Posts by tag: homologation

Yamaha August 6, 2015 posted by

Second Coming: 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02 for Sale

1999 Yamaha R7 R Side Front

Introduced in 1999 and sold for just two years, the exotic Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02 was the long-awaited successor to the OW01 of the late 1980's, a barely-legal roadbike intended to homologate the R7 for World Superbike competition. But after just two years, Yamaha pulled the plug on the bike and their WSBK team as well. Was it because Yamaha felt their inline four couldn't be competitive in a series whose rules heavily favored v-twins? Possibly: even Honda gave up on their RC45 to run twins, a move which saw them achieve the success they'd been seeking, but unable to find with their V4 superbikes.

1999 Yamaha R7 Tank

Regardless, the R7 featured tiny details all over the bike that made it more than just another roadbike: the steering geometry could be changed to suit rider preference, with rake, trail, and the steering head all adjustable. The 749cc engine, as you'd expect, featured Yamaha's five-valve heads. Dead stock, the bike made a disappointing 106hp, but that was simply to appease emissions and safety legislation. Each bike has a second, dormant set of injectors that could be activated. Along with a race-kit and a carbon airbox that added a ram-air effect, the two sets of injectors unleashed the full race-spec 162hp.

1999 Yamaha R7 Tail

Of course, this led to a corresponding loss of reliability. Hardly a concern for race teams, but a bit of problem if you wanted to use your R7 on the road. Some owners just said "screw it" and fitted an R1 engine, which seems sacrilegious, until you realize the swap probably captures the R7 experience in terms of power, if not in terms of the original engine's appetite for revs...

1999 Yamaha R7 Radiator

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02 for Sale

The bike is in excellent mechanical and cosmetic condition with only 6490 Kilometers (4032 Miles). The Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02 is a race homologation motorcycle of limited production run of only 500 units. It was designed to compete in the Superbike World Championship and Suzuka 8 Hours endurance races.

The second set of fuel injectors have been activated (only 4 of 8 are activated from the factory), also included are the supporting YEC kit parts:
carbon fiber airbox
velocity stacks
throttle and cables
fuel pump
fuel regulator

I also have the OEM versions of these parts.

When the power is turned on to the bike, the oil light flashes 5 times, meaning the ECU supports
all 8 fuel injectors being activated.

This R7 had the crank recall done at Wilson Yamaha in Fresno California where the bike was originally purchased.

Also, this R7 is titled and plated in CA. There are no back DMV fees due, the bike is in non-operation status.

I also have the factory assembly manual and YEC kit manual.

1999 Yamaha R7 R Side Peg

As is so often the case, I'd love some better photographs: seriously, if you upload them and realize they're kinda blurry, you can go back and reshoot them. Especially if you're expecting top-dollar for your bike.

And with a Buy It Now price of $22,000 the seller certainly is. Although with some pretty serious bidding going on, it looks like the market isn't caring so much about those poor-quality photos...

-tad

1999 Yamaha R7 R Side

Second Coming: 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02 for Sale
Ducati July 24, 2015 posted by

More Than Skin Deep: 2001 Ducati 748R for Sale

2001 Ducati 748R R Side

Ducati's 916 bikes were built in great enough numbers, and are available for sale often enough, that it's sometimes hard to think of them as "rare." I mean, it's much harder to find a nice ZX-7R than it is a 996 these days. But while we may have become a bit blasé about these former fantasy-garage machines, there are still a few out there like this 748R worth getting excited about.

2001 Ducati 748R L Side Front

While Ducati's "S" models are generally just their regular offerings with some carbon parts thrown at them and some upgraded suspension bits you probably won't notice unless you're racetrack-bound, if at all, the "R" bikes are often a whole different kettle of fish.

2001 Ducati 748R Cockpit

They generally don't look all that different, but that's kind of the point: they're homologation bikes built to include parts Ducati wants to use on their racebikes, and they generally don't need to sell all that many of them, so they can be very, very expensive.

2001 Ducati 748R Tail

Designed to compete in World Supersport racing and heavily revised in 2001, the 748R used a lightened version the 996 World Superbike's frame to allow use of a larger, two-part airbox. Constructed from carbon fiber, the new airbox added some stiffness back to the lighter frame and permitted the use of Formula One type shower fuel injectors. The new airbox and injectors, along with titanium valves and connecting rods gave 106hp on the road, with plenty of potential waiting to be unlocked by the race teams.

Adjustable triple clamps and Öhlins suspension front and rear helped make what may have been the sweetest-handling Ducati of the period even sweeter.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Ducati 748R for Sale

Well well well...you won't see this every day. Immaculate 2001 Ducati 748R with only 1,695 original miles!

This rare example is nearly stock with an Arrow exhaust, Yoyodyne slave cylinder and a few carbon bits. We've just done a major service including valves, all fluids, battery, chain, brake pads and more.

You won't find one this nice anywhere else.

Tech Specs: The top of the range model was now the 748R, Ducati's racing homologation model produced only in very limited numbers. This engine was again a derivative of the SPS model but with more tuning. The main difference is that the R model has an overhead shower-injector arrangement compared to the 748E and S model's traditional throttle bodies, titanium connecting rods, titanium valves and more extreme valve timing.

As such, the 748R has a larger, two-part airbox and thus the frame was also different in order to accommodate this. The suspension choice was Ohlins for both the rear shock and front forks, although the very first models in 2000 used Showa titanium nitride (TiN) front forks and a Showa shock absorber. The engine included a very basic slipper clutch to ensure that this would then be homologated for use in racing, as well as an oil cooler.

2001 Ducati 748R Rear Suspension

High-mileage Ducati's shouldn't scare you off, but badly-maintained ones should have you running the other way, hands clamped protectively over your wallet. This bike has low miles and is being sold by a dealer, which likely means the price will be higher. In the plus column, they obviously know what they have and what they are doing, which will hopefully increase buyer confidence.

If you're looking into four-valve Ducati ownership, there are much, much cheaper options out there. But for collectors or track junkies, this is one to have.

-tad

2001 Ducati 748R L Side

More Than Skin Deep: 2001 Ducati 748R for Sale
Ducati July 16, 2015 posted by

#467 of 534: 1990 Ducati 851 SP3 for Sale

1990 Ducati 851 SP3 L Front

The Ducati 851 debuted in 1987 and featured brand-new four-valve heads and liquid-cooling, revolutionary design features for the already venerable 90° L-twin. The Pantah engine, while very durable even under racing conditions, was limited in terms of outright power by its two-valve heads and air/oil cooling. Ducati wanted to compete in World Superbike racing, and this was the result.

1990 Ducati 851 SP3 R Side

The SP3 was similar in concept to Ducati's "R" versions today and was intended to homologate the bikes for WSBK racing. The higher-compression SP bikes actually displaced 888cc's and used a close-ratio gearbox along with Öhlins suspension components. Reports of power varied, but something north of 110hp at the crank would probably be accurate.

1990 Ducati 851 SP3 Dash

What's interesting is that the SP3 was actually introduced in 1991, and this bike is listed as a 1990, which should have made it an SP2. It does feature the plaque on the top triple, along with the characteristic upswept pipes and black wheels appropriate to the model. The photo isn't all that clear, so I thought maybe the "3" was really an "S," but the SPS was a variant of the 888 and introduced much later, in 1992...

So assuming this is a genuine SP3 that is just titled incorrectly, you're looking at a very rare motorcycle, with just 534 made.

1990 Ducati 851 SP3 L Side Fairing

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Ducati 851 SP3 for Sale

Out of the 500 that were made of this bike, this is stamped #467. The 851 Superbike won WSBK in 1990. This is a wonderful specimen with a unique aftermarket exhaust, which sounds absolutely amazing. This bike does run, and it runs very strong.

1990 Ducati 851 SP3 R Side Detail

There are just over 3,000 miles on the clock and, although some of the photos are less than clear, this looks like it's in excellent condition. But even given the limited production, that $32,000 starting bid is pretty jaw-dropping. It's been a while since I've seen one of these up for sale, but that price seems pretty ambitious. There is still a full week left on the auction, so I'm curious to see how much serious interest this bike generates.

-tad

1990 Ducati 851 SP3 L Side

Ducati June 11, 2015 posted by

Under the Skin: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale

2005 Ducati 999R L Side

Enough ink has been spilled complaining about the design of the Ducati 999, but two things are clear: it is a far more practical, useable motorcycle than the classic 916, with ergonomics that at least took actual human physiology into account and the controversial looks of the bike are aging well. To be honest, as much as people fawn over the 1098 as "the bike that should have followed the 916," I find its styling way too derivative. I love the headlamps and nose, but overall, it just looks like a bike designed by someone terrified to screw up, rather than a bold new statement. The 999 may never be considered beautiful in the way that the 916 was, but function has a beauty all its own, and you'd never mistake it for anything else.

2005 Ducati 999R R Side Naked

But beauty is more than skin deep, and while a 999S is really just a 999 with some bells and whistles, the 999R is another beast entirely and was intended to meet requirements for Ducati's assault on the AMA Supberbike class. Internally, the R shares little with its less-aggressive stablemates: it features a completely different bore and stroke, 104mm × 58.8mm vs.100mm × 63.5mm. The 999R actually displaces exactly 999cc, whereas the regular 999 has 998...

2005 Ducati 999R Fairing

With 12.5:1 compression, titanium rods and valves and a knife-edged crankshaft spinning in sand-cast cases, the R was good for a legitimate 150hp at the crank, a big number for a twin in an era before all the electronic trickery found on today's top-tier sportbikes.

2005 Ducati 999R Tank Detail

Today's example shows just why it's so great to be bike fan shopping for a used Ducati: extremely low mileage, fastidious care by an enthusiast owner, and only the best quality components thrown at it. And while the price won't be cheap, the 999R is certainly one of the most desirable models of the period.

From the original eBay listing: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale

VERY RARE Ducati 999R, unlike NO other! sold to me as a trophy bike by eBay seller "lambo19752009" Bought as an investment not to ride. However, as a Ducatista she called me to ride. Current milage is 4758- I will stop before 4999. I have had a 999 before, the 999R is a different world! Research the 999R. Condition is excellent. Minor road wear is now visible. Nothing has happened in my care other than ADULT driven 434 miles so far. Tires tell the story no abuse. Why sell? I have another Duc and need to free up cashflow...my loss your gain. From the photos to reality you will see pegs & kickstand paint wear plus a spot of gold 3M wrinkled on the engine cover. Otherwise drop dead gorgeous. Handle bars just adjusted by Dunbar Ducati, will not go to lock but are perfect alignment. Grips are black not gold as in some photos.

2005 Ducati 999R L Front

Pop on over to eBay if you want to see the laundry list of bolt-on moto-bling that's been thrown at this bike. Honestly, I'd sell off half of it and get the bike back a little closer to stock-looking: I love Rizoma as much as the next guy, but these things start to look like they've got some gold-anodized skin condition when people throw the whole catalog at them. And apparently, other people are using the term "Rizoma'd" as well. I met a guy over the weekend who was mourning the loss of his 848 Streetfighter that was "all Rizoma'd out."

In any event, this is a very low mileage, apparently pampered bike that'd be easy to get back to stock condition if you prefer. And while some Special Edition Ducatis are just "paint and tape" jobs with some upmarket suspension that offers questionable improvement over the stock setup, the 999R is the real deal: a true homologation special.

-tad

2005 Ducati 999R R Side

Under the Skin: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale
Honda January 21, 2015 posted by

Big-Bang Theory: 1996 Honda RVF400 for Sale

1996 Honda RVF400 R Front

Introduced in 1994 to replace the VFR400R, the RVF400 used a smaller, 399cc version of Honda’s gear-driven V4 powerplant with a 360° firing order. The updated model featured a revised fairing with cat-eye headlamps replacing the earlier bike’s round units, distinctive air tubes leading from the fairing to the front of the tank to feed the carburetors, although the airbox was not pressurized by any sort of ram-air system. Running gear saw a change to more modern upside-down forks and a 17” wheel replaced the earlier bike’s 18” item.

1996 Honda RVF400 Rear Suspension

Honda's homologation V4 engines featured a “big-bang” firing order that has all of the combustion events taking place relatively close together, instead of spaced evenly. This naturally increases engine vibration, but creates distinctive pulses in the power delivery that allows the rear tire to momentarily regain traction in between during on-track moments at the edge of adhesion, aiding handling and increasing tire life.

There’s also the undeniably subjective benefit in terms of sound: the “big-bang” engines often have the rawer, more charismatic sound generally associated with V4 engines compared to more conventional “screamer” motors with evenly-spaced firing intervals.

1996 Honda RVF400 L Side

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Honda RVF400 for Sale

1996 Honda RVF400 NC35. This bike is in very good condition. Bike has 9589 km = 5753 miles. Engine runs fine, no problems. There is a crack in the seat "see pictures". The passenger seat covers the crack so you don't see it. You don't see many RVF400 in this condition anymore. Bike is original, not restored. I have a clear California title for the bike.

1996 Honda RVF400 Dash

Sold officially only in Japan, all RFV400’s are grey-market imports. The seller is based in Japan, although this bike is supposedly in the US and has a clear California title. There is plenty of time left on the auction, with no takers yet at the $9,000 starting bid.

While these are obviously not as desirable as their bigger RC45 siblings, the RVF400 is prized by collectors for its motorsports heritage. And while the stock bike’s claimed 53hp is underwhelming on paper, the little RVF is reportedly a brilliant-handling bike, a “brains-over-brawn” bike for riders who like gear-whine that drowns out the stock exhaust.

-tad

1996 Honda RVF400 R Side

Big-Bang Theory: 1996 Honda RVF400 for Sale
Honda January 13, 2015 posted by

Exotic Heavyweight: 1985 Honda VF1000R Interceptor for Sale

1985 Honda VF1000R L Side

Some more 80's Honda action this week, only this time the bike is in much better condition and has all of its parts included! Modern sportbikes often obsessively address issues of weight while clawing at ever-higher horsepower numbers, worshiping at the temple founded by Lotus founder Colin Chapman and his philosophy that, “adding power makes you faster on the straights, subtracting weight makes you faster everywhere.” Today’s Honda VF1000R is a substantially-engineered motorcycle that lives by the first part of that axiom, but falls down a bit on the second…

1985 Honda VF1000R Nose

Looking much like a scaled-up GSX-R, the fully-faired, monoshock VF1000R was designed to homologate a number of features for Honda’s endurance-racing efforts, but was actually noticeably heavier than the sport-touring VF1000F at over 600lbs wet. The 998cc V4 replaced the F’s timing chains for the gear-driven cams that would eventually become an Interceptor calling-card, while anti-dive front suspension, quick-release axles, vented rear brake disc, and distinctive Comstar modular wheels fitted with radial tires rounded-out the exotic package.

1985 Honda VF1000R Rear Tire

All-in-all, the VF1000R was a bit of a disappointment as a roadbike, but that was never really the objective anyway: like most homologation machines, it was built to allow specific included parts to be used in much higher-performing, production-based racebikes. And it paved the way for Honda’s all-conquering RC30 and RC45, although I understand those were also fairly disappointing in road trim. Spare me your anger and flame in the comments section: I freely admit I’ve never ridden either of them, but I’ve read plenty of period reviews that were less than impressed, especially considering those bikes’ price tags then and now. Once again: road performance wasn’t really the point of those bikes, either.

1985 Honda VF1000R Tail

This particular example from ’85 has been upgraded with the dual-headlight setup from an ’86 model and looks to be in pretty spectacular shape, considering the bike’s age and the fact that it has seen a reasonable amount of road use, as opposed to a pampered life in a collection. For most of us, that just makes it sweeter, and means that it’s a runner, not a display bike. The included D&D pipes should make this bike a real howler: among Ducatisti, D&D is known for making pipes that exchange volume for anything resembling subtlety…

1985 Honda VF1000R Exhaust

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Honda VF1000R for Sale

Super Clean 1985 VF1000R, dual headlight upgrade over the original single one, clean paint, like new tires, smooth idle, it’s a Honda all the way!!! I hate to part with it, but I destroyed my left shoulder in Afghanistan and just can't take the lean forward any more 🙁 ... She is garage kept, and the pics don't do it justice... I will include a set of D&D pipes to the winning bidder as well! Any Questions just ask, I'm listing an Aprillia 1000R in a few more days as well.

Thanks for looking

The biggest challenge with many Japanese bikes from the 80’s and 90’s was their mass-produced affordability: people bought them, rode them hard, and exploited their famed reliability. That means in spite of higher production, tracking down nice examples of bikes like this can be just as difficult as finding a more exotic Ducati or Bimota that was produced in much smaller numbers, but has led a much more pampered life.

1985 Honda VF1000R Dash

There are still a few days left on the auction and bidding is active, although the reserve has still not been met at just north of $3,000. Much more a “GT” and less of a “back-road-burner” by today’s standards, this should make for a pretty cool road tool for Honda fans and that V4 soundtrack, complete with gear-whine, will make any bike fan smile.

-tad

1985 Honda VF1000R R Side

 

Exotic Heavyweight: 1985 Honda VF1000R Interceptor for Sale