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Posts by tag: FZR1000

Classifieds July 16, 2018 posted by

1995 Yamaha FZR 1000 in Austin, Texas $5,500

1995 FZR 1000, Carbs cleaned; front and rear brakes drained and adjusted; all of the farings re-painted factory match and new factory match decals; replaced front turn signals (faded) and replaced gauges with OEM off a 95 750 (have the old gauges); approx 24K; scratch on muffler and a few wheel chips, but a great survivor. 2nd owner. 145 HP, fastest production bike in 1995. FIRM

1995 Yamaha FZR 1000 in Austin, Texas $5,500
Yamaha July 6, 2018 posted by

Genesis Device: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Over in the comments sections of another post, we've been debating the relative merits and values of some of the priciest motorcycles, but it's still possible to find something cool, collectible, and very competent if you're on a limited budget. It's not one of Yamaha's fastest sportbikes, but this first-generation FZR1000 might be their most historically significant. At the moment, it's also one of the most unappreciated machines of the modern era: if the GSX-R was the first sportbike of the modern age, it can be argued that the FZR1000 actually codified the formula.

The original version of the FZR1000 built from 1987 through 1988 seen here was powered by a 989cc version of Yamaha's inline four. It did not feature their signature EXhaust Ultimate Power or "EXUP" valve in the exhaust system, but did use their "Genesis" heads with three intake and two exhaust valves. Five-valve technology proved more useful in theory than in practice, in spite of the fact that Yamaha stuck with it for a pretty long time. But, perhaps more importantly, the Genesis engine's characteristic steeply forward-canted cylinder head allowed the airbox to be located under the fuel tank instead of between the rider's knees.

However, the bike's defining feature was the aluminum beam "Deltabox" frame, the first time one had been used in a big bike like this. The contemporary GSX-R used an aluminum frame, but the square-tube construction was more of a cradle-type that looked backward towards past designs, while Yamaha's beefy Deltabox was a much more forward-thinking concept. The frame spars were positively massive for the time, but the thin-walls meant the structure was as light as it was strong, and while five-valve heads proved to be a bit of a fad, thick beam frames have stood the test of time.

Looking at the spec sheet, all you'd need to do is add a sixth gear to the box and you could be looking at something from just a few years ago: the aluminum beam frame, liquid cooling, under-tank airbox, and 17" wheels all sound very modern. It's obviously from a different generation and is both heavier and less powerful by far than current literbikes. But it was very much the complete package when new, and the five-speed gearbox speaks to the bike's seemingly bottomless well of torque and flexible midrange, qualities shared with the GSX-R1100, a bike that also lacked a sixth cog.

Ideally, if you're looking at an FZR1000 you'd probably want something just a little bit newer, as the thorough redesign for 1989 featured a slight bump in displacement and the addition of the EXUP valve, but this is the original, and looks very sophisticated in blue and white speedblock graphics.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Up for auction is my 1988 FZR1000.  It is titled in my name and is currently registered in  the state of California til October 2018.  It is a nice survivor.  It has various scratches and some cracks here and there but overall in very clean condition.  It has good tires, a new fuel pump, fuel filter, various fuel lines, carb cleaning and synchronization done Dec of last year, rebuilt fuel valves, battery new last year, new windshield, front brake master cylinder rebuilt and a couple other things I can't remember  now.  It comes with a tank bag, some spare parts and a service manual. It handles, runs, starts, brakes fine....although maybe it could use another carb cleaning as it has been sitting.  Still you could ride it right now.....it has  good  power.

Some things it would need is a new headlight.  Choke doesn't work but it still starts easy when cold. Return throttle cable not hooked on.  Fuel pump is controlled by a switch in the back  so you may want to hook up correctly.....and I'm sure a few other things I can't remember right now.

If anyone is interested but not local...PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE ask questions and request photos of any area of the bike you would like.  I REALLY PREFER SOMEONE LOCAL WHO COULD COME BY AND KICK THE TIRES AND INSPECT IN PERSON but if not please ask all the questions you want before bidding.  Although this bike is clean and a survivor it has not been in a box the last 30 years ridden only 50 miles so keep that in mind.  It currently has 20950 miles. I may make a couple trips up the mountain before it's gone so there may be a few more miles on it.

Here is a video of it running.  

I am selling because  with my back condition I cannot use it like I thought I could.  

If you have any questions please ask.  If you think I left something out please ask.  If you need better pictures please ask.  I want to be as honest and accurate as possible so please ask anything.  If the winning buyer comes to pick it up and dosent want to go through with the deal for any reason no worries.....I will cancel the transaction....no problem.  The previous owner named this bike Noah. I want to see this go to a good home.

The Yoshimura tri-oval exhaust obviously isn't stock, and isn't even trying to look period-correct, but I actually like it: stock exhausts of the era are often pretty heavy and very ugly. Overall, the bike has some usual chips and wear you'd expect on a bike this old, but it seems honest. And the seller includes a nice video of the bike starting and running, with some closeups. Slingshot Gixxers and other late 1980s sportbikes have been rising in value, but the Yamahas seem to have been lagging behind a bit, and while the later EXUP models will probably be a bit more desirable, this early machine is historically significant. And also pretty cool. There are several days left on the auction and no takers yet at the $2,150 opening bid. It may not be original, but this could be a hell of a do-it-all machine with style if you're on a budget and looking for something out of the ordinary.

-tad

Genesis Device: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale
Bimota April 9, 2018 posted by

Old School Superbike: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Bimota's formula for success involved plentiful, reliable engines supplied by outside manufacturers, top-shelf braking and suspension components, frames designed with pure performance in mind, all wrapped in sleek, often wildly-styled bodywork. The use of well-developed and widely available engines meant they managed to survive much longer than most other boutique motorcycle manufacturers and their style and performance mean they're pretty striking motorcycles in the flesh, and I'm sure you'd get tons of questions about a Bimota YB11 like this one anywhere you parked it.

The YB11 is obviously an old-school analog motorcycle, with a torquey engine and a peak power figure that is unimpressive by today's standards. But keep in mind that the only thing letting modern motorcycles get away with their outrageous power figures are the very sophisticated electronics that keep riders with less than professional skill levels from crashing into the nearest hedge. This was a full-blown exotic superbike in its day, and the 145hp available from the YB11's five-valve Genesis engine is plenty to have fun with for even an experienced rider, considering the bike's 400lb dry weight and 170mph potential. There's no digital safety net here, and every single horse is present and accounted for, and happy to do the bidding of your right hand. Just make sure you know exactly what you're asking them to do before you twist that throttle...

I'd read that the YB11 has an "odd" riding position and can confirm: the legs are weirdly cramped and there's a long reach to the bars. Maybe it makes more sense on the move, or with time you just get used to it, but by comparison, the SB6R parked next to the one I sat on seemed surprisingly comfortable... Like every other Bimota, maintenance is an issue here. Parts for the Yamaha engine and transmission may be relatively plentiful, but the beam frames of the YB and SB series are wrapped tightly around them, making access difficult with the bodywork or even the engine in place. Great for the experienced home mechanic, as you're basically looking at a lot of labor instead of expensive parts, but still a pain if you don't like disassembling your motorcycle every time you want to adjust the carburetors or valves...

I'm a fan of 90s Bimotas in general, mostly because they're both extremely exotic and currently extremely affordable, and they epitomize all that's stereotypically good and bad about Italian motorcycles: sophisticated materials, high-end components, striking looks, and sharp handling, combined with indifferent build-quality, incomplete development, and unreliable electrical systems. In terms of style, I don't think the YB11 is one of their best efforts, but it's still great-looking motorcycle and parts for the engine at least should be no trouble. You're on your own if you need fork seals or bodywork though. Still interested? The asking price for this Italian exotic is just $6,700, although there is an issue with the mileage...

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Specialized Motors is proud to offer this Bimota YB11 . This bike was bought to put into our motorcycle in 2003 with 5800 miles since then this bike has been cared for and stored in our Museum, as of now the gauge pack is inop - MILEAGE AND TEMP ARE NOT WORKING, this seems to be a common issue with these Bimota motorcycle. We estimate 500-1000 additional miles BUT WE CAN NOT LIST MILES , BIKE WILL BE SOLD AS IS . Bike is in excellent condition never down starts and runs perfect . Bike will be sold mileage exempt ot TMU (true mileage unknown)

Speaking of "unreliable Italian electrical components..." Well, there are many good aftermarket options these days, and ones that look much better than the stock gauges and include everything you could possibly want to know about your motorcycle. As far as I'm concerned, the 11,000 miles indicated are a good thing for a bike as finicky as a Bimota: it means it's been functional often enough to actually be ridden regularly! Plus, inactivity seems to kill vehicles, especially Italian vehicles. It's like they're sitting there, angry at not being used, slowly corroding, drying out, crumbling...

-tad

Old School Superbike: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale
Yamaha March 14, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Update 3.14.2018: Turns out this one sold faster than we could post it. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

A modern literbike is a relatively peaky beast: chasing horsepower without increasing displacement means ever-higher revs are required, and a six-speed box makes sense. It's telling that bikes like today's Featured Listing Yamaha's FZR1000, one of the cutting-edgy-ist sportbikes of its day, made do with just five and could still be considered fast now. Six-speed gearboxes had become the norm for motorcycles by the late 1980s, unless you were looking at cruisers, touring machines, or big-bore sportbikes. Why? Well, narrow, peaky powerbands require more gears to effectively exploit and the big-inch engines of the aforementioned six-speed exceptions had enough flexibility and torque to make them window-dressing: an extra gear just wasn't needed.

Considering that Yamaha's FZR1000 makes just 20 more claimed horses and weighs nearly 40 pounds more than a modern R6, you might think that these old-school machines would be no match for even a much smaller machine from today. But it's the 79 ft-lbs of torque from the FZR that makes it so effective: a modern literbike like the BMW S1000RR makes just a few more foot-pounds. So how did they do it? Well the GSX-R1100 obviously benefited from a few more cubes, but the smaller 1002cc FZR1000 combined Yamaha's five-valve Genesis head with their EXUP or "Exhaust Ultimate Power" valve to provide both low-end torque and high-end power.

Five-valve heads have pretty much disappeared these days, the theoretical advantages proving insufficient to outweigh the additional complexity required, but EXUP-style exhaust valves are ubiquitous, now that Yamaha's patents have expired, allowing other manufacturers to take advantage. By the late 1980s, servo-operated "power valves" were common on two-strokes, but this was the very first use of the technology in a four-stroke, and the result was a very flexible engine with a 170mph top speed.

Introduced in 1987, the 1989 redesign seen here looked similar, but included updates to the frame and engine: the original had a 989cc engine bumped to 1002cc and rotated backwards in the Deltabox frame for a shorter wheelbase. Later, the bike adopted a single headlight design to help modernize it, but you can't go wrong with a pair of big, round lamps. As you'd expect, performance and in particular handling improved throughout the bike's lifespan, but this particular model strikes a nice balance between classic superbike styling and the better performance and handling of the redesigned bike. I happen to prefer the looks of the earlier machines: the single-headlight version does look pretty sharp, but it just doesn't have the old-school round-lamp charm.

From the Seller: 1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

For being 28 years old the bike looks and runs awesome! It has less than 18k original miles, has never been dropped and has only a few minor cracks around the fairing mounting areas from the tightening of the bolts, which is normal for these older more brittle plastics (see near bolts in pics attached).

The 1989 version, crowned the "Bike of the Decade" by Cycle World, had 0-60 acceleration of 2.9 seconds, and a top speed of over 167 mph. I purchased one of these brand new in Miami Fl in 1989. I got on it and rode that bike all the way the Newline Vermont, 1460 miles in two days. It was a amazing adventure and the bike never missed a beat ripping off 700+ mile days with ease. This is truly a sports cruiser rather than a rep-racer R1. This particular dual headlight model was only produced one year, Yamaha went to the single (ugly) headlight in 1990. Anyway buy this unit, gas it up and head to for the opposite coast! We can deliver this bike anywhere in the United States for $500 enclosed and insured.

A few notes about the bike:

  • The bike was owned by 1 famous owner from new until when I bought it three years ago. It was a famous biker from the publishing world who collects bikes (Forbes magazine) and the bike was in Palm Beach all of its life until I got it. I have a copy of the title with his info on it that I can provide.
  • The bike was purchased from him for $4,500 and needed some TLC.
  • The bike had extensive work done to get the bike all up to modern running equipment. I spent over $4,500... All well documented (will provide) at Fast by Ferracci.
  • I also had a GPR slip-on imported from Italy (over $500) and it sounds awesome!
  • The carbs were also completely rebuilt, last summer 2016, and has all new gaskets - the engine runs amazingly well!
  • We over $9,500 invested in the bike. Went way overboard in its preparation. My loss, your happy smiles!

This does seem to be the version collectors will want, and in just a few years you may be kicking yourself for not taking advantage of the seller's $5,500 asking price. There are some minor cosmetic imperfections, small cracks and the like, but these are clearly documented and not unexpected on a Japanese bike from the 1980s: paint and finish were generally of a lower standard than on European bikes and they often age poorly, even when well-maintained and sparingly used. Luckily, the major servicing headaches have been taken care of and the bike is reportedly mechanically sound, meaning that this should be a great candidate for a rolling restoration, since collectors will likely want to replace that lighter, but non-original exhaust can and take care of the blemishes.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale
Yamaha March 2, 2018 posted by

Big Fizz: 1990 Yamaha FZR1000 3GM

It's hard to find an FZR 1000 that isn't as cool as a snow cone in a blizzard, but the '89s and '90s really speak to me. Maybe it's the Bike of the Decade designation for the '89s. Maybe it's the Ow01-aping bug-eyed fairing. Maybe it's the sub-three-second 0-60 and 170 mph top end. Probably it's a little of each.

1990 Yamaha FZR1000 3GM

In any case, the drool comes on hard and strong when one of these comes up, and today's 1990 Yamaha FZR1000 3GM is from a friend of the site whose rides are always a cut above the rest. It has one aftermarket fairing to replace a cracked original, but the bodywork is otherwise untouched. The cracked original piece is included, for those who have to have everything just as it was.

From the eBay listing:

Time to sell the big guns! Up for sale is a very nice 1990 Yamaha FZR1000 with only 14,640 kilometers (9,097 miles). This FZR is in excellent condition and looks beautiful. Upper fairing had a crack in it so I put on a new very high quality FRP upper fairing from Italy. (Original fairing included in sale if you’d like it). The rest of the fairings are 100% genuine OEM Yamaha factory. Bike has stock exhaust and OEM factory passenger seat cover for that solo look. Bike would be in perfect condition if not for the right side inner plastic panel. There is a very small piece that has broken off. You wouldn’t notice it if I didn’t tell you but it’s there. Original windscreen has a few scratches and blemishes but very clear. Regardless, this is a very nice bike. No dents in the tank, the muffler is perfect no scratches, the fairings are perfect no scratches and the bike runs like new. Just serviced with new Dunlop Sportmax tires, new battery and new engine fluids. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a streetbike for road use. $200 deposit due immeadiatly after sales end thru PayPal. Balance due within 5 business days by check, bank wire or cash in person. Please text 801-358-6537 for more photos or questions.

It's a great piece of early '90s nostalgia, and remains a ridiculously fast motorcycle, even in the face of 30 years of development.

Big Fizz: 1990 Yamaha FZR1000 3GM
Yamaha December 12, 2017 posted by

Low Miles, Even Fewer Forks: 1993 Yamaha GTS1000 for Sale

Bikes today are faster, lighter, better-handling, and safer than ever before. But while there have been huge advances in terms of electronics and the materials used to build them, they use basically the same layout and suspension since motorcycle design became codified sometime in the late 1980s. The familiar telescopic forks are most definitely a compromise, but one designers and suspension tuners have become accustomed to working around. Simply put: when motorcycle forks compress under braking it upsets weight distribution and changes suspension geometry. So if you're developing a suspension system that gets around those issues, you'd think you'd create some sort of exotic hypersports bike to show off the advantages of your high-performance design, right? Well if you're Yamaha, you put your radical Omega Chassis Concept in a stylish, buy heavy sports-tourer like this GTS1000.

It's a shame, because the GTS might otherwise have made a great case for this alternative, swingarm front end: simply put, the design works very well.  Oh sure, there isn't any huge advantage over a conventional front end in a sport-touring application like this, but there's no real downside either. And the single-sided front end should make tire swaps a breeze, although the lack of a second front disc might give faster riders a bit of pause... At least it's vented and equipped with a six-piston caliper, and period tests don't complain about stopping power.

Yamaha licensed James Parker's forkless RADD front end to create their radical grand touring machine, and installed their five-valve, 1002cc inline four and five-speed gearbox, here tuned to produce a torque-rich 100hp. So the GTS was far too heavy and underpowered to be a legitimate sportbike, but limited fuel range and luggage options meant it leaned hard on the "sport" elements of sport-touring. Only available in the US from 1993-1994, the GTS1000 didn't sell very well, as the odd suspension, high price, and relatively limited touring capabilities scared potential customers away.

 

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Yamaha GTS1000 for Sale

Selling a very rare GTS1000A with a very low low miles. 

Bike is in a beautiful condition, kept in the garage for years , recently serviced with all new fluids and filters. New fuel pump. Left mirror has a small crack from moving in the garage, not even noticeable. Please feel free to ask me with any questions . 

New tires are needed. 

Treat yourself with a beautiful gift for the holidays. 

Bike starts and runs like new. 

The Buy It Now price is set at $6,500 which is pretty steep for a GTS1000 but, with just 4,400 miles on the clock, it's probably one of lowest-mileage examples in existence.  The problem is that, unless you're a collector of oddities, there's really no point: these things can rack up crazy miles so there's really no need to find one in such unused condition unless you plan to keep it as a museum piece. And that'd be a shame, since the GTS1000 is an amazingly competent mile-muncher.

-tad

Low Miles, Even Fewer Forks: 1993 Yamaha GTS1000 for Sale