Posts by tag: GSX1100

Sport Bikes For Sale April 9, 2018 posted by

Bonhams Spring Stafford Sale – April 21st!

For those lucky enough to be in attendance at the Staffordshire County Showgrounds in Stratford, UK, there will be an amazing collection of motorcycles passing over the auction block courtesy of Bonhams. But fear not: you need not be in attendance in order to participate in the auction. And just so you don't miss out on any of the key lots going up for sale, RSBFS is here to help you navigate through the drool-worthy articles on hand. Register early, and bid with confidence!

For the rest of us, let us know what you think of the sale and estimates in the comments below.

- RSBFS Team

1998 Ducati 916 SPS - This 4,000 mile machine has a Bonhams estimate of $21,000 - $27,000 USD

1990 Ducati 851 SP2 by NCR - Never been raced, but chock full of NCR parts. Bonhams estimate: US $39,000 - $49,000 USD

1989 Honda VFR750R Type RC30 - this works Honda is an Isle of Man TT and Macau Grand Prix veteran. Bonhams estimate: US$ 35,000 - 49,000

1987 Ducati 851 - Alan Cathcart's personal machine since new, this tri colore beauty has a Bonhams estimate of $49,000 - $63,000 USD

1998 Ducati 916 Senna III - This low mileage 916 is number 281 of 300. Bonhams estimate: $14,000 - $17,000 USD

1998 Ducati 916 SPS - With a documented history (including complete engine rebuild) this SPS has a Bonhams estimate of $18,000 - $24,000 USD.

1999 Ducati 996 SPS2 - Only 150 examples of this Euro-spec model were built. Bonhams estimate: $13,000 - $17,000 USD

1986 Ducati 400 F3 - With only 327 kilometers showing, this late Cagiva-era Ducati has a Bonhams estimate of $5,600 - $8,400.

2000 MV Agusta 750cc F4 S - This '1+1' Biposto example of the astounding F4 lineup has a Bonhams estimate of $9,800 - 13,000.

1990 Suzuki GSX-R750L 'Slingshot' - Presented as virtually new after an extensive restoration, this bike will be sold at No Reserve. Bonhmas estimate: $4,900 - 6,300.

1988 Honda VFR400R Type NC21 - A rare oddity in the US, this baby RC30 shows approximately 23,000 miles. Bonhams estimate: $3,100 - $3,900

1978 BMW 980cc R100RS 'Krauser' - Though rather high mileage at 80k+, this looks well looked after. Bonhams estimate: US$ 7,100 - 11,000

1971 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport 'Telaio Rosso' - Recently restored, previous magazine tester. Bonhams estimate: US$ 34,000 - 42,000

1976 Ducati 900SS - Used in the late 70's in amateur racing, it was later returned to road duty but includes many spares. Bonhams estimate: US$ 35,000 - 45,000

1977 Benelli 750cc Sei - odometer shows 13k KMs, includes receipts. Bonhams estimate: US$ 11,000 - 17,000

1979 Honda CBX1000Z - Imported to the UK via Canada in 1982. Includes receipts and Delkevic exhaust system. Bonhams estimate: US$ 14,000 - 20,000

1983 Suzuki GSX1100 Katana - Shows nearly 25k miles and includes some receipts. Bonhams estimate: US$ 7,100 - 11,000

1979 Suzuki GS1000 - No mention of Wes Cooley, is it a clone? Bonhams estimate: US$ 6,400 - 9,200

1970 Clymer Münch 1,177cc TTS 'Mammoth' - One of the featured lots of the Stafford auction. Completely restored. Bonhams estimate: US$ 110,000 - 140,000

1973 MV Agusta 750S - Another featured lot at the Stafford sale and noted as one of the most desirable of post-war motorcycles. Bonhams estimate: US$ 99,000 - 130,000

1957 F.B. Mondial 250cc DOHC Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle - World Championship and Isle of Man TT-winning motorcycle of great historical and technical interest. Offered with assorted correspondence relating to its provenance. Bonhams estimate: US$ 110,000 - 170,000

Honda 250cc RC163 Grand Prix Replica - The 250cc inline four gem was a championship winner, this replica is suitable for parades or vintage racing.  Bonham's estimate: $20,000 - $25,000

1974 AMF Harley-Davidson 250cc Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle - This Aermacchi-designed two-stroke is unrestored and was in the stable of the Cesena Motorcycle Club before being on display at the Rimini Motorcycle museum for the past 30 years.  Bonham's estimate - $17,000 - $21,000

Bonhams Spring Stafford Sale – April 21st!
Bimota September 14, 2017 posted by

Even Rarer than Rare: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale

You'd think that, with just 272 built during its run, the SB4 would be as rare as it gets for a production motorcycle. But no: Bimota actually offered an even rarer version of their Suzuki-powered race-bred machine, the even more limited-production-y SB4S. Just 34 of these thoroughbred machines were factory-built, with another 72 sold in kit form. That's right: Bimota used to make build-your-own superbikes!

These days, Bimota makes moto-jewelry, high-end fashion accessories that just happen to be incredibly fast motorcycles. But their creations used to be some of the fastest, best handling motorcycles available at any price. Unfortunately, modern manufacturers' products are not only reliable, but offer handling and refinement Bimota can't hope to significantly better, considering their limited resources. So modern Bimotas offer an unmatched level of craftsmanship and exclusivity, but minimal performance advantages, compared to the motorcycles that donate their engines and transmissions. But that wasn't always the case, and bikes like the SB4 are the perfect example of what Bimota did to earn their respected place in motorcycling history.

The rugged, air-cooled Suzuki engine that powered the SB4 displaced 1075cc and came equipped with four valves per cylinder, along with their TSCC or "Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber" technology that improved combustion efficiency. It made plenty of power, so Bimota left it largely stock. Instead, the Bimota's performance advantage came from improved suspension and much lighter weight: the SB4 shed almost 140lbs off the Suzuki's 535lb dry weight. The lightweight, one-piece tank and tail is attached by just a few bolts, and can be easily removed for maintenance.

The frame is a masterpiece, and a major contributor to the bike's improved handling. A hybrid construction of chrome-moly tubing with gorgeous machined aluminum side plates, it's a shame it's mostly hidden in the photographs. Wheels were modular 16" and fitted with radial tires, which were a relative rarity at the time.

So what made the SB4S more exclusive than the regular, pedestrian SB4? Well supposedly we'd be looking at a four-into-one exhaust, although this bike seems to have the regular SB4's dual exhaust. The S should also have an oil-cooler as well, but it's hidden behind the fairing in the pictures, if indeed it is present. This machine also features some pretty ugly turn signals fitted to the fairing, which is unfortunate as the stock bike would originally have had none. Not very safe, but much nicer-looking. Given the dual exhaust, I'm not even sure if this is actually an SB4S, so I'd be happy to get any input from any knowledgeable readers. Either way, it's still a very rare and exclusive Bimota, and bidding is pretty active, with several days left on the auction.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale

1994 Bimota SB4S, mint condition, very rare and beautiful, pearl paint, Campagnolo wheels, no issues, we at buyer's expense can ship worldwide.

As always, I'd like a bit more information about this motorcycle in terms of maintenance and history. It's a bit dusty in the photos, and it'd also inspire more confidence if the seller got the year right: it's listed as a 1994 model but I'm pretty sure Bimota, in spite of a pretty weird production history, wasn't still making the SB4 in 1994...  At the end of the day, a mechanical restoration shouldn't be too hard, as long as the frame, suspension, and bodywork are all intact, since the Bimotas of the era used many components, including the gauges and switchgear, from the donor Suzuki GSX1100.

-tad