Posts by tag: homologation special

Ducati April 30, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 2005 Ducati 749R #0074 with 774 miles !

Update 4.30.2018: Ted wanted to add that new timing belts and tires were installed this month at Hansen's BMW. -dc

Ducati doubled down on the World SuperSport series in 2003, hotting up their 999-styled 749 for the private team market. The modification rules were more restrictive in WSS than in SuperBike, compelling Ducati to make a very advanced -R available in the showroom. This example has turned only 774 miles with all the homolagation components plus a couple of nice upgrades.

Starting in the engine room, a more oversquare ( 94mm stroke x 54mm bore ) was used, combining with exotic materials in the rotating parts to make an easier-revving engine good for 121 hp.  High-strength aluminum pistons, titanium valve gear, lightweight crank, and magnesium valve covers were all on board, as well as a factory slipper clutch.  Continuing to the suspension, Öhlins are found all around ( including steering damper) and the box-section swingarm is shared with the 999R.  Though many of the small guards and covers are carbon, it plays less of a part than on the 2004 edition, the bodywork being presented in a high strength polymer.  The 2005 nose is a little less busy with only two openings for intake air, and the 749R came with a nice enduro length 18 liter fuel tank.  Adjustability is the key word, with seating position, foot pegs, steering head, and of course suspension set up for the rider.

The present owner added Sato rearsets and a Paulimoto clutch cover before putting just 774 miles on number 0074.  It has the gloss of a brand-new bike and appears undamaged by road or garage mishaps.  Regular RSBFS advertiser Automania says this about the 749R:

This bike, number 74 of at least 500 produced to meet FIM homologation regulations. Along with the retail cost of $21,995, the owner then opened up his wallet for a set of Sato Rear Set and a Paulimoto Vented Clutch Cover. The exhaust is stock Ducati, most likely the only stock muffler on a Ducati in the world.

What we have here on the showroom floor is one of the best handling Ducatis ever produced, renowned for it's super precise, nimble handling. Adjustable Steering Head rake angle, great top end power with Race Exhaust, quiet and smooth with Stock Exhaust. It has an amazing transmission, gorgeous body work with original paint. It is arguably the greatest middleweight twin ever made, fantastic fun as a street bike or track day bike. The best part is that coming from a private collection, showing 774 miles from new.

Of the several hundred 749R's made, many were sold to team owners, riders, and collectors, with relatively few ridden much.  The buyers got a nice package because of the competition rules, and likely to be a unicorn on the road.  As a track day machine, it's an immersive experience without advanced electronics.  The Terblanche design has gained popularity over the years and this 749S would continue to be a great show machine.  Automania's asking price is $10,595, and their own page on the bike is - here - .  They would be happy to discuss the possibilities on (541) 479-8888, or by email - here -.

 

Featured Listing – 2005 Ducati 749R #0074 with 774 miles !
Ducati April 19, 2018 posted by

Trick Track Toy: Low-Mileage 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale

To some, it might seem like sacrilege to take a gorgeous, expensive, limited-edition Ducati superbike and turn it into a trackday toy. But if you've got the money to spend on something you can afford to wreck and want the very best, you can't go wrong with today's Ducati 1098R track bike. Honestly, homologation-special Ducatis don't really make practical roadbikes anyway: their uncomfortable ergonomics, race-bred handling, and ridiculous power only makes sense in an unrestricted environment.

History I'm sure will be kind to the Terblanche-styled 999. But at the time, the successor to the storied 916 was a relative sales flop, in spite of it being better in virtually every way. Power was up, electronics were more sophisticated, and the solo seat models even offered adjustable ergonomics. Unfortunately, the restyle went just a bit too far for Ducati's conservative fan base, but Ducati quickly learned their lesson. The 1098 that followed was really Ducati walking back their radical mandate, at least in terms of styling. It's a good-looking bike, but obviously kind of derivative, which was really the whole point after all. It may be my least favorite Ducati superbike, but apparently I'm crazy because I know more than a few guys who love it unreservedly. And you can't argue with the performance: in ultimate, 1098R form seen here, the v-twin pumped out a claimed 180hp, a huge jump over the earlier bike.

A big bump in displacement certainly helped: the 1098R actually had a larger 1198cc engine to exploit the full displacement allowed by World Superbike regulations at the time, an interesting reversal of the more recent Panigale 1299R that displaces less for the same reason... Aside from the bump in displacement that resulted from a larger bore and shorter stroke, the R also used titanium valves and connecting rods to help the bike rev higher. And while the 180hp is basically the minimum required for entry into the literbike club these days, the massive 99 lb-ft of torque should be enough to widen eyes everywhere.

Possibly the most significant aspect of the 1098R, aside from its competition-derived engine, was a race kit exhaust and ECU "intended for off-road use only" that liberated an additional 9hp and also activated the revolutionary Ducati Traction Control system with 8 levels of adjustability. It was relatively crude, compared to today's systems, but was undeniably effective and was used on Ducati's MotoGP and WSBK machines of the time.

After all that, it's almost easy to overlook the bike's trick suspension that included an Öhlins TTX36 twin-tube shock at the rear and represented pretty much the very best roadgoing suspension money could buy at the time. Just 300 examples of the 1098R were imported to the US, priced at $40,000. This one is number 277 of a total 450 produced worldwide and has only 2,800 miles on it, although most of those have accumulated on closed courses, and track miles are kind of like dog years...

From the original eBay listing: 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale

ONLY 2,800 MILES

#277 of 450

THIS BABY IS BAD!

PLEASE UNDERSTAND THIS IS A TRACK BIKE, NOT A STREET BIKE

The 1098 R is the ultimate Superbike. The most advanced, most powerful twin-cylinder motorcycle ever built. It is the product of a team of designers and engineers focussed on one objective only – to win.

The ‘R’ is a race bike, pure and simple. Its competition specification and superior components together with advanced electronics and race-proven chassis technology deliver a level of performance that empowers you with confidence and capability. On the road, it distinguishes you as a connoisseur of high-performance motorcycles. On the track it promotes you to a higher level of riding and closer to realising your dreams.

World Superbike rule changes mean that the road-going ‘R’ version is closer than ever to our factory race bike. The 1098 R is not a replica – it’s the real deal. An incredible 180hp L-Twin Testastretta Evoluzione engine in a race-winning Trellis chassis set-up tips the scales at an unbelievably lightweight 165kg (364lbs) and comes with a race kit that introduces Ducati Corse’s world championship winning traction control system.

Once again, Ducati raises the bar and sets the world standard for sport bikes while turning the heads and racing the hearts of enthusiasts throughout the world.

The 1098 R – Built to Win

If you have a need for speed, then this is your answer. 

This motorcycle was bought stock from the Ducati Dealership in 2012 when it had only 331 miles. The previous owner has upgraded numerous parts over the past few of years. I do have most of the original parts here in a box. The bike does have a couple minor scratches and chips (most have been professionally touched-up). Normal wear items for a track bike. This 1098 has always been serviced at the Ducati Dealership. Please understand; THIS IS A TRACK BIKE, not a street bike. 

The Buy It Now price for this low-mileage, race-ready homologation special is a reasonable $19,995. That's less than other 1098Rs we've seen, but of course it's likely to see a harder life than most and that's going to make it less desirable to collectors. 180hp and primitive traction-control seen here might not sound all that impressive, in this age of the cornering-ABS-equipped, up-and-down quickshifter-ed, traction-controlled, 206hp at-the-wheel Panigale 1299R Final Editions. But this 1098R most definitely is a very significant and collectible homologation-special Ducati from the dawn of the Electronics Era, when rider aids shifted [see what I did there?] from simply improving safety to making riders faster. If you've got the cash to splash, this is a pretty cool way to get your trackday kicks, and a race track actually seems a more appropriate place for a 1098R than collecting dust in some collection.

-tad

Trick Track Toy: Low-Mileage 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale
Ducati March 12, 2018 posted by

Live from Hollywood – 2005 Ducati 999R

Long ago when V-twin Superbikes made do with a mere liter, Ducati made a smashing revision to the 916 series.  Like some other revolutions, it was voted down - but the monoposto 999R is the apex of the short-lived Tamburini design.

2005 Ducati 999R for sale on eBay

 

Ducati produced just 200 of the R-spec for homologation purposes, and while not quite race-prepared, they had the equipment that the WSBK team wanted to be able to use.  For the 999R, that meant a slightly different engine with revised heads and a lot of titanium, resulting in 150 hp at a low 9,750 rpm, and a flat torque curve.  Headstock angle is adjustable, as is the seat console position.  Öhlins are found front and rear, fully adjustable with revised valving and nitride-treated fork legs.  Clutches were "free" or unconstrained by the rule book, so the factory was not compelled to add a slipper clutch, though the big twin calls for one.

 

Looking very stock and showing just under 10,000 miles, this 999R is apparently in the care of a specialty dealer in Florida.  Maybe not subject to the endless polishing and re-farkeling it would get at home, but very good shape with only one scrape, though how it got there without a lot of collateral damage is a mystery.  From the eBay auction:

This motorcycle is in excellent condition, and has been cared for properly since day one. Starts runs and drives perfectly. 2005 was the first year of the deep sump 999R 150HP motor, and big swing arm. The previous year came with a weaker motor, and less robust swing arm. It also has the full carbon bodywork.
There are a few tiny scratches, and a small bit of road rash on the underside of the belly fairing, but overall it is in amazing condition.

 

The base 999 has a lot of awe-inspiring details, and the -R has them as well, but executed in carbon or forged alloy, and often adjustable.  But turning some of these knobs requires some expert knowledge, besides open track time and a mechanic or two.  Like winning the lottery, it would be fun to give it a go.  Not sure if there is a "starter" 999R, but this might be it - ready for a valve adjustment, new rubber, a little paint work, and maybe a personalizing update or two.  The Make Offer button beckons...

-donn

Live from Hollywood – 2005 Ducati 999R
Yamaha October 14, 2017 posted by

Extreme-ly LE – 1989 Yamaha FZR750R / OW01 with 1277 Miles !

An iconic product of the WSBK race series, the Yamaha FZR-750R or OW01 was an homologation special which sold for more than twice what a more streetable FZR-1000 fetched, and cost Yamaha zillions.  Rather than a tarted-up road machine, Yamaha built the race bike - poorly suited for the road actually - equipped it for DOT inspection, and sold it to race teams and collectors.  Pre-owned by the latter, this OW01 was imported but never registered, and has been ridden only 1277 miles.

1989 Yamaha FZR750R for sale on eBay

Yamaha was playing a little catch-up after the first WSBK season, and prepared the FZR750R for 1989 year.  Based on a proper race engine, the OW01 has Yamaha's signature 5-valve heads, titanium connecting rods, and low-friction pistons with short skirts and only two rings.  Their EXUP exhaust valve adjusts exhaust flow and improves running outside of the 9,000-12,000 powerband.  The light alloy DeltaBox frame is thin but wide, capped by an aluminum fuel tank.  43mm conventional forks lead an Ohlins monoshock, and 4-piston Nissin brakes are up front.  Riding position in the full endurance fairing is uncompromising.

This Oregon owner has been a fine caretaker of #427, with no apparent wear or damage.  Even the footpegs are pictured, virtually unmarked.  It's without a stateside title, but some preparation for registration has been done.  From the eBay auction:

Out of the crate this is part of what you got for your money.

1.       Titanium con rods with light weight, short-skirt, stepped-top pistons.
2.       Hand polished ports on a big 5 valve head.
3.       Handmade aluminum fuel tank and handmade aluminum Delta box frame, etc.
4.       Huge magnesium Nissin racing calipers and 320 mm discs provide race quality stopping power.
5.       More magnesium parts to reduce weight.
6.       Quick release axle clamps.
7.       Light weight fiber cowling/fairing.
8.       Close ratio 6 speed gears.
9.       Ohlins adjustable rear shock.
10.     43 mm forks with full range of adjustment.

The OWO1 has the perfect balance of light weight, agility and power. The OWO1 represents one of the best handling and most exclusive Japanese sport bikes of the era and in my opinion, is one of the sexiest looking motorcycle design ever to come out of Japan.

Now about my 1989 OWO1 #000427

This a Japanese domestic model OWO1 with 1277 miles/2044 kilometers. Mileage and initial registration is documented on the Japanese vehicle registration form (shaken-sho). The Japanese shaken-sho is up-dated every two years through a physical vehicle inspection by the Japanese DMV.

This OWO1 is guaranteed to have never been raced. It is a beautiful motorcycle that is 100% stock except for two things. The original owner changed the single horn to a dual horn set-up for safety reasons. He also added a little more heat shielding to protect the light weight fiber cowling/fairing.

This bike has never been registered here in the U.S. You will receive the following from me after purchase so that you can register the bike.

  1.   (CBP form 7501(04/05). This form tells the DMV that customs has been cleared and the bike is ready to be registered.
  2.   A bill of sale
  3.   Because this bike is over 25 years old no EPA or DOT documents are necessary for registration.

This bike has been in storage for a while, so I have done the following before the sale. I have put in a new battery, changed the oil, filter, coolant, brake fluid, and spark plugs.

This OWO1 is extremely rare and beautiful. It is very hard to find one in this kind of condition. But, please keep in mind that it is not a new motorcycle so there are some minor blemishes.

Most OW01's went racing, with a dealer's team or privateers, and a factory race kit which added a few thousand to the already astronomical price.  Finding an almost un-used FZR750R has become a odyssey for some, since only a few hundred were made each year.  Though it never resulted in a championship, the OW01 made a healthy mark on WSBK, and under Carl Forgarty held the absolute lap record at the Isle of Man TT for many years.  From an era when factories' engineering chops could be seen and felt, fans speak reverently of discovering the little-known secrets of the OW01...

-donn

Extreme-ly LE – 1989 Yamaha FZR750R / OW01 with 1277 Miles !
Suzuki September 26, 2017 posted by

JDM Gixxer: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition

Honda's famed RC30 was basically designed from the ground up for competition, and seemingly only sold to the public to satisfy production-based racing requirements. That's one way to go about it, but if you don't have Honda's practically endless resources, how do you create a machine that will help your racers to compete at the top levels of production-based racing? You build something like this Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition. In recent years, "Limited Edition" has come to refer to things like luxury trim packages for Toyota Corollas, somewhat watering down the cachet of the term. But in this case, it was truth in advertising, with just a few hundred made to satisfy the regulations.

The regular GSX-R was already a pretty impressive machine and, considering that the Limited Edition was the most expensive Japanese sportbike of 1986, you'd be forgiven for thinking that the performance of this rare and exotic version is underwhelming. But the changes were designed to allow their inclusion on race machines, not make for a better roadbike. The LE was just six pounds lighter than the standard bike, most likely a result of the fiberglass solo-seat tail section. Power was very similar as well, since the engine internals were virtually identical to the stock GSX-R750, and flat-slide carburetors are great for producing maximum power, but they're not really suited to everyday use. Fortunately, the LE's lightweight vented dry clutch should produce enough rattle to drown out the supposedly noisy carburetor slides... Aside from those notable and very expensive upgrades, the bike also featured a revised swingarm for improved stability and the electronic, anti-dive forks from the GSX-R1100, although I wonder if many race teams actually used those. Photos of our recent GSX-R AMA Superbike suggest that at least some of them did...

So out of the box it didn't necessarily perform any better than a stock bike, and was hideously expensive. But honestly, most manufacturers of homologation specials probably weren't too concerned about selling them: I'm pretty sure the rules only required that they build the required machines, so if they sat in showrooms for a few years, manufacturers wouldn't lose any sleep over it. Collectors and enthusiasts with the money to buy them still did so, regardless of cost, but the main goal was to get the right parts legalized for the racers.

From the original Craigslist Post: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition for Sale

1986 GSXR-750 Limited Edition in Japanese Domestic Model Specification
Suzuki only produced 500 units world wide of the GSXR750 Limited Edition

The bike is imported from Japan.
Not registered yet in the U.S.
This bike is sold without title. (NO TITLE)

Start engine! Runs well
Flat slide carburetors
Dry clutch
Original FRP rear seat cowl

24,374 km (15,145 miles)
Engine Number R705-125561

$13,800

The last Limited Edition GSX-R750 we featured on the site was also a Japanese import in similar colors that were intended to celebrate Suzuki's success at the 8 Hours of Suzuka, but this appears to be a different bike entirely. First-generation "Slabbie" Gixxers are already increasing in value, and nice Limited Editions are starting to command premium dollars. The lack of a title could prove to be a hassle, but many people considering a purchase will be looking to collect or display, not actually ride it, so that may not be all that much a problem. The $13,800 asking price seems in line with recent LE prices, but I wonder if the lack of title will have any impact on its value.

-tad

Ducati June 6, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 2001 Ducati 996 SPS for Sale

7.28.2017: Sold to an RSBFS reader in Mexico! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

6.6.2017: Price drop to $12,495! Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

It's sometimes hard to get excited about the bike often referred to as "Tamburini's Masterpiece" these days: the 916 and its derivatives have appeared in countless forms in popular culture, everything from big-budget feature films to bedroom wall posters, where they're often depicted straddled by young ladies in outfits that would provide shockingly little crash protection. It doesn't help that Ducati made them for nearly a decade, in different displacements and levels of specification, from affordable road-going exotica like the base model 748 all the way up to over-the-counter race bikes designed to be competitive right out of the crate. But they all had the same DNA, and in most cases are just a few simple, but possibly very expensive, changes away from being real track and back-road weapons. Of course, some of them were just a bit more gifted from the factory in that regard, like today's Featured Listing, a Ducati 996 SPS.

2001 Ducati 996 SPS for sale AutoMania GP

Ducati have racing in their blood, and for many years it seemed like they were only selling their roadbikes as a way to pay for racing. Surely there can be no other justification for the inhumane ergonomics of Tamburini's creations. It's pretty clear they were designed from the off as competition motorcycles: the entire tail of the 916 flips up easily for access to the electronics, quick-release Dzus fasteners attach the bodywork, and early bikes didn't even have a provision for a passenger. The 851/888 that preceded it might have been slightly more practical roadbikes and were successful in World Superbike competition, but there's no denying that the 916 is a gorgeous machine that still looks incredible twenty years later. The 916 and the 996 and 998 that followed appear virtually identical at first, but represent a gradual evolution under the skin: frames were revised to allow different airboxes and adjustable steering heads, injection systems were improved, heads were revised, and deeper sumps were added.

The SPS or Sport Production Special as seen here was originally the top-of-the-line roadgoing 996, with lightweight Marchesini wheels, an adjustable steering head, and an uprated engine, although straight-line performance wasn't all that much improved. Cornering was a different story, as the year 2000 saw the addition of Öhlins suspension at the front and rear. 124hp might not sound that impressive compared to many of today's superbikes, but keep in mind that they are only really rideable because of sophisticated traction control systems that keep 200hp missiles like the Panigale from high-siding you into the treeline the first time you exit a corner and whack open the throttle to the stop. When new, the SPS was state-of-the-art Italian exotica, one of the fastest, best-handling bikes available at any price.

From the Seller: 2001 Ducati 996SPS for Sale

Mileage: 4,330 U.S. miles
VIN#: ZDM3H99S51B003808

One of the joys and dangers of being a motorcycle dealer is that you can buy and own anything that is offered by your franchise factory line to which they throw in stupefying financing with decades to pay it off. It becomes one of those almost addictive behaviors that for the most part society frowns upon except when it is for really nice stuff. Like a rare and exclusive motorcycle such as the 2001 Ducati 996SPS you see here. Not only that, because you have access to all of the trick goodies and parts that are offered for the model, you can add them to the package, making your bike even more ultimate and personal.

As part of the homologation process to race World Super Bike, the motorcycle was designed by Tamburini (also of MV fame) as the latest evolution of the 916SPS range of the water cooled, 4V 90 degree twins. Suspension was upgraded with full Ohlin’s front and rear along with thinner and larger tube diameters used in the frame for this track only motorcycle The engine was treated to titanium connecting rods, carbon fiber air box, P8 ECU, specific cam, higher compression heads, all hand assembled by Ducati putting out an additional 14 horse power over the same engine sized 916 SPS.

Hansen’s BMW Ducati was a dyed in the wool Ducati fanatic dealership, loved the bikes, loved the customers, loved everything about the bikes, the passion they exuded, the Italian design, everything about the line. This 996SPS, #1714, was the ultimate expression of Ducati in 2001 and the owners of the shop decided that they deserved to experience the bike as their own. Darn right! Being a fairly accomplished rider and ex-racer, the owner knew what parts could be added to enhance the performance and handling, especially where there were no irritating limits such as a budget.

First off, body work was ordered to allow street legal lighting including the nose cone holding the head light buckets. ASR runners allowing turn signal mounts and a larger, stronger front fender installed. Cycle Cat supplied the Side Stand, Rear Sets, Handle Bars, Triple Clamp and Frame sliders. Billet Mirrors, Turn Signals, Clutch Cover, Gas Cap and Sprocket Cover were added for their go fast values. Radial Adapters were placed between the upgraded Road and Track Öhlins front forks and the Brembo Calipers sliding past Brembo Floating Rotors. At the rear, a Titanium Rear Spring was added to the Öhlins Shock along with the Öhlins Steering Damper. At both ends, BST Carbon Fiber Wheels were spooled on along with a STM Slipper Clutch to control rear wheel hop during deceleration. The front brake is operated by a Brembo Radial Master Brake Cylinder matched by a Brembo Radial Master Clutch Cylinder on the other handle bar.

There was an early issue when the bikes were new with the rocker arms flaking off bits of material. As a preventive measure that only a dealer could pull off, all of the arms were replaced with the corrected part when the issue was first announced.

Within the past twelve months, the valves were checked, belts replaced and all fluids refreshed including engine, brakes and clutch. Internal Fuel Lines along with O-Rings were also replaced (we have a copy of the work order). The battery is almost new. Unfortunately many of the stock parts a have been misplaced. Among the parts that will come with the bike are the stock exhaust system and the upper triple plate number which has the “1714” number on it.

The selling price is $14,995 $12,495. Contact Ted for further details: ted@automaniagp.com

$14,995 is a big number for a Ducati 996. But for an SPS with some of the very best parts and tuning thrown at it? You'd obviously not be able to duplicate this machine for anywhere near that, so the price seems very reasonable. Some might bemoan the compromise in collectiblity that comes with the changes, but all the replacement parts are of high quality and are designed to improve the bike's performance and handling. The cosmetic changes might not be to everyone's taste, but are easy to change with original parts or different aftermarket bits to suit the new owner's preferences.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2001 Ducati 996 SPS for Sale