Posts by tag: inline four

Honda March 22, 2017 posted by

All You Really Need: 1990 Honda CB-1 for Sale

No one is arguing that we don't live in an era where "learner bikes" aren't very sophisticated machines, but no matter how impressive the electronics found on modern small-displacement bikes may be, and no matter stone-axe reliable the mechanicals are, there's something distinctly uninspiring about the weedy exhaust note of a single-cylinder KTM RC390. It's a great motorcycle in pretty much every way, especially considering the affordable price-point, but it definitely doesn't sound sexy. Something like this Honda CB-1 however, might appeal to both new and experienced motorcyclists, especially those a bit shorter in stature or riders who've realized the truth of the old axiom, "It's more fun to ride a slow bike fast than it is to ride a fast bike slow."

There's no problem with a lack of sexy here, although that's probably because the CB-1 wasn't really designed as an entry-level motorcycle: the 399cc inline four that motivates the CB-1 was shared with the sportier CBR400 that never officially made it to the USA, although they do show up from time-to-time as grey market imports. As you would expect, this mini-sportbike powerplant is very sophisticated, and has four tiny cylinders, sixteen valves, and dual overhead cams operated by gears, instead of the expected timing chain. The little four made 55hp and could push the 400lb machine to a top speed of 118mph. The frame is a less-sophisticated tubular steel unit instead of the CBR's aluminum beam frame, valves are bit smaller, and the CB-1 has a single-disc front brake set up, but it is otherwise very similar in terms of performance, except in top speed. Of course the CB-1 was geared a bit shorter and actually felt quicker in real-world riding than its sportier sibling.

This example appears to be very clean, although the gauges could use a little help. A trip to eBay should eventually turn something up, or fit something cool and modern from Acewell or Motogadget. The carb service mentioned by the seller is a nice bonus, as that could be a headache for a new rider, or even for an experienced wrench.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Honda CB-1 for Sale

This is a fine specimen of a CB-1. It does not at all look its age. It's not museum quality, there are a few minor blemishes, but it is very close to perfect. The bike was just serviced: the carburetors were cleaned & synched and new tires were mounted. It runs perfectly, all the lights work, etc. It needs nothing but a new owner to enjoy the ridiculously smooth high-reving beauty.

The seller is asking just $3,100 for this particular bike, a bargain considering the performance and sophistication found here. There are near cult-like levels of devotion surrounding the somewhat forgotten Honda CB-1 and it's v-twin stablemate the Hawk GT, although that hasn't translated into increased values, as these are still very affordable bikes and offer performance, rarity, and relatively easy maintenance. Although handling is limited by the budget suspension, bolt-on upgrades from the era's CBR should sort that out easily and improve stopping as well with a second front brake disc and caliper. In an era of relatively simple and economical small-displacement machines, something like this offers up big-bike thrills in a very sophisticated, manageable package, with a low price tag, street cred, and good looks.

-tad

All You Really Need: 1990 Honda CB-1 for Sale
Suzuki March 21, 2017 posted by

Slingshot My Heart: 1988 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Suzuki's original GSX-R750 is arguably one of the most influential sportbikes of all time. Other bikes may have incorporated some of its design and performance elements, but none were able to combine them all into such an affordable package, or were able to capture the public's imagination in the same way. Every iteration of the Gixxer was made by the bucketload, but the bike's reliability and ubiquity meant that they were used and abused, and then discarded, making pristine examples like this one both desirable and very hard to come by. The early "Slabbie" has already reached collector status,  but the second-generation "Slingshot" GSX-R750 models are steadily increasing in value as well and offer more modern performance and handling, compared to the slightly vintage original.

Looking at the slab-sided design, it's pretty easy to see where the Slabbie GSX-R got its nickname, but the Slingshot is named for the 38mm semi-flatslide Mikuni "Slingshot" carburetors that fed the 748cc inline four cylinder engine. Suzuki's original GSX-R was designed with simplicity and light weight in mind and, as a result, the bike was oil instead of water-cooled. But the significant cooling demands of a high-performance sportbike meant the Gixxer needed a sophisticated, high-capacity oil pump and associated cooling and filtration system known as Suzuki Advanced Cooling System or "SACS" to keep temperatures under control. SACS was used on the GSX-R750 and 1100 up until 1992 when Suzuki bowed to convention and switched to water cooling for subsequent generations of the bike.

This particular example appears to be in excellent condition and has obviously been enthusiast-owned and lovingly maintained. It isn't just some well-maintained survivor though: it includes some very tasty modifications like that Metmachex swingarm, a very desirable bit and the suspension has been more than just "overhauled," as the original bike didn't have upside-down forks until 1991. The LED signals are probably not to everyone's taste, but they're reliable, improve visibility, and are, as the seller mentions, easily changed.

 

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

You are bidding on a 1988 Suzuki GSXR-750 first year, 2nd Gen. model GSXR-J aka Slingshot in Suzuki's traditional blue & white paint scheme that is very sought after. This is one of the lightest and fastest oil cooled GSXR of its time. This particular bike is mostly original condition with the exception of a few upgrades which I'll list later on in the description. Some of the OEM parts  I still have (I'll notate) and can be sold with the bike, if you are interested in going back to stock.

The exhaust is a Yoshimura pipe ceramic coated and aluminium canister. The Mikuni 36mm flat slide carburetors has a Stage 3 jet kit, these both were ideal performance mods for this motor. The blinkers have been replaced with modern LEDs but you can easily go back to stock since all the wiring and connectors are intact. Also, the windscreen was switched out to a tinted by the previous owner. The suspension has had a major upgraded since the stock GSX-R were notoriously known to have a low ground clearance with only a slim margin of error. Both the front and rear have been completely rebuilt by Lindemann Engineering. The rear swingarm is ultra-rare Metmachex (equal to JMC) braced and with eccentric adjusters. This is the style of the endurance racers used back in the late 80's since the stock was shown to have flex. I do have the original OEM swing arm available upon request. The original speedo and tach have been replaced due to the needles falling off. I replaced them with an 1100 model of that year since it's was close to the miles but I do have the original for the new owner and I am basing the miles on the original speedo/tach cluster.  
 
All of the body panels are original and in good condition, no cracks or brittle spots. There are some scratches from general wear and tear which I'll try and capture in the photos. The wheels are in great shape, paint is excellent and no sizable chips. Cosmetically, I would claim this motorcycle is an 8 out of 10.  Mechanically it is flawless, runs perfect, shifts smooth, pulls hard and easy to ride. All of the electrics work as they should; blinkers, horn, lights, speedo, tach, are properly functioning. The bike just had a full detailed service and tune up, all fluids were flushed, and mechanically everything was inspected and replaced if necessary. The Battery and tires are less than a year old.  

This GSX-R750 was well-taken care of and adult own, and I am the 3rd owner. It was never abused or down to my knowledge.  Please feel free to ask any questions, do not hesitate to contact me. If you need any additional pictures or have any additional questions,  feel free to message me or call me here 424-225-2028. Also, I'm including with the sale, are the OEM passenger seat, and tank bra. Service manual and receipts for all maintenance and upgrades.

There is plenty of time left on this auction, but bidding is already pretty active. This particular version of the GSX-R was only produced for a couple of years and doesn't seem to have been particularly well-regarded when it was new but, with all due respect to the original "Slabbie" I think it's far and away the best-looking GSX-R ever made and if I had space in my garage, I'd really want to find a nice one.

-tad

Slingshot My Heart: 1988 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale
Yamaha March 20, 2017 posted by

Naked Ambition – 2001 Yamaha FZ-1

The Yamaha R1's likeable cousin, the FZ-1 was known as the Fazer offshore.  With its smaller carbs stretching the torque curve, more compliant suspension, and accomodating riding position, the FZ-1 was a bit of a sleeper with 143 hp.  Some of that friendliness has been dyno-tuned out of this example from Michigan, with airbox delete, exhaust and re-jetted carburettors.

2001 Yamaha FZ-1 for sale on eBay

The Fazer model began as 600, but with the R1 right across the showroom, requests for the 998cc four in a plain wrapper became too numerous for Yamaha to ignore.  The FZ takes advantage of the Genesis five-valve heads and EXUP exhaust, which tailors the dimensions of the exhaust collector to engine speed.  Brakes are similar to the R1 but use a larger rear disk in anticipation of a passenger.  Frame mounted fairing is a little bigger than your average bikini, and echoes the R1 beak.

The FZ-1 was only offered in age-appropriate color schemes and this one is basic black with the steel frame in silver-gray.  The owner has deleted the frame-mounted mirrors and the blue anodized covers look good with the levers and brake caliper pucks.  But the stock mirrors will have to go back on unless the new owner picks some bar-ends, which are not part of the deal, as stated in the eBay auction:

Originally a slightly detuned version of the R-1 this is a torque monster. This bike is not detuned. It has a full stage 3 modification from Fast Bikes in Grand Rapids. He now works at Fox and does all the engine tuning and dyno testing. This bike pulled 136 HP at the REAR WHEEL. A huge grin to ride. And comfy enough to ride all day long.
It pulls like a jet from 30 to 110 and I have seen 154 on the speedometer. 
All the original parts go with it. I did think it was a bit plain so put vinyl accents on it. Also the tank bag, soft bags go with it. The soft bags had lousy rain covers so I had some made from Sunbrella waterproof covers.
It has plug covers where the original mirrors were. I have the original mirrors I had trouble seeing behind me with the stockers. So I put very pricey bar end mirrors on it. I am keeping them. All stock parts except the original pipe go with the bike.

The FZ-1 was a good seller, so while rarity wouldn't be in the cards, this unusual level of tuning might be worth looking into.  The FZ-1 reviewed as a real-world R1, and while compromises in the chassis and weight can't be denied, you can hack around town most of the afternoon and still have the energy for a quick jaunt on a back road.  This one has some neat professionally done mods and looks well cared for...

-donn

Naked Ambition – 2001 Yamaha FZ-1
Honda March 18, 2017 posted by

Pinnacle – 2007 Honda CBR1000RR Nicky Hayden Edition

Celebrating Nicky Hayden's 2006 Moto GP Championship, the Repsol-liveried CBR1000RR was also its own high point in liter-bike performance. This very clean example has just a few updates, and new rubber.

2007 Honda CBR1000RR Nicky Hayden Edition for sale on eBay

Coming out of the American flat track scene and making his way to an AMA championship in 2002, Nicky Hayden arrived at the big Moto GP show and rode for Honda 2003-08.  Hayden helped develop the RC211V, and many of the innovations made their way to the CBR1000RR.  The engine architecture was new, with the transmission countershaft more above than behind the main shaft, shortening the engine and allowing a more compact package.  A die-cast alloy frame was used, with an electronic steering damper, and the fuel tank was more centrally located behind the tank cover.  The long swingarm leads to a more stable feel despite the whopping 172 hp.  The fairing and seat console are busy aerodynamically and the complex Repsol graphics package keeps up.

  

Apparently babied by its Tennessee owner, this CBR has just a few scuffs, but Galfer brake lines, Corbin seat, and GPR exhaust.  Though not well pictured, the signal lights have been re-done in LED, and the license plate tucked away.  From the eBay auction:

Rare Nicky Hayden Edition Repsol in great condition. 3 minor scuffs on bike, included in pictures. Added Galfer front and rear brake lines, Corbin seat, G.P.R. exhaust, oem rear seat cowl (Repsol blue), integrated brake light with signals along with led flush mount front signals, led license plate mount (under seat), and new Michelin Pilot tires. Bike also comes with both original seats (excellent condition) along with all other parts that have been replaced with upgraded parts. Bike is clean and ready to go.

  

Making the most of his share of good luck, the Kentucky Kid reached the summit in the 2006 championship, and the bike has several #1 decals.  A local boy's signature under the Moto GP wreath makes this a rare and desirable machine, almost as much of an attraction as the high tech and exquisite production of the steady-handling superbike.  All the better with the succession of tough breaks that followed.  A singular team effort from the manufacturer, racing team, and rider made this a special year for the big CBR...

-donn

Pinnacle – 2007 Honda CBR1000RR Nicky Hayden Edition
Honda March 17, 2017 posted by

The Big One: 1994 Honda CB1000 for Sale

We all love focused, hard-core sporting machines. It's right there in the website's name, so why else would you be here? But there comes a time when past injuries, the debilitating effects of aging, and old war wounds start to make the fully-committed, racer's-crouch position required impossible to maintain for the length of time it takes to get from your garage to the good riding roads. So what then? Load your sportbike into the back of a pickup truck to haul to the canyons? Throw in the towel and buy a Harley? Ride through the pain and get addicted to prescription opioids? Fear not! There's a middle ground option: buy yourself one of the brand new "super nakeds" from KTM or Aprilia. The V4 Tuono and Super Duke are great bikes, but very expensive so, if your money doesn't stretch to one of those impressive, do-everything machines, something like this Honda CB1000 might give you plenty of bang for not too many bucks.

Introduced in 1992 and built through 1996, the CB1000 wasn't actually sold here in the US until 1994. It used an updated version of the 1987 Hurricane's liquid-cooled inline four that displaced 998cc, produced a claimed 97hp, and was backed by a five-speed gearbox. The CB1000 was known as "Project Big One" behind the scenes at Honda while in development and was apparently actually called the "Big One" in Japan. Make no mistake, this is a pretty large  motorcycle: those are actually 18" wheels front and rear, and the old-tech package weighed in at 542 lbs dry.

The bike was well reviewed and handled much better than you'd expect, considering the weight and spindly, non-adjustable forks, but Honda's CB1000 was a bit before its time, a big naked before big nakeds were really popular. It's always been a bit of an oddity here: Honda basically priced themselves out of the American market, as there was only a $500 difference between the CB1000 and the CBR1000, a much faster, nimbler, and an all-around more high-performance motorcycle. For buyers here, style won out over practicality, and the CB1000 is a pretty rare sight on our roads, especially in such nice, well-maintained condition.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Honda CB1000 for Sale

Very hard to find conditions like this CB1000, NEW synthetic oil and filter, front fork seals, seal protectors, rear tire, front and rear brake pads, carburetors cleaned, synced, K & N air filter, D & D muffler, Corbin leather seat, no rust, no dent, no scratch, no smoke, never down or crash, start right up, all day comfort with powerful 1000cc engine, no issue everything works. clear title, Honda legendary build quality, you would swear riding a brand new bike with that solid feel.You see it you will buy it, no test ride unless full payment in my hand, Spring time is here, hurry to take this rare and beautiful bike to go for a ride, it will put a smile your face, absolutely no disappointment here.

The seller also includes a short clip of the bike starting and running. Bidding is active, but still well under $3,000. Miles on this one are reasonable, considering how practical these are, and condition appears to be excellent. I'm not sure these have all that much collectible potential in the near future, but throw on a set of modern forks and this might be a great do-it-all sporty bike for a rider with limited funds, a willing spirit and flesh that's weak.

-tad

The Big One: 1994 Honda CB1000 for Sale
Yamaha February 21, 2017 posted by

Going Solo: 1994 Yamaha YZF750R for Sale

A solo seat on a sportbike is a statement of intent that says, "I'm a very serious sports motorcycle rider, and a passenger will only slow me down when I'm out dragging a knee in the canyons." Or maybe it just says that your significant other has their own motorcycle for canyon-carving... Honestly, considering the utterly impractical nature of modern sportbike design, pillion seats and pegs are, for all intents and purposes, largely decorative. Sure, people can ride back there in a pinch, but it ain't much fun. The comfort situation might have been better back in the 1980s and 1990s, but the message broadcast by a solo tail like the one on this very clean Yamaha YZF750R is the same now as it was then.

The top-spec YZF750SP was never officially sold here in the USA, and the R lacked that bike's adjustable swingarm pivot, flatslide carbs, and bolt-on rear subframe/solo seat combo. Gearbox ratios were different as well and the bike featured hotter cams and higher-spec suspension. With a claimed 125hp from the 749cc engine and a dry weight of 432lbs, absolute performance is closer to a modern 600 than a genuine superbike, but with some upgrades to the suspension and modern tires, there's plenty of fun to be had.

Ironically, the most significant part of the YZF750's story might be three other letters: CBR. The CBR900RR was introduced in 1993 and basically rewrote the rules for the class, offering nearly literbike power in a 750cc package. It ignored established rules that saw roadbike displacements reflecting racing class limits to embody the "win on Sunday, sell on Monday" philosophy: until the introduction of the CBR, the 750cc class was hotly contested on the street as it was in World Superbike, the premier production-based racing class of the era, where it represented the class limit for four-cylinder displacement. But the CBR belonged to no racing class at all and its popularity helped signal the end of the 750 class dominance.

But that certainly doesn't mean the YZF750R is a bad motorcycle. In fact, the 750cc bikes represent the pinnacle of 1990s superbike development. I prefer the earlier round headlamps to these "cat's eye" peepers and the simpler, less garish "speedblock" graphics of the late 1980s, but there's no arguing that, if you want a 90's superbike, you'd be hard-pressed to find one nicer than this YZF750R.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Yamaha YZF750R for Sale

For sale is my truly superb YZF750R. I was with intention to hold onto it forever but I am seriously short of good garage space following my son's moving here from overseas with his "toys" etc. This may be the best one in the country, no exaggeration!  It looks like it left the showroom this morning.

This model was only imported for about 2 years and most of them were just used for the race track. This bike has NEVER seen a race track!  It starts up instantly, idles smoothly, is very fast and I have never had it close to the red line of 13,000rpm.  It has only done 6,600  miles from new, no noises or smoke or any leaks. When tested by magazines at the time, this model attained a speed of 165mph, a deep sounding after market exhaust system lets a bit more power out! For those not familiar with this machine, it has the 5 valves per cylinder engine.

It will purr along at 40 mph in 6th gear and carburates perfectly. I use full synthetic Mobil motorcycle oil and non ethanol 93 octane gas. I will be 70 years old next year and take it out for a 20 mile ride every few weeks on the local back roads here in NC.   I have had many, many bikes over the years both on the road and on the track, and this one always gives me a grin when I dismount.

I am starting the bidding at $5000 with no reserve. NADA has it valued way above this with a lot more miles for the year. I paid more than this a few years ago.  Ride it home or I will assist with any shipping to be paid for by the high bidder.  Clear NC title.

I'm not sure the seller is correct that "most of them were just used for the race track," as that was the job of the higher-spec YZF750SP. But, since the SP was never officially sold in the USA, you certainly would have started with this bike if you wanted to race a 750cc Yamaha here in the 1990s. That being said, the later YZF750 is a pretty rare machine in any guise here in the USA, especially in such extremely clean, low-mileage condition. Starting bid for this very nice YZF is $5,000 with no takers yet and four days left on the auction. That's definitely on the high end for a YZF but, if you've got an eye towards collectibility, it doesn't seem outrageous, considering this one is so clean you could just about eat off it.

The YZF750R generally came with pillion accommodations but the solo tail seen here, possibly from an SP, should save some weight and allows the aftermarket pipe to tuck in higher and closer for improved cornering clearance. It certainly looks the part. The D&D exhaust and the fake-looking carbon dash, on the other hand, are much more questionable choices but are easily replaced with a bit of careful eBay shopping. I'm not exactly sure what that switch on the left fairing in-fill panel does, though. Last time I saw one of those on a bike, it was a switch to turn off the rear brake light in case you needed to, um... run from the cops.

-tad

Going Solo: 1994 Yamaha YZF750R for Sale