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Posts by tag: inline four

MV Agusta June 27, 2018 posted by

From the Racing Department: 2016 MV Agusta F4RC for Sale

The second generation of MV Agusta's superbike as exemplified by this F4RC was more sophisticated, more refined, but no less dangerous. It's not really a question of power: there are obviously plenty of other literbikes with similar [or better] power-to-weight ratios. It's the general sense of wildness, an absolute willingness to murder you if you get too familiar with it. I was speaking with a husband and wife over the weekend about one, describing how it just feels far more serious than something like an Aprilia RSV4 that makes similar power and weighs about the same. At the end, she said, "It has no pity." Which I think pretty much perfectly sums up the MV Agusta F4: it does not suffer fools gladly.

The team working on the second generation of the F4 faced a big challenge: how do you update a motorcycle that is widely considered to be one of the most beautiful designs of all time? How to you revise it so that it looks noticeably more modern, yet still maintains clear visual links to the earlier bike? I do prefer the original Tamburini bike, but it's hard to argue that MV didn't knock it out of the park: it's a bit more angular, a bit more technical, but still retains the overall shape and proportions that made the previous design so iconic.

Perhaps most importantly, the electronics are far more sophisticated and a huge leap forward for the bike, with 8-level traction control and multiple engine power maps for throttle sensitivity, torque, engine braking, and response. Your ego might make you think you need whatever the equivalent of "RACE" mode is, but for most riding, I'm sure a less-aggressive map would help the bike's tendency to wheelie and generally try to kill you. Honestly, with the kind of power this thing makes, it will always feel fast. Power was up significantly: even the "entry level" F4R made a claimed 195hp at the crank, and this 2016 F4RC was supposedly good for an outrageous 212hp. From cold, it still has the distinctive loping idle and a hard-edged, exotic wail when revved, but overall it feels far more refined than the earlier bike.

Ergonomics were improved as well, although that really isn't saying much and the bike is still pretty uncomfortable for anything like regular riding. Unfortunately, heat is still a significant problem and the F4 will still roast your thighs and try to boil over if you get caught in traffic. Keeping an eye on the temp gauge is difficult though: the updated LCD gauge cluster and blue lighting looks very sophisticated, but is difficult to read at a glance.

Interestingly, the bike wasn't even all that expensive when it was introduced in 2010, comparatively speaking. Sure, there was a premium to be paid for owning and Italian exotic, but the new F4 was priced just a few thousand dollars higher than a Yamaha R1, and while performance was similar, there's no comparison in terms of the bikes' styles. These days you can pick up a nice, low-mileage F4R for $12,000 and people will still think you're riding a bike worth ten times that. Seriously: I've overheard those conversations. Unfortunately, this particular F4RC is much closer to what the hoi polloi might be expecting, and the bike's asking price is a cool $35,995 although maybe those are Canadian dollars...

I'm generally not a fan of race-replica graphics, especially on a premium Italian motorcycle, but I think the RC red-white-green looks pretty sharp. The biggest draw for me is that stunning Termignoni exhaust that addresses the only real design element of the second generation F4 that I find disappointing. The organ-pipe setup on the first generation bike is terrific, but the revised design tried to maintain the four undertail pipes with an updated style that used squared-off tips, and generally looked like it was trying too hard. The twin Termignoni cans suit the bike well and sound amazing.

From the original eBay listing: 2016 MV Agusta F4RC Reparto Corsa for Sale

Used like new, very rare motorcycle MV Agusta, F4 RC Reparto Corsa AMG, 2016, 237 miles (380km), must see.

WSBK Ready, 212 Hp, Only 250 built around the world in 2016. Limited warranty available, not included, call us for details.

Price based on local pick-up, shipping available worldwide.

Contact us to check the shipping and/or customs fees according to your location.

Applicable sales tax.

Race ready motorcycle, it is up to the buyer to take the information according to his locality for the possibility of road registration.

We are not partners with Uship and do not confirm the accuracy of their quotation, call us for a more accurate price.

http://www.motosillimitees.com/fr/powersports/occasion/mv-agusta-f4-rc-reparto-corsa-amg-212-hp-2016/10766748/

Motos Illimitées

Well this is obviously being offered by a dealer and there isn't much information about the bike's history. But as usual with a bike that has so few miles, there probably isn't much to tell. If you want a nice F4, you certainly don't need to pay this kind of money, although it's pretty comparable to top-shelf Ducati Panigales and a bargain, compared to the Superleggera. Modern MV Agustas don't get much more collectible than this.

-tad

From the Racing Department: 2016 MV Agusta F4RC for Sale
Honda June 14, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Museum Quality 1989 Honda CB-1 for Sale

I’ve always been a “slow bike [and car, for that matter] fast” kind of guy, mainly because I could never really afford the fast bikes I wanted, but also because I'm pretty sure I'd have gotten into trouble riding something powerful all the time. But some folks just prefer smaller-engined motorcycles: on the road especially, you can barely get a modern sportbike into third gear unless you’re on the freeway, and winding one to redline, even in second gear, is likely to land you in jail if you do it in or around civilization… But that’s never a problem with something like today’s pristine Featured Listing Honda CB-1.

The 400cc class came about because of regulations that heavily taxed and otherwise displacements over 400cc in some markets, not because everyone was clamoring for them. In Japan, the 400cc sportbike, and even 250cc four-stroke sportbike classes were hotly contested, with Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Yamaha all producing smaller, more sophisticated machines than we ever saw officially in the USA. But licensing and laws aside, there are also fans of smaller displacement bikes that have the experience and skill to handle a legitimate sportbike and don’t want to be stuck with one of the torquey, but fairly crude-feeling singles or parallel twins you normally find powering bikes in the class.

Enter the Honda CB-1. Powered by a slightly detuned version of the CBR400RR's engine, the 399cc inline-four had some serious mechanical specifications, including sixteen valves and gear-driven dual overhead cams. The result was 55hp and a 13,500rpm redline, plenty to motivate the 400lb machine and push it all the way to 118mph, assuming you were prepared to thrash the sewing-machine-smooth engine mercilessly.

The CB-1 was one of only a couple of 400cc, inline-four sportbikes that were ever available in the United States, and that sophisticated little screamer is the main appeal here, along with the simple, sporty styling that has aged very well. The CB-1 did lose the CBR's aluminum frame and made do with tubular steel unit instead, but saved weight by losing the fairing and the CBR's second front caliper and rotor. Smaller valves and different tuning meant slightly less outright power that the CBR, but lower gearing meant it was a better real-world bike as well.

Unfortunately, as polished as it was, the CB-1 didn't really sell very well here in the USA, where bigger is always better and 600cc supersports are considered "learner bikes." But its surprising sophistication had fans then and now, and has become a bit of a cult bike here in the States. But if you missed the boat the first time around and didn't get to buy one new from your local Honda dealer, here's your chance: this one has just 9 miles on the odometer and is amazingly clean.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda CB-1 for Sale

There isn't much to say other than this bike is literally a brand spank'n new bike. There are only "9" miles on the bike, as in "nine". These miles were put on at the factory. The tires are original and still have the injection nibs on them. I bought this bike out of a collection because I am a huge CB-1 fan. I own another CB-1 that I ride and use with my kids. They are amazing bikes and have a cult following. I bought this bike about three years ago simply because it was so cool and such a time capsule that I could not pass it up. I have never ridden it. It only sits covered in climate controlled storage. I never had the heart to ride it because it is so perfect. It is the curse of its newness. I spent some careful time and money prepping it for long term storage when I fist took delivery of the bike. The dealer did a full inspection, started the bike, and did a leak down prior to putting it into its cryogenic state. If you intend to do the sacrilegious act of riding it, then the battery will need to be re-installed and a few other minor checklist things, but easy to do. I can do this for you if needed. I have full records of what the dealer did to prep it for storage. You are welcome to check with the dealer and inquire what they did. The bike is PERFECT! Serious buyers are encouraged to look at it in person. Please feel free to ask me any questions. I'll do my best to reply quickly. I live in the North San Francisco area. I can help with organizing shipping if needed. I would prefer an in person inspection before it gets shipped. Buyer must pay for all shipping and crating if needed. Local pickup is of course preferred. I have "ALL" the paperwork... I mean everything down to the original pamphlets, certificate of origin, title, etc, etc. I also have both original keys. Payment must be completely cleared in my account before I will release the bike.

Update 6.14.2018:

There have been some questions about the long term storage of this bike so I feel I need to give some detail. When I received the bike it had no fuel or fuel residue in the tank, fuel lines or carbs. When I received the bike it had already been put into a long term storage state.

We I received the bike in order to test and run the engine we never put fuel in the tank. We did an external IV fuel drip to test the motor and it started immediately and ran perfect. After we were done the carbs were taken off and completely drained, dried and sprayed internally with an aerosol oil specific for storage. We sprayed the inside of the tank as well. The spark plugs were removed and the inside of the cylinders were sprayed.

Every single piece of rubber on this bike was generously coated with grease specific for long term storage of rubber and plastic. For example spark plug boots, all cables, hand controls etc. Much of this was wiped away for the photos but if you look at the chain that will give you an idea.

The forks were carefully inspected and treated but I need to look at the document to see what was done.

The engine was drained and then refilled with a specific oil to a higher level for long term storage to minimize any moisture buildup.

All of the exposed electrical was coated specifically for long term electrical storage. The battery was removed, I have a new battery ready to go.

The inside of the exhaust was treated to remove any moisture and the end of the exhaust was bagged and sealed. This seal was removed for the photos.

In summary this was a very expensive hibernation process that is fully documented over $2K. This was done at Marin Speed Shop as a labor of love by their master mechanic Max. Max took a great deal of time and care doing the research to ensure that this bike would stay in BRAND NEW condition for the next 30 years. Please call the shop to verify but only if you are a very serious buyer, respectfully please do not waste their time.

There are lots of small details I am leaving out but I'm almost certain that the shop still has the hibernation document if not I'm sure I do somewhere.

There is ZERO corrosion of any kind on this bike. If the buyer does the unthinkable and decides to ride it, I would suggest putting on new tires because tires do harden over time. That said the tires visually look perfect. I did not replace the tires because the tires are original to the bike as they were on the showroom floor and that's cool!

Hope this help, and good luck

My guess is that this could very well be the only brand new CB-1 in existence. If there is another one, it is probably in the Honda motorcycle museum in Japan.

Good luck on bidding and I look forward to meeting you.

Obviously, with basically just delivery miles, you'd likely need to go through the bike top-to-bottom before riding it. So perhaps the biggest question here is, "Does anyone really need a museum-quality Honda CB-1?" Well since the bike was originally a practical, affordable, and sophisticated do-it-all scoot, I doubt this will have the universal, drool-worthy appeal of something like an RC30, a bike that was sold in very limited numbers and had very exotic components. But somewhere, you just know there are a couple folks who've always loved this classy little machine or are looking to complete their extensive Honda collection. Regardless, it's obvious there is real interest in this bike: although nice, well-used CB-1s regularly change hands for around the $3,000 mark, bidding over at the eBay auction is already up north of $6,000 with several days left on the auction!

-tad

Featured Listing: Museum Quality 1989 Honda CB-1 for Sale
Bimota June 12, 2018 posted by

Naked Italian Supermodel: 1998 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Look, I'll get this out the way up front: the Bimota YB11 does not "look way cooler with the bodywork off." Since the missing bits appear to be included, I'm going to assume, for the purposes of this post, that a lack of taste is the actual reason the bodywork isn't currently in place. Don't get me wrong, I love Bimotas shorn of bodywork: the minimalist frame, the simplified construction, the elegance. But with that headlight and tail sections in place and the rest missing? It just looks unfinished. It might run cooler though... Anyway, differing aesthetic opinions aside, the YB11 is certainly an affordable way to get into quirky Italian exotica: we're obviously comparing apples and oranges here, but you can generally pick up 90s Bimotas for the price of a new Ducati Scrambler.

Stripped of much of its bodywork, this YB11 looks like it might have more in common with an Aprilia Tuono or a KTM Super Duke than a modern liter-class superbike. The 145 horsepower claimed by Bimota for their mildly-tuned version of Yamaha's five-valve Genesis inline four means the YB11 is closer to “supernaked” than “superbike” in terms of power, as well. Certainly, the 1002cc displacement means it isn’t eligible for superbike racing classes.

But just as bikes in the supernaked class are less powerful, but sometimes more fun than full-blown superbikes, top-end horsepower might impress when you’re comparing stat sheets over a beer, or railing at 10/10ths on a race track, but it doesn’t necessarily translate that well to the real world. Take a look at the YB11’s 80 lb-ft of torque and 400lb dry weight: the Genesis engine has a famously fierce midrange and the bike is claimed to start pulling savagely from below 4,000rpm. Modern superbikes do make much more top-end horsepower, but also weigh a bit more and produce very similar amounts of torque, so you can imagine that a YB11 will still make for a very exciting ride.

Obviously, this old-school superbike comes from a much simpler time, something that’s easy to see once the bodywork is removed. One look under the skin of a YB11 alongside something like Ducati’s new V4 Panigale and you can see just how complicated modern superbikes have become, since modules and wires and hoses pack every available nook and cranny. It's a good thing the new Panigale has a heavily truncated frame, since I'm not sure where you'd fit a regular one. So no, an old beast like this Bimota isn’t as good as something truly modern. But you also shouldn't worry too much about more modern bikes running away from you out on the road.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 for Sale

A beautiful work of art that looks like it was designed by Michelangelo, this bike is super-light (Superleggera) + excellent handling with 51mm front fork tubes (largest ever put on a production cycle!) + Brembo brakes front +rear, carbon fiber everywhere/ high perf. ARROW exhaust system/ 145H.P. with 12:1 lightweight forged pistons in a 1002cc Thunderace Yamaha engine with lightened quick-rev. crankshaft. Bodywork is off presently cause it looks way cooler with it off, but I do have all the parts that go with the bike.

I'm not clear from the seller's description whether the "12:1 lightweight forged pistons... with lightened quick-rev. crankshaft" are components from some sort of engine rebuild or if he's suggesting they were included in the original YB11. I'm pretty sure that Bimota made no internal changes to the stock powerplant and if the engine was rebuilt or otherwise modified, I'd love some more detail regarding what was included and why it was done. Bidding is active with a few days left on the auction, but only up to a bit more than $4,000 at this point. Aside from the missing bodywork [it is included in the sale as you can see below], this bike does look like it's in very nice shape, but Bimotas of this vintage are still a tough sell, so someone still might get a good bargain.

-tad

Honda June 1, 2018 posted by

Sharp Little Blade: 1991 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for Sale

If you're into bikes that aren't obviously compensating for something, this little Honda CBR400RR offers big-bike looks and serious refinement in a more compact, less overwhelming package. The included photos are very nice, but the seller has included just three of them, so I'll keep this post short. In general, 400cc sportbikes from this period are grey market imports: while very popular overseas and in particular in their home market of Japan, there was little to no interest in a sportbike displacing less than 600cc here in the USA.

That's unfortunate, because this "Baby Blade," so called because its bigger sibling was called the "Fireblade" in other markets, was a pretty sophisticated machine. It was powered by a 399cc inline four with sixteen valves, gear-driven twin overhead cams that was suspended in a stiff aluminum frame. The 70hp available from de-restricted versions was put through a six-speed gearbox and overall there's plenty of fun to be had on a tight canyon road.

Americans actually could pick up the CBR's close relative in the relatively obscure CB-1 that used a detuned version of the CBR's engine but replaced the aluminum frame with one made of steel. Weight was similar as the CB didn't have a fairing, but it looks like Honda might have gambled correctly in not importing the CBR, since the CB-1 didn't sell very well.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for Sale

1991 Honda CBR400RR NC29 aka Baby Blade

Classic smaller displacement sport bike popular in Japan/UK. Imported from Japan.
Starts and runs nicely all through rev range!

Recently carb tuned and de-restricted. Bike is in KM and I added a MPH overlay.

Makes a great small displacement track bike! 

New: 

  • Pirelli Rosso Corsa
  • Screen
  • Mirrors
  • Battery
  • Tank grip
  • Axle slider

Buy It Now price is $5,500 which is a pretty decent price although you'll obviously have to be careful to verify you can register it where you live. This one is in Texas and I'm assuming it's been road-registered there since the seller has gone to the trouble to add the MPH overlay to the speedometer.

-tad

Sharp Little Blade: 1991 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for Sale
MV Agusta May 18, 2018 posted by

Handsome Brute: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale

Launched at almost the same time, MV Agusta's Brutale has always lived in the sleeker F4's shadow. Styling aside, it was just a little bit lower-spec, a little less focused, a little too practical. Like that's a dirty word. I happen to love the design, although it's hard to argue that the F4 isn't a better-looking bike. But you have to suffer for that sublime style. The fact is, as much as I love the F4, it's hard work: the riding position puts lots of weight over the front wheel, the pegs are high, and the suspension is stiff. The Brutale, while by no means plush, certainly can feel that way after spending time on an F4. Which makes sense, since the F4 was designed for the track. For the road? It honestly doesn't get much better for canyon hooliganism than the Brutale.

Like the original F4 750, the Brutale 750S was considered by some to be "too slow," as if 127 high-strung horses in a lightweight naked bike with a nearly dirt-track riding position isn't a recipe for a good time. The 910R seen here followed the original Brutale and displaced... 910cc. At 136hp, claimed power isn't up all that much, but midrange is improved and honestly, it's all the power you need in a naked road bike. Seriously, who is riding these things and really thinks they're not fast enough? Sure, moar power is great and all, but the later 1078 and 1090 versions just seem like overkill, making the 910R the Goldilocks of the Brutale range: not too fast, not too slow. Just right.

The seller of this very clean example mentions a Titanium exhaust, and it looks like a set of beautiful headers and a de-cat link pipe have been fitted, but the bike retains the original "shotgun" style end-cans. Not the worst choice, as the aftermarket never really did come up with anything that looks quite as elegant as these slash-cut bits, although the actual openings in the ends do look kind of... inadequate. But if you're worried about a lack of noise, trust me: this one probably isn't all that quiet.

The only problem I see here is a lack of a Power Commander. MV's of this era can generally use fueling help. They're typically very lean through most of the rev range, then run overly rich at the top end. It makes sense, given limited development resources and the fairly crude technology available when the bike was introduced, but an aftermarket fueling module and some dyno time gives the instant response and fluid midrange the bike was always designed to have. It's perfectly rideable without one, but is well worth the investment.

From the original eBay listing: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale

Selling an MV Agusta Brutale 910R in excellent condition

KBB value at $5880 without considering the premium extras we have here. Price firm.

With top notch quality accessories
1. Titanium exhaust
2. Stock carbon fiber body parts (from MV Agusta)
3. Rizoma mirrors
4. CRG clutch and brake levers
5. MV Agusta cover and upright stand
6. Trickle charger

Title status: clean 
Transmission: manual 

Never down or raced/tracked. Low miles:4890 !!! 
Serviced at Ducati dealer every time.
Have the stock exhaust as well.

Have title in my name.

Good to know the title is clean, but did the seller really need to tell us the transmission is a "manual"? Does a constant-mesh, sequential gearbox even qualify as a manual? The seller also seems pretty impressed by all the "premium extras" included but honestly, this is basically a stock bike, by MV Agusta standards. And that's really the appeal of this one: it's clean, looks very sleek in the unusual black, and hasn't been messed with too much, although the missing Power Commander is something I'd rectify as soon as possible if it were mine. Is it worth the maintenance hassles? Well that's a different story: a Street or Speed Triple certainly handles as well, has plenty of character, and is much easier to maintain. I'd like to say those bikes are less expensive as well, except at the moment they're not: the asking price for this particularly nice Brutale is $5,999. That's pretty much bang-on for a good 910 these days, but Brutales in general are a screaming deal, considering the looks and performance. Anyone have $6,000 they can loan me?

-tad

Handsome Brute: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale
Suzuki May 15, 2018 posted by

Sharp Slabbie Survivor: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Suzuki's GSX-R750 brought endurance racer performance to the masses. It may not have been the first bike to use a full fairing wrapped around lightweight aluminum monoshock frame and a four-cylinder engine, but it was the first bike to make that formula accessible to ordinary mortals, and it popularized the format. Prior to the GSX-R's introduction in 1985, you needed to be looking at something from a boutique manufacturer like Bimota if you wanted that kind of package, and those were far out of financial reach of most enthusiasts.

In a step that seems retrograde at first, the GSX-R used oil cooling instead of water. But this actually meant for a lighter, simpler package that was also easier to work on, meaning the potential loss in maximum power was a good trade off. A high-capacity oil pump and a system of oil jets dubbed SACS or "Suzuki Advanced Cooling System" helped keep things cool and that, along with dual overhead cams and four valves per cylinder, helped the bike produce a genuine 100hp.

This 1986 example would have been from the first year the bike was actually imported to the USA. Slim, right-way-up forks [with anti-dive!], 18" wheels and very skinny tires clearly date the bike, but it otherwise appears pretty shockingly modern, considering it is 32 years old. It does have a few minor blemishes and small cracks in the fairing mounts, but is otherwise about as perfect as you're likely to find outside a museum.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

For all those searching for an original, early GSX-R that wasn’t beat to hell or “modified” by some 18 yr old, here it is. All original everything in amazing condition. Miles are correct- no replaced speedo or set back to 0 after rebuild. Previous owner said the tires were original. Some scuffs, scratches and your typical stress cracks around the fairing bolts (as typical with these old Slabbies). Tank is beautiful, dent free and unlined. Exhaust/heat shield is perfect- (probably worth 2k in exhaust and tank alone if you can find them in this condition). A surface scratch approx 4-5” long on right side of tank (probably can be buffed out) and a few mm gouge on decal stripe on right tank side. Have a new tank decal kit if you’re going for museum quality restoration. Small (approx. 1/8”) plastic piece cracked on tail section cover, left side bottom shown in photo 17.  Some clear coat wearing off due to age near headlight cowling decals, photo 13. I tried to show everything, including flaws in the photos. In general, the paint is amazing. I took these photos in bright sunlight so some of the distortion you see is reflection. And I didn’t clean the bike and bathe it in armor-all for the photos. What you see is how it is after taking the cover off after several years. Never saw road salt or cinders- was previously a FL bike. 

I purchased this bike nearly 3 years ago, rode it approx 200 feet after it left the shipping truck, and parked it. Battery was removed and bike hasn’t been run since then. I just noticed some crusty brake fluid buildup that weeped from the front reservoir when taking these photos (4/23/18). Brakes should be bled, fluid replaced. I should have drained the carbs (but didn’t), so they may have to be cleaned.  

I bought a new GSX-R750 in '86, sold it when the military had me for 4 years, and purchased this one for more $ than what I paid new in 86’. If you want one of the nicest examples of the first true street -legal production race bike, and something that will hold its value, here’s your chance. More fun than a 401k too. I’m selling because after hitting the big Five-O mark, I’m more into dirt riding and the race replica style ergonomics don’t agree with my back and neck any more. Sold my Kawi triple, my GS1100, and Yamaha 2 strokes, and this is the last to go. PA antique title in my name. (Last owner was also older,  so bike was never abused).

Photos are part of the description ( **and no, the Shelby Cobra and KTM in the pictures aren’t included). I tried to include all the good and bad. If there’s any questions about things I may have missed, feel free to email and I’ll gladly answer. No outside CONUS shipping unless discussed prior to sale. I won’t crate and ship but I will work with your shipper. Bike located near Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, PA. Have your finances in order: if your bid wins, it’s yours. Non-refundable Pay Pal deposit due after auction. Bike and title won’t be released until all payments clear. Less than 10 positive transactions contact me first before bidding. In person examination can be arranged if desired. No low-ball offers please. Don’t waste my time or yours. I don’t need the cash, so if I can’t get what I’m asking, I’ll just keep it. If you can find one nicer and all original, go for it.  Thanks for looking.

Relisted because I ended it early due to not wanting to sell it the first time. My wife promptly changed my mind.

The asking price? $7,500 which is obviously on the high-side for a Slabbie right now, but not really out of line, considering the condition and originality. It wouldn't be all that hard to find a cheaper one, but minor blemishes aside, this one's in pretty exceptional shape.

-tad

Sharp Slabbie Survivor: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale