Posts by tag: FZR1000

Yamaha December 12, 2017 posted by

Low Miles, Even Fewer Forks: 1993 Yamaha GTS1000 for Sale

Bikes today are faster, lighter, better-handling, and safer than ever before. But while there have been huge advances in terms of electronics and the materials used to build them, they use basically the same layout and suspension since motorcycle design became codified sometime in the late 1980s. The familiar telescopic forks are most definitely a compromise, but one designers and suspension tuners have become accustomed to working around. Simply put: when motorcycle forks compress under braking it upsets weight distribution and changes suspension geometry. So if you're developing a suspension system that gets around those issues, you'd think you'd create some sort of exotic hypersports bike to show off the advantages of your high-performance design, right? Well if you're Yamaha, you put your radical Omega Chassis Concept in a stylish, buy heavy sports-tourer like this GTS1000.

It's a shame, because the GTS might otherwise have made a great case for this alternative, swingarm front end: simply put, the design works very well.  Oh sure, there isn't any huge advantage over a conventional front end in a sport-touring application like this, but there's no real downside either. And the single-sided front end should make tire swaps a breeze, although the lack of a second front disc might give faster riders a bit of pause... At least it's vented and equipped with a six-piston caliper, and period tests don't complain about stopping power.

Yamaha licensed James Parker's forkless RADD front end to create their radical grand touring machine, and installed their five-valve, 1002cc inline four and five-speed gearbox, here tuned to produce a torque-rich 100hp. So the GTS was far too heavy and underpowered to be a legitimate sportbike, but limited fuel range and luggage options meant it leaned hard on the "sport" elements of sport-touring. Only available in the US from 1993-1994, the GTS1000 didn't sell very well, as the odd suspension, high price, and relatively limited touring capabilities scared potential customers away.

 

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Yamaha GTS1000 for Sale

Selling a very rare GTS1000A with a very low low miles. 

Bike is in a beautiful condition, kept in the garage for years , recently serviced with all new fluids and filters. New fuel pump. Left mirror has a small crack from moving in the garage, not even noticeable. Please feel free to ask me with any questions . 

New tires are needed. 

Treat yourself with a beautiful gift for the holidays. 

Bike starts and runs like new. 

The Buy It Now price is set at $6,500 which is pretty steep for a GTS1000 but, with just 4,400 miles on the clock, it's probably one of lowest-mileage examples in existence.  The problem is that, unless you're a collector of oddities, there's really no point: these things can rack up crazy miles so there's really no need to find one in such unused condition unless you plan to keep it as a museum piece. And that'd be a shame, since the GTS1000 is an amazingly competent mile-muncher.

-tad

Low Miles, Even Fewer Forks: 1993 Yamaha GTS1000 for Sale
Bimota October 17, 2017 posted by

Why Be Ordinary? 1992 Bimota YB8 for Sale

By the end of the 1990s, it could be argued that Bimota was basically irrelevant. After all, the whole point of a Bimota was simple: take a powerful, reliable engine from a bike from an established manufacturer, then slip it into a stiff, lightweight frame with the best suspension money could buy at both ends, and wrap it all in simple, lightweight bodywork. The resulting bikes were free from practical considerations, expensive, and very fast. Sure, they often weren't quite finished as delivered, but a bit of time setting one up to your personal preferences meant you had the ultimate exotic racebike for the road. Unfortunately, the relentless pace of the Japanese manufacturers meant that their powerful, reliable engines were soon housed in bikes that were lighter than past efforts and handled much better than ever before, erasing any real advantage the Rimini machines had over their stock counterparts. But before that happened, bikes like this Bimota YB8 showed just how spectacular the results could be.

The YB8 was an evolutionary design, and used same basic frame as the YB4 and YB6, but used the larger, more powerful FZR1000 engine, complete with the famed EXUP system. 149 claimed horses doesn't sound like much in this era of superbikes making more than 200hp at the rear wheel, but keep in mind that Yamaha felt that the FZR only needed five gears for its literbike instead of the six found on 600s and 750s, and the 1002cc engine has a spread of torque that would make a modern machine jealous. Bimota claimed their alloy-framed confection was a claimed 64lbs lighter than a donor bike that no one would call slow even today. In the YB8, it meant a tested top speed of 173mph to match the race-bred handling.

One of the things that stands out on the YB8 and Bimotas in general is something that's missing: bodywork fasteners. If you've ever serviced your own sportbike, you know that, in most cases, removing the bodywork is a nightmare of tiny, sometimes inaccessible fasteners, screws, and plastic clips, that require all manner of wiggling and cursing to remove. Not here. Just a few bolts attach the bodywork, helped by the fact that the panels themselves are made up of just a few pieces. Great for simplicity, but possibly very expensive if your pride and joy tips over in the garage...

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Bimota YB8 for Sale

1992 Bimota YB8
1,900 original miles (3,200 kilometers)
Original / Unrestored
A+ condition
Clean title in hand
VIN: ZESS8YA23NRANS003

Here is a quick video with walk around etc... Sorry for my terrible mic on my camera. Also may seem like I'm winding it out a little at the end of the video, was just trying to show that it runs good on power, was no where near red line. Also switched to open source music so my apologies if it is annoying.

Bought the bike from a guy who had it sitting in his living room for several years. I love the early 90s carbed full fairing sport bikes so I had to have this when I saw it. The only reason I am selling is to fund another purchase that I have been given exclusive opportunity for. I was given a folder full of paperwork, with full service history, manuals, brochures etc... from what I see in there this bike stickered for $23,000 in 1992. I am also under the impression that this was one of only a handful of these imported into the U.S. for sale.

A bike like this is really only going to go up in value as the full fairing bikes of the early 90s are just getting rarer by the day, this one was rare in the first place with only 252 being manufactured there is probably only a handful left, and maybe none in this condition with this low of miles... please only bid if you are serious about owning and IF YOU HAVE 0 FEEDBACK YOU MUST CONTACT ME PRIOR TO BIDDING

THE ODO IS AT 3200... I AM OF THE UNDERSTANDING THAT THIS IS IN KILOMETERS... which would translate to ~1,900 miles...PLEASE UNDERSTAND I AM NOT 100% CERTAIN OF THAT, IF YOU KNOW HOW I CAN FIND OUT FOR SURE LET ME KNOW, WORST CASE SCENARIO IT HAS 3200 MILES.

Bike is for sale locally for $18,500 obo although I did not know exactly what to ask as the bike very well could be one of a kind in this condition, with this low of miles. I am definitely negotiable. If bike does not sell prior to auction end it will sell to highest bidder. Local buyers encouraged to come see the bike in person, all others I can send pictures or video of whatever you would like to see.

SHIPPING: I am happy to assist your shipper in any way I can, I can also provide a shipped to your door price where I arrange all of the shipping. Shipping motorcycles these days is very reasonable usually costing 200-600$ depending on how far you are from Reno, NV.

If you have ANY questions please feel free to contact me call or text at 775 742 8807 or message through eBay.

In case you missed it in the excerpt above, the seller does include a video of the bike, including a walk-around, start-up, rev, and even a ride. I recommend you turn the volume way down, or skip forward to the 2:20 mark to avoid the really horrible music that's even worse than the seller suggests. It's not the greatest video but it does give you a pretty good idea of what to expect. The seller is very honest about the fact that he wasn't sure how to price this, which is refreshing. Unfortunately, that $18,500 asking price seems optimistic, considering what 90s Bimotas have been selling, or not selling for recently. These Bimotas have a bit of a kit-bike feel to them, but with a bit of patience and, in some cases, even a bit of re-engineering, they can be made into very fast machines, since the fundamentals are all there: the trademark frame, powerful engine, high quality, if slightly dated suspension, and lightweight bodywork. This does look like a very nice example, a sharp, low-mileage bike that should need nothing, whether you plan to display it or to use it on the road.

-tad

Why Be Ordinary? 1992 Bimota YB8 for Sale
Bimota August 24, 2017 posted by

Big Ten: 1993 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

Considering that Bimota is still... in business [was going to type something else, but had second thoughts as maybe "thriving" is a bit too strong a word] it's a little surprising that some of their older offerings are so affordable, considering their exotic looks, extreme rarity, high specification, and performance that will at least keep modern bikes in sight. Powered by the Yamaha FZR1000's inline four and five-speed gearbox, today's Bimota YB10 is a surprisingly affordable proposition, considering parts for the drivetrain at least shouldn't be too hard to come by...

With just 224 built between 1991 and 1994, the YB10 "Dieci" or "Ten" in Italian was the tenth Bimota powered by a Yamaha engine. Have you stumbled across and unfamiliar Bimota? You can tell a bit about it just from the name, which basically reads as "Yamaha, Bimota, Number 10." Modifications to that EXUP-valved 1002cc Yamaha Genesis engine were minimal, up to 149hp from Yamaha's 145hp claim, owing to better breathing from an improved intake that also smoothed out some dips in the donor bike's powerband. Slipperier bodywork meant a slightly higher top speed as well: 172mph as tested.

1970s Bimotas typically featured gorgeous tubular steel frames, but by the 1990s Bimota had moved on to beefy aluminum frames as seen here, with fully adjustable 42mm Marzocchi upside-down forks up front and an adjustable Öhlins shock out back. The main performance advantage of the YB10 over the FZR1000 is a result of weight lost: the Bimota had a claimed dry weight of 407lbs, nearly 70lbs less than the Yamaha. Period tests praised the handling and seemingly unlimited cornering-clearance of the YB10, along with unexpectedly improved ergonomics over the preceding YB8 and YB9.

Unfortunately, there's not much information over on eBay about this bike, as it's a dealer listing, although there are some nice pictures!

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Bimota YB10 for Sale

Specialized is offering this gorgeous, Italian-designed Bimota YB10 , this motorcycle comes out of our Museum collection. 1000 cc inline 4 cylinder Yamaha engine in a hand built Italian chassis, except for rear turn signals this is a Original YB10 correct as produced.

The Buy It Now price for this bit of exotic kit is $8,900. To me, 1990s Bimotas represent a real steal if you're looking for something incredibly rare, fast enough to keep up with modern bikes, and relatively easy keep on the road. Of course, "easy to keep on the road" assumes you don't drop it and need difficult-to-obtain bodywork or end up trying to track down nearly impossible-to-obtain suspension components: I know a guy who was waiting many months on a set of fork seals for a YB11. Although, if that becomes a problem, I'm sure you could track down a set of modern Öhlins forks and have someone make you up a set of adapters...

-tad

Big Ten: 1993 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale
Bimota May 7, 2017 posted by

California Dreaming: 1997 Bimota YB11

In the wonderful world of Bimota, the first letter of the bike designation always represents the manufacturer of the engine. In the case of this YB11, it is Yamaha. This is the 11th model of Yamaha-powered Bimotas, one of the most potent bikes Bimota has developed, and the last of the Yamaha-Bimota series ever produced. In the world of Bimota, the Yamaha dials go up to 11, but not to 12.

1997 Bimota YB11 for sale on eBay!

The Yamaha in question is the powerful 1,000cc, five valve per cylinder Genesis evolution. You can expect on the order of 145 HP from this magnificent lump, which has earned Yamaha all sorts of accolades for tractability, reliability and longevity. It's not often that you can heap "power" and "works well for a long time" in the same sentence referring to the same motor, but that is really how good this unit is. Bimota took all that was right with the Thunder Ace power plant, and shaved a significant amount of weight from the similarly powered YZF1000R - some 40 odd pounds wet(!). With an aluminum twin-spar frame derived from the successful YB6, multi-adjustable Paioli-supplied suspension front and rear, Brembo brakes all around, a custom ram-air intake and bespoke four into one exhaust, the performance of the YB11 obliterated the original donor bike from Yamaha by a good margin.

From the seller:
1997 BIMOTA YB11 , NEAR MINT CONDITION ,RUNS EXCELLENT ,EVERYTHING WORKS ,CLEAN CALIFORNIA TITLE ,RECENT SERVICE AND NEW BATTERY

Bimotas of this era are hand-built and lovingly assembled. They are lightweight and horrendously impractical by most standards. The hand-laid fiberglass is impossibly thin and prone to cracking; the move to carbon helps significantly in this area. Access to engine and components for maintenance purposes is marginal at best, tortuous in any case. The riding position is uncompromising and decidedly lacking in the thick padded seat department. But who really cares about that useless stuff? This is the most potent Yamaha-powered liter bike you are going to find from this era; it begs to be ridden hard. The most difficult aspect of owning a bike like this is wiping the smile off of your face every time you ride it, park it, wash it, or simply look at it.

This bike is available in California, where it also happens to be titled. Woo Hoo - score one for the most restrictive DMV state! It has a fair amount of miles on the clock (more so than we normally see for a Bimota), but that is not a problem at all for the running gear. If the bodywork and ancillaries check out, this one is good to go for a long, long time .... and it will probably begin to appreciate in value along the way. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on either the Yamaha five valve motor, or the YB series of Bimotas. Good Luck!!

MI

California Dreaming: 1997 Bimota YB11
Bimota November 1, 2016 posted by

Nineties Flyer: 1991 Bimota YB8 for Sale

1991-bimota-yb8-r-side

With lightweight bodywork held on by just a few bolts [note the one-piece tank-and-tail unit] and a plastic fuel cell, the Bimota YB8 used plenty of tricks learned on the racetrack and was pretty far ahead of its time. Based on the previous YB4 and YB6 but powered by the larger FZR1000 engine, approximately 250 were produced between 1990 and 1994. Bimota claimed 149hp from the FZR1000 engine, up a bit compared to the stock bike due to Bimota ignoring the "gentleman's agreement" of the time and applying the usual tuning tricks, and the inline four puts its power to the rear wheel through the Yamaha's standard five-speed box. Top speed is a 173mph but, as always with Bimota, it's the cornering that impresses the most.

1991-bimota-yb8-l-side

It's hard to blame a small manufacturer if they wanted to recycle or slightly update an existing frame, especially if the donor engines slot in easily. Looking at the later YB11, the frames look very similar and, as was pointed out by one of the Commentariat, I wonder if a Yamaha R1 engine and transmission might slot in there without too much persuading... Somehow, that doesn't seem to be as sacrilegious an idea as it would be for something like, say, a Ducati. The resulting bike should be a shade lighter than the original R1 if the manufacturers' dry weights are to be believed...

1991-bimota-yb8-clocks

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Bimota YB8 for Sale

Very are super bike, mint condition, needs nothing, we ship at buyer's expense can ship worldwide. Runs excellent, reasonable reserve, rare opportunity.

1991-bimota-yb8-r-side-rear

The listing doesn't include much information and the bike is clearly part of a larger collection. That's unfortunate although, obviously restoring that engine should be much easier than for some other obscure motorcycles. Bidding is up to just $5,200 with the Reserve Not Met, but Bimotas of this era seems to be going for around the $10,000 mark these days. Sure, for the price, you could buy a couple of nice Yamaha R1's, but that's hardly the point of this bit of Italian exotica.

-tad

1991-bimota-yb8-front

Nineties Flyer: 1991 Bimota YB8 for Sale
Yamaha September 5, 2015 posted by

Thunder, Thunder, Thunderace! Sharp 1997 Yamaha YZF1000 for Sale

1997 Yamaha YZF1000 R Front

Yamaha's YZF1000 wasn't a big seller, and was available in the US for only one year, making this an extremely rare bike here. Five valves, five gears, and 1003cc's should tell you pretty much all you need to know about this bike. Known as the "Thunderace" in many markets, the big YZF was a strange mix of high and low tech: it used Yamaha's sophisticated five-valve inline four mated to a five-speed transmission. But the engine's wide powerband means you really don't need that sixth cog anyway.

1997 Yamaha YZF1000 L Front

This was really more a bike in the spirit of Kawasaki's ZX-11 than one of today's highly-strung, just barely under 1000cc machines. 147hp is still nothing to sneeze at today, especially when combined with a claimed 435lbs dry weight, and older literbikes like this were built for fast, two-up traveling, with midrange power undreamed of by today's screaming twins and fours.

1997 Yamaha YZF1000 L Rear

And if those brakes look like they've been fitted fitted from a later R1, you'd be partly correct: the Thunderace was famous for its excellent brakes and was the first model to feature the one-piece, four-piston "blue spot" calipers that were later used on the R1.

This bike looks to be in excellent, well-maintained shape, considering its age. From the original eBay listing: 1997 Yamaha YZF1000 for Sale

This model, Yamaha YZF1000R  in USA for one year only, 1997.  Last all purpose supersport  (not RR) with carbs.  198 kg (437 lbs) dry. Genesis 5-valve motor145 hp (133rw hp), forged (not cast) pistons, drag coefficient .29, forged aluminum rims, steering damper.  Frame is 5kg less than YZF 750R, hence equivalent dry weight w/20+hp advantage and more robust 5spd transmission carried on from FZR 1000.  Runs, shifts, handles as new.  New tires, brake pads, battery, chain, filters, all fluids.  Billet aluminum swingarm, smoked windshield.  Always kept in dry garage under cover. 

Extremely well kept overall, but for one repairable chip on upper left fairing, and one very small (1.25") stress crack on right lower fairing. Chip shows on photo, crack too small to easily show here. Small chip at rear of white fiberglass cowling cap also too small to easily show. D&D carbon fiber exhaust as new with original aluminum exhaust nearly mint condition. Flush mounted front signals with originals included and shown.

From MC Review (see masterfairings.com blog):  "The last breed of the classic old school superbikes that Yamaha aimed to produce on an international level ... it's just overall a brilliant bike."

In a December 1996 Car & Driver Magazine comparison test of Yamaha YZF1000R with Dodge Viper the bike won all acceleration tests, top gear roll on, etc., but greasy dusty track at Willow Springs  favored Viper until its motor blew and it DNF.

Scarcity and and content quality make this one a collectible low cost supersport ride.  Bike is beautiful, fast and comfortable, but not for beginner.

It's not in perfectly original condition, although the seller does have the original exhaust can and turn signals if you'd prefer a dead-stock look. That clutch lever does look a bit bent, but that could be the result of a simple tip-over, something to be expected in a bike of this age.

1997 Yamaha YZF1000 L Fairing

The simple white-and-red panels on this bike have aged extremely well and give it a more sophisticated style that stand out in a sea of wild, paint-splash neon zebra designs that were popular during the 1990's. All-in-all, with just 17,000 miles on the clock and $3,400 Buy It Now price, this represents a killer deal for sportbike fans on a budget.

-tad

1997 Yamaha YZF1000 R Side

Thunder, Thunder, Thunderace! Sharp 1997 Yamaha YZF1000 for Sale