Posts by tag: homologation

Kawasaki January 10, 2018 posted by

Mean and Very Green: 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 for Sale

Forgoing the elegance and class of the European sportbikes, Kawasaki's unabashedly garish ZX-7R, or ZXR-750 as it was known in other markets, is splashed with jagged graphics in vivid green, white, and blue. Not a modern, metallic, beetle-green, of course. Kawasaki's impossibly green green, with the un-self-consciously adolescent "Ninja" in fluorescent lettering splashed across the tank, along with a pair of HVAC air tubes that don't actually feed a pressurized airbox, just direct cooling air at the cylinder head... I hated these bikes when I was younger. But I'd buy one in a heartbeat now, since I could ride a Ninja with a sense of humor about the name, and not be worried that people might think I had a pair of tabi boots in my closet and some shuriken in my sock drawer next to a pair of nunchaku...

The ZX-7R was Kawasaki's entry into the hotly-contested 750cc superbike class in racing and on the street, their answer to the Suzuki GSX-R750, Yamaha's YZF-750R, and Honda's RC30. At the time, the 750cc inline four was the go-to configuration in World Superbike competition, unless you were Ducati. Of course, each manufacturer built limited-production homologation specials to help create the very best foundation for their World Superbike entries, except for Honda, whose RC30 was basically an homologation special to begin with.

The ZX-7R sold in 1991 is generally known as the "J1," so what's going on here with what the seller claims is a "K1"? Although they provided a wide range of tuning parts for their ZX-7/ZXR-750 that allowed them to compete successfully, Kawasaki didn't really create an homologation special until the 1991 model year's ZX-7R K1. The K1's solo seat and aluminum tank meant it was was lighter, while flat-slide carbs and higher compression meant the engine made a bit more power and could rev a bit higher. Different ratios with a taller first gear were better for the track, but made stoplight getaways a clutch-slipping pain. Price was nearly double the stock bike, but worth it if you wanted to be competitive.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 for Sale

Some of the most exotic motorcycles ever sold to the public were built during the 1990s, the golden era for homologation Superbikes.  For sale is a rare and wonderful example of such a motorcycle - a limited edition 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 production-based race bike.  

The Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R K1 was a special limited edition of Kawi’s ZX-7R used in AMA Superbike. Kawasaki enjoyed tremendous success in competitive racing with this bike, and plenty of that tech made it to the ‘civilian’ version. Required to produce 500 examples for homologation purposes, Kawi packed this bike full of features like 39mm Keihin flat-slide carbs, an aluminum gas tank, and a close ratio six speed transmission with an exceedingly tall first gear. All these goodies nearly doubled the MSRP compared to a base ZX-7R, but for the lucky 142 riders in the US who got to buy one, it was well worth it.  Weighing 10 pounds less than a base ZX-7R, the K1 had a tweaked engine with higher compression and a redline that was 500 rpm higher. This powerplant produced 120 horsepower at the crank, leading to a top speed of just under 160 miles per hour. (from the website bike-urious).
This particular model has only 3,100 miles and starts, runs and rides beautifully...and sounds great with Muzzy exhaust.  The upper fairing near the right side mirror has a couple small cracks (don't ask), but the bike is in remarkably nice shape overall and shows no sign of having been down.  A new lithium battery is included, as well.

Please Note:  I’m listing this bike for a friend who has an exceptionally nice collection of motorcycles for sale, including other homologation bikes (Honda VFR750R RC30, Yamaha FZR750R OW01, numerous rare Ducati’s), a Vincent Black Shadow, an Ariel Square Four, two BSA Gold Stars, a 1937 UL Flathead Harley Davidson, etc. (additional photos included above).

These are very rare and were extremely expensive when new, and there's been plenty of interest in sportbikes of the late 1980s and early 1990s recently. The starting bid for this ZX-7R K1 is $18,000 with no takers yet and several days left on the auction. The last one we featured sold for $14,500 back in 2015, so $18,000 seems like a fair price for this very clean, low-mileage example but maybe a bit high for a starting bid?

-tad

Mean and Very Green: 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 for Sale
Honda January 4, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1982 Honda CB1100R

This is a rare opportunity to get your hands on a very special early Honda homologation special. The CB1100R predates HRC, and was sold overseas to make the big bike legal for competition in Europe and Australia. Honda cranked out just over 4,000 of the 115 horsepower beasts over a three-year run.

The fiberglass bodywork and hand-welded aluminum tank set the bike apart from just another UJM with pretty paint, though this bike has seen use that is most often seen on run-of-the-mill models. The bike was imported 15 years ago, according to the seller, and was ridden extensively across the U.S. after being titled and tagged.

The seller restored the paint and bodywork when he bought it about 10 years ago, and rode it for a short while before mothballing it and storing it in a museum.

From the seller:

Exremely rare limited edition Honda Homologation Special Superbike. Never imported into the US. This bike was built out of the fabled RCS division of Honda. This is a pre HRC special.

The Honda CB1100R was an exotic Honda model that was produced in limited numbers from 1981 to 1983. It is a single-seat, fully faired sport bike based on the Honda CB900F. The R suffix denotes a racing version, however the CB1100R was a road-legal machine produced by Honda and offered for sale to the public. It was produced only in numbers sufficient to meet the homologation requirements for the R to be classed as a production motorcycle in markets into which it was sold. It was Honda's first homologation special and was raced in the production class racing in most major markets: including Europe South Africa Australia and New Zealand. It was not sold in the USA.

This particular bike was imported by a enthusiast about 15 years ago from the Netherlands. He then titled the bike and road it all over the united states. It has some miles on it approx 35k. The body is completely fiberglass and the tank is hand welded aluminum. The pair work is in very nice condition as I restored the body/paint completely when I bought it. I purchased it about 10 years ago and road it around for a few years then it was drained of all gas and has been in storage in my personal museum. Certainly extremely rare and definitely a must have for those with a RC30, RC45 etc type of Honda collection. The motor though similar to the CB1100F that was offer herein the United States is in a much higher state of tune. The Nikko Baker 4 into 1 exhaust is pure music to the ears. The bike will require a full recommissioning for consumables (i.e.: tires, oil, battery, plugs, carb sync etc) prior to riding and sold as is. It will need to be recommissioned if the buyer plans to actually ride this beast.

In 1981 the CB1100R won the New Zealand Castrol Six Hour ridden by Australian pair of Malcolm Campbell and Mick Cole. The CB1100R won the premier Australian production race in 1982, the Castrol Six Hour in the hands of future 1987 500cc GP World Champion Wayne Gardner and team mate Wayne Clark. Other CB1100Rs finished the race 2nd, 3rd and 4th, with 6 CB11000Rs finishing in the top 8 spots. The Australasian success of the CB1100R lead directly to the development of the Suzuki GSX1100SXZ Katana homologation racing specials.

The model designations are CB1100RB (1981), CB1100RC (1982), and CB1100RD (1983). In 1981, 1050 units were sold, followed by 1500 per year in 1982 and 1983. The 1981 “RB” was half faired with a solo seat only. The 82 and 83 models have different bodywork including a full fairing, aluminum fuel tank, and pillion seat covered with a removable seat cowl. The 82 (RC) and 83 (RD) (pictured) were largely similar with differences in paint scheme, rear swing arm and front fork design. In 1983 the Honda CB1100F was launched that essentially was a blend of the CB1100R and the CB900F, for a broader market. The 1981 CB1100RB had a claimed 115 hp (86 kW) @ 9000 rpm.

The CB1100R won big races across the globe under a series of big names, most notable 500cc GP World Champion Wayne Gardner. The bike is listed at $15,000, and you can contact Pete with your interest here: email bocco1@optonline.net and phone number 1-203-515-5146

Featured Listing: 1982 Honda CB1100R
Ducati January 4, 2018 posted by

WSBK Ready: Race-prepped 2012 Ducati 1199 Panigale

Before this 2012 Ducati 1199 Panigale turned a wheel in anger, it was stripped of its street parts, taken down to its bones and rebuilt as a track weapon the likes of which few people will ever have the fortune to sample. Every inch of the bike has seen some sort of work or other, consuming $80,000 along the way.

2012 Ducati 1199 Panigale for sale on eBay

The seller claims the result is a superbike-spec ride that pushes out 220 horsepower through a Superstock-spec Termignoni exhaust and rolls on custom Ohlins suspension bits. A dream team roster of Ducati techs from across the country turned wrenches to produce the bike listed here.

The engine work alone reportedly ran $17,000, and included Carillo rods, head work a thin head gasket and a balanced crank. The fork is a giant 53 mm Marzocchi unit running Ohlins internals, while the shock is a computer-controlled Ohlins TTX MKII. This is where we would normally let the seller speak for themselves, but the description of this bike is part of one of the pictures, so see the gallery below for the full laundry list of parts and modifications.

With the V4 Panigale on its way, $20,000 might seem like a lot for a 220-horsepower Ducati, but keep in mind: The full-bore 2018 Ducati Panigale V4 Speziale is expected to run close to $40,000.

 

WSBK Ready: Race-prepped 2012 Ducati 1199 Panigale
Honda December 30, 2017 posted by

Jersey-Titled Vee Four: 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30 for Sale

Prices of the RC30 have gone through the roof, and enthusiasts who want a taste of Honda's homologation specials have been forced to go elsewhere. Luckily, the less-desirable, less cubically-endowed, and equally exotic VFR400R NC30 manages to provide many of the qualities of its larger sibling at a greatly reduced cost. At a glance, it's pretty hard to tell the RC30 and the NC30 apart anyway, as both feature very similar styling with those distinctive twin round headlamps and the distinctive Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm. It's just as tasty under the skin, as both the 750cc RC30 and the 400cc NC30 are powered by V4s with gear-driven cams and 360° "big bang" crankshafts that gave the bikes a distinctive noise and a wide, accessible powerband that made them easy to fully exploit on road or track.

The NC30 had impressive handling to match it's bigger-engined brother, and although power was down compared to the RC30, so was weight: the NC30 clocked in at a claimed 313lbs dry versus 400lbs, and the little 400cc machine had a top speed of 130mph, a pretty impressive achievement. Sure, the NC30 only makes 59hp, but handling is the name of the game here, and revving the nuts off a bike to make good progress on a fast road is much more fun than loafing with the throttle barely cracked for fear of catapulting yourself into the weeds riding a 200hp liter bike.

Prices for the smaller V4 machine have increased significantly over the past few years, but examples like this very clean Honda VFR400R show that good deals are still available for the cost of a used R6. Keep in mind that these are all grey market imports here in the US: some have sneaked in from Canada, and more have been brought over from Japan in recent years. But a valid title, especially from a state with more stringent requirements like New Jersey as is the case here, adds plenty of value for anyone who actually wants to ride their little homologation specials on the road.

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Honda VFR400R for Sale

1992 Honda VFR 400 NC30 with 24449 miles. It will come with a clean New Jersey State title. Full maintenance service was performed including carb rebuild, new fork seals, new ngk ER9EH spark plugs, Motul Motocool coolant, motul brake fluid, Motul 300V oil, hiflo filter and new set of Michelin PRD3 tires. I also had the wheels and fork legs powder coated. Bike does have some minor scuffs all over from years of service. Fairings are all OEM but does have some scratches and fading on front fender. This bike is solid and ready to go! Please refer to the High Resolution pics attached.   

Bidding is slow so far, and up to just over $2,000, with a Buy It Now price of $7,800 that still seems like a relative bargain. That funky 18" rear hoop might make things a bit more difficult when the time comes to fit new tires. Fortunately, an increase in the popularity of classic racing means there have been more options recently, since a number of the late 1980s two-strokes share the 17" front and 18" rear combination seen here. Aside from a few scuffs and scrapes, this appears to be in very nice condition, the the seller is obviously an enthusiast.

-tad

Jersey-Titled Vee Four: 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30 for Sale
Honda December 11, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Honda VF1000R

Update 12.19.2017: eBay shows this bike has sold for $5k. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Built to celebrate Honda's AMA F1 and Daytona 200 successes in the early to mid-'80s, the Honda VF1000R was bedecked with everything Honda's skunk works had bolted together for its racebikes, and made the kind of power that the F model could only dream about. The V4 had the same displacement and basic layout as the VF1000F, but that is where the similarities ended, the key difference being the R's gear-driven cams.

1986 Honda VF1000R for sale on eBay

The changes made it good for more than 10 horsepower over the F, but the special parts list meant the bike the better part of 100 pounds heavier than its stablemate. Still, it was among the more special bikes available in its day, especially from Japan, and all of Honda's wizardry meant the VF1000R held fastest production honors briefly.

This 1986 Honda VF1000R is in excellent condition for its age and sports a scant 4,122 miles. The low miles can be attributed to the bike having been stored for the last 26 years, and while many cosmetic pieces have been lightly repaired and repainted to account for that, the bike still is not perfect.

It has its share of blemishes from sitting and age, but none are serious. The carburetors have been cleaned, as have the fuel tank and fuel pump, and it has a new petcock, fuel lines, fuel filter, spark plugs and side cover gaskets. The bike runs, but its suspension has not been rebuilt and it wears original or very old tires, which would need to be changed if you're going to ride it.

From the seller:

All fluids have been changed with new filters installed.
New NGK plugs
Bike is running. Clutch, brakes and gearbox are in good condition and operate.
Starter clutch sticks a little when cold starting, once warmed up bike idles at 1000 rpm , heat cycles and fans operate. Revs fully to red line, no noises other than a beautiful cam gear drive whine these bikes are noted for.
Cold blooded starter.
Not a perfect bike, but a really nice example.
Clean title
4122 original miles.

Light cosmetic restoration.
A few issues with the bodywork were repaired, repainted and clear coated with PPG products, the body work was NOT stripped and redone. Great care was taken to preserve the original decals to keep the bike as authentic as possible.
95% of the bodywork fasteners have been replaced due to corrosion of the originals.
The fuel tank was cleaned inside, new Honda petcock, Motion Pro fuel lines, new needle valves in conjunction with a carb cleaning. New fuel filter and a cleaned fuel pump (original).
Original air filter.
Rebuilt starter.
Rebuilt clutch master, all new fluid.
Stainless steel lines (F/R brakes and Clutch line) that were on the bike since 1991 and show a little patina.
New chain on original chain wheels, old chain was unable to be salvaged, chain wheels looked new.
New gaskets for the stator and clutch covers.
New battery.
All electrical accessories work (horn, lights, blinkers).
Original Honda Exhaust.
All original reflectors and directionals.
Original seat and pad covers. Small tear in seat near solo cowl.

The motor has not been removed from the chassis.
Some fasteners have some patina.
Original Honda TRAC front fork and rear air suspension.
Rear shock has functioning cable adjuster, the shock HAS NOT been rebuilt.
Forks are original and have not been rebuilt. No leaks, dust seals look very good.
Tires are thought to be original and would need to be replaced before putting the bike on the road.

Low mile bike that is a great candidate for a full restoration.
I have limited the restoration to keep it as original as possible.
This bike can be taken to a higher level restoration for the right buyer, or, it would make a great addition to a collection as is.
If you intend to ride it, seriously consider upgrades to the rear suspension as the only parts available for a rebuild are the air seals.
Tires will need to be replaced, if riding it is in your plans.
If you are unable to effect these modifications, inquire.
$7500 or reasonable offer.
Located in Clermont, FL 34715.

The $7,500 asking price is upper echelon for these bikes, but the seller has made a strong effort here to keep the bike as original as possible while making sure it is mechanically sound. With just a little more work, the bike would make an excellent collectible that could still be ridden.

Featured Listing: 1986 Honda VF1000R
Sport Bikes For Sale December 2, 2017 posted by

Late Two-Stroke: 1995 Suzuki RGV250

The waning light of the two-stroke era really brought out the best Japan had to offer, with a spate of lightweight 250cc road racers with DOT concessions that would pull the front wheel more or less at will. Suzuki's RGV250 v-twin topped the heap, with prodigious power, decent reliability and years of development to keep it as rideable as such a bike can be. It's no surprise that these engines powered Aprilia's world-beating 250s Grand Prix bikes of the era.

1995 Suzuki RGV250 for sale on eBay

This 1995 Suzuki RGV250 Gamma is a South African-market bike, meaning it runs a de-restricted engine that pushes out the better part of 65 horsepower, almost none of which hits until about 7,000 RPM. The bike here is in impressive condition, and appears to be unchanged from stock.

The fairings show nicely, the stock expansion chambers are not rusty and the switchgear is clean.

From the eBay listing:

A great mint example of true collectors item.
This VJ22 has been kept in a private collection for the past eight years and has only done 1950 miles. The engine is as perfect as the day she left the factory.Tyres were replaced recently as the original factory tyres were starting to show signs of deterioration due to age.The factory original tool kit is included.
Worldwide shipping is available at competitive rates.
Shipping(insurance included) to all major ports in:
U.S. and Canada : $ 1 780
Europe : $ 1 550

Shipping from South Africa makes this RGV a steep proposition for anyone hoping to flip it, but as an addition to a collection or an occasional rider it's a nice mount.

Late Two-Stroke: 1995 Suzuki RGV250