Posts by tag: Genesis

Yamaha March 14, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Update 3.14.2018: Turns out this one sold faster than we could post it. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

A modern literbike is a relatively peaky beast: chasing horsepower without increasing displacement means ever-higher revs are required, and a six-speed box makes sense. It's telling that bikes like today's Featured Listing Yamaha's FZR1000, one of the cutting-edgy-ist sportbikes of its day, made do with just five and could still be considered fast now. Six-speed gearboxes had become the norm for motorcycles by the late 1980s, unless you were looking at cruisers, touring machines, or big-bore sportbikes. Why? Well, narrow, peaky powerbands require more gears to effectively exploit and the big-inch engines of the aforementioned six-speed exceptions had enough flexibility and torque to make them window-dressing: an extra gear just wasn't needed.

Considering that Yamaha's FZR1000 makes just 20 more claimed horses and weighs nearly 40 pounds more than a modern R6, you might think that these old-school machines would be no match for even a much smaller machine from today. But it's the 79 ft-lbs of torque from the FZR that makes it so effective: a modern literbike like the BMW S1000RR makes just a few more foot-pounds. So how did they do it? Well the GSX-R1100 obviously benefited from a few more cubes, but the smaller 1002cc FZR1000 combined Yamaha's five-valve Genesis head with their EXUP or "Exhaust Ultimate Power" valve to provide both low-end torque and high-end power.

Five-valve heads have pretty much disappeared these days, the theoretical advantages proving insufficient to outweigh the additional complexity required, but EXUP-style exhaust valves are ubiquitous, now that Yamaha's patents have expired, allowing other manufacturers to take advantage. By the late 1980s, servo-operated "power valves" were common on two-strokes, but this was the very first use of the technology in a four-stroke, and the result was a very flexible engine with a 170mph top speed.

Introduced in 1987, the 1989 redesign seen here looked similar, but included updates to the frame and engine: the original had a 989cc engine bumped to 1002cc and rotated backwards in the Deltabox frame for a shorter wheelbase. Later, the bike adopted a single headlight design to help modernize it, but you can't go wrong with a pair of big, round lamps. As you'd expect, performance and in particular handling improved throughout the bike's lifespan, but this particular model strikes a nice balance between classic superbike styling and the better performance and handling of the redesigned bike. I happen to prefer the looks of the earlier machines: the single-headlight version does look pretty sharp, but it just doesn't have the old-school round-lamp charm.

From the Seller: 1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

For being 28 years old the bike looks and runs awesome! It has less than 18k original miles, has never been dropped and has only a few minor cracks around the fairing mounting areas from the tightening of the bolts, which is normal for these older more brittle plastics (see near bolts in pics attached).

The 1989 version, crowned the "Bike of the Decade" by Cycle World, had 0-60 acceleration of 2.9 seconds, and a top speed of over 167 mph. I purchased one of these brand new in Miami Fl in 1989. I got on it and rode that bike all the way the Newline Vermont, 1460 miles in two days. It was a amazing adventure and the bike never missed a beat ripping off 700+ mile days with ease. This is truly a sports cruiser rather than a rep-racer R1. This particular dual headlight model was only produced one year, Yamaha went to the single (ugly) headlight in 1990. Anyway buy this unit, gas it up and head to for the opposite coast! We can deliver this bike anywhere in the United States for $500 enclosed and insured.

A few notes about the bike:

  • The bike was owned by 1 famous owner from new until when I bought it three years ago. It was a famous biker from the publishing world who collects bikes (Forbes magazine) and the bike was in Palm Beach all of its life until I got it. I have a copy of the title with his info on it that I can provide.
  • The bike was purchased from him for $4,500 and needed some TLC.
  • The bike had extensive work done to get the bike all up to modern running equipment. I spent over $4,500... All well documented (will provide) at Fast by Ferracci.
  • I also had a GPR slip-on imported from Italy (over $500) and it sounds awesome!
  • The carbs were also completely rebuilt, last summer 2016, and has all new gaskets - the engine runs amazingly well!
  • We over $9,500 invested in the bike. Went way overboard in its preparation. My loss, your happy smiles!

This does seem to be the version collectors will want, and in just a few years you may be kicking yourself for not taking advantage of the seller's $5,500 asking price. There are some minor cosmetic imperfections, small cracks and the like, but these are clearly documented and not unexpected on a Japanese bike from the 1980s: paint and finish were generally of a lower standard than on European bikes and they often age poorly, even when well-maintained and sparingly used. Luckily, the major servicing headaches have been taken care of and the bike is reportedly mechanically sound, meaning that this should be a great candidate for a rolling restoration, since collectors will likely want to replace that lighter, but non-original exhaust can and take care of the blemishes.


Featured Listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale
Yamaha February 23, 2018 posted by

Urban Camo – 1994 Yamaha YZF750R

Descendant of Yamaha's OW01 homologation special, the YZF-750R was a vaunted endurance racer in race trim, and a two-time Bike of the Year winner in the mid-90's.  A victim of the displacement arms race and an aging platform, the Yamaha 750 lasted only a few years.  This YZF might be a little rough around the edges but has great potential.

1994 Yamaha YZF750R for sale on eBay

The five-valve Genesis head was used on the YZF-750R, pushing 125 hp, with the EXUP exhaust valve helping broaden the curve for the 59 ft-lbs. torque.  The quick-handling chassis was complemented by 41mm upside-down forks and slowed with six-piston calipers over 320mm disks.  Full bodywork has an aggressive stance and room for a co-rider.

Resident of sunny California, this YZF appears to be complete, with mandatory rear fender-ectomy, turn signal change and smaller muffler.  Pictures need more resolution but this bike may be Öhlins equipped, and only minor scuffs are apparent.  From the eBay auction:

29,000 miles
carbs recently rebuilt, may need to be adjusted
starts and runs

a few other items of interest:
MSRP of $10,500 back in 1994.
inverted forks
6 piston calipers
26,000 mile valve adjustment intervals
Genesis 5 valve head
1995 bike of the year for SportRider
1994 bike of the year for Cycle World
only real contender against the Ducati 916 in those years

The Yamaha had a great combination of handling, power, torque, and brakes, and a number are seen with significant miles.  Build quality was second only to Honda and got demerits for just the 432 lbs. dry weight and notchy transmission.  Though better photos and history would help a serious bidder, it's a no reserve auction and might be right for a knowledgeable fan of the model...


Urban Camo – 1994 Yamaha YZF750R
Yamaha December 29, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Yamaha FZR400

When it comes to imports, the 400cc welterweight class is the gem of the grey market set. With decent power at stratospheric redlines, these lighter, smaller sport bikes can run rings around middleweights (and even the big bikes) when the going gets tight. Sized for normal people, one need not be a practitioner of human origami in order to fit. Rare in the United States, yet more reliable than the buzzier two strokes that receive the lion's share of import press coverage, every stable should house at least one of these 400cc scalpels. And this Japanese home market 1WG model FZR400 in super rare blue might just be the one you need.

Unlike the rest of the Big Four, Yamaha actually imported the 400cc four stroke 1WG model into the US. US bikes began with 1988 the model year, although they were otherwise identical to the 1WG spec of the earlier Japanese models (the EXUP exhaust valve being a mandatory EPA fitment for CA bikes). US bikes showcased the red/white livery of Yamaha racing, and by the close of 1989 the party was pretty much over stateside. Often derided as the most common of the 400cc offerings, the FZR did offer real performance: Genesis DNA is evident in the engine configuration; liquid cooled cylinders tilted at an extreme angle to aid weight distribution, the four valve heads, four carbs with straight shots into the intake ports, and the four into one performance exhaust. On the chassis side, an aluminum "Delta Box" perimeter frame showcased the sporting intent of this model. If you didn't know better, you could easily mistake a naked FZR400 for a FZR600 or 1000. These are not starter bikes or toys - these are very capable road and track motorcycles that come by their reputation honestly.

From the seller:
1986 Yamaha FZR400 1WG.
Bike is minty. Rarer color. JDM bike. All fairings and components are 100% genuine
factory Yamaha. Bike is 100% stock. I have freshened it up a bit. I have replaced
the front master cylinder with new OEM. Engine covers (caps) have been replaced with
new OEM. New fuel petcock. New fork seals, new battery and new engine fluids. All
fairings, exhaust, and components not mentioned are original to the bike. No rust in
the tank. Runs and rides like new. Will install a new set of tires for the right
customer. Comes with Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use.

Asking $6900
Email Gary for details:

This particular FZR is a Japanese home market model and comes to us from well known collector and RSBFS follower Gary. You have seen many bikes in his collection pass through these pages (he has what must be the most lusted-after living room furniture we have seen). Feedback from those who have conducted business with him has been positive - he is an avid rider and collector. That shows in the presentation and condition of the bikes offered. This specimen appears to be very, very clean. Mileage appears to be approximately 6,150, based off of the odometer reading on the KM clocks. Strike a deal and this blue beauty rides off into the sunset with a fresh set of rubber, ready to attack the canyons.

FZR400s are interesting from a collector perspective. In some ways the FZR is almost passe - another mass-produced sport bike from the Big Four. But by the numbers it tells a very different story. It used to be that the unloved FZR400 was a bargain basement bike, picked up for a song and thrashed wildly on the street and track. Those days of "nearly free" Fizzers are behind us. The word is out and the market has spoken. Even officially imported US bikes are rapidly rising in value; we have seen asks approaching $10k. Now it is optimistic to expect a 1WG to approach the same velocity of appreciation as, say, an RC30, but there is no doubt that we are seeing a rise in pricing for FZR400 models. Some use is evident, but this particular example looks to be in fantastic shape for a model going on 32 years young. This bike is undeniably rare in color and form for US buyers, and is looking for a new home at a reasonable $6,900. Shop around a bit - but if you are looking for the right FZR400 you will be hard pressed to find another like this. Interested buyers should contact Gary directly. Good Luck!!


Featured Listing: 1986 Yamaha FZR400
Bimota December 13, 2017 posted by

Classic Superbike: 1988 Bimota YB4 Race Bike for Sale

It's fitting that the last couple of Bimota YB4s we've featured have been race bikes, since the YB4 was a competition machine first, and a road bike second. In fact, only a racing version was built at first, until World Superbike homologation rules required 200 roadgoing examples be built. The YB4 competed head-to-head with the best Japan could build, first in Formula 1, and later on in the new World Superbike series, an amazing feat for such a tiny manufacturer.

First produced in 1987, the YB4 was powered by Yamaha's 749cc five-valve "Genesis" motor and six-speed gearbox, which it ironically used to compete against Yamaha's OW01. Weight for the roadbike was 396lbs dry, and both versions used Bimota's stiff, lightweight aluminum beam frame and swingarm, so handling was predictably sublime.

Before their untimely demise, Bimota had become a manufacturer of expensive toys for well-heeled collectors or the occasional race team maybe looking for something to differentiate themselves from all of those very competitive Kawasakis and BMWs. There's nothing inherently wrong with recent Bimotas, but the Japanese Big Four and the Germans have caught up, and they didn't provide the kind of competitive advantage that bikes like the YB4 offered to racers and road riders of the 1980s.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Bimota YB4R for Sale

1988 Bimota YB4 Racing, ex-Steve Williams Team Fowlers Yamaha UK VIN: YB4*000027

4th overall in the 1988 World TT F1 (Superbike) Championship  - that year Fogarty won it, second Joey Dunlop, both on Honda RC30. This bike was also in the top ten results of TT IOM 1988 and 1989.

Rare opportunity to acquire a piece of the early Superbike era and of Bimota history. Bike is genuine, complete and working with the right patina, fitted with the correct carbs engine with magnesium sump.

Letter of verification by Dennis Trollope with the bike.

Parade, race and collect!

Bike is currently located in 33080 Roveredo in Piano, Italy but i can get them delivered all around the World at cost, no problem. I can supply US contacts for reference.

This example comes to us via a seller that should be familiar to RSBFS and CSBFS readers. I've never met him, but he obviously has great taste in motorcycles. There is very little time left on the auction, and bidding is up to just north of $5,600. Bimota values in general and pretty low right now, but this particular machine I'd hope would buck that trend: it's got racing history and plenty of patina. It's obviously a bit scruffy around the edges, but that's pretty much par for the course with well-used racebikes.


Classic Superbike: 1988 Bimota YB4 Race Bike for Sale
Yamaha December 12, 2017 posted by

Low Miles, Even Fewer Forks: 1993 Yamaha GTS1000 for Sale

Bikes today are faster, lighter, better-handling, and safer than ever before. But while there have been huge advances in terms of electronics and the materials used to build them, they use basically the same layout and suspension since motorcycle design became codified sometime in the late 1980s. The familiar telescopic forks are most definitely a compromise, but one designers and suspension tuners have become accustomed to working around. Simply put: when motorcycle forks compress under braking it upsets weight distribution and changes suspension geometry. So if you're developing a suspension system that gets around those issues, you'd think you'd create some sort of exotic hypersports bike to show off the advantages of your high-performance design, right? Well if you're Yamaha, you put your radical Omega Chassis Concept in a stylish, buy heavy sports-tourer like this GTS1000.

It's a shame, because the GTS might otherwise have made a great case for this alternative, swingarm front end: simply put, the design works very well.  Oh sure, there isn't any huge advantage over a conventional front end in a sport-touring application like this, but there's no real downside either. And the single-sided front end should make tire swaps a breeze, although the lack of a second front disc might give faster riders a bit of pause... At least it's vented and equipped with a six-piston caliper, and period tests don't complain about stopping power.

Yamaha licensed James Parker's forkless RADD front end to create their radical grand touring machine, and installed their five-valve, 1002cc inline four and five-speed gearbox, here tuned to produce a torque-rich 100hp. So the GTS was far too heavy and underpowered to be a legitimate sportbike, but limited fuel range and luggage options meant it leaned hard on the "sport" elements of sport-touring. Only available in the US from 1993-1994, the GTS1000 didn't sell very well, as the odd suspension, high price, and relatively limited touring capabilities scared potential customers away.


From the original eBay listing: 1993 Yamaha GTS1000 for Sale

Selling a very rare GTS1000A with a very low low miles. 

Bike is in a beautiful condition, kept in the garage for years , recently serviced with all new fluids and filters. New fuel pump. Left mirror has a small crack from moving in the garage, not even noticeable. Please feel free to ask me with any questions . 

New tires are needed. 

Treat yourself with a beautiful gift for the holidays. 

Bike starts and runs like new. 

The Buy It Now price is set at $6,500 which is pretty steep for a GTS1000 but, with just 4,400 miles on the clock, it's probably one of lowest-mileage examples in existence.  The problem is that, unless you're a collector of oddities, there's really no point: these things can rack up crazy miles so there's really no need to find one in such unused condition unless you plan to keep it as a museum piece. And that'd be a shame, since the GTS1000 is an amazingly competent mile-muncher.


Low Miles, Even Fewer Forks: 1993 Yamaha GTS1000 for Sale
Yamaha December 10, 2017 posted by

1 Liter, 1 Owner, 1 Mile – 2006 Yamaha YZF-R1 LE

Yamaha dreamed up a 50th birthday present for them and us in 2006, and made only 1000 copies. Serial number 002 was put in storage without even a celebratory ride and is available as new.  It's a show and go affair with Roberts-era racing colors and 174 hp.

2006 Yamaha YZF-R1 50th Anniversary #002 for sale on eBay

The R1 was first introduced in 1998, and improved over the years with fuel injection, underseat exhaust, more aerodynamic fairing, and 2006 was the last model year to use the 5-valve Genesis engine.  For this year the reinforced swingarm was extended, and a factory slipper clutch system added.  The commemorative edition has Ohlins front and rear, forged Marchesini wheels, and a data-logging race dash.


Presented by a Las Vegas specialty dealer, this LE looks showroom new.  No history to speak of, but they did say in the eBay auction:

Please enjoy viewing this 2006 Yamaha  R1 anniversary Limited edition.  It has been professionally "mothballed" in order to store it without damaging the bike. It has never been ridden and has 0 miles on it.  This is #2 of 500 made and #1 is in the Yamaha museum.  Included with this bike is everything that came with the bike along with a special tool kit only made for this bike.


Likely the mileage and low serial number will be of more interest than the late R1's reputation as a forgiving superbike, ready to rack up the miles.  The 50th anniversary is also a milestone as for 2007 Yamaha returned to a more typical 4-valve head.  Fun to think that a skilled rider could take this ten year-old superbike right out and ( after a stop at the tire dealer ) turn a 10-second quarter mile...


1 Liter, 1 Owner, 1 Mile – 2006 Yamaha YZF-R1 LE