacturer.  This early production CB has had a white-glove  restoration using period correct parts and techniques.

1969 Honda CB750 for sale on eBay

Known as the original superbike, the big CB750 was designed with some simplicity in mind.  Low-friction plain bearings are used throughout the engine, and the cylinders are undersquare with a longer stroke than bore, partly in order to limit crankcase width.  The cam chain and intermediate drive share the middle of the one-piece crankshaft for strength.  The switch to disk brakes had just begun but Honda cast theirs in rust-resistant stainless to ensure the clean look stayed nice.  The twin tube steel frame might’ve been the most traditional and not-over-engineered part of the package.  Early on a kickstarter was included though electric start was standard.

Subject of a three-year restoration completed in 2014, this CB was built with NOS parts for the engine and cosmetics.  An NOS wiring harness and exhaust system were sourced for the build, as few survive at their age.  A crucial un-restored tank was found in Candy Blue Green, though it post-dates the sand-cast era.  With the pebble-surfaced cases that "sand cast" refers to, the engine was rebuilt by Honda specialist Mark McGrew in Minnesota.  The complete package is easy on the eyes, the chrome rear fender echoing the front, and the quartet of headers making their way down and back.  Looking head-on shows the lightness and surprising ground clearance available.  Moto Borgotaro is located in Brooklyn, NY - here is a short excerpt from their complete offering which you can view - here - :

“Sand cast” guru Andy Morris of Hampton Bays, New York built this bike. Morris has worked on 15 “sand cast” CB 750s and nearly 50 later versions – he is so good that he can correctly assemble one of these Hondas from a tub of parts without reference to any manual – and he remembers buying # 2659 from a shop in Pennsylvania in the late 1990s. Its restoration took him three years and he used only OEM NOS replacement “sand cast” parts except for the rear rim which he had to have re-plated. All the fasteners, the spokes, the wiring harness, the four exhaust pipes, and other components came out of Honda parts boxes.

www.motoborgotaro.com

For all intents a "new" 1969 motorcycle, this CB750 has turned only 756 miles since completion.  It just looks like fun waiting to happen, at least to riders of a certain age.  My intro to the model was my buddy's CB550 in 1974, and even that seemed endlessly powerful compared to the trail bikes and vertical twins that were more my speed.  Though the standard layout had a self-limiting effect on top speed, it could do almost anything and torque was  always available.  It was also another chapter in the Honda quality story, the single cam engine being eminently reliable.  Strangely enough, the introductory model was also the most powerful, as horsepower figures waned through the emissions legislation and gas crisis years.

Honda used the pre-production molds to cast around 7,000 engines, which would be a successful year for most manufacturers and a full lifespan for more exotic models.  But as usual Honda was looking over the horizon, to around 40,000 machines each year with total production over 400,000.  This museum quality CB750 could be the opener for a collection of Honda superbikes, or the capstone for a history of earlier Hondas.  Moto Borgotaro can be contacted - here -.

Featured Listing – 1969 Honda CB750
BMW April 8, 2018 posted by

Ab Fab – 1975 BMW R90S

Lots of young men had Farrah Fawcett posters on their walls in the mid 1970's, while those with the two-wheeled affliction might've had one of a sexy R90S.  The bike was BMW's return to /S machines and was made only for a few years, but won Daytona and the inaugural AMA SuperBikes championship in 1976 under Reg Pridmore.

1975 BMW R90/S for sale on eBay

A descendant of BMW's venerable R75, the R90 was bored out to 898cc's and the helpful addition of Dell'Orto carburetors brought home 67 hp.  The first production year retained the Type 247 engine's kickstarter, but the 1975 update deleted that and added drilled brake rotors and a strengthened crankshaft.  The R90S was an early design of Hans Muth, who went on to many machines at BMW and then for Target Design.

This Tennessee /S has been comprehensively restored, every part NOS or newly painted, polished, or plated.  The owner started with a tired example with a rusty tank and missing its fairing, but has achieved a rare level of mechanical and cosmetic completeness.  From the eBay listing:

Bike was completely taken apart down to the bare frame and ever component rebuilt, restored or replaced. The complete motor, transmission, forks, wheels and carbs were rebuilt by Guenther Wuest in Indiana. He is a well know BMW motorcycle restorer.  Almost ever part replaced was replaced with parts from BMW thru Max. I have all the receipts and most of the packaging they came in. 

The only parts that are not BMW are the rear shocks and exhaust. I have all the original parts that were removed and replaced including all fasteners and are included with the sale.  Bike did not have a fairing or mirrors and had some kind of custom seat pad when I received it.  It also only had three aluminum  blinkers with no internals. The original gas tank was rusted beyond use so I went searching for a tank and came across a complete set of Daytona Orange body parts including a fairing.  The parts were re-painted some time ago but are in very good shape.  There are a few small chips on the tank and a couple small cracks on the fairing.

Front wheel was rebuilt with a new rim from Max and stainless steel spokes. The rear wheel was replaced with an original rebuilt Weinmann wheel I bought from Guenther.  Tires are new and wheels are balanced.  Every cable, nut, bolt, clamp, hose, seat, blinkers, bulbs, wires and complete brake system including the master cylinder is new. Also found a NOS tire pump that is included along with some new BMW tools.  Bike has only been ridden maybe 2 miles since completion and it starts right up and runs very smooth.

The R90S reviewed as a great all-rounder - not the fastest or most powerful, but handled well and was comfortable to ride through the 6 gallons of fuel on board.  The bikini fairing was borrowed widely though most did not include the thoughtful clock and oil pressure gauge.  The design was soon superseded with fast-paced engineering updates leading to the R100S and RS.  Likely this one will be for show only, though the restoration has prepared it for the road as well...

-donn

Ab Fab – 1975 BMW R90S
Laverda May 30, 2017 posted by

WAUW: Cor Dees Laverda collection for sale (Netherlands)

I know this listing has already been posted on the RSBFS Facebook page and on other sites such as laverdaforum.com but this opportunity is too unique to not deserve a post here on the RSBFS mothership site - Marty

Late spring is usually the busiest time for RSBFS as people bring their bikes out of storage and decide they need to "thin the herd" a bit. A good example is the recent listings from seller Whiteknuckle in Springville, Utah who has been offering quite a wide variety of makes, models and conditions.   But over in the Netherlands another collection is up for sale that is truly amazing, the Laverda collection assembled by Mr. Coor Dees.  Apparently after 30+ years of collection Dees has decided to hang it up and the entire collection/museum is now up for sale with over 80 Laverda's as well as a huge amount of memorabilia such as cutaways of engines.  Also includes is a massive photo archive that tells the story of the Laverda marque decade by decade.

Laverda Motorcycle Collection/Museum in the Netherlands

Dees dedication to the Laverda marque has produced possibly the finest long term collection of the north-Italian Laverda marque.  He collected everything related, even artifacts and old machinery showing the agricultural roots of Laverda and his close friendship with the Laverda family allowed him to purchase many of the bikes and associated memorabilia directly from the Laverda factory.  Now, after thirty years of collecting, he feels that it's finally time to hand over the keys to his amazing collection.

The full list of the bikes that will be included in the sale is available via the link above but below are some some highlights of the offered machines.

*Laverda Racing models*
1973 Laverda 750 Side sidecar racer - factory SFC engine
1975 Laverda 750 SFC 1976 Belgium Champion
1975 Laverda 1000 spaceframe works endurance racer
1975 Laverda 1200 Franz Laimböck Monocoque racer
1978 Laverda 500 Formula Mk2 - one of 75 - Laverda Cup

*Laverda Prototypes*
1971 Laverda 1000 Milano EICMA motorshow - prototype
1986 Laverda OR 600 Atlas prototype
1986 Laverda 668 Cruiser prototype
1989 Laverda 668 Hidalgo prototype
1989 Laverda 700 El Cid prototype

*Laverda 650 & 750*
1968 Laverda 650 production number 17 - May 1968
1971 Laverda 750 SF
1972 Laverda 750 SF
1973 Laverda 750 GTF
1973 Laverda 750 SF1
1974 Laverda 750 Polizia Allessandria police
1974 Laverda 750 SF2

*Laverda 1000 & 1200*
1974 Laverda 1000 3C
1977 Laverda 1000 3CL
1980 Laverda 1000 Jota 180
1981 Laverda 1000 RGS Executive panniers & fairing
1982 Laverda 1000 Jota 120
1982 Laverda 1200 TS
1983 Laverda 1000 RGA
1989 Laverda 1000 SFC wire wheels - 2000 km

*Laverda Zanè production*
1995 Laverda 650 I.E.
1997 Laverda 668 Diamante
1999 Laverda 750 Formula

I have to admit I am personally happy to see some Zanè-era models also included as well as some prototypes I have never even heard of.  Amazingly even the original Laverda entrance sign of the old Breganze factory will be included in the sale (200 kg and 4m long, it was in the Laverda factory between 1952 and 2000).

Now before you begin looking through your checkbook, there are a few caveats with this offering.  Though the complete collection is for sale, Mr. Dees will (for now) keep the most significant specimen of Laverda engineering: the legendary Laverda V6.  After eight years of determination Dees has indicated he has almost completed the restoration of the 1991 V6 racer back to its 24-hour endurance race trim.  Dees has also indicated he wishes to continue working on the original 90-degree 1000cc Vee-Six prototype which caused a sensation during its presentation at the 1977 Milano Motorcycle Exhibition.

While not having these bikes in the sales of collection might disuuad some prospective owners, Dees has stated that once these two (of three!) existing Laverda 1000 V-Six machines come up for sale, the new owner of the collection will be given the Right of First Offer to purchase both machines as well as the remaining factory V6 spares and technical drawings.

Another caveat of the sales is that the collection has to be maintained.  This could be by being included in a museum or exposed as part of a larger collection of motorcycles but Dees also wants the collection to be based somewhere where there is a strong Laverda community, ideally near the companies home of Breganze, Italy.  Lastly he wants the collection open to the public so it can be admired on a regular basis by visitors from across the world.

It seems safe to assume the sale price for this amazing collection will likely depend on how closely the new owner is able to satisfy Dees requirements.  While Dees has stated he is ready to sell his collection at a very reasonable price if the next owner is a real enthusiast who is willing to exhibit the collection for the next decades, it has been my experience that when a lifetime-effort collection like this is sold what typically happens is the collection is parsed with the highest-end/most notable pieces being added to a major collection (possibly being rotated) while other categories are eventually sold off to collectors more oriented towards those aspects.

Given the size of this collection and the caveats on the sale, I don't think this one will be going to a private collector.  Perhaps it can be acquired by one of the big museums in Italy such as the Museo Nazionale del Motociclo.  If by some chance it does end up in private hands all I can say is hopefully whomever acquires this amazing collection will at least meet the final caveat of keeping the collection open to the public so fans of the marque can continue to enjoy these Northern-Italian lovelies.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

WAUW:  Cor Dees Laverda collection for sale (Netherlands)
Report May 29, 2012 posted by

Sidetracked on Vacation: NR750 in Belgium

While traveling through Belgium recently, I stopped in at the Auto World museum in Brussels. Auto World is a fantastic museum located in the historic Parc du Cinquantenaire complex. Everything in Europe appears to be steeped in history, and the Cinquantenaire Park is no different. The construction of the Cinquantenaire Park complex occurred in the second half of King Leopold II’s reign and took decades to complete (construction started in 1880). Intended as a world expo to showcase Belgian artists, production and industry, the museum on the site today shows more than 200 cars from a variety of eras.

One of the most interesting displays was not a display at all. Sitting somewhat forlorn in an upstairs corner of the massive facility, this Honda NR750 was devoid of any information, placards or other forms of display. The NR was apparently a gem to be discovered by only a few.

There is no indication as to the history or ownership of the bike. There was no indication it was for sale, how it came to the museum or its ultimate fate. One should hope that it gains a more prominent showing in the future, repleat with the occasional ride to keep all the internal workings in order.

This bike exhibited some rash along the right hand side, consistent with a low-speed tipover. It brought to mind the following video posted years ago on youtube. The damage incurred was the same side, and similar in nature. Could the bike in the museum and the bike in the video be the same unlucky NR?

I left the museum without any answers, but I thought the international nature of RSBFS might be able to shed some light on this one. Do any of our readers know anything about this Belgian find? Some of the photos shown here were actually found on the internet, so at least a few folks caught a glimpse of this one. The NR750 was definitely the highlight of the auto museum visit, and goes to show you never know when you are going to stumble onto a truly rare find such as this.

MI